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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Beaman, Thomas E., Jr
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Record #:
3775
Abstract:
Excavations at a small construction site near the Harvey Mansion in New Bern reveal items used in the 1700s and early 1800s, including pearl ware porcelain, moca ware, and black glass. The artifacts also reveal dietary practices.
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Record #:
18593
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From 1952 to 1958, Morley Jeffers Williams conducted extensive archaeological investigations at Tryon Palace in New Bern. These excavations provided information that guided the interior and exterior restoration and reconstruction of the buildings and other architectural features.
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Record #:
20363
Abstract:
When archaeological investigations began at Brunswick Town in the 1950s, numerous fragments of decorative tin-enameled tile were recovered from three structures. The decorative motifs represent nine distinct styles and help archaeologists discern the history of delftware ceramics in the Americas.
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Record #:
20372
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It has been argued that historical archaeology began in North Carolina with the work of Talcott Williams in the 19th century in search of the Roanoke settlements or with the work of James Sprunt at Russellborough near Brunswick Town. Beaman argues that historical archaeology did not flourish in the state until the mid 20th century, when Morely Jeffers Williams conducted the first archaeological investigation into the opulent pre-Revolutionary home of William Tryon in New Bern.
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Record #:
21656
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This article examines the work of landscape archaeologist Morley Jeffers Williams in preparing the research needed for the restoration of Stratford Hall, Mount Vernon, and Tryon Palace, in the 1930s and 1950s.
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Record #:
35203
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Beaman’s intent was the determine whether the normative frequency ranges of the Carolina artifact patterns were sufficient to accommodate the upper class lifestyle of Tryon Palace, the home of Loyalist governors such as Josiah Martin and William Tryon. Factors used to determine this possibility were an examination of the Palace’s artifact groups and individual artifacts. Beaman’s conclusion was that many of these artifact groups deviated from the expected normative ranges. Furniture, Personal, and Tobacco Pipe groups were beyond the range, while the Kitchen and Clothing groups were below the range. Only the Architecture, Arms, and Activities fell within the anticipated normative ranges.
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Record #:
35210
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This article’s discussion of cultural behaviors of smoking in Southeastern NC Colonial society and culture built from articles written about fifteen excavations between the 1960s to the present. Discussion of the recent excavation work at Brunswick Town focused on new discoveries of white clay pipe fragments uncovered. This encouraged a reevaluation starting in 1997 of earlier findings, done through the use of methods such as regression formulas and pipe stem dating.
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Record #:
18605
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Milton Perry conducted the first archaeological research at Fort Macon as part of the 1952-1953 restoration project. Perry's investigations are compared with subsequent archaeological projects at Fort Macon State Park and show the relevance of archaeological contributions to the study of the Civil War.
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Record #:
4428
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In 1794, John Beam bought land in what is now Cleveland County and began farming. The family would farm the property, now on the National Register of Historic Places, for over 100 years. The authors describe the site's architectural and archaeological features, look at the placement of the farmstead on the Piedmont landscape, and describe farm changes during the 100 years of Beam family ownership.
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Record #:
4426
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In 1958, Brunswick Town was rediscovered and excavations began shortly thereafter. Research at the site between 1958 and 1968 contributed to Brunswick Town's becoming a State Historic Site. The authors summarize the decade's archaeological investigations, their significance, and their importance in the archaeological history of the state.
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