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4 results for Fountain, Alvin M
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Record #:
8476
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before the automobile, wagons were the prime mode of local transportation. Wagons built in eastern North Carolina differed from those built in western North Carolina in the width of their track. Owing to the rough terrain, western buggies had a width of only fifty-four inches; those in the east had a width of sixty inches. Buggies that went on roads outside of their region experienced rough rides. This was rarely a problem, however, as few North Carolinians took their buggies far away from home. The automobile changed things. The first mass-produced cars, such as the Ford Model-T, came with a sixty-inch tread option, but by 1916, all cars were manufactured with a fifty-four-inch tread. This caused a lot of damage to roads in eastern North Carolina until the paving campaigns of the 1920s and 1940s.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 2, July 1983, p14, il
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Record #:
9134
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Allen and his family left the Hawfields community in 1852, and moved to Arkansas. By the time they arrived, letters from home were waiting for them. The letters between Allen and his family at home in Alamance County give a detailed description of what occurred in Hawfields in the decade leading up to the Civil War. Fountain records some of the events here, including slave ownership, the copper boom, and deadly diseases.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p17-18, por
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Record #:
9221
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1920s, the State sponsored a tick-eradication program. The program required farmers to run their cattle through a narrow concrete vat, completely submerging the animals in a tick-killing solution. During this time of controversial laws regarding animals, Duplin County considered building a wall around the entire county so that it would not have to pen all of its animals.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 1, June 1979, p16, 30, il
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Record #:
24548
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author provides the history of one family’s migration from their home in Hawfields, Alamance County, to Arkansas in 1852. John Mebane Allen kept detailed notes on his family’s migration, providing historians with a window into the past in the mid-1800s.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 12, May 1976, p22-23, por, map
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