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4 results for Electricity--History
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Record #:
30865
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1930s, only ten percent of rural Americans had access to electricity. In April 1936, farmers and business people in Tarboro, North Carolina formed a cooperative to apply for help from the Rural Electrification Administration to build a member-owned electric distribution system. This led to North Carolina’s first electric co-op and remains thriving today as Edgecombe-Martin County EMC.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 10, Oct 2009, p12-13, il, por
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Record #:
31255
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1930s, when electricity was introduced to the North Carolina countryside, people went around explaining all the new appliances that were coming into the lives of rural families. Pansy Dillard, a member of the Sylva 4-H Club in 1939, embarked on a learning project that involved giving demonstrations on the wonders and benefits of electricity. She kept a record of her project and created a book called, “My 4-H Records in Rural Electrification.”
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 32 Issue 11, Nov 2000, p23, por
Record #:
31323
Abstract:
This article traces the fifty-year history of rural electrification in North Carolina. The discussion covers the barriers between farmers and the electrical power industry, and how support for rural electrification grew. Farmers and rural homeowners soon realized the advantages of electrical power in farming operations, appliances, and homes.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 6, June 1985, p14-19, por
Record #:
31320
Author(s):
Abstract:
The nation’s rural electrification program is marking fifty years of success on May 11. Since then, the Rural Electrification Administration has completely transformed rural communities by extending electric power to rural areas. This article discusses how the program was established, and presents excerpts from interviews with North Carolinians recalling rural life with and without electricity.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 5, May 1985, p19-27, il, por