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15 results for Camden County--History
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Record #:
11702
Abstract:
Host of the 1725 General Assembly and home to one of the earliest Native American reservations in the United States, Camden County has a sundry past. Containing one of the oldest settlements in North Carolina, Old Trap, Camden County was once visited by President James Monroe. Beleaguered with a slave insurrection in 1802, and containing the presence of both Baptists and Methodists, Camden County is also known for the town of South Mills.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 9, Sept 1964, p9, 15-16, il
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Record #:
11700
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Abstract:
Formed in 1777 as the smallest county in North Carolina, Camden exudes a history that includes agriculture, industry, and a booming economy shut down by the establishment of Elizabeth City. Once a part of Pasquotank County, Camden played a role in constructing the Dismal Swamp Canal. Bitterly divided during the Civil War, Camden revitalized slowly by constructing a new courthouse, diversifying agricultural production, and constructing better roads.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 9, Sept 1964, p10-11, 22-24, il
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Record #:
11893
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Abstract:
Tarrants recounts the history of the Camden County jail.
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Record #:
18449
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Continuing his travels around the state, Goerch describes the things of interest he found in Camden County. The county was formed in 1777. The Dismal Swamp Canal traverses the county, and the Inland Waterway links the waters of Virginia and North Carolina. The first Baptist Church in the state was organized in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 26, Nov 1941, p1-2, 19-20, il
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Record #:
37202
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Abstract:
Article about the formation of NC government under an oak tree on the Pasquotank River, Culpepper’s Rebellion, Indian War and the formation of Camden County, NC.
Record #:
37537
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Abstract:
Announcement of the re-enactment of the battle in Camden County, NC.
Record #:
37588
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The story when President James Monroe came to Camden County to view the Dismal Swamp Canal and stayed at the home of Enoch Sawyer.
Record #:
37599
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This article details the battles Gen. Isaac Gregory fought in.
Record #:
37634
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Abstract:
Taken from an article of the printed tax list.
Record #:
38012
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A history of the Wade’s Point Lighthouse (1859-1955) and a small article naming Joseph Mercer as the last keeper of Wade’s Point Lighthouse.
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Record #:
38006
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A small portion of the Camden County Tax List 1782
Record #:
39012
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author of this article tells the story of how two sisters, Elizabeth and Sarah McPherson, were daughters of Willie McPherson (1775-1835), the wealthiest man in Camden County. Elizabeth married Dr. Francis Newby Mullen and Sarah married Dennis Dozier Ferebee, they both building large columned homes less than one hundred feet apart. By 1860, Ferebee was the richest man in the county and Mullen was the second richest. When the question of Secession came in 1861, Ferebee was against it and Mullen was for it. Circumstances lead to a duel between the brother-in-laws. The duel was called off by Mullen at the last moment and the brother-in-laws never spoke directly to each other again.