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9 results for Botanists
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Record #:
4181
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Early America was explored for plants by hundreds of European botanists. André Michaux, France's most eminent botanist, was one of them. A world traveler, he came to America with his son in 1785, for what became ten years of exploration. He collected thousands of specimens, and his travels in North Carolina took him as far as the Black Mountains. He was the first white man to set foot in those mountains. In 1802, he journeyed to Madagascar, where he contracted a rare tropical fever and died.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 4, Sept 1990, p15-17, il
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Record #:
5752
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Born in France in 1746, botanist Andre Michaux was sent to America by the French government in 1785 to collect seeds, trees, shrubs, and plants. In the process he roamed through 30 North Carolina counties, where he either discovered or described 300 plants. Yet, though he covered more territory than Daniel Boone and made many botanical discoveries, Michaux remains relatively unknown in this country.
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Record #:
5824
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Troyer discusses the life and botanical contributions of Hardy Croom, who was born in Lenoir County and conducted his botanical work in the Southeastern United States. Croom, his wife, and three children perished in the wreck of the steamboat HOME, which was caught in a hurricane October 7, 1837, and wrecked near Ocracoke.
Record #:
5823
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Burk discusses the life and accomplishments of Alma Leonora Holland Beers, who was the first woman botanist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the first half of the 20th-century.
Record #:
8706
Abstract:
Moses Ashley Curtis of Hillsborough was regarded as the American authority on fungi in the 1850s. He developed international friendships, one with Reverend Miles Joseph Berkeley in England, with whom he wrote five scholarly papers. Curtis's most important work, however, was his forty-year study of plant life in North Carolina. His SHRUBS AND WOODY VINES OF NORTH CAROLINA was first published in 1860. This list of 4800 North Carolina plants was the largest North American regional list.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Feb 1982, p11-12, il
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Record #:
9306
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Arthur Devernon Hugur was one of 19th-century North Carolina's best botanists and published volumes of poetry under the name Chucky Joe. Living in Hendersonville, he wrote often of Herbert's Spring and other places as he traveled through the mountains.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 10, Mar 1980, p16-18, il
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Record #:
19425
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Lewis David von Schweinitz was born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in 1780 and was a great-grandson of the founder of the Moravian Church. His interest in botany began before he was seven and the interest never ceased. His early education was in Nazareth. His father was called back to Germany in 1798, and the family went with him. There he continued his botanical studies. He married just before just before returning to America in 1812 and established himself at Salem, North Carolina. He published many botanical works and received many honors, one of which was the presidency of the University of North Carolina. He declined because it would keep him from his studies. He died in 1824.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 42, Mar 1944, p9, 16
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Record #:
722
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North Carolina's wilderness was widely explored during the 18th century by frontiersmen and plant lovers. Among them were William Bartram, Asa Gray, John Muir and Moses Ashley Curtis.
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Record #:
699
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B. W. Wells found his life's work in a field of wildflowers near Burgaw and changed not only his thinking but also the way we look at North Carolina's landscape.
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