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9 results for Simpson, Marcus B
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Record #:
21280
Author(s):
Abstract:
While it is well known that much of Dr. John Brickell's text from his \"Natural History of North Carolina\" was plagiarized from John Lawson's \"A New Voyage to Carolina,\" as well as the writings of the Reverend John Clayton of Tidewater, and Thomas Hariot's \"A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia,\" little examination has been done of the map of North Carolina and the illustrations in the text. Brickell's \"Map of North Carolina,\" is derived from Edward Moseley's \"A New and Correct Map of the Province of North Carolina\" printed in 1733. Numerous engravings from Brickell's text have been copied or inspired from engravings in other texts and are compared to the extant material to demonstrate Brickell's plagiarism.
Record #:
21352
Author(s):
Abstract:
John S. Cairns spent much of his short adult life observing and collecting wildlife in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina, especially birds. Between 1887 and his accidental death in 1895, Cairns corresponded with William Brewster, a naturalist from Massachusetts. The letters between the two discuss Cairns' trips into the wilderness and the specimens he collected.
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Record #:
21369
Author(s):
Abstract:
Famous Boston zoologist William Brewster visited the North Carolina highlands around Asheville for two weeks in 1885 to search for lost bird species and for evidence of which northern birds might nest in the southern mountains. During his expedition, Brewster proved that over 20 northern species nested in the southern Appalachian Mountains during nesting season based primarily on the presence of certain trees and forest types.
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Record #:
21464
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Abbot was an American naturalist and biological illustrator of the 18th century through whose work the ornithology and entomology of the southeastern coastal plain were examined in minute detail. First visiting Virginia in 1773, Abbott spent the next decades cataloging and studying the birds and insects of the Southeastern United States. In 1797 he published a book of his findings including wonderful watercolors of his specimens in 'The Natural History of the Rarer Lepidopterous Insects of Georgia.'
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Record #:
21500
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1809, the father of American ornithology Alexander Wilson took a tour of the South, including North Carolina, to collect information about local birds and drum up subscribers for his extensive and costly book series, 'American Ornithology.' His success in both collecting bird data and subscribers in the South all but assured the success of the book series.
Source:
North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 63 Issue 4, Oct 1986, p421-476 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
21508
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the 17th and 20th centuries, the waters off of North Carolina were some of the most fruitful for whaling in North America. While never a large industry for local fishermen who usually participated in shore-whaling, pelagic whalers from New England were common visitors, stalking the whale pods.
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Record #:
21109
Abstract:
While it is well known that much of Dr. John Brickell's text from his \"Natural History of North Carolina\" was plagiarized from John Lawson's \"A New Voyage to Carolina,\" it should be noted that writings of the botanist Reverend John Clayton of Tidewater, Virginia were also a source for Brickell's work. Passages from Brickell's text and Clayton's source material are transcribed side-by-side to demonstrate Brickell's plagiarism.
Record #:
21222
Abstract:
While it is well known that much of Dr. John Brickell's text from his \"Natural History of North Carolina\" was plagiarized from John Lawson's \"A New Voyage to Carolina,\" as well as the writings of the Reverend John Clayton of Tidewater, Thomas Hariot's \"A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia,\" has been identified as a third source. Passages from Brickell's text and Hariot's source material are transcribed side-by-side to demonstrate Brickell's plagiarism.
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Record #:
21254
Abstract:
Contrary to ideas that no serious zoological studies were conducted in North Carolina until after the Civil War, there is considerable evidence that Reverend Moses Ashley Curtis was the first modern scholar of animal life in the State. Although known mostly for his studies in botany, Curtis' earliest ornithological investigations began almost 30 years before the Civil War and almost 50 years before the well-known studies by John S. Carins and the Brimleys. Appendices include lists of North Carolina Birds.