NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


34 results for Powell, William S
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
11579
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reginald A. Fessenden, a Canadian-born revolutionary in the field of radio, developed a system that made wireless communications possible. Conducting experiments in the Albemarle Sound region from locations in Manteo and Hatteras, Fessenden spent a significant portion of his life in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 2, June 1964, p15-17, por
Full Text:
Record #:
12587
Author(s):
Abstract:
Documented by French explorers as early as 1564, as well as by Thomas Harriot, and John Lawson, Yaupon, a shrub of the Holly family that naturally grows between Virginia and Florida, was used, in the past, by Native Americans and eventually, Europeans, for a variety of purposes. Producing small red berries that can either be medicinal or decorative, Yaupon, has therapeutic qualities which reportedly, restores lost appetites, strengthens the stomach, offers agility and courage to those preparing for battle, and also serves as an emetic. In addition, Yaupon contains a high caffeine content and was used and traded as tea or a tea additive during the Colonial Period.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 1, June 1962, p11, 56, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12635
Author(s):
Abstract:
The eternal mystery of Sir Walter Raleigh's Lost Colonists is still North Carolina's No. 1 Story. First published in \"American Heritage,\" Powell's article tells the story of North Carolina from Sir Walter Raleigh's 1584 land patent, to the settling on Roanoke Island, and finally the return of Lane and Grenville to the colony only to find it abandoned.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p9-10, por
Full Text:
Record #:
12673
Author(s):
Abstract:
On the September day of 1862 when Zebulon Vance first took the office of governor, North Carolinians would have been hard pressed to admit that they already had a governor. In fact, there were three governors that day, including Henry T. Clark who held the office until Vance took over. North Carolina's \"surplus\" governor, Edward Stanly, was appointed by President Lincoln to be military governor of that part of North Carolina in Federal control.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 6, Aug 1961, p13, por
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12695
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first shocks of an earthquake shook Bald Mountain in North Carolina on February 10, 1874. For weeks following, area residents were convinced that Bald Mountain was in fact a volcano, spurring a plethora of newspaper accounts, and eventually bringing forth an engineer from South Carolina to investigate. Relieving the fears of local residents, the engineer stated positively the event was an earthquake, and the \"Old Baldy,\" would do little more than rumble and was not a volcano.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p15-18, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12738
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tales of Welsh-Speaking Indians recur in manuscript records and early accounts of the settlement of this country. The Welsh record of an expedition fitted out in 1162 by Prince Madoc is well known, and many accept he discovered America. The first report from America on the discovery of Welsh-Speaking Indians came from Rev. Morgan Jones who encountered them along the Pamlico River in eastern North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 14, Dec 1961, p16, il
Full Text:
Record #:
13144
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many superstitions and folk tales of North Carolina are centered around the Devil himself. Natural formations, Cherokee folklore, and personal accounts reflect the presence of Lucifer in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 17, Jan 1956, p9-10, 26, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
13172
Author(s):
Abstract:
Slightly larger than a blue jay and containing a bigger wingspan, the paroquet of North Carolina vanished in 1909. First reported along the coast in 1586, by Thomas Hariott, the paroquet is a member of the parrot family. Living in large groups partial to orchards, paroquets fell to extinction as a result of destructive habits associated with human beings.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 7, Aug 1954, p15-16, il
Full Text:
Record #:
13279
Author(s):
Abstract:
Powell details the history of England's first American colony as Sir Walter Raleigh and an expedition commanded by Captains Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe sailed to North America and found trial and tragedy on the coast of North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 7, July 1953, p35-36, f
Full Text:
Record #:
13371
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Carteret went to sea early and was appointed bailiff of the Island of Jersey and later Lieutenant-Governor. From Jersey he conducted a vigorous war against ships supplying the forces of Parliament and was declared a pirate. He later married Lady Grace Granville, of the family of Sir Richard Granville, who many times visited Roanoke Island and the coast of the Carolinas. Sir George inherited his grandfather's share in Carolina and left it to his son John, who as allotted a large body of land which has come to be known as Granville's Grant. North Carolina's Carteret County, formed in 1722, was named in honor of Sir John.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 13, Aug 1953, p6, por
Full Text:
Record #:
13378
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lord William Berkeley was commissioned governor of Virginia in 1641. Berkeley encouraged exploration of the surrounding country while holding off Indian rebellions and a Dutch invasion. However, during the early years of his administration he relentlessly persecuted the Quakers and Puritans. Nathaniel Bacon led a rebellion against the government which forced Berkeley to flee to the Eastern shore of the colony. After Bacon's death, he set out on a course of execution and confiscation so violent as to cause his recall by the English government.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 15, Sept 1953, p4-5, por
Full Text:
Record #:
13388
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Colleton was born in England in 1608, served faithfully during the Civil War for the royal cause, and was commissioned by Sir John Berkeley to raise a regiment. In late 1650 Colleton went to the Island of Barbados where he was described as a merchant, promoter, and financier. He was knighted in 1661 and obtained a grant from the King for land lying south of Virginia. A grant of land then known as Colleton Island is now known as Collington in Kitty Hawk Bay.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 17, Sept 1953, p13, f
Full Text:
Record #:
13442
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first shocks of an earthquake shook Bald Mountain in North Carolina on February 10, 1874. For weeks following, area residents were convinced that Bald Mountain was in fact a volcano, spurring a plethora of newspaper accounts, and eventually bringing forth an engineer from South Carolina to investigate. Relieving the fears of local residents, the engineer stated positively the event was an earthquake, and the \"Old Baldy,\" would do little more than rumble and was not a volcano.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p15-18, il
Full Text:
Record #:
13841
Author(s):
Abstract:
Originally published in American Heritage, this is about regional food likes and dislikes in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 39, Feb 1953, p3-4, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
13868
Author(s):
Abstract:
On 24 March 1663, Charles II granted land in the New World to eight men who had supported his efforts to regain the throne of England. The first in a series of biographical sketches describing the Lords Proprietors, Powell discusses Edward Hyde, the Earl of Clarendon and his career in England prior to coming to the New World, as well as his namesakes in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 46, Apr 1953, p1-2, por
Full Text: