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46 results for Schwartz, Frank J
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Record #:
3929
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From 1982 to 1996, the Poor Boy Shark Tournament was held at Shallotte Point. These tournaments were popular because sharks were plentiful, good sport, and good to eat. However, two things ended the tournament in 1996. First, because sharks were being overfished, there were plans to limit size and catch; and secondly, other fishing tournaments began to offer larger money prizes.
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Record #:
5825
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Basking sharks are the second largest sharks in the world, reaching lengths of 9 meters to 13 meters. Over 363 of these creatures have been observed in North Carolina waters between 1901 and 2002.
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Record #:
7554
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Four species of frogfishes occur in North Carolina waters: the ocellated frogfish, singlespot frogfish, striated frogfish, and the sargassumfish. Other than their general ranges, little is known about them. Schwartz discusses the distribution and size of these creatures found in North Carolina and why their occurrences, except the sargassumfish, have been scarce since the 1980s.
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Record #:
8429
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Butterfly fishes are marine fishes that are usually found in tropical seas and in coral reefs. Few North Carolinians know that this fish species is part of the western Atlantic North Carolina fish fauna. Yet, five of the seven western Atlantic butterfly fishes are found in North Carolina waters. Schwartz reports the names, lengths, and distributions of the butterfly fishes in the University of North Carolina fish collection.
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Record #:
8436
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Five of seven species of belonid, ten of fourteen species of exocoetids, one scomberesocid, and five of nine species of hemiramphids fishes are known to occur in the western North Atlantic, in or off North Carolina waters. This information is drawn from specimens deposited in the North Carolina State Museum in Raleigh that give the size, distribution, abundance, and length-weight observation for each specimen. Most species frequent marine or brackish waters.
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Record #:
8728
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Snapper fishes occur worldwide in tropical and temperate shallow to 550 m deep waters. In North Carolina waters sixteen snapper species have been recorded. Schwartz reports on their distributions, abundances, standard and total lengths and discusses a few length-weight relationships. Gray snappers are the most common and abundant snapper in North Carolina.
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Record #:
15557
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Schwartz reports on eight species of stingrays collected by trawl and longline between 1972-2010 at two Onslow Bay sites. Three species were collected more often during a cooler water period and five others during a warmer water period. He summarizes the recent status of the stingrays noting sizes, seasonality of occurrence, sex ratios, and batch changes during the sampling period.
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Record #:
15558
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The damselfish, a small colorful fish, frequents tropical coral reefs around the world. However, one was observed south of Morehead City on July 19, 2010. How it got there is unknown, but it could have been carried northward by the Gulf Stream.
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Record #:
16648
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Richard's skate was first described off New Zealand in 1961. Among the features of this deep-water skate are a diamond-shaped body and brown to gray coloration dorsally and ventrally. Few have been collected worldwide since 1961; however, recent searches of the literature have revealed two specimens that had been collected off the North Carolina coast in 1974.
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Record #:
19685
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Between 1965 and 2011, a total of 113 bull sharks have been recorded in North Carolina waters, including Pamlico Sound and the Cape Fear River. The article includes methods of recording, observations, and discussion. There have been forty-one shark attacks in the state's waters between 1870 and 2011. Bull sharks were involved in nine of these between 1990 and 2011, and all victims survived, except one who was killed near Avon on the Outer Banks.
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Record #:
19714
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Between the years 1983--2011, the Institute of Marine Science in Morehead City collected rainfall locally. Among the questions the authors sought to answer were how this rainfall period collection compared with previous ones and how were shark, finfish, and shrimp catches affected by rainfall and hurricane runoff and flooding.
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Record #:
19053
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Florida manatees, first sighted in North Carolina in 1919, are known to have frequented 59 sites along the North Carolina coast through 1994. Increased sightings in the later years of this period may be a function of increased population, or increased public awareness.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 22, June 1995, p53-60, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
19060
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Schwartz reports of the nipping behavior of certain fish species on clam siphon tips in the Cape Fear River estuary.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 24, Apr 1997, p33-45, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
28425
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Atlantic midshipman fish were collected off North Carolina between 1911 to 2012, and four were found in Pamlico Sound. Once abundant their numbers have declined after 1990 when ocean water temperatures changed from cool to warm. Today they are rarely caught or seen in North Carolina.