NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


20 results for Edgerton, C.R
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
132
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once classified as endangered, the brown pelican is staging a comeback.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan 1992, p10-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
225
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina ecologists view wetlands as the sustainers of the well-being of coastal waters, while the timber industry, companies such as Weyerhaueser, Union Camp, and Champion International, view wetlands as places for the harvesting and growing of timber.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1992, p10-14, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
226
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists have identified an algae that might be responsible for the recent large fish kills in Eastern North Carolina.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
1401
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fort Macon, built between 1826 and 1834 in Carteret County, is a popular tourist spot and a witness to decades of North Carolina history, including the April 25, 1862, Civil War battle.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1993, p13-18, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6193
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between August 30, 1954, and September 19, 1955, six hurricanes - Carol, Edna, Hazel, Connie, Diane, and Ione - struck on or near North Carolina. In their wake was death and destruction. Edgerton summarizes each storm, listing path, power, and destruction.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
19368
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds of North Carolina are dynamic mergers of water, wind, and currents that prompt the growth of many fish species. Edgerton discusses how fish migration into these sounds from birth in the Gulf of Mexico.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Feb 1990, p2-3, map, f Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
19378
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fishermen call it trash fish; fisheries resource managers call it bycatch. Either way, the loss of unintended fish catches (or bycatch) has been a serious fisheries problem in North Carolina. Thus, North Carolina Sea Grant researcher as developing new trawling methods to reduce the number of juvenile fish caught in shrimp nets.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 17 Issue 7, Aug 1990, p3-6, il, f Periodical Website
Record #:
19370
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once upon a time, the shallow waters of Currituck Sound were clear, drinkable, and harbored abundant fish. Thanks to the native submerged seagrasses, ecology in the Sound flourished. Through the years, the quality of Currituck Sound has hinged on the survival of the Sound's seagrass beds, and its ups and downs.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 17 Issue 3, Mar 1990, p4-6, il, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
19375
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lake Mattamuskeet shines like a silver bowl in the North Carolina swamp land, and has long been the fall and winter home of millions of migratory birds. Now biologists and refuge officials are attempting to maintain the quality and abundance of migratory birds from the threat of hunting and human encroachment.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 17 Issue 6, June/July 1990, p2-3, map, f Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
19377
Author(s):
Abstract:
Discovered in 1755, the 16,600 acres of crystal clear waters in Lake Phelps forms one of the best-kept secrets of the North Carolina state park system. Edgerton discusses the origin of Lake Phelps and the treasures it cultural and ecological treasures it contains.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
19376
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lake Mattamuskeet, at 40,000 acres, is the largest natural lake in North Carolina. The lake is both economically and ecologically valuable, but activities like draining and canaling have altered the lake over time.
Source:
Record #:
19386
Author(s):
Abstract:
The beaches of New Hanover County may be close in proximity but are as different as they can be in character. Wrightsville Beach has garnered a reputation for the wealthy and affluent, while Carolina Beach's history has not been as affluent. However, both communities offer unique opportunities and experiences.
Source:
Record #:
19387
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nestled between the bustling beaches of New Hanover County, Masonboro Island is a dream-come-true for naturalists. And recent designation as part of the North Carolina estuarine reserve system guarantees an ecologically bright future.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
19388
Author(s):
Abstract:
The striped bass is a species in danger due to overfishing and poor water quality. But in Aurora, North Carolina a hardy hybrid is striped bass is doing well.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
19382
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duck decoys are a unique part of the cultural heritage of eastern North Carolina, and people like Jarvis Snow are trying to keep that heritage alive.
Source: