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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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Record #:
9048
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1784, a statue of George Washington was commissioned to be carved in the finest marble. Thomas Jefferson chose French sculptor Jean Antoine Houdon to complete the statue. It was dated 1788 but not received in Richmond, Virginia, until 1796. Hubard cast six bronze copies of the statue and the Gorham Company of New York has cast nineteen since 1909.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p11-12, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
9047
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1853, William James Hubard received authorization to make bronze copies of the Houdon statue of George Washington which has been in the Virginia capitol since 1796. Hubard offered the second copy of the statue to North Carolina, but because of conflicts within the General Assembly, it was not dedicated until July 1857. The statue stands on Capitol Square in Raleigh.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p8-10, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21402
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the best known but least demonstrative white North Carolinian with abolitionist sentimentalities was Hinton Rowan Helper. The anti-slavery movement in North Carolina has often been generalized by well-known but still racist, anti-slavery proponents who felt that all blacks were inferior to whites. The anti-slavery movement in North Carolina began with the gradual emancipationists during the 1780s-1820s which was then supplanted by the American Colonization Society and North Carolina Manumission Society during the 1820s and 1830s. No single group was dominant in the state after that period.
Subject(s):