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63 results for "Textile industry"
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Record #:
10369
Abstract:
For 146 years, J.P. Stevens & Co., Inc., has been one of the largest and most diversified manufacturers of textiles in the country. Thirteen of these plants are located in North Carolina. The article includes a brief description of each one.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 17 Issue 6, Nov 1959, p60, 62, 140-141, il
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Record #:
10942
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The Morris Fur Company of Burlington imports and processes opossum fur from New Zealand, Tasmania, and Australia, not for the clothing industry but for the textile industry. The springiness and retention of shape that this particular fur possesses makes it invaluable for use on shuttles used in weaving mills. Morris Fur is one of three companies in the country that supplies the heavy demand of the textile industry for shuttle fur.
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Record #:
11056
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Clyde W. Gordon of Alamance County at age sixty-eight is rounding out a distinguished career in the textile industry. Gordon is currently Secretary-Treasurer of the Collins-Aikman Corporation's Monarch Division at Graham. He is featured in this month's WE THE PEOPLE MAGAZINE'S North Carolina Businessman in the News.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 29 Issue 3, Mar 1971, p20, 22, 53-54, por
Record #:
11065
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Don S. Holt was reelected president of Cannon Mills and named Chairman of the Board, following the death of Charles A. Cannon in April 1971. He is only the third leader of the company in its eighty-four-year history and the first who does not bear the Cannon name. Cannon Mills is the world's largest manufacturer of household textiles. Holt is featured in this month's WE THE PEOPLE MAGAZINE'S North Carolina Businessman in the News.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 29 Issue 6, June 1971, p13-14, 44-45, por
Record #:
11107
Abstract:
John E. Reeves, a native of Mount Airy, is chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Reeves Brothers, Inc., which was founded in Mount Airy in the early 1920s by Micah R. and John M. Reeves. The company is one of the nation's larger textile manufacturing corporations. Reeves is featured in this month's WE THE PEOPLE MAGAZINE's North Carolina Businessman in the News.
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Record #:
11149
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Thomasville native Stuart Warren Cramer - architect, author, and inventor - transformed the textile industry and turned the industry in a new direction with his innovations. Her perfected the layout of textile mills, developed an air-conditioning system, and created a first-class mill village.
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Record #:
11584
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Lewis S. Morris has had a forty-year career in the textile industry. Today he is chairman and chief executive officer of Cone Mills Corporation in Greensboro. He is featured in We the People of North Carolina magazine's Businessman in the News.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 34 Issue 4, Apr 1976, p10, 12, 14, por
Record #:
12500
Abstract:
Dewey L. Trogdon is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Cone Mills Corporation. In 1986, he served as president of the Washington-based American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. Trogdon discusses the rising tide of foreign imports and other important issues facing the textile industry.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 44 Issue 10, Oct 1986, p20-22, 24, 26, por
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Record #:
12499
Abstract:
North Carolina's textile industry dates back to the early 1800s, but in 1980, the industry began a decline. Predictions were made that if the world situation did not change, there would be no domestic textile industry by the 1990s. Mackie discusses that possibility.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 44 Issue 10, Oct 1986, p14-16, 18, 20, il
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Record #:
12904
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Collins and Aikman, suppliers of upholstery materials as well as pioneers in unusual uses of pile fabrics, is a New York based company with subsidiaries in North Carolina. Run by Ellis Leach, Collins and Aikman sell the majority of their products to entities in the transportation field.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 11, Oct 1959, p12, 22, il
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Record #:
13480
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The North Carolina knitting industry is overwhelmed with sock demands. Producing 46 percent of the nation's socks, North Carolina mills employ some 24,000 men and women.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 15, Sept 1952, p17, il
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Record #:
14595
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A. M. Guillet started out to be an actor, but his career in the latter part of his life has been devoted to the invention of more than 25 devices used in erecting and maintaining textile mill machinery.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 41, Mar 1946, p9-10, f
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Record #:
15249
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No list of pioneer manufacturers in North Carolina would be complete without including the name of Edwin M. Holt, founder of a great textile industry. With the water power of the Great Alamance Creek, Holt began his modest textile mill with help from Chief Justice Thomas Ruffin. From this small beginning sprang a textile empire which extended until it embraced hundreds of thousands of spindles and thousands of looms, giving employment to thousands in the Piedmont.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 33, Jan 1940, p7, 22
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Record #:
16973
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Goerch recounts one of the most interesting and sensational business careers ever seen in North Carolina--James Spencer Love, head of Burlington Mills, Inc., which is headquartered in Greensboro.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 6, July 1937, p5, 18, por
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Record #:
17771
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A new exhibit at Cameron Art Museum in Wilmington uses spools of thread from abandoned mills to highlight North Carolina's textile industry.
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