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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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17 results for Drennan, James C.
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Record #:
876
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Abstract:
Mike Smith, former faculty member of the Institute of Government at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has succeeded John Sanders as the new director of the institute.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 58 Issue 1, Summer 1992, p9-10, por
Record #:
5347
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drennan discusses a recent decision of the North Carolina Supreme Court in the case of WOOD v. GUILFORD COUNTY which \"addresses a county's liability when a person is injured at a courthouse by the criminal act of another person.\" The case resulted from an attack on an employee of the clerk of the superior court in the courthouse restroom.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 67 Issue 4, Summer 2002, p2, il
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Record #:
18357
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Most adult North Carolinians have driver's licenses. A few, however, have lost their license for a number of reasons. This article examines mechanisms developed by the legislature to ease the difficulty for those who have lost their licenses.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 45 Issue 3, Winter 1980, p14-18
Record #:
20156
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Abstract:
This bulletin discusses the law applicable to conflicts that pit an individual's desire to exercise his or her personal religious beliefs against the state's need to establish governmental rules and norms that have the effect of prohibiting such practices and forcing the individual to choose between obtaining a governmental benefit or exercising one's religious beliefs. The bulletin begins with a brief review of the legal principles governing these issues and concludes with an analytical framework for use in confronting these issues.
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Record #:
20244
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This bulletin discusses two separate provisions to regulate the behavior of convicted impaired drivers, enacted by the 1999 North Carolina General Assembly. It includes a list of drivers covered by each provision, the length of time the provision is applicable, the methods by which each provision is enforced, and the consequences of a violation of each provision.
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Record #:
20388
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Abstract:
Both North Carolina and Florida have laws dealing with frivolous lawsuits. Several different statues dealing with this general issue were examined by the NC Courts Commission, which then decided to follow Florida's statue as a model. This memorandum briefly analyzes the differences between the North Carolina and Florida statutes and then will summarize Florida's experience with its statute.
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Record #:
20394
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An infraction is a noncriminal violation of law not punishable by imprisonment. Unless otherwise provided by law, the person committing the infraction faces a penalty of not more than $100. This memorandum will discuss the effects of the infractions law on the procedures used by criminal justice officials, provide a list of infractions, and discuss a significant new driver's license revocation made applicable to all motor vehicle offenses by the infractions legislation.
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Record #:
20400
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This memorandum describes the provisions of 1989 legislation establishing a separate driver's license system for drivers of commercial vehicles, as well as a new criminal offense for operating a commercial vehicle while impaired.
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Record #:
29950
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North Carolina authorizes the use of either blood or breath tests to determine a driver’s blood alcohol content depending on which test the arresting officer designates. This paper discusses cases and statutes pertaining to chemical testing and its use as evidence.
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Administration of Justice Memorandum (NoCar KFN 7908 .A15 U6), Vol. Issue 2, Nov 1982, p1-34, f
Record #:
29958
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1979, the General Assembly enacted a bill containing major amendments to the driver’s license laws. Because of the substantial changes, the amendments were not made effective until 1981. This memorandum discusses the important changes in the law and its effect on the enforcement of the driver’s license law.
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Administration of Justice Memorandum (NoCar KFN 7908 .A15 U6), Vol. Issue 2, Jan 1981, p1-10, f
Record #:
29989
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Abstract:
In Delaware v. Prouse, the United States Supreme Court held that a police officer may not stop a vehicle to check the motorist’s driver’s license, vehicle registration, or equipment, unless the situation follows certain conditions. This memorandum summarizes the facts and reasoning of the case and discusses the implications for North Carolina law.
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Record #:
29988
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The 1977 Session Laws, which rewrites the section prescribing penalties for driving under the influence of drugs or intoxicating liquor, becomes effective March 1, 1979. The new statute is provided in this memorandum.
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Record #:
30002
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Abstract:
The 1979 Session passed a bill that requires a person convicted of driving under the influence to complete an alcohol or drug education traffic school. This memorandum summarizes the legislation and discusses some of the changes that could cause problems as judges and others begin to apply the statutes.
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Record #:
42574
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Abstract:
An examination of how North Carolina’s District Court has evolved since 1966 entailed comparisons that could be measured by society’s changing perception to issues such as gender equality, substance abuse, at risk children, and domestic violence. Introducing these issues bridged the author’s discussion of how they are handled within the context of civil and criminal jurisdictions and in the face of present social issues such as cultural diversity. From this discussion, Drennan concluded the evolving role of judges and technology in particular will play an important part in how North Carolina’s District Court adjusts to inevitable change.
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Record #:
18166
Abstract:
Turnbull and Drennan examines the geographic distribution of political parties in North Carolina given 1972 general elections statistics.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 39 Issue Supplement, 1973, p16-21, f