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52 results for "Williams, Robert L"
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Record #:
7863
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Lithium, the lightest of all solids, is an alkali metal found on every continent. But the most economic form of lithium, spodumene, is found in the greatest abundance in North Carolina from Lincolnton to Bessemer City. Lithium is used to make everyday items such as wash machines, refrigerators, eyeglass lenses, automobile headlights, and air conditioning systems, to name a few. It is also used in medicine as a tranquilizer. Lithium might be used as a super fuel someday, but in the 1980s the systems to harness its energy were slow to develop.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 11, Apr 1987, p16-17, il, por
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Record #:
7869
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A group of children called Junkies lived in the two-block section of Seventh Eighth streets in Statesville in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Every Friday, the Junkies assembled at the junkyard on Seventh Street and the gully on Eighth Street to gather scraps of metal from old automobiles. Even if the Junkies received only a dime for all of their hard work, they were pleased because it was enough to get them into the Crescent Movie House, which featured western films.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 8, Jan 1987, p16-17,27, il
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Record #:
7889
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Sugar Hill, a suburb of Fallston, is known for its annual Easter egg fight. Participants bring anywhere from 6 dozen hard-boiled eggs to 125 dozen, sometimes more. A fight commences when one person taps his or her egg against another person's egg. When one end of an egg is cracked, it is turned over, and another attack begins. A winner is declared when both ends of a competitor's egg are cracked. The winner keeps the loser's egg and both of them move on to the next fight.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987, p10-11,52, il
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Record #:
8089
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A major irritation in picking blackberries is dealing with trombicula, more commonly known as chiggers. If you want to pick berries in the wild, you will have to suffer through chigger bites. There are some homemade remedies however, that can help to prevent bites, including wearing tight clothing and placing a kerosene soaked cloth around your ankles.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 2, July 1984, p18-19, il, por
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Record #:
8506
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Watermelons are coveted items on a hot summer day. A great problem with watermelons is that they can grow only during the summer and early fall. There is a way, however, that ensures that you can enjoy this summer fruit year round - dehydration. During the summer you can take a ripe watermelon and dehydrate slices in an oven or in the sun. Dehydrated watermelon tastes especially sweet because the fruit's natural sugars are concentrated after the water is removed. The watermelon rind can be pickled, too, thus enabling the entire watermelon to be enjoyed year round.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p18-19, por
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Record #:
8552
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In 1844 on his way to the Democratic National Convention, James K. Polk spent the night at Magnolia Grove, the mansion of David Smith located in southern Lincoln County. The first tavern of the area, Dellinger's Tavern, stood just behind Magnolia Grove and not more than a hundred yards from the mansion was a rock building that would become the first jailhouse and first courthouse in Lincoln County. The construction of the main house at Magnolia Grove is truly remarkable for its state of preservation. Some of the bricks still bear fingerprints from the original masons. Magnolia Grove has been in the Love family since 1972 and it was Ed and Elizabeth Love who took such care to restore the house. The furniture is not from the 1820s, but the rest of the house still has original woodwork and plaster. The basement, once used to chain slaves, has metal rings in the walls. The bedroom where Polk slept is perfectly preserved.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 2, July 1982, p12-13, 33, il
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Record #:
8585
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Every year Cleveland County's smallest town, Belwood, hosts its Heritage Day celebration. Residents dress in 18th-century clothing, travel by horse to the community church where they have a town picnic and celebration. Belwood almost disappeared when the town lost its post office, businesses, and local schools. Local citizens, however, bought the old schoolhouse and teacherage from the county, preventing the demolition of the buildings. The State of North Carolina officially recognized Belwood as a town in 1978, thus ensuring that the town will not disappear.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 4, Sept 1983, p16-17, por
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Record #:
8644
