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22 results for "Snelson, Franklin F"
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Record #:
8135
Abstract:
The brown water snake is harmless, but its bad temper, heavy body, and large flattened head make it appear dangerous. It is the largest of all the water snakes and has a maximum length of five feet. North Carolina's largest specimen measured fifty-seven inches in length. The brown water snake is very abundant along lakes and sluggish waterways of the Coastal Plain. It has a tendency to climb trees and bushes, often to a height of fifteen feet or more. The snake's food consists mostly of fishes.
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Record #:
8170
Abstract:
The Carolina pygmy rattlesnake is characterized by its small size, tiny rattle, and typical pit viper appearance. Its coloration is highly variable, running the gamut from gray to brick red. Most adult snakes measure around eighteen inches, but a few approaching two feet have been found in North Carolina. Its preferred habitat is in the Sandhills and southeastern part of the state.
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Record #:
8138
Abstract:
The rainbow snake is a colorful, inoffensive reptile. Its average length is 3 to 3 and one-half feet. The largest ever found in North Carolina measured 4 and one-half feet. It is an aquatic snake and is rarely found any great distance from water.
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Record #:
8198
Abstract:
The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is the largest and most impressive of all the venomous snakes in North Carolina. Adults measure between four and five feet, but some exceed six feet in length. This snake lives mostly in the Coastal Plain and is slow to retreat when its habitat is invaded. Its diet consists of rabbits and other small mammals.
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Record #:
8201
Abstract:
Because of its slender shape and the leaf green color on top of its body, the rough green snake is not easily confused with other snakes. It is probably the most arboreal of the state's native snakes, and most specimens are discovered in vines, trees, or shrubs. This snake is distributed over most of the state and in mountain regions has been found at elevations of 2,500 feet. Its preferred food is spiders and insects.
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Record #:
8315
Abstract:
The canebrake rattlesnake is one of the most impressive and colorful of all the eastern rattlesnakes. It commonly attains a length of almost five feet. In North Carolina it is found most frequently in the low grounds and pocosins of the Coastal Plain. Breeding occurs in the spring, and the young are born alive. Small mammals make up the main food of this snake.
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Record #:
8318
Abstract:
This poisonous snake is identified by shiny rings of red, yellow, and black, completely encircling its body, a black snout, and the contact of red and yellow rings. Its habitat in the state is in the southeastern Coastal Plain. It is an elusive snake, and very little is known of its breeding habits or its young. Small snakes and lizards make up the main part of its diet.
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