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42 results for "Tobacco industry"
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Record #:
31648
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Abstract:
Seventh District Representative Charles G. Rose of Fayetteville believes North Carolina tobacco farmers are not getting a fair share in the market place, and he’s supporting efforts to change that situation. In an interview, Rose discusses the Congressional Rural Caucus, rural development, tobacco allotments, and import tariffs on foreign tobacco.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 9, Sept 1975, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
31659
Author(s):
Abstract:
United States Senator Sam Ervin discusses the importance of North Carolina agriculture and identifies developments that threaten it. Ervin also highlights important business and trade elements that provide services to sustain farm operations, and the state’s flue cured tobacco market.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, Mar 1974, p6-7, il
Record #:
12207
Author(s):
Abstract:
Accounting for the majority of farm income within Pitt County, tobacco farming has sustained the community since 1725. Selling more flue-cured tobacco than any other county in the United States, Pitt County merchants established a market in 1891 from which to sell their goods. Initially, a one warehouse operation, membership in the Greenville Market grew to 31 different auctioneers, who, as of 1956, sold 97,367,576 pounds of tobacco, 57,161,694 pounds of which was grown locally.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 10, Oct 1957, p15-18, il
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Record #:
13139
Abstract:
North Carolina is the leading industrial state of the southeast with both the number of industrial worker and in industrial production. From the beginning, North Carolinians have adapted new ideas to the needs of the state with such endeavors as railway promotion and the home-grown industry in tobacco, textiles, and furniture.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 16, Dec 1955, p10-14, f
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Record #:
13362
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The P. Lorillard Company began construction on a $13 million dollar tobacco plant set to be the largest one-story factory of its kind in the world. Encompassing 12 acres, Lorillard's new plant is the largest construction project attempted in the state as well as the biggest expansion the company has undertaken in 25 years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p9-10, 27, il
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Record #:
24691
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The P. Lorillard Co. plant, which manufactures tobacco, will open at a new location in Greensboro. Because of this expansion, North Carolina will have four of the six largest cigarette manufacturing companies within its boundaries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p9-10, 27, il
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Record #:
13830
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In 1952, the Taylor Brothers Tobacco Company of Winston-Salem was sold to the American Snuff Company. This sale marks the end of small, independent tobacco manufacturers in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 32, Jan 1953, p1-2, 19, por
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Record #:
13748
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K.M. Biggs, Incorporated, in Robeson County this year becomes the largest grower of tobacco in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 37, Feb 1952, p6, 24, f
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Record #:
13623
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The threat of a price ceiling, which might have greatly impaired one of North Carolina's most picturesque and important enterprises, tobacco, has been removed for the moment.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 14, Sept 1951, p3-6, 19, map, f
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Record #:
30104
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It has been suggested that the cigarette shortage is due to a shortage in cigarette leaf tobacco. Developers argue however, that the shortage is due to a lack of manpower rather than shortages in the flue-cured or burley leaf tobacco.
Record #:
14705
Author(s):
Abstract:
After months of hard work, tobacco farmers of North Carolina are now cashing in on their labor. The crop this year is above the average with respect to size and quality.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 15, Sept 1944, p6-7, f
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Record #:
15485
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Indigenous tobacco plants satisfied early settlers' appetites but in 1852 the first \"bright leaf\" tobacco was grown and started the state's tobacco boom. The popularity of J. L. Green's tobacco with Civil War soldiers created the world-famous \"Bull Durham\" brand. The Duke's became prolific tobacco farmers and the \"Duke's Mixture\" helped J. B. Duke form the American Tobacco Company. The tobacco industry was not limited to the 'Triangle' and places like Winston-Salem became cigarette manufacturing locales.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 17, Sept 1935, p7, 19, il
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