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In 1754, Englishman Arthur Dobbs arrived in America to take over as governor of North Carolina in the midst of the French and Indian War. To protect the state, Dobbs had Fort Dobbs built near present-day Statesville and made Hugh Waddell commander of it. On the night of February 23, 1760, the Cherokee Indians orchestrated an attack on the fort, but the defenders fought fiercely and the Indians backed down. By 1766, Fort Dobbs lay in ruins. In 1970, the fort was recorded on the National Register of Historic Places and restoration of it began. Today, the fully restored fort sits on a thirty-three-acre plot of land complete with a visitors center and playground.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 1, June 1981, p12-14, il
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Record #:
8651
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Maymont, a huge house in Cramerton, was built by Stuart Cramer in 1917. The house has thirty-eight rooms, gigantic fireplaces, and a pool so deep that it once served as a reserve water supply for the town. A mill and industrial community grew up around the house, and Cramer, who bought many local mills, became the textile leader of the area. Senator George Tinkham of Massachusetts spent many months at Maymont, and area residents claim he predicted the war with Japan before it occurred. Although the house was bought by Burlington Industries in 1940 and began to sink into disrepair, Ray Andrews and his wife currently rent the house and are slowly restoring it.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 2, July 1981, p14-16, il
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Record #:
8674
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Hill Greene of Boone was ordered to take down his six-hundred-foot American flag after it was found to be in violation of City Ordinance V-4. The ordinance states that no over-sized business signs can be erected along the stretch of highway where Greene's Phillips 66 service station is located. One of Greene's employees, Eddie Cole, wrote to the Watauga DEMOCRAT and the story received national attention. Reporters from CBS, the White House, and even GLOBE, a tabloid out of Canada, flooded Greene's station to cover the story. On June 25th, the city announced it would not be enforcing the regulation in Greene's case, and his flag was allowed to continue flying. The ordinance will probably now be amended.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 4, Sept 1981, p12-13, il, por
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Record #:
8672
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In July 1916, after two tropical storms ripped into North Carolina's mountains within days of each other, the Catawba River in Gaston County flooded. Bridges were washed out, mills were flooded, and several buildings were taken downstream. The Southern Railway trestle collapsed on July 16th,and the nineteen men who had been standing on it died. In total, eighty people died and flood damage topped out at $22 million.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Aug 1981, p19-20, il
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Record #:
8698
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At age ten, Reverend Charles Keyes of Hickory discovered the true meaning of Christmas. Several of his friends had received nothing for Christmas, and Charles bought them candy and chewing gum. He began delivering mini-sermons at the age of four, becoming known as The Parson in later years. These days, he plays Santa Claus to the mountain people of five states, delivering tractor-trailer loads of clothes, food, and toys in the early part of December each year. The Parson also opened Camp Joy in Hickory, a summer camp where underprivileged children come for a week and are taken on a shopping spree at the week's end.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 7, Dec 1981, p16-18, 29, il
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Record #:
8738
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During 1865, Governor Zeb Vance admitted it was impossible to continue to carry out his gubernatorial duties in Raleigh. He moved to Statesville that spring, but was arrested at his home on May 12, 1865 by Federalist forces. Because Vance was not involved in the profiteering common in the state at that time, the house is humble and hardly a mansion. The house is now a museum in honor of Vance and is open to the public.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p11-12, il, por
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Record #:
8747
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George McPoole, alias Lord Salisbury, was always ostentatiously dressed, and never missed a public appearance in Statesville. Described by onlookers as a carousel, McPoole adopted his colorful attire in an effort to heal a wounded ego after losing the woman he loved. Lord Salisbury performed magic tricks and continued making appearances until his death. It was reported close to 10,000 people attended his funeral services.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 1, June 1980, p11-12, 34, il, por
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Record #:
8757
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NBC's Today Show recently visited North Carolina to do a piece on a little boy. The three-year-old son of writer Robert Williams, Robert III has become the youngest published photographer in the country. No matter the camera, the little boy is able to take stunning photographs, often better ones than professionals. The five and a half hours of film recorded about the boy will be condensed to a four or five-minute segment and will air later this year.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 5, Oct 1980, p24-26, il, por
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