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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for "Riggs, Brett H"
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Record #:
35117
Abstract:
In 2002-2003, Brent Riggs, R.P. Stephen Davis, and Mark Plane, archaeologists from the University of North Carolina, discovered Catawba pottery from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in New Town, South Carolina. Highlighted aspects of their discovery included this pottery’s characteristics, assemblage, production and trade. Also noted was this research’s significance and implications for the Colonoware debate. Figures feature location sites, shards or vessels images, and burnishing stones that aided in Catawba pottery’s production.
Record #:
18625
Abstract:
In 2001, the UNC Research Laboratories of Archaeology began the Catawba Project, an extension of the 20-year Siouan Project that seeks to trace the evolution of native societies of the Carolina Piedmont through the 18th and early 19th centuries. Documentary and archaeological research have exposed a series of settlements now known to have given rise to the modern Catawba Nation.
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Record #:
35406
Abstract:
This article is a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Riggs and Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.
Record #:
35113
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article was a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Brett Riggs and Christopher Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.