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31 results for "Vance, Zebulon Baird, 1830-1894"
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Record #:
41318
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Mountain or coast scape, urban or rural setting, landmark present or prospective, this gallery of paintings selected by the Our State staff can appeal to the heart as well as the intellect.
Record #:
41093
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From free turnip seed, the tie-breaking ballot for building new courthouse was cast. From being built in Lapland, Zebulon Vance predicted the new courthouse would flourish. With a few years, Lapland was renamed Marshall, and a third courthouse was built. Today, the town renamed for a chief justice and its symbol of justice testify to Vance’s vision.
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36567
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A Cleveland, Ohio native made an impact on the town that prompted his self-identification as an “Ashevillian.” How his influence continues is through philanthropic contributions to the city. Those noted include the Asheville Public Library, Vance monument, and Montford Residential Park. Such endeavors generated the city’s nods to his name such as Pack Square.
Record #:
37894
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This battle's carnage is measured in more than Union and Confederate casualties. Included by the author were the destruction of the 26th North Carolina Regiment as a formidable force. Attesting to Gettysburg’s destruction included 28,000 Confederate dead or wounded, 2,935 of whom were buried in Virginia’s Hollywood Cemetery. The large number of North Carolina soldiers killed, one in four of total forces, helped to usher in a peace movement yielding 100 rallies and increased division between the Secessionists and Unionists.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 8, Jan 2014, p132-134, 136-140 Periodical Website
Record #:
24072
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Vance Monument pays tribute to Zebulon Vance (1830-1894), the governor of North Carolina during the Civil War. Vance was also later a United States Senator.
Record #:
21829
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This article examines the debate over whether to emancipate and arm Southern slaves to fight for the Confederacy during the Civil War. The perspective of Governor Zebulon B. Vance is given particular attention, along with the attitudes of North Carolinians towards slaves during the war, and to emancipated blacks after the war.
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Record #:
21646
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This article examines Zebulon B. Vance's re-election campaign for governor of North Carolina during the Civil War in 1864. Vance was originally against Southern succession but by 1864 he was convinced that the Confederate cause was necessary for the continuation of the Southern way of life. His campaign was built around his commitment to Confederate nationalism and ultimately he was successful in his reelection.
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Record #:
4891
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Zebulon B. Vance was governor of North Carolina during the Civil War. He commanded the Twenty-sixth Regiment of North Carolina Troops at the battles of New Bern and Malvern Hill, prior to his election in 1862. He was an ardent nationalist and supported the Confederacy to the war's end. It was this steadfastness to the state that won him reelection in 1864 over peace candidate William W. Holden. Vance was again elected governor from 1877 to 1879 and then served as a U.S. Senator till his death in 1894.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p21-23, il
Record #:
21870
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This article discusses and examines Zebulon B. Vance, North Carolina's governor during the Civil War, and his defense for the state's secession and his own actions as governor. Vance's defense hinged on a reluctant North Carolina being pressured by outside forces and his own sense of duty that caused him to support the Confederacy. This line of reasoning boosted Vance into a successful political career.
Record #:
1105
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Zebulon Vance, North Carolina politician, Confederate soldier, and southern patriot, was widely known for his sharp wit and sense of humor.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 1, June 1993, p10-12, por
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Record #:
2608
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Not every brandy maker can have his product extolled by a governor, but R. A. Bynum of Farmville was one. In 1879, Governor Zebulon B. Vance's statement praising the apple brandy appeared on the front page of THE RALEIGH OBSERVER.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 6, Nov 1987, p7, il
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Record #:
8737
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Civil War governor, Zebulon Baird Vance, was born in Reems Creek Valley outside Asheville in 1830. The Vance Birthplace was built around 1795, and has been a state historic site for twenty years. The outer walls of the main log house have been reconstructed, but most of the interior of the house is original. There are also six log outbuildings on the site. The house has workshops for students and teachers, including how to dip candles, cook over an open fire, and hand weave.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p9-10, il
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Record #:
8738
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During 1865, Governor Zeb Vance admitted it was impossible to continue to carry out his gubernatorial duties in Raleigh. He moved to Statesville that spring, but was arrested at his home on May 12, 1865 by Federalist forces. Because Vance was not involved in the profiteering common in the state at that time, the house is humble and hardly a mansion. The house is now a museum in honor of Vance and is open to the public.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p11-12, il, por
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Record #:
8842
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In 1877, Governor Zeb Vance began his third term, deeply concerned about the state of the North Carolina State Library. He enlisted the help of Cornelia Phillips Spencer from Chapel Hill to re-catalogue the entire collection. Once the catalogue was complete, the collection had to be reorganized by State Librarian Sherwood Haywood. Spencer's catalogue, if published, did not survive.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p10-12, 32, il, por
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