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6 results for Cape Lookout National Seashore
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Record #:
25006
Author(s):
Abstract:
The water is getting dangerously close to the Cape Lookout lighthouse. With erosion increasing from 2.8 feet a month to 23.4 feet a month, it will not be long before the lighthouse is falling into the sea. While blame for this problem is being put on various causes, the big issue now is not who did it, but how the lighthouse will be saved.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, February 1979, p1-3, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
26465
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carteret County Wildlife Club celebrates the Year of the Coast at Cape Lookout, one of North Carolina’s most iconic maritime getaways.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 7, Jul 1980, p8-9
Record #:
26523
Abstract:
In this letter to the public, the NC Beach Buggy Association urges the Department of Interior to to rethink their plans to make Cape Lookout National Seashore a wilderness area.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 10, Oct 1980, p13
Record #:
9535
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout National Seashores provide the state with coastal wilderness stretching over 136 miles and the largest unspoiled beaches left in the country. Fishing is one of the most popular recreations there. Wildlife is abundant, and most of the villages located near them have retained their charm.
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Record #:
34460
Author(s):
Abstract:
An avid outdoorswoman shares her experiences on the eastern shore of North Carolina. Paddleboarding, canoeing, and kayaking all offer a new way to see the state’s natural resources and seashores, especially around Beaufort.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2017, p30-33, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34777
Abstract:
Typically, leatherback sea turtles nest on tropical beaches, but are now beginning to come further north and nest on the North Carolina shore. Fort Fisher State Recreation Area and Cape Lookout National Seashore have both been recently made home for a few nesting leatherback turtles. It is still rare to see, with a total of 39 confirmed nests since 1966.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2018, p38-39, il Periodical Website
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