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8 results for Country music
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Record #:
3027
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The Piedmont area of the 1920s produced a group of musicians, including Charlie Poole and Walter \"Kid\" Smith, who took country music to national prominence with their ballads and playing style.
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Record #:
5092
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Where do local country music singers and musicians go to build name recognition and a following? In North Carolina the answer is the country music showcase, which gives local talent a chance to perform on stage with a live band. Showcases have appeared over the last ten years in towns including Benson, Goldsboro, Liberty, and Smithfield. Some local performers, like Julie Hamilton, are profiled.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 69 Issue 1, June 2001, p94-96, 97, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7756
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During the Great Depression, North Carolina families found an inexpensive form of entertainment in the radio. Every weekday afternoon the program “It's Briarhopper Time” aired, which featured country and gospel songs and novelty numbers. The program lasted through World War II and popular singers and movies stars made appearances, including Claude Casey and Whitney and Hogan. “It's Briarhopper Time” was still playing when the article was written in 1986, and was more popular than ever. The original members of the program, who were in their seventies, made appearances all over the United States and Europe. Their unique style of country music endured the cultural changes of a century.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p26-27, il
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Record #:
9959
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The Arthur Smith Show was one of the most popular programs at the time, delivering country, folk, and bluegrass music to audiences nationwide. Among numerous enterprises, Arthur Smith's time was divided largely between his Charlotte-based touring group the Crackerjacks and recording studio.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p19-20, por
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Record #:
17087
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One of the best kept secrets in eastern North Carolina is an Americana music series being presented at a de-commissioned Baptist church in Nashville, North Carolina.
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Record #:
28963
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Steph Stewart and Mario Arnez are the duo, Blue Cactus, from Chapel Hill. Their music is a mix of classic country music, honky-tonk, and modern string instruments. Songs on their debut album explore heartbreak and hope with time-tested honky-tonk humor.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Feb 2017, p14-15, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28997
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Far Western, a documentary about country and bluegrass enthusiasts in Japan, will premiere at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival in Durham. The film covers the cultural influence of American troops in Japan, and how country and bluegrass music became synonymous with idealistic notions of freedom.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 12, April 2017, p21, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31287
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Of all the musical styles played throughout North Carolina, many believe that country music is the state’s finest style. North Carolinians claim country music owes its appeal to the yearning for simplicity and rootedness that permeates modern society. This article presents a selection of stories and thoughts on the subject.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 31 Issue 6, June 1999, p12-14, il, por Periodical Website