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10 results for Sendor, Benjamin B
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Record #:
474
Author(s):
Abstract:
Changes in evidentiary rules pertaining to child victims affect prosecution, children's needs, and defendants' rights.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Spring 1987, p1-16, f
Record #:
18427
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's public school system began with a seed sown in the Constitution of 1776, which directed the General Assembly to establish public schools. The system evolved during the next 200 years into today's intricate division of responsibilities and control among state, county governments, and local school administrative units.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 50 Issue 3, Winter 1985, p21-29
Record #:
20389
Author(s):
Abstract:
The NC Supreme Court has held in State v. Peoples (1984) that hypnotically refreshed testimony, testimony about the hypnotic session, and a videotape recording of the hypnotic session are inadmissible in a criminal trial. Thus the Court overturned its earlier decision in State v. McQueen (1978). This memorandum will discuss Peoples and its effect on trial testimony and law enforcement practices.
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Record #:
20392
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three recent decisions of the NC Supreme Court and the NC Court of Appeals interpret hearsay exceptions under the NC Code of Evidence in ways that have special significance in child abuse cases. This Memorandum summarizes these three cases, including the procedural steps they require for the admission of hearsay testimony in particular circumstances.
Source:
Record #:
29940
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three recent decisions of the North Carolina Supreme Court and the State Court of Appeals interpret hearsay exceptions under North Carolina’s Code of Evidence in ways that have special significance for child abuse cases. This memorandum summarizes three cases and the procedural steps required for admitting hearsay testimony.
Source:
Record #:
29938
Author(s):
Abstract:
The residual hearsay exceptions in both the North Carolina and the federal rules of evidence can be highly useful to trial lawyers. This article discusses the common law background and legislative history of these exceptions, the criteria for admissibility of statements under the exceptions, and patterns developing in case law.
Source:
Record #:
29953
Author(s):
Abstract:
A United States Supreme Court decision held that the death penalty is an unconstitutionally disproportionate punishment for felony murder when the State does not prove that the defendant himself killed or was associated with killing a victim. This memorandum analyzes the Court’s decision and suggests ways to implement it under North Carolina’s death penalty procedures.
Source:
Record #:
20393
Abstract:
This memorandum will summarize acts of the 1985 NC General Assembly affecting criminal law and procedure. Each new law discussed is referred to by the 1985 Session Laws chapter of the ratified act and by the number of the original bill that became law--for example Ch. 841 (S 438). The effective date of each new law is also given.
Source:
Record #:
20395
Abstract:
This memorandum will summarize acts of the 1987 NC General Assembly affecting criminal law and procedure. Each new law discussed is referred to by the 1987 Session Laws chapter of the ratified act and by the number of the original bill that became law--for example Ch. 693 (H541). The effective date of each new law is also given.
Source:
Record #:
20391
Abstract:
This memorandum will summarize acts of the 1985 NC General Assembly affecting criminal law and procedure. Each new law discussed is referred to by the 1985 Session Laws chapter of the ratified act and by the number of the original bill that became law--for example Ch. 764 (H 533).
Source: