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7 results for "Salamanders--North Carolina, Western"
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Record #:
30085
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new species of woodland salamander, Plethodon aureoles, occurs between the Little Tennessee and Hiwassee rivers on the western slopes of the Unicoi Mountains and nearby lowlands in southeastern Tennessee and adjacent North Carolina. It is a member of the Plethodon glutinosus group of salamanders in the southern Appalachian Mountains.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 9, June 1983, p1-20, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
9549
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are more different species of salamanders living in western North Carolina than anywhere else in the world. Among them are the long-tailed, red-cheeked, two-lined, Blue Ridge spring, and red-backed salamander.
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Record #:
30024
Abstract:
Comparative descriptive data are provided on variation of egg size in five species of salamanders in the southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. The species differ in their use of larval habitats.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 18, June 1993, p71-82, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
9833
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two subspecies of hellbenders have been found in the United States. North Carolina's hellbender lives in the cold mountain streams of the western counties. It is one of the largest salamanders in the western hemisphere and can grow up to 2 and one-half feet in length. It is rarely seen and lives on crayfish, fish, and other foods.
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Record #:
30023
Abstract:
Data were collected on populations of six species of salamanders at two locations in the southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. Although the numbers have fluctuated for various reasons, there has been no trend in the numbers of any of the species.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 18, June 1993, p59-64, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
39403
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new education and outreach program has begun at Pisgah National Forest called River Rangers. Currently the forest is seeing more visitors than ever. The River Rangers program aims to inform visitors for reducing habitat disturbances for endangered species in the forest. O particular concern is the hellbender salamander.
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Record #:
29834
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Southern Appalachians is home to more than sixty species of salamanders in North Carolina. The salamander fauna is so diverse because as the Appalachian Mountains formed and evolved, the salamanders adapted to profound geologic and climatological changes. Many species are in serious decline due to diseases and water pollution.
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