NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for "Drive-in theaters"
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
36308
Author(s):
Abstract:
For Henderson, the word roses can remind natives of a common surname in town. Two native sons most associated with the name: Charlie Rose, longtime host of the TV program “CBS This Morning”; Paul Rose, founder of the department store that opened in 1915. The word can also prompt reminders of Henderson’s blossoming economic development, in establishment of businesses like Iams Pet Foods and a Durham semiconductor firm, Semprius.
Record #:
12356
Author(s):
Abstract:
At one time there were nearly two hundred drive-in movie theaters in North Carolina. With the arrival of air-conditioned movie theaters, their number dwindled. The only six still operating are in the towns of Albemarle, Belmont, Bessemer City, Eden, Henderson, and Shelby.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 2, July 2010, p60-63, 64, 66, 68-69, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
24238
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are only eight drive-ins left in North Carolina even though this entertainment niche was once more popular. This article discusses various drive-ins in North Carolina and why the numbers have decreased over the years.
Subject(s):
Record #:
8215
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina used to have a large number of drive-in theatres. Today, few remain. Jeter describes typical drive-in theatres. Usually, drive-ins were located on large flat fields. Some, such as the Carolina Pines were different. This theater, owned by H. A. Carlton, had terraced parking that enabled each row of parked cars to be higher than the row in front. Moviegoers could see a movie for twenty-five cents a person and snacks were cheap.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p14
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
17374
Author(s):
Abstract:
A. P. \"Byng\" Farrar became known as \"The Show Man\" after he organized a portable movie theater to bring film to rural communities without theaters. He decided on a six-town circuit which he would complete once a week. For a small commission, Mr. Farrar would set-up a projector and speaker set to show movies to citizens in rural locations.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 3 Issue 3, Dec 1935, p10-11, il
Subject(s):