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39 results for "Carraway, Gertrude"
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Record #:
14944
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two of the world's largest marine bases are located at New River and Cherry Point. It is at these bases that the Marines get their training for every type of fighting.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 13, Aug 1942, p10, 22-26, f
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Record #:
14976
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Camp Lejeune prepared many men and women for the war arena, and during World War I trained man's best friend as well. A war dog unit, made up of 24 canines, and led by Captain Jackson H. Boyd, was groomed for battle. This band of dogs landed with Marines on Bougainville Island November 1, 1943. The marines utilized the dogs' natural abilities to aid delivering of messages, medical services, and to flush out the enemy.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 44, Apr 1944, p1-2, 22
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Record #:
14983
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Abstract:
Nazi attacks on shipping along the Atlantic prompted a patriotic group of civilians to assist the overextended Navy. Volunteer pilots from Florida, New Jersey, and the Carolinas banded together to form the Civil Air Patrol. These pilots took it upon themselves to assist the Navy in spotting enemy U-boats along the east coast. Their presence was felt as the war record reflects; 24,000,000 airplane miles, 173 submarines identified and 57 were bombed, 363 stranded survivors of plane crashes or sunk vessels found, and the pilots also reported any mine warfare.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 50, May 1944, p7, 16
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Record #:
15088
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Abstract:
The Superior Stone Company of Raleigh cashed in on the limestone industry during the early 1940s. As of 1941, the company employed 200 men, 40 trucks, and large mining machines capable of processing 300 tons per hour. Limestone could be found along the Onslow and Jones County line with large quantities concentrated near Belgrade. The demand for limestone was generated by construction of the New River Barracks.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 14, Sept 1941, p10, 25, il
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Record #:
15097
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Abstract:
During the early 1940s, ambitious plans were made to transform Bath into a living history town much like Colonial Williamsburg. Bath presented the perfect locale for such a project because it is the oldest incorporated town in North Carolina. By 1941, some of the restoration had already been completed. The state's oldest church building, St. Thomas Episcopal, had just been restored and work begun on restoring the Marsh Home dated to 1744.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 20, Oct 1941, p18-19, il
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Record #:
15145
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kannapolis, already far famed as the largest unincorporated town in the world and the home of the world's largest towel factory (Cannon Mills), is becoming noted as the \"Wilmington of North Carolina,\" inasmuch as all new buildings in the business district are being designed in the colonial style.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 53, May 1941, p12-13, f
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Record #:
15154
Author(s):
Abstract:
Barrage balloons were a developmental aerial defense strategy for the coast during World War II. The contraption consisted of cigar-shaped neoprene bags inflated with helium and moored to winches controlling altitude. The object of barrage balloons was to create aerial obstacles for enemy airplanes. Balloons placed strategically had the desired effect of pushing enemy aircraft either off target or forced bombers to drop their arsenal at higher altitudes, meaning better chance of inaccuracies. Barrage balloon training began in April 1940 at Camp Davis, near Wilmington, as part of the Coast Artillery Corps.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 28, Dec 1941, p8-9, il
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Record #:
15338
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Abstract:
Sidney Blackmer was a Salisbury native before moving to Hollywood where he pursued an acting career. His path to acting was difficult and did not begin until after a year in law school at the University of North Carolina, which he could not afford tuition for more than a year. After being recruited during World War I, he returned to theater where he worked his way up from stage hand to cast member. His most acclaimed work came from his portrayal of President Theodore Roosevelt in seven different movies.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 26, Nov 1937, p1, 18, por
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Record #:
15344
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Abstract:
Eastern North Carolina farmers entered into a cooperative business plan in 1936. Farmers from five counties - Carteret, Craven, Jones, Onslow, and Pamlico - organized the Federate Cooperative Exchange, Inc. The cooperative operated out of New Bern where cannery, meat curing, and processing plants were opened.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 34, Jan 1938, p1, il
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Record #:
15337
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James Davis ran the state's first printing press in New Bern, 1749. The General Assembly hired Davis as the official state printer. He was charged with printing money, journals about the assembly's activities, and the state's first newspaper called the North Carolina Gazette in 1751.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 25, Nov 1937, p6
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Record #:
15346
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Abstract:
Slater Path was a unique town located on the banks of Bogue Sound near Morehead City. The isolated community lacked paved streets, automobiles, electricity, and any form of local government. Religion and fishing were the cornerstones that held the community together.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 37, Feb 1938, p1-2, il
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Record #:
15356
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New Bern and Craven County cooperatively purchased Fort Totten and the seven acres it occupied for the sum of $2,000. Spurred by enthusiasm from the Junior Woman's Club, organizers planned to restore the Civil War fortifications and transform the area into a public park. The area consisted of both Confederate and Union fortifications because of New Bern's capture in 1862.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 49, May 1938, p10, 24, il
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Record #:
15471
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Abstract:
One of the most popular resorts in North Carolina this summer will be the coastal state park at historic Fort Macon in Carteret County, where the battle-scarred, century-old fortress is now open to public inspection, following partial restoration by federal funds and the construction of a four-mile shore drive from the Atlantic Beach Causeway.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 49, May 1937, p3, 18, f
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Record #:
15468
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Abstract:
Hog growers in the five eastern North Carolina counties of Craven, Carteret, Pamlico, Jones, and Onslow have formed a Cooperative Livestock Market Association, with headquarters in New Bern, and in the first twelve weeks they built up a strong market and made hundreds of thousands of dollars.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 48, May 1937, p5, f
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Record #:
15466
Author(s):
Abstract:
The youngest solider on either side during the American Civil War was a native North Carolinian, the late George H. Jacobs, of South Mills, who enlisted as a drummer boy in the Confederate army at the age of nine.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 46, Apr 1937, p19
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