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19 results for "North Carolina--Government"
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Record #:
27300
Author(s):
Abstract:
House Bill 2 has created tension within the state of North Carolina, across the country, and internationally. The law overturned a Charlotte ordinance that allowed transgender people to visit the bathroom of their current status and set up a class of nondiscrimantion that does not include sexual orientation or gender identity throughout the state. Due to the nationwide backlash, the law has had a major impact on North Carolina’s economy.
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Record #:
18641
Author(s):
Abstract:
Newly elected Governor Pat McCrory and his cabinet members began discussion about state budget reforms. The author predicts what changes will be made based on the Republican controlled government and considering campaign speeches. Increasing revenue and decreasing expenditures, for example state funded mental health programs, are the tact the newly elect Republican governor intends to follow in balancing the state budget.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 3, Jan 2013, p11 Periodical Website
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Record #:
21716
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Benjamin Smith was governor of North Carolina from 1810 to 1811. A prominent resident of the Lower Cape Fear region, Smith owned several plantations in Brunswick County. Little attention has been paid to Smith by historians as his short gubernatorial has been viewed as powerless. When examined, his tenure in office exposes the difficulties that governors are under during the early 19th century.
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Record #:
25749
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In the past, North Carolina’s cities and counties have been run by all-white governments. But now, 22 years after the Voting Rights Act of 1965, local government structures are changing so that blacks can finally get elected. At least 30 local governments are in the process of changing to systems that are no longer solely inclusive of white politicians.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 5 Issue 8, April 23-May6 1987, p7-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25629
Author(s):
Abstract:
As Gov. Jim Martin’s commission releases its report on making the North Carolina state government more efficient, THE INDEPENDENT investigates which politically sensitive aspects the commission wouldn’t dare question.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 17, September 13-26 1985, p1, 7-9, il Periodical Website
Record #:
28938
Author(s):
Abstract:
The basic services and amenities of life depend upon good leadership and execution in the local government. The North Carolina General Assembly organizes and directs how local governments deliver these basic services. This issue of Insight examines how state government in North Carolina addresses local government concerns.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p2-5, il, f
Record #:
18236
Author(s):
Abstract:
The General Assembly looked to both state and national precedents to guide legislation on governing and maintaining paperwork of state, county, and municipal employees. Personnel files were not standardized across the state often with smaller municipalities having little or no paperwork on employees while bigger cities, like Durham, had extensive records of the city's workers. Beyond disparity in record keeping, the article also discusses employee confidentiality and which forms and paperwork can be release publicly.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p24-30
Record #:
28934
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1971, the Citizens’ Conference on State Legislatures published a study of the capabilities of state legislatures, in which North Carolina’s General Assembly was ranked forty-seventh. Since then, an agenda for a stronger governorship was made, including veto power for the governor, the governor’s budget, appointment of cabinet officers, election, and removal of the lieutenant governor’s legislative duties.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Fall 1978, p4-7, il
Record #:
28937
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gary Pearce is the press secretary for James B. Hunt Jr., the governor of North Carolina. In addition to press secretary, Pearce acts as Hunt’s speech writer, political advisor, confidante, aide, and friend. Although press secretary is an unelected position, Pearce influences the governor’s decisions by offering multiple views of an issue.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Fall 1978, p14-17, por
Record #:
32231
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Robert Walter Scott was inaugurated on January 3, 1969 in Raleigh. North Carolina Senator J. Ruffin Bailey of Wake County, chairman of the inaugural committee, discusses gubernatorial inauguration planning and Governor Scott’s inauguration ceremony.
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Record #:
17623
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Legislative Committee of the North Carolina Police Executives' Association proposed three changes to the 1961 General Assembly. The first concerned broadening the types of property that could be searched under a warrant. A second proposal clarified the terms of arrest at the scene of an automobile accident. The third and final addressed an officer's right to arrest even without possession of a warrant when that officer has personal knowledge or a credible informant.
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Record #:
17625
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Abstract:
The Judicial Council was comprised of the Judicial Department, Supreme Court, Superior Court, Legislative Department, Executive Department, and the Bar. The 1949 General Assembly formed this council to oversee the judicial system and make astute observations about how to best administer judicial matters. In 1961, the Judicial Council was concerned with superior court judges, civil and criminal law procedure, and solicitorial districts.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 27 Issue 5, Feb 1961, p20-21
Record #:
17620
Author(s):
Abstract:
Population increases prompted a 1961 redistricting effort in the state. This had not occurred since 1941. Included are maps demonstrating congressional and senatorial redistricting from 1911-1961 and statistical data regarding districts and their respective number of representatives.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 27 Issue 5, Feb 1961, p1-5, il
Record #:
17621
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ten professional gentlemen, either lawyers or professors, comprised the 1961 General Statutes Commission. This commission approved twenty bills to be submitted to the 1961 General Assembly. The bills range from spousal property rights to clarifying terms of property transfer between master and slaves.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 27 Issue 5, Feb 1961, p7-9