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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for "Woodcock, American"
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Record #:
6607
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Although the American woodcock is known by at least thirty names, including big-eyed John, bogsucker, and timberdoodle, it remains one of the least known and understood game birds. To a small number of North Carolina hunters, it is one of the most popular game-birds. Amundson discusses the woodcock's history, description, general characteristics, food and breeding habits, management, and natural enemies.
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Record #:
16456
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The American woodcock is one of the most widespread game birds in North America. Although it is known by at least thirty names, including big-eyed John, bogsucker, and timberdoodle, it remains one of the least known and understood game birds. The article provides information on the woodcock, such as its appearance and behaviors, and stresses the importance of habitat maintenance to insure its stability.
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Record #:
25971
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The American Woodcock puts on quite a show, and North Carolina game management officials believe may have the potential to increase diversity and quantity game hunting in the state.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Jan-Feb 1975, p21
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Record #:
8356
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Woodcocks are unusual game birds, having short legs, pot bellies, large eyes, and long bills. They are actually seabirds that prefers to live in wet woodlands rather than along the seashore. Woodcocks migrate southward in the winter and spend the season in North Carolina and other southeastern states. The best places to look for the bird when hunting are young forest areas on poorly drained land and in alder thickets.
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Record #:
9537
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With a beak that can reach three inches in length, the woodcock is a strange looking bird. Although their erratic flight pattern make them a tough bird to target, to a small number of North Carolina hunters, the woodcock is one of the most popular game-birds.
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Record #:
9686
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Almy makes the case for hunting woodcocks, which he considers the state's most neglected game bird.
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Record #:
9856
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Woodcocks and snipes spend the summer in New England and Canada and winter in North Carolina. Although these reclusive game birds frequent boggy areas in forests and have many characteristics of upland game birds, they are actually shorebirds that moved inland over time. Earley compares the birds.
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Record #:
7923
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The coastal plain is the primary wintering range for woodcocks. Most woodcocks head north in the spring, but a number live and breed in the state year-round. The woodcock's population has declined over the past twenty years because of habitat alteration and destruction, winter mortality, and predation.
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Record #:
10551
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The coastal plain of North and South Carolina is the primary wintering range for woodcocks in the Eastern Flyway. This bird has a long bill which is ideal for probing in the dirt for food, and its mottled brown color provides a good camouflage against predators. The woodcock's preference for dense cover habitats makes it a challenging bird to hunt.
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