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4 results for Harper, Dave C
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Record #:
8753
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Abstract:
Originating in Great Britain in 1823, rugby first appeared in North Carolina in 1965 at N.C. State University. Today, all ACC schools have rugby teams. Although similar to football, rugby players wear no padding and no helmets. Often considered barbaric, the white collar of the uniform jersey is a reminder that this is the sport of gentlemen and ladies, and both teams cheer each other off the field at the end of games. Additionally, the home team hosts an after-game party for the visitors.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 5, Oct 1980, p14-15, 38, il
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Record #:
9055
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Abstract:
The original boundary line between North and South Carolina was established in 1735. Because of confusion between the states about the exact location of the line, it was re-drawn in 1928 by George Syme of North Carolina and Monroe Johnson of South Carolina. Using evidence found near the boundary, the two were able to recover the original line. Eight-inch granite posts serve as markers along the boundary, set at two mile intervals.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p10-13, il, por
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Record #:
9232
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Abstract:
A land survey ending in 1737 established a boundary between North and South Carolina. In 1750, both states colonized towns in the same region, but it was not until 1762 that the British Board of Trade asked for the boundary to be resurveyed. Finally, in 1813, the boundary line dispute was concluded to the satisfaction of both states.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 5, Oct 1979, p10-12, il, map
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Record #:
9581
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Abstract:
The boundary between North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia was disputed in the early 1800s. While South Carolina and Georgia settled their boundary along the Tugaloo River in 1802, North Carolina and Georgia did not settle their boundary until 1807. Both sides claimed rights to an area called Walton County, and for five years the area became a lawless no-man's land where no state had the power to enforce laws. Both states sent representatives to a meeting in 1807, where the current boundaries were established. North Carolina successfully claimed the Walton County region.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 11, Apr 1984, p10-12, il, map
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