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7 results for Watts, L. Poindexter
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Record #:
17882
Abstract:
During the 1965 session of the General Assembly, several changes were made to legislative affecting boating, commercial fisheries, and wildlife management agencies. Changing the Omnibus Revision of the Fish Law constituted the biggest portion of legislative decisions, which reorganized and redistributed the Division of Commercial Fisheries of the Department of Conservation and Development. New rules regarding boat safety were also passed.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 32 Issue 4, Dec 1965, p16-19, 22
Record #:
17979
Abstract:
Legislative interest in wildlife bills was high in the 1959 North Carolina General Assembly. Game and fish laws were of particular importance as well as boating safety.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 25 Issue 9, June 1959, p70-75
Record #:
18084
Abstract:
Watts discusses where property owner's rights end and public property access begins in relation to North Carolina waters.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 38 Issue 4, Dec 1971, p13-14
Record #:
18646
Abstract:
Despite former attempts to deter and end instances of drunk driving, state legislators struggled with decreasing the number of drunken driving citations. In 1980, Governor Hunt instructed the Governor's Crime Commission to analyze the problem and propose a range of solutions. The committee's report and outline of recommendations for curbing further drunk driving incidents is presented.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Winter 1983, p20-36
Record #:
20005
Abstract:
The new Trial and Appellate Procedure Act, recommended by the Criminal Code Commission, became effective July 1, 1978. A number of changes were proposed. Watts selects for discussion certain changes that are either of special interest or may require background explanation for full understanding.
Source:
Record #:
473
Abstract:
The North Carolina Juvenile Code includes a provision, known as the \"Child Abuse Reporting Act,\" that requires anyone who suspects juvenile abuse or neglect to report such. The wording of the law has confused professionals and citizens alike, so the author sets out to identify the sources of confusion and to clarify the law.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 52 Issue 1, Summer 1986, p17-29, f
Record #:
26255
Abstract:
All health professionals are legally required to report any suspicion of juvenile abuse to county social services. The Juvenile Code covers reporting requirements but there is confusion over what must be reported, especially in the context of health care. Despite ambiguities, the safest rule for health professionals is to report when in doubt.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 70, March 1987, p1-17, f