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Record #:
4461
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In March 1541 Giovanni da Verrazano, a Florentine in the employ of Francis I of France, became the first white man to visit North Carolina. He wrote of his travels up the coast from North Carolina to New York, but France was too occupied at the time with European concerns to consider attempts at colonization. It would be almost sixty years before Verrazano's writings would be published in Richard Hakylut's Diver's Voyages (1582).
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Record #:
7757
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Giovanni Da Verrazano arrived in North Carolina sixty-four years before Sir Walter Raleigh, yet many historians fail to mention him at all. He was born into a wealthy family in Italy around 1480. He moved to France to become a privateer and later was credited with capturing $1.5 million from a Spanish ship on its way to Charles V. In 1524 he embarked on a voyage to find a short cut to the Far East. He hit land in the Cape Fear region of what is today Bogue Banks, Carteret County. Verrazano stayed on board while crew members disembarked for water. One crew member gave small gifts to the natives. He was the first European they ever encountered. Verrazano made several other stops along the shores, including the New York Bay, before returning home without finding a passage around North America.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 4, Sept 1986, p14-15, 29, il, por
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Record #:
4476
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Abstract:
Sailing for Francis I of France, Giovanni da Verrazano, an Italian, crossed the Atlantic in search of a passage to India. What he found was the Outer Banks and a body of water beyond he called the Oriental Sea. This would later be named the Pamlico Sound. Verrazano sailed as far north as Newfoundland before returning home. His \"discovery\" of an oriental sea kept explorers sailing west for many years seeking the elusive passage.
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