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23 results for "Montgomery, Frank A., Jr"
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Record #:
12076
Abstract:
At 1:40 am, 23 December 1864, the Louisiana, loaded with 215 tons of black powder, accidently exploded, foiling Union General Benjamin \"Beast\" Butler's intentions of destroying the Confederate stronghold, Fort Fisher.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 5, July 1956, p9-10, 27, il
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Record #:
12144
Abstract:
Operated by the International Nickel Company, the Sea Horse Institute, located in Wrightsville Beach, is devising ways of countering the corrosion of metals exposed in or near seawater.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 13, Nov 1956, p8-9, 37, il
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Record #:
12717
Abstract:
During early autumn, it is the time for the Tar Heel hunters to ready themselves for annual safaris into the tidelands for clapper rails or \"marsh hens.\" The importance of wind and tide in marsh hunting can't be overestimated, as it takes good \"grass covering\" high water to flush out the prey in order to find and shoot them.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p11, 24, por
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Record #:
12727
Abstract:
During the closing days of 1931-1932, a period of time spanning less than 12 months, sea grass disappeared from the North Carolina sounds. Struck by a mysterious parasite, eelgrass disappeared in bodies of water throughout North America, Europe and the Mediterranean. Despite re-plantings of eelgrass to save ecosystems, the sea grass continued to die off until 1937 when it began growing again in the Chesapeake Bay area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 13, Nov 1961, p11-12, 22, il
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Record #:
14969
Abstract:
The oyster industry has been elevated to a position of great importance in the commercial fishery business of North Carolina. Due to the rapidly increasing consumption of oysters, which has badly depleted the supply of natural beds in North Carolina, the State Department of Conservation has been making an effort to rehabilitate existing beds and encourage new beds in the sound along the coast by the transplantation of seed oysters.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 31, Jan 1943, p3, 20, f
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Record #:
15382
Abstract:
The Brigade Boys Club began in Wilmington around 1896. Colonel Walker Taylor organized the group for boys seeking recreation. Eventually it developed into a resource for poorer Wilmington boys to enjoy companionship and learn about civic responsibility.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 10, Aug 1935, p1-2, il
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Record #:
15535
Abstract:
The natural range of the alligator extends as far north as the coastal swamps of the southeastern part of North Carolina. Montgomery relates some interesting facts about their habits.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 52, May 1935, p3, il
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Record #:
8545
Abstract:
Once great flocks of passenger pigeons, numbering in the millions, filled the skies. Over 16 inches in length with a two-foot wingspan, the bird made its home mainly in the Northern regions of the country, but it did visit North Carolina. Thomas Harriot gave the first English account of their presence in the state when he observed them on Roanoke Island during the winter of 1585-86. Moravians reported them in 1760. Early writings note the great damage caused by the flocks of birds, such as breaking trees limbs and bending others to the ground. In the late 19th-century, the passenger pigeon was the most abundant wildlife species in the world, with numbers reaching five billion. Market hunters practically wiped it out in the last two decades of the 19th-century. The last passenger pigeon in North Carolina was shot in 1894, and the last passenger pigeon in the world died in the Cincinnati Zoo on September 1, 1914.
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