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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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21 results for "Housing development"
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Record #:
31554
Abstract:
The Qualla Housing Authority is planning to carve and build new brick dwellings for the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians directly within the mountains of Western North Carolina, but various soil conservation problems are associated with such a project. The Soil Conservation Service recommended to use a high-pressure hydroseeder to plant grass, prevent erosion and maintain a foundation.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 11 Issue 10, Oct 1979, p11, por
Record #:
32220
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many North Carolina firms are producing pre-built housing, which represent the latest development in low-cost modern housing. The change they are bringing in the industry has caused the North Carolina Mobile Housing Institute to change its name to the North Carolina Manufactured Housing Institute. Becky L. Griffin, the Institute’s executive director, discusses how the new unit could be an answer to North Carolina’s housing shortage.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 2 Issue 11, Nov 1970, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
32225
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jones-Onslow Electric Membership Corporation of Jacksonville is growing at an average of nine-hundred new consumers a year. Alvin Morton, its general manager, discusses why the Jones-Onslow area is growing at one of the fastest rates in the state. In addition to the military and tourism industries, mobile home manufacturing has created new jobs and contributed to the area’s thriving economy.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Aug 1969, p20-21, il, por
Record #:
32223
Author(s):
Abstract:
The growing popularity of mobile homes is making the manufacture and sale of them one of North Carolina’s fastest growing businesses. Mobile homes may be the answer to the housing shortage because they offer complete housing packages, completely furnished, at economical prices well below the cost of other housing.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Aug 1969, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
32224
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bill Wellons is planning to develop a “mobile home city” called Olde Farme, located near Fort Bragg at Fayetteville. Wellons decided on mobile homes rather than houses because of high building costs and interest rates. Five-hundred acres of former farm and wood land are being converted to develop mobile housing, recreation and service shops for Olde Farme.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Aug 1969, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
31041
Author(s):
Abstract:
The natural spring once touted as the southeastern North Carolina's most promising resource is not the center of a new and novel development. Bouncing Log Spring has become Boiling Springs Lake, Inc; the 14000 acre coastal oak and long leaf pine area is being transformed into a budding housing development surrounding a 350 acre man-make lake.
Source: