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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Cain, Robert J
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Record #:
2756
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Abstract:
The British Records Program of the North Carolina Colonial Records Project seeks to collect copies of state-related documents in English repositories and to make them available for public use at the State Archives in Raleigh.
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Record #:
8559
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Abstract:
The Tercentenary Celebration of North Carolina took place in 1963, and the Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission was established to make plans for the celebration. The commission set up the North Carolina Colonial Records Project as an agency of the Division of Archives and History. This project, led by editor Mrs. Mattie Erma Edwards Parker of Raleigh, published its first volume, NORTH CAROLINA CHARTERS AND CONSTITUTIONS, in the tercentenary year. Afterwards, a search for documents pertinent to the colonial period of North Carolina began. In 1975, the Colonial Records Project was awarded the Award of Merit by the American Association for State and Local History.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 3, Aug 1982, p7-10, il
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Record #:
21530
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Abstract:
This article looks at the career and businesses of James Sprunt, a prominent Wilmington civic leader and merchant who, between the mid-1870s and 1900, transformed his firm, Sprunt and Son, from a small trader in naval stores to the nation's largest exporter of cotton to Europe. Sprunt was appointed as North Carolina's representative to the British vice-consulate between 1884 and 1915, and then occupied an equivalent post with the German vice-consulate from 1908 to 1911. Sprunt's business ties to Germany were distasteful to the English, and Sprunt eventually was forced to resign his vice-consular post.
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Record #:
22710
Author(s):
Abstract:
Housed in the English National Archives is a letter from Robert Holden, former resident of Virginia and the Albemarle, to Sir George Carteret, chairman of the proprietary board. The letter--from 1679--describes, for the first time, the Albemarle region in detail, including climate, native populations, fauna, and political government.
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