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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for Brown-Graham, Anita R
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Record #:
4506
Abstract:
The purpose of the federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 was to prevent racial discrimination in housing. Still, Hispanics encounter discrimination when seeking living quarters, especially in the private rental markets. Brown-Graham discusses the extent of housing discrimination, what recourse an individual has under current law, and options a local government has to see these laws are followed.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p45-51, il, f
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Record #:
6724
Abstract:
Brown-Graham discusses the history and law relating to public funding for faith-based organizations and suggests measures local governments can take to (1) set and enforce standards for public services delivered by sectarian groups and to (2) ensure that public funds are not being used for religious proselytizatio or to (3) subsidize employment discrimination based on religious affiliation.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 105, Apr 2004, p1-8, f
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Record #:
7072
Abstract:
Community strategic visioning is a planning tool that asks residents to look at their community as it exists in the present and project what they want it to be at a future date, even though the resources to accomplish the change are not currently available. The authors discuss the five-step New Oregon Model comprehensive visioning process and examine strategic visioning as developed on the Outer Banks and in Burke County.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 69 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 2004, p14-22, il, f
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Record #:
8032
Abstract:
Twenty-seven years ago Asheville's downtown area was a place where 75 percent of the buildings stood vacant, few people lived, and even fewer went. In 2006, downtown Asheville is an area where people want to live, visit, and spend time and money. The authors describe this remarkable transformation; offer local governments insight into the multifaceted nature of downtown development efforts; describe a model of public leadership within the context of a public-private partnership; and set a general framework for considering the requirements for leading a change initiative.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 71 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 2006, p4-15, il, f
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Record #:
19885
Abstract:
This bulletin summarizes legislation affecting community and economic development enacted by the 2006 session of the North Carolina General Assembly. Legislation includes biotechnology, eminent domain for economic development, and state tax reduction for manufacturers.
Record #:
19884
Abstract:
This bulletin summarizes legislation affecting community and economic development enacted by the 2005 session of the North Carolina General Assembly. Legislation includes tax and grant incentives, the Mill Reuse Act, workforce development, and affordable housing.
Record #:
20556
Abstract:
The NC General Assembly requires state and local government to cooperatively fund and manage service and regulatory programs in public health, social services, mental health, and other areas. One of the disadvantages of this system is dispute over which entity bears legal responsibility when a citizen is injured by a negligent act of a local government employee administering or providing services in such a program. This bulletin discusses two recent cases from the NC Court of Appeals that illustrate the difficulty involved in determining whether the state of a local government is responsible for injuries to a plaintiff.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 68, May 1995, p1-7, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
20555
Abstract:
Some North Carolina state and local public servants enjoy immunity from personal liability for torts committed in the course of fulfilling their public duties. Therefore, public policy is better served by protecting certain defendants from liability. This bulletin examines the traditional rules of liability for public servants, traces the evolution of the new rule of individual governmental/sovereign immunity, and proposes a legal framework for approaching public servant immunities.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 67, Apr 1995, p1-8, f
Record #:
20735
Abstract:
Supervisors are becoming increasingly concerned about their potential personal financial responsibility for the wrongdoings of subordinates. The type of lawsuit most cited as the source of concern for most supervisors of public employees is the one based on the Civil Rights Act of 1871. While this concern is not without foundation, much of it is based on misinformation. The following bulletin aims to give public managers a basic understanding of how this law may be used to hold them personally liable for the acts of someone they are responsible for supervising.
Source:
Public Personnel Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7835 .A519), Vol. Issue 7, May 1996, p1-8, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
28738
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly requires state and local government to cooperatively fund and manage service and regulatory programs in public health, social services, mental health, and other areas. There is dispute over which entity is held liable when a citizen is injured by the negligent act of a local government employee administering such a program.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 68, May 1995, p1-7, f
Record #:
28737
Abstract:
Some North Carolina state and local public officials enjoy immunity from personal liability for tors committed in the course of fulfilling their public duties. The reasons for protecting public officials are often at tension with the public policy underlying other rules.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 67, Apr 1995, p1-8, f
Record #:
28743
Abstract:
In Meyer v. Wall, the North Carolina Supreme Court clarified several rules of public liability relevant to citizen injuries caused by negligent acts of local governments administering programs cooperatively funded and managed by the state. This bulletin discusses those rules and the legal responsibility of local and state governments.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 88, July 1998, p1-5, f