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24 results for "University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Institute of Marine Sciences"
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Record #:
26130
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hans Paerl and Rick Leuttich, Carolina marine scientists, are concerned about fish kills and algal blooms in the Neuse River because they may be a sign of declining water quality. Their new monitoring project is confirming that the health of fish is influenced by nitrogen loading, oxygen levels, and water circulation patterns.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p9-12, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26131
Abstract:
Marine scientists believe that agriculture is responsible for most of the nitrogen pollution flowing into the Neuse River. They are working on a model that shows how an individual farm operation affects the ecosystem, and measures how policies influence people’s behavior.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p13-14, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26140
Author(s):
Abstract:
Marine scientists are studying small marine animals, known as hydroids, off North Carolina’s coast. They discovered hydroids have very strong UV-absorbing compounds that could possibly be used in sunscreen products.
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Record #:
26146
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Abstract:
Southerly surges occur when winds off the California coast suddenly change directions, but are difficult for weather forecasters to predict. UNC marine scientist John Bane, flew an airplane to get better measurements to help develop more accurate computer models.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Fall 1997, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26149
Abstract:
Tim Bralower, associate professor of geology and of marine sciences, studies ancient plankton called foraminifera. These ancient species were fossilized in volcanic sediments offshore of Colombia, and help explain evolution and global climate change.
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Record #:
26145
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Abstract:
Marine scientists, Hans Paerl and Jay Pinckney, are studying how tiny organisms live and survive in Antarctica. Their research might reveal how life could exist on Mars or other frozen planets.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Fall 1997, p18-20, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26172
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Abstract:
UNC scientists are studying loggerhead sea turtles to learn how adults find their way back to their birthplace. They believe turtles have the ability to orient themselves through the magnetic field of the earth.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Jan 1997, p4-5, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26203
Author(s):
Abstract:
Professor Charles Peterson and undergraduate research assistant Tracey Langhorne conducted a research project on the nesting habits of the loggerhead sea turtle. They concluded that the number of campers at Hammocks Beach did not interfere with sea turtle nesting success.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Fall 1990, p18-19, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26236
Author(s):
Abstract:
Marine geologist Charles Paull discovered a community of organisms in the Gulf of Mexico that survives on chemical energy, not sunlight. The processes associated with the chemosynthetic food chain help explain deep-sea geological processes, and may lead to solutions to chemical pollution.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Fall 1988, p18-20, il, por Periodical Website