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4 results for Family medicine
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Record #:
8432
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University opened in 1977. Its mission is to train North Carolina residents to become family doctors in the eastern section of the state. When the medical school opened, fewer than 800 family doctors practiced east of I-95. Tyrrell County did not have a doctor, and Camden County had only one. Today there are over 1,600 primary care physicians practicing in the east. Over one-fourth of them are Brody graduates. Row discusses the work of some of the doctors, nurses, and other health care professionals that the Brody School graduates who are improving the lives of small-town families.
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Record #:
29443
Author(s):
Abstract:
East Carolina University's School of Medicine trains doctors in the practice of primary care and family medicine, which have become critical areas in healthcare both nationally and in North Carolina. ECU's medical school is also advancing students into their careers in family medicine with the Three Plus Three Program that combines the fourth year of medical school with the first year of residency.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 3, March 1992, p76, 78-81, por
Record #:
31601
Author(s):
Abstract:
East Carolina University, after twelve years of planning and preliminary accreditations, was approved this spring for the enrollment of its first four-year medical class. Dr. William E. Laupus, dean of the School of Medicine, believes the family medicine program will be one of the school’s strongest assets and offer the training needed to prepare doctors for rural medical practices.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 9, Sept 1977, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
32011
Author(s):
Abstract:
Medical professionals tend to seek jobs in city hospitals, but they are also needed in rural areas and small towns. Several anonymous general practitioners comment on their problems and their satisfactions of the medical profession in rural North Carolina.
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