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7 results for Ripley, Richard M
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Record #:
21197
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ripley recounts the organization, training, battles, and demobilization of the 30th Infantry Division in World War I. Components of the Division were drawn from National Guard units, and half of the Division came from North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Some units, including the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd NC Infantry Regiments, had just returned home from Federal service on the Mexican Border during 1916-1917. When it came time to choose a nickname for the Division, the Southern soldiers suggested President Andrew Jackson's, and the Division officially was known as the \"Old Hickory Division.\"
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 1, May 1997, p8-12, il, map
Record #:
21195
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rufus Geddie Herring of Roseboro in Sampson County is North Carolina's only Navy Medal of Honor recipient in World War II. He received the medal for action during the pre-invasion of Iwo Jima. Ripley's article describes the action and also includes Herring's Medal of Honor Citation, which was signed by President Truman.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Apr 1996, p1-3, por
Record #:
21213
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brockman was born in Greensboro in December, 1895, and at age 101, he is one of the few living North Carolinians who served in the war. He joined an ambulance company being organized by the Greensboro Chapter of the American Red Cross, and it was sworn into the Army in June 1917. The company, now called Ambulance Company No. 321, joined the 81st \"Wildcat\" Division, which included many North Carolinians. Brockman arrived in France on August 24, 1918, and the last battle the company took part in was the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. After the war, he settled in Greensboro where he worked with an office supply store.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 1, May 1997, p14, por
Record #:
21215
Author(s):
Abstract:
British forces made two attempts to control North and South Carolina during the first two years of the American Revolution. Both failed. From 1775 to 1778, the northern colonies bore the brunt of most of the major fighting. With fighting in the north stalemated late in 1778, British commanders again looked southward. Ripley recounts the fighting in the South up to 1781, much of which was a bitter, violent civil war between Tories and American militia, with little participation by British soldiers.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997, p1-5, por, map
Record #:
21338
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ripley recounts the reasons for and the results of the violent and rebellious attempt by Native Americans living in Eastern North Carolina in 1711 to regain their independence. The war began with a general massacre of white settlers in Bath County on September 21, 1711, and ended with the four day battle at Fort Neoheroka, March 20-23, 1713. Over 600 whites and Indians were killed there. This period is known as the Tuscarora War.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Fall 2001, p14-20, il, map
Record #:
21196
Abstract:
Sergeant William McBryar was born in Elizabethtown in Bladen County in 1861, and at age 25, enlisted in the 10th U.S. Cavalry. He was a sergeant in Company K. For actions against the Apache Indians on March 7, 1890 at Salt River, Arizona, he was nominated for and received the Medal of Honor. He was later promoted to lieutenant and was in the Spanish-American War and Philippine-American War. After he retired, he was a watchman at Arlington Cemetery, a prison guard, and a school teacher at Newton Grove and other places. McBryar died in 1941 and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 2 Issue 2, Oct 1996, p1-2, por
Record #:
29136
Abstract:
World War II’s the Battle of the Bulge, also known as the Ardennes Campaign, is detailed in three sections. The first section covers the stalemate between German and Allied troops in the autumn and early winter of 1944. The second section covers the background, strategy of the German troops, and the loss of life in Battle of the Bulge from December 16-26, 1944. The final section specifically looks at the 30th Infantry Division’s participation in the battle.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 6 Issue 1, May 2000, p1-3