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9 results for Bryant, Henry Edward Cowan (Red Buck), 1873-1967
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Record #:
15361
Abstract:
H. E. C. (Red Buck) Bryant begins a series of articles recounting his newspaper experiences as a cub reporter in Charlotte and later as a Washington correspondent, where he wrote articles to the people back home about what was going in in the nation's capital. Bryant began his career on the Charlotte Chronicle in 1895, the forerunner of the Charlotte Observer. In 1907, J. P. Caldwell, owner of the paper, sent him to Washington.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 26, Nov 1934, p3, 27, por
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Record #:
15381
Abstract:
Bryant continues his series of articles about his journalism career as a cub reporter in Charlotte and as a Washington correspondent reporting on happenings in the nation's capital. In this article he relates his experiences as he covers the Shemwell murder trial which took place in Lexington in the summer of 1895. Baxter Shemwell, a wealthy Lexington citizen, shot and killed Dr. Robert I. Payne, one of North Carolina's leading physicians, on the streets of Lexington.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 27, Dec 1934, p8, 22
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Record #:
15398
Abstract:
Bryant continues his series of articles about his journalism career as a cub reporter in Charlotte and as a Washington correspondent reporting on happenings in the nation's capital. In this article he tells of his association with some of North Carolina's great men, including Joe Caldwell, Matt Ransom, Jeter Pritchard and others.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 28, Dec 1934, p25
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Record #:
15442
Abstract:
Bryant continues his series of articles, this time writing about the number of pickpockets who flooded into the state during the 1890s. The gang would take advantage of crowds at railway stations, political rallies, and fairs. They made some big hauls until they were forced to go elsewhere.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 31, Dec 1934, p25-26
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Record #:
15444
Abstract:
Bryant continues his series of articles, this time relating some intimate anecdotes about North Carolina's great educational leader, Governor Charles B. Aycock.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 33, Jan 1935, p7, 22, por
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Record #:
15513
Abstract:
Bryant continues his series of articles, this time recalling the events surrounding a murder of a farm family around the turn of the century in Rowan County named Lyerly -- father, mother, and three children. Five African American farm hands, three men and two women, were charged. Before the trial was concluded, the jail was broken into and the three men were lynched; the women were beaten and set free. Bryant tells of an unknown man in a Panama hat who incited the mob to lynch the prisoners.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 35, Jan 1935, p10
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Record #:
15524
Abstract:
Bryant continues his series of articles, this time recalling one of the most sensational murder cases ever tried in North Carolina. It was one of the most mysterious events to happen in Elizabeth City. Nellie M. Cropsey disappeared from her home on the night of November 20, 1901. Twenty-six days later her body was found in the river, and her suitor was charged with her murder. The trial attracted nationwide attention. Yet questions still remain over some details of the case.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 39, Feb 1935, p7, 21
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Record #:
15523
Abstract:
Bryant continues his series of articles, this time looking back to the dark days of Reconstruction when North Carolina's Republican Party was not looked upon with favor. However, there were some Republicans who had courage and strength of character to stand up and be counted. They were Dr. J. J. Mott, called the \"Iron Duke,\" Thomas Settle Jr., and Edmund Blackburn.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 38, Feb 1935, p21, 24
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Record #:
15520
Abstract:
Bryant continues his series of articles, this time recalling how different the experiences are for the modern-day reporter when compared with the difficulties and obstacles he faced in gathering the news in the 1890s and afterwards. For example, few newspaper offices in the state were equipped with typewriters.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 37, Feb 1935, p14
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