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30 results for "North Carolina. General Assembly--Budget"
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Record #:
30703
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1957 North Carolina General Assembly are facing unexpected and substantially increasing financial problems. Pay increases for teachers and funds for one week before and after school ends were originally recommended; however, where these adjustments would be made within the state's budget was uncertain. Increases to teacher pay would require a small tax increase or spending of the surplus.
Record #:
30712
Author(s):
Abstract:
In proposals to raise the salary of all state employees, including teachers, North Carolina's Governor Hodges has provided places where the finances can be used for the increase. Hodges proposes that funds to meet the new budget items can come from previously recommended funds for capital improvements, the Highway Fund, and interest from tax investments.
Record #:
30806
Author(s):
Abstract:
Total revenue and funds availability for the North Carolina General Fund amounted to over $307 million for 1958. Expenditures for the state during this time period, for public safety, welfare, education and others, only amounted to over $277 million. This left the state with a balance of $29, 347, 993. Although there was a surplus in the budget, there were no material changes to the proportions of total revenue raised from the ten major sources including individual and corporate income and sales, franchise, license, insurance, inheritance, and beverage taxes.
Record #:
30832
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1959 North Carolina General Assembly will face a problem with funding expanding public services. Despite a surplus in the previous year, the Assembly will face the biggest budget ever. Four ideas have been proposed to face an attempt at balancing the budget: increased taxes, a booming economy, witholding plan for income taxes, and decreased spending.
Record #:
30843
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Hodges surprised the 1959 North Carolina General Assembly by proposing a balanced budget without raising taxes or increasing schedule rates. This will be accomplished by generous estimates of revenue prospects, use of surplus, windfall payments of individual income taxes adopted from withholding plan of collecting individual income taxes, and holding appropriations to a limit.
Record #:
30887
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1959 North Carolina General Assembly authorized state services and agencies to spend over $582 million during the next biennium to 1961. This was an increase of 12.56% from the previous year. The financial picture, given the previous year's spending and revenue, would again put the state in a deficit of over $1 million.
Record #:
30909
Author(s):
Abstract:
Launched by the 1959 General Assembly to cover the next two years, the $600 million spending program will occur without levying any new taxes or increasing rates to old schedules. Only the amount of increased revenue made by estimates of improved business conditions could used for appropriations above budget recommendations.
Record #:
30907
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Fund for 1959 got a pleasant surprise of $5 million, when the Budget Bureau made public a final report on income and expenditures for the fiscal year. The surplus was much larger then expected, despite higher expenditures, due to a gain in revenues.
Record #:
31007
Author(s):
Abstract:
Revenues collected from 1959-1960 amounted to over $328 million, while expenditures totaled just over $277 million. this left the state with a budget surplus of nearly $19 million. The majority of revenues came from individual income taxes and sales taxes, while the majority spent was in education and public welfare programs.
Record #:
31022
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Fund for 1961-1963 will begin with a credit balance of $53,088,469, three times the credit balance the current biennium started with. With anticipated revenue increases of over $19 million, appropriation recommendations call for the expenditure of the entire credit balance.
Source:
Record #:
31182
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite being a primary concern of North Carolina's Governor Sanford, public schools are getting a smaller share of the General Fund than received under previous administrations. This is due to the sharp decline in pupil attendance, and the millions usually spent on pupils will become available to help pay for teacher salary increases and other public school improvements. In turn, more funds are left over from sales tax to pay for expansions and improvements in other state operations.
Record #:
31181
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Fund budget presented to legislature in February recommends an 18.1 percent increase in appropriations for operations. This combined with a increase in spending voted upon in 1961 will result in General Fund tax spending in the new biennium at a rate of $1.64 for every dollar spent in the last biennium. In other words, a 64.6 percent hike in General Fund tax support for budgeting operations.
Record #:
31513
Author(s):
Abstract:
The recommended North Carolina state budget for 1969-1971 will most likely reach and/or exceed $3.5 billion. This is an estimate based on the recommended total by the incumbent Governor Dan Moore to Governor-elect Robert Scott. It is additionally estimated that the credit balance for 1969 will exceed $100 million, allowing the incoming Governor to make some adjustments to the budget if needed.
Record #:
32229
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article provides statistics and an analysis of the Advisory Budget Commission’s $3.3 billion blueprint for operating State Government. The article discusses anticipated General Fund sources, the outlook on estimated revenues during the next biennium, recommendations for public school teacher pay and highway improvement.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Feb 1969, p15-18, il, bibl, f
Record #:
32317
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Scott proposed in the legislative budget to increase the gross premium tax on insurance companies doing business in North Carolina. The state’s life insurance industry believes this is an undue tax burden, which would further result in driving off investment capital from the state, placing the domestic life insurance industry at a further disadvantage in competing with out-of-state firms.
Source: