The East Carolinian, November 28, 2006












VOLUME 82, ISSUE 33
www.theeastcarolinian.com
YOUR SOURCE
FOR CAMPUS
NEWS SINCE 1925
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2006
Preparing for exams
can be a grueling
experience, don't' wait
to the last minute.
Start studying now
with these tips in
mindPage A4
Branding project promotes school spirit
If you aren't getting
enough sleep, you
may need to adjust
your routine. Steal
some helpful tips
for a good night's
sleepPage A4
The Pirates won in
Raleigh on Saturday
for the first time
since 1999, beating
N.C. State 21-16 and
securing a bowl bid.
Read our football
recap and find out
what bowl possibilities
awaitPage A6
The ECU men's
basketball team
completed a near-
perfect sports
weekend
Sunday afternoon
with a 68-47 win
over North Carolina
Central. Read
morePage A6
5 2 7 6 3 1 9 8 49 3 8 2 5 4 1 6 74 6 1 7 9 8 3 5 2
1 4 3 8 7 9 2 6 58 2 9 5 4 6 7 1 36 7 5 2 1 3 8 4 9
3 1 2 7 5 8 4 9 66 7 5 4 9 2 3 8 19 8 4 1 3 6 5 2 7
Test your skills at
SuDoKuPage A9
NEWSPageA2
PULSEPageA4
SPORTSPageAB
OPINIONPage A3
CLASSIFIEDSPageA9
New signs with ECU colors are being put up around Greenville to encourage school spirit and loyalty.
Pitt County had the most DWI violations during Halloween, after both Mecklenburg and Wake counties
Pitt County ranks first statewide
for Halloween drinking citations
Results from over
1,864 statewide
sobriety checkpoints
GENERRA CORNWELL
STAFF WRITER
At ECU, UNC Chapel Hill
and N.C. State campuses check-
points, patrols and other proto-
cols were put into effect to keep
students safe during Halloween.
The campaign was called the
Booze It Or Lose It campaign
and it ran from Oct. 27-31.
At ECU and UNC, Hal-
loween celebrations are huge,
street-wide affairs that take
place throughout the downtown
areas.
ECU students and Greenville
residents transform the down-
town streets into a giant Hallow-
een party. This year thousands
of ECU students, Greenville
citizens and visitors from all
over North Carolina crowded
into downtown to enjoy the
festivities.
UNC Chapel Hill also has a
well-known Halloween celebra-
tion on Franklin Street, and
since N.C. State is relatively
close to both Greenville and
Chapel Hill, many N.C. State
students travel to either event.
Officers across the state
worked together to conduct more
than 1,864 sobriety checkpoints
and patrols during Hallow-
een. Counties with the highest
number of DWI citations issued
included Pitt(8l), Mecklen-
burg(6'8) and Wake(SS).
In December, a new DWI
law signed by Governor Mike
Easley, will go into effect. This
new law stipulates that a driver
with a blood-alcohol level of 0.08
grams per deciliter (gdl) can be
convicted of DWI.
Another part of this new law
is that anyone under the age 21
who is found with any level of
alcohol in their system may face
misdemeanor charges.
Also, anyone purchasing a
keg of beer must obtain a permit
from the beer vendor.
Furthermore, prosecu-
tors must report why a DWI
charge was dismissed, which
will ultimately decrease the sub-
Addition of more
purple and gold
ADELINE TRENTO
STAFF WRITER
ECU students may soon
have a more school spirited
campus thanks to the ECU
Brand Enhancement Project.
The Brand Enhancement Proj-
ect, which hopes to promote ECU
and increase loyalty to the school,
will be working to add more purple,
gold and pirate references to campus.
Wayne Newnam, the Campus
Life Marketing Director, said that
although ECU's campus is beauti-
ful, it lacks some unique features
that other colleges may have.
Newnam said that it is very
important to make a lasting impres-
sion on prospective students, par-
ents and visitors. He believes that
by adding more school colors and
embracing the history of ECU on
campus, students will receive a long-
lasting impression of the school.
"It is very important for these
groups to retain a lasting, unique
image ofECU that will stay with them
for years to come said Newnam.
Some of these changes have
already begun. The previously
green visitor parking signs have
been changed to purple and new
purple street signs have recently
been added to campus.
Many students feel that these
changes are a nice addition to ECU
and will help people feel more con-
nected to the school.
"I think the new purple signs
are great said Laura DeVantier,
sophomore nursing major. "It defi-
nitely adds something to campus
and increases school spirit
Other ideas are also being
proposed to add the school colors
to different places around the uni-
versity. Benches, tables, on-campus
crosswalks, signs and buses may
soon be changed to show off more
ECU purple and gold.
Flags and banners will also be a
welcome addition to campus and an
easy way to display the school colors.
Newnam said that although the
Brand Enhancement Project plans
to add more purple and gold to
campus, it is not the only purpose
of the project.
"The Enhancement Project
is not about painting the campus
purple Newnam said . "It is about
tastefully adding highlights of our
school colors and heritage around
campus to promote the ECU
brand, building a stronger identity
for ECU and creating a lasting
impression for all that are a part of
this university and those that visit
Newnam said the changes
being made to enhance school
spirit at ECU should not be limited
to adding more school colors alone.
He believes that statues of impor-
tant people from ECU's past and
the usage of pirate terms on street
signs as well as buildings would be
a unique way to help separate ECU
from other universities.
The hope of the ECU Brand
Enhancement Project is that these
changes will help make ECU stu-
dents more involved, more school
spirited and proud to be a part of
this university.
Newnam encourages students
to communicate with their student
leaders through SGA and get their
ideas heard about the changes they
would like to see on campus.
"Getting students involved is
paramount Newnam said. "Great
ideas come from students, students
are the reason ECU exists. Sugges-
tions promote a new way of thinking
This writer can be contacted at
newst heeastcarol in ian .com.
Students learn how to
prevent AIDS locally
Professor Mary Glascoff tells students of the effects of AIDS in Greenville
stantial number of DWI cases
that are.dismissed without expla-
nation.
Both the ECU and Greenville
Police Departments were unable
to be reached for comment but
the statistics of the Halloween
Booze It Or Lose It campaign
speak volumes. Pitt County
issued 41 underage DWI cita-
tions compared to Orange Coun-
ty's (where UNC is located) two
and Wake County's one. Also
Pitt County issued 40, over-21
DWI citations, Wake issued 52
and Orange issued three. Pitt
County police officials did con-
duct 42 checkpoints and patrols
while Orange County conducted
four and Wake County con-
ducted 54.
Sargent John Barnwell, N.C.
State Campus Police stated,
"ECU statistics are going to
be higher than ours because of
their special event, because most
of our students participate in
ECU and Chapel Hill events our
campus is relatively quiet
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Students learn about
the virus
CLAIRE MURPHY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Professor Mary Glascoff spoke
yesterday in Mendenhall on the
issue of AIDS in the Greenville
community. She is also the direc-
tor of the Community Health
Education program, and shared
her knowledge with the crowd.
Glascoff once had a student
who would show up to class late
and then fall asleep at her desk.
This frustrated Glascoff and
she eventually confronted the
student.
The student had a brother in
Pitt Memorial Hospital who was
dying of AIDS. Since she was
living in Greenville, she was the
one who stayed with him at night.
This changed Glascoff's punish-
ment for the student. They became
close and Glascoff attended his
funeral.
"It's the most awful virus I've
ever imagined said Glascoff.
She also explained the compar-
ison of the human body to a castle.
There are many ways in, but there
are guards to keep bad things out.
The guards in this case are white
blood cells. AIDS keeps the guards
from doing their job.
Preventing illness is a matter
of protecting yourself. Glascoff
said, "When we pee, poop, fart,
puke, snot, it's all to protect our
bodies from bad stuff
Years ago AIDS was thought
of as an automatic death sentence.
Today, there are more powerful
drugs, and more of them, to keep
people with AIDS living healthier
and longer lives.
A virus causes AIDS. It is
not a living thing like bacteria.
It goes into the blood and cannot
be cured.
Glascoff told the story of
another man who was dying of
AIDS in the hospital. In his last
days, a minister would not come
to his bedside because he was a
homosexual with a sexually trans-
mitted disease. At his funeral, the
family denied his illness and said
he had died of cancer. They were
too ashamed to tell the truth.
North Carolina used to have
the most effective laws for teach-
ing about AIDS in schools. Now
it is the law to teach abstinence
only.
People don't talk about AIDS
very much anymore as if it is unim-
portant. The spreading would
decrease if everyone got tested.
The problem is, people don't know
see AIDS page A2
I
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News
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2006 PAGE A2
Campus & Community
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Nov. 1 - 28
MTVUnited Way Alternative
Spring Break 2007
MTVUnited Way are spon-
soring the 2nd annual
Alternative Spring Break to
the Gulf Coast. If you are
interested In participating,
United Way of Pitt County
is gathering a team to be
a part of this great event.
The application deadline
for this area is Nov. 28. To
apply visit mtv.comthink-
mtvasb2007. For more
information contact the
Local Coordinator Cassie
Reid at CLR0401ecu.edu.
Human Performance Labo-
ratory
Research Study Investigat-
ing The Effects of Endur-
ance Exercise on Differ-
ences in Skeletal Muscle
and Fat Cell Metabolism
Between African-American
and Caucasian Women. Sub-
ject criteria: 1.Overweight
and non-overweight women
ages 20-45 years 2.Inac-
tive-Exercise less than two
daysweek, less than 30
minutesday for at least
six months. Contact: The
Human Performance Labo-
ratory. Procedures include
body composition assess-
ment, blood fat, sugar and
insulin testing, 10 days or
eight weeks of supervised
exercise, and four or six
muscle biopsies. Benefits
include percent body fat
and free aerobic fitness
assessment, health ben-
efits of supervised training
and up to $400 payment
upon completion of the
study. Call (252) 328-
2575 for more information.
VOLUNTEER
OPPORTUNITIES
Tuesday, Nov. 28 through
Saturday, Dec. 10
Holiday Gift Wrap
Humane Society needs vol-
unteers wrap gifts at the
mall for donations. Shifts
are available Monday
through Saturday starting
at 10 a.m and Sunday 1 - 6
p.m. at Colonial Mall in
front of Belk. Contact
Vicki Luttrell at 353-8833
or vluttrel I @ u nited
waypittcounty.com.
Friday, Dec. 1
Special Olympics Basketball
Tournament
Volunteer needed to assist
with running the tourna-
ment: Registration, score
keeping, cheerleading, set-
upclean-up, etc. Shifts are
from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. at
Epps Recreation Center
in Thomas Foreman Park.
Contact Deirtra Cran-
dol at 329-4541.
Saturday, Dec. 2
Parents' Night Out
Volunteers are needed to
set-upbreak down and
assist in running the event.
Shifts are from 6 - 10:30
p.m. at the Student
Recreation Center and
Mendenhall Student Center.
Contact David Gaskins
at gaskinsd@ecu.edu.
Christmas Parade
Volunteers are needed
to line up parade partici-
pants in correct order and
possibly carry sponsor
signs. Shifts are from 8
a.m. - 12 p.m. Volunteers
should check in at the
corner of Green and First
Streets. Contact Karen
Smith at 328-4173.
Habitat for Humanity
Volunteers needed to hand
out flyers and encourage
Lowes customers to donate
to Habitat at cash regis-
ters. All donations will
go directly to our local
Habitat Chapter. Shifts
are from 9-11 a.m 11
a.m. - 1 p.m. and 1 - 3
p.m. Contact Paulette
White at 758-2947.
Reindeer Dash for Cash
Volunteers are needed to
assist on runners' course,
registration, clean up,
as well as other tasks.
Shifts are from 11:30
a.m. - 5 p.m. at the
Greenville Town Commons.
28 Tue 2 9Wed 3dhu 1fH 2sat 3sun 4
Mon
Last day to submit
thesis to the Graduate
School for completion
of degree in this term.
Healthy PIRATES Holi-
day Ornament Sale
The Healthy PIRATES
will be selling one of a
kind holiday ornaments
as a fundraiser. One
ornament for $3, six for
$15 and 12 for $24.
Wright Plaza
Healthy PIRATES Holi-
day Ornament Sale
Wright Plaza
ECU hosts Ice Skating
Club event
The inaugural gathering
of the ECU Ice Skating
Club. Childcare pro-
vided.
Bladez on Ice Rink
6 p.m.
Russian Film Series:
"Russian Ark"
Movies have English
subtitles or dubbing.
Bate 2011
6:30 p.m.
SGA Presents the Suc-
cess for Life Workshop:
Making the Grade
Learn tips to help pre-
pare for exams and
develop a strategy of
how to finish the semes-
ter strong.
Bate 1032
7 -8:30 p.m.
Healthy PIRATES Holi-
day Ornament Sale
Wright Plaza
ECU School of Art Holi-
day Exhibition Opens
ECU'S School of Art and
Design holds the annual
holiday exhibition sale.
Wellington B. Gray Gallery
Jenkins Fine Art
Center
9 a.m. - 8 p.m.
ODK hosts Deans and
Issues forum
Omicron Delta Kappa's
Leaders and Issues
Forum is an open dis-
cussion about current
ECU issues and related
leadership topics. Invited
guests include: Dr.
Virginia Hardy, Brody
School of Medicine;
Dr. Al Smith, First Year
Center; Dr. Lathan Tume.
Students, faculty and
staff are invited. Refresh-
ments will be served.
Bate 3009
5 p.m.
CoffeehouseOpen Mic
Pirate Underground
7 p.m.
11th Annual Festival of
Trees hosts "Bedtimes
with Santa"
Greenville Convention
Center
Greenville Boulevard
6 - 7 p.m.
ECU School of Art Holi-
day Exhibition
Wellington B. Gray Gal-
lery
Jenkins Fine Art Center
9 a.m. - 9 p.m.
World Fest
Recognition and cel-
ebration of various
and traditional holiday
celebrations. Displays
and speakers will be
available to illustrate
the celebrations and
to answer questions.
Co-sponsored with the
ECU Student Activi-
ties office. For more
information, call 328-
6495.
Mendenhall Student
Center
4 p.m.
Uptown Greenville Art-
Walk
Emerge Gallery & Art
Center
404 South Evans
Street
6 p.m.
The Never
Pirate Underground
7 p.m.
ECU School of Art
Holiday Exhibition
Wellington B. Gray Gal-
lery
Jenkins Fine Art
Center
9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Greenville Annual
Christmas Parade
Downtown Greenville
10 a.m.
11th Annual Festival of
Trees hosts "Storytimes
with Santa"
Greenville Convention
Center
Greenville Boulevard
3 -4 p.m.
Housing Authority
Meeting
Central Housing
Authority Office
1103 Broad St.
5:30 p.m.
BRIEFS
FBI struggles to win trust of
Muslim, Arab communities
(MCT) When a local
FBI agent wanted to make
contacts in this city's tight-
knit Muslim community, he
started knocking on doors.
The agent didn't look, much
less act, like a typical investiga-
tor. He spoke Arabic and he wore
street clothes, not the suit and tie
favored by many in the bureau.
"Heseemed really friendlysaid
Muhammad Sahli, a U.S. citizen
approached at his home last month
by the agent. "So I invited him in
But agents also recognize that
the alienation that Muslims and
Arabs feel could undermine the
bureau's hunt for domestic ter-
rorists. If the fear subsided, more
citizens might come forward with
tips, agents believe, at a time when
the bureau is under mounting pres-
sure to collect better intelligence.
According to a study released
earlier this year by the Vera Insti-
tute of Justice, seven out of 16
U.S. cities with significant Arab
and Muslim populations didn't
have active FBI outreach pro-
grams. The institute, a nonprofit
organization in New York, wasn't
permitted to identify the cities as
part of its agreement with the FBI.
Authorities plan to scale back
search for missing boys
(MCT) After four days of
combing through a vast wooded
stretch of land but finding
no sign of two young broth-
ers who went missing on the
Red Lake Indian Reservation,
authorities said Saturday they
are likely to scale back the air
and ground search later Sunday.
Among those in the 26-person
unit braving strong winds were
about a dozen relatives of the miss-
ing boys. Their cousin Valencia
Jones spent a fourth day scouring
this northern Minnesota Indian
reservation. "I have to she said.
"We're hoping for the best, and
bracing ourselves for the worst
said Jones, who added that the boys'
mother, Alicia White, who pleaded
publicly for their safe return
on Friday, "is holding up well
The search concluded
about 6 p.m. Saturday and
was to resume this morning.
Man missing from capsized
boat in Willamette River identi-
fied
(AP) Authorities say
the man who tried to swim to
safety this morning after his
boat capsized in the Willa-
mette River is presumed dead.
Fifty-one-year old Rich-
ard Allen Ellis, Senior of
Oregon City is missing and
believed to have drowned.
Sheriff's deputies say he
was not wearing a life jacket.
Police say a fishing party of
four was floating on the river this
morning when the anchor line got
tangled in the prop of the motor.
The boat capsized the men were
thrown into the 47-degree water.
The three other men did have
lifejackets on were able to stay
afloat until they were rescued.
Police say Ellis tried to
swim to Rock Island in the
river south of Portland. But the
search was called off two hours
after the boat had capsized.
50-year-old beer found in
desert
(KMTR) Get ready to see
what happens when you open
up a can of beer that's been sit-
ting in the hot sun and freezing
cold of the desert for SO years!
Hikers saw this old can
sticking out of the desert sand.
"We were curious, dug
down a little deeper and
couldn't believe what we found
More cans. Lots more. Tin
cans of Coors Beer, a half-century
old and never opened. A mystery!
They looked up, and there,
a few hundred feet above
them were railroad tracks.
Ah, now this was all begin-
ning to make some sense.
Twisting through the moun-
tains near Jacumba are the tracks
of what's now called the Carrizo
Gorge Railway, but fifty years
ago, it was the San Diego and
Arizona Eastern, when two cars
derailed and went over the side.
On one of them, was a
truck of Coors Beer. Well the
wreckage remains even today,
but all the beer was collected.
The color of cough syrup
and smelling like a combina-
tion of fermented wine and dirt.
He'll leave the rest unopened.
For they are among the last
remaining traces of what hikers
and rail fans call the "Coors
Wreck A little known bit of high
desert history about San Diego.
Near San Diego, California,
I'm Ken Kramer for NBC News.
Purple robes could be on the agenda in May aids
continued from Al
Opinions of students
needed for the decision
KIMBLRLY BELLAMY
STAFF WRITF.R
A change in the robe color for
graduation was discussed at the
congress meeting on Monday.
There is a possibility that
purple could replace black for the
robbing color as soon as May 2007.
Liz Johnston, a representative
from the commencement task
force, spoke about the issue and
gave an example of four different
shades of purple that the robes
could be.
Johnston said that the com-
mencement will most likely be
held outside and that thi.s would
enhance the visual appearance of
the graduates.
"The purple robes will create a
visual sea of purple as the gradu-
ates walk in said Johnston.
Corey King, assistant vice
chancellor of student experiences
said, "This graduating class in
May will usher in the centennial
King also said that '2007 is a
great time to bleed purple at ECU
with the centennial approaching.
The main reason for 'the
change in robe color is because
of the centennial that is quickly
approaching.
Some congress members
favored the decision by acknowl-
edging that the visual appearance
of the crowd is enhanced at athletic
games because of the abundance of
purple that fans wear.
Other congress mem-
bers opposed the idea of the
color purple because it would
clash with their cords for orga-
nizations that they belong to.
SGA discusses changes in graduation robe colors for students planning to graduate in May 2007.
A suggestion was by a con-
gress member to incorporate a
different solid color such as white
into the upper part of the robe so
that the cords wouldn't clash.
A commencement task force
has been assembled to get addi-
tional suggestions and opinions
from students. The task force
includes three students.
Another major topic discussed
at the meeting were establishing
and maintaining a good relation-
ship with the communities that
surround the university.
Larry Spell, City Council
member, spoke about noise and
occupancy issues that will be
stressed more in the future.
Some of these laws included
the three occupancy law which
states that no more than three
unrelated people can live together
in a house.
A $500 fine is the penalty for
.noise violators in these neighbor-
hoods because of a Greenville
noise ordinance.
Other issues discussed
included a law that will require
you to get a permit to buy a keg
and will hold you responsible if
underage drinking occurs from a
keg you buy.
The permit can be retrieved from
ABC stores and the law will take
effect on Dec. 1, according to Spell.
The last major topic of discus-
sion at the congress meeting was
new opportunities for organiza-
tions to get funding for events.
Kristen Crutchfield, repre-
sentative from campus activities,
explained to congress that their
organization can fill out an appli-
cation to receive $500 or1000 to
put on an event between the hours
of 9 p.m. and 1 a.m.
These events will be held
on Jan. 26 and 27, Feb. 9, 10, 23
and 24, and March 23 and 24.
Organizations can find out
more about this opportunity by
visiting Crutchfield's office in
224-A Mendenhall.
Keri Brockett, SGA secretary,
reminded and encouraged every-
one to attend the second Talk-It-
Tuesday event being held in West
End Dining Hall from 5-8 p.m.
next Tuesday.
To find out more about SGA,
visit ecu.edusga or 328-4SGA.
This writer may be contacted at
newsOtheeastcarolinian.com.
they have it.
AIDS in America is a com-
pletely different illness from AIDS
in other countries. Here we worry
about using condoms and getting
tested. In parts of Africa, they
have to worry about used medical
equipment, rape and other things
that are harder to prevent than
they are here.
It is easier for a woman to con-
tract AIDS from a male, than for a
man to get it from a woman. It is a
swapping of bodily fluids. Women
who have sex with men (unpro-
tected) carry the semen with them
for days. Men are only exposed to
vaginal fluid for a short while. It is
important for everyone to get tested
for themselves, and to keep their
sexual partners safe.
More stories on events being
held for AIDS week can be found
in The East Carolinian through
next week.
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian.com.
ARE YOU
HOT IF YOU
HAVBt'TTOLD
www.shareyourlife org
1-800-355-SHARE
I CoamnonagmtTakaCttWx





inion
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 28,2006 PAGE A3
RANT OF THE DAY
Here's a hint guys: If a girl makes eye contact with
you more than once, she's interested. If single,
proceed.
Breakfast of champions
Fake 'N Bake
Skin cancer isn't exactly attractive
JESSICA DUNLOW
OPINION WRITER
According to the FDA, 42 percent of teenagers
try indoor tanning. I have done it. You have done it.
However, other than thinking about how beautiful we
will look in our prom dresses and even those who tan
year-round, have we considered the consequences?
Skin cancer rates for teenagers and college-age
kids have doubled since 1975. In addition, an esti-
mated 2,050 tanning bed users will be diagnosed
with skin cancer this year.
Directly correlated with the rise in tanning
is the society in which we are raised. Yes, blame
society for everything. If the people we idolize
like Paris Hilton and Jessica Simpson advocate the
bronze color, then of course everyone follows.
Rumors say that being tan makes you look skin-
ner. Overexposure to ultra-violet rays increases
your cancer possibilities, so is it actually worth it?
Apparently, a hot tan attracts a hot boy. Is this hot
boy going to be attracted to you with a leathery,
wrinkled face? In addition, men are beginning to
take advantage of these tan boxes.
Yes, a tan "bod" during the summer is very
attractive, but in the depth of winter, a steamy
orange skin tone is rather absurd.
These tanning facilities are not all they crack
up to be. There are cases reported in emergency
rooms about damaged skin and eyes, which has
nothing to do with skin cancer. Also, many tan-
ning teens do not use their goggles on their eyes,
which leads to damage to the eyelids and possibly
the eye itself.
It is not worth it. All the money, up to forty
dollars a month, the painful nights with horrible
burns, the risk of skin disease, time wasted lying
in a frying box attempting to grasp onto the last
heat in summer?
Accept the natural beauty bestowed. Why
rush aging through direct UV-rays to your skin?
Smooth skin is in and wrinkles are out.
Bush vs. Chavez
Venezuelan Elections and U.S. interest
JUSTIN SUMMERS
OPINION WRITER
Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez has gained
quite a reputation over the past few years in the United
States and around the world. In Latin America, Chavez
is admired and well liked by the majority of people.
Supporters believe his stand against George Bush and
American imperialism through the World Bank and
IMF will bring prosperity to a continent that has been
in poverty for so long.
After he won his election in 2002, Chavez has not
cracked under U.S. pressure and has been hugely suc-
cessful at achieving his goals for social change in Vene-
zuela. Chavez promised healthcare and education among
other things to the Venezuelans and has come through
on his word, incorporating almost 350,000 people
into the university education system in the past three
years. Chavez plans to create thousands more students
and doctors that will provide aid in an ailing region.
Millions of people stand by Chavez and sup-
port his aim to socialize Venezuela and the rest
of South America, in the United States, how-
ever, people are not so fond of Chavez.
The United States has been in opposition of Hugo
Chavez from the very beginning. We have done every-
thing in our power besides direct military involvement
to keep Chavez out of office.
Before the Venezuelan elections in 2002, the
United States secretly gave millions of dollars to the
opposition party in Venezuela. The National Endow-
ment for Democracy, the international arm of the
Republican Party and the International Republican
Institute, among others had a hand in anti-Chavez
actions. These agencies along with the Venezuelan
media, military leaders and politicians who still sup-
ported U.S. corporate interest in Venezuela, helped
lead mass protests days before the election and aided
in kidnapping Chavez.
Due to unexpected public support, Chavez was
returned within days and has remained in office even
after two more unsuccessful coup attempts.
That brings me to current day Venezuela. Hugo
Chavez will once again be on the chopping block in
December and the world is wondering what will happen
in these elections. Since the last three attempts at get-
ting Chavez out of office failed, the Bush administration
will have to employ the same dirty tricks as well as
come up with some new ones if they want success.
First order is a campaign of hostile rhetoric coming
out of Washington that has been ongoing for some
time, and is part of a project to justify whatever schemes
the Bush administration has cooked up to oust him. It
comes in the harshest language and from the highest
levels in the administration like when the now fired
Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld called Chavez
another Hitler and one of the most dangerous and
destabilizing forces in the region, or when pat Roberts
tried to justify assassination of Chavez.
After a demonization campaign, the next line of
business is enforcing sanctions. We will uphold that
Venezuela is not cooperating in the war on drugs and is
trafficking humans therefore should be subject to sanc-
tions, even though Venezuela has more than doubled
cocaine seizures since Chavez has been in office and has
made significant efforts to stop humans trafficking.
Another big step was when the United States
created a new international classification, and Ven-
ezuela is the only country under it. This classification
is for "not cooperating with the war on terrorism
The Bush administration is hard-pressed explain-
ing what this new classification means, and why
Venezuela is the only country accused under it. The
administration has only responded (fraudulently)
that "AH the countries on the list are state sponsors
of terrorism even though the United States has
never classified Venezuela as a terrorist nation as the
world community would be outraged at such a claim.
The next elections in Venezuela are Dec. 6 and
it won't be long before the fireworks begin. It now
remains to be seen how the latest chapter in the saga
of the Bush administration vs. Hugo Chavez will play
out. As of now there are still two things in Venezuela;
Hugo Chavez and the second-largest oil reserve in the
world. For Bush, one has gotta go.
PIRATE RANTS
State loses yet again. I think Chuck
the Chest is getting the boot before
this rant gets published!
What a game by our football team, I
just want to say congratulations to the
players and would like to commend
our fans for taking over Cater-Finely
Stadium and making it more like
a home game. We be bowling!
Flame on fantastic four.
Way to go ECU Football team!
You restored the Pirate Pride back
into our school. To the graduating
seniors, you should be proud!
Congrats guys.
Driving a busted minivan with
missing hubcaps is not cool. You
shouldn't compulsively lie about
girls liking you when you're not
straight to begin with. You owe me
a new starfish too.
If I don't get some booty soon, I
think I'm going to explode.
Missing you is only as bad as it is
because I know you don't miss me.
You don't even realize I'm gone.
Taco Bell and spandex aren't friends.
When the package is this pretty, no
one cares what's inside.
Because marriage has never
changed. Women are still property,
black people can't marry white
people and divorce is illegal. What
makes you think being gay means
that a person can't experience love
and devotion, as you so eloquently
put it, "two dudes hooking up No,
that's what Britney Spears did, and
it was perfectly legal for her. God
Bless America.
Everyday I wake up, I wonder why
they took me off of the medication.
You shouldn't dye your hair blonde
so much. It's really bad for it. Go
back to brunette!
TEC does a pretty good job of
showing both the liberal and
conservative sides of issues.
The conservatives (simpletons)
that wanted to kick gay marriage
supporters out of the USA are
showing their closed minds.
I love getting to know you.
Sorry about our fight. You are a
great friend. Thanks for dealing with
my selfishness!
I'm falling hard for you.
SGA - you have to be kidding
me. I don't respect you or your
President as it is and now you
feel the need to tell me how to
behave as well. Get a life and shove
your new raise that my student
fees are paying for up your
Who are you to tell anyone who
they can or cannot marry? You'd
be pissed off too if someone
told you that you couldn't
marry your wife or husband!
Isn't South Africa one of the most
unsafe places in the world to
live? I would not move there just
to have a homosexual marriage.
Why do people care so much what
complete strangers do with their
lives? Let people live and be happy.
Does no one care about peace and
love anymore?
Does your girlfriend know what we
do in the group study rooms?
The cold weather is making me
sad. No more girls wearing next to
no clothes. Sigh.
Pirate Rants make me smile!
I am a fatty now that Thanksgiving
has come and gone, but everyone
loves the fat kid!
If TEC can add another Sudoku
puzzle they can definitely print
more Pirate Rants!
Airports are so confusing!
I don't know who I like better
McDreamy or McSteamy?
I wonder how many Pirate Rants
TEC receives each day!? I'd love
to see more of them!
I'm not dating a minute man, I'm
dating a second man help!
The only bad thing about North
Carolina is that it is in the middle of
the Bible belt.
Did anyone else feel bad chanting
Chuck is fired at the ECU vs. State
game?
ECU should invest in a huge
Christmas tree on campus. Or is
that not PC?
Over Thanksgiving break, my pet
snake escaped from its cage in my
apartment complex, and I have no
clue as to the snake's whereabouts.
"Winter Wonderland" is on the
radio, but I'm wearing flip-flops.
I was just wondering if sorority girls
ever get their clothes mixed up or
themselves, even. I mean they all
wear the same thing.
To the person who thinks that
ECU Greek Life is doomed: You've
been misinformed. The rules and
regulations are not new; they just
were not understood, followed or
enforced until now. If you cannot
honor and respect the privileges
that come with being a part of
ECU'S Greek life then drop, if you
haven't already. There are many
other menwomen willing to take
your place and value it!
To the girl who thought she broke in
front of me to get fruit at Todd - you
didn't, I promise. But your smile
made my day, so thank you.
The ECU parking and transportation
department is the most inept and
foolish gaggle of rent-a-cops I
have ever had the misfortune
to deal with. Something has to
be done about these animals.
To the guy who paid for my friend's
food on Monday in the Croatan, that
was probably the nicest thing I've
seen in my four years here at ECU.
It's nice to know there are still good
people out there.
It's OK Chuck, we'll let you work
clean up at Dowdy-Ficklen next
year.
When I wanted a relationship, the
men that I found only wanted to be
friends with benefits. Now that I only
want to be friends with benefits, the
men that I find cling to me like I am
the last woman on earth.
If you ask Chuck Norris what
time it is, he always says, "Two
seconds till After you ask,
"Two seconds to what?" he
roundhouse kicks you in the face.
Previously posted: "Greek Life
is for those who lack a real life
Correction: "Greek Life is for those
who want a better life Check it out
for yourself before making ignorant,
stereotypical comments.
Girls as superficial as the Greek
girls here at ECU deserve to be
tarred and feathered and then
used as a pinata at a 5-year-old's
birthday party.
To the sorority who kicked out the
"sister" that just found out she is
pregnant because it would look bad
for them way to show true support
and sisterhood. Go sisters!
JUST ASK JANE
Need advice? Want answers? Just ask Jane.
Dear Jane,
I am a five and a half year senior who is graduating
in December. I absolutely love it here at ECU. In fact,
that is probably why I have prolonged graduation. I
know this sounds bad, especially since I now pay for
my own college. I'm considering intentionally failing a
course this semester just to have another five months
here. Is there something seriously wrong with me?
Signed,
Still a senior
Dear Senior,
Your case of senioritis is quite different from that
experienced by most college students because, in your
case, what you want is not to "get out but to "stay in
Sure, the parties were great and the beer flowed freely,
but so did the lectures and the exams and the late night
study sessions and the stress of not knowing what the
next day would bring and so do the tuition dollars.
I do not suggest that you tail anything intentionally.
1 cannot think of a single instance in which failing on
purpose would be an acceptable practice. All it means
is more money down the drain when you could have
been finished with it all long ago and out there making
money in your brand-spanking new job.
I know you love college, but think of all the things
you'll be delaying, too. Perhaps a new apartment,
definitely a new job, new challenges, a new rontine,
new friends! Think about it this way: Remember those
times in which you missed being a child? Remember
recess? Snack time at school? Taking naps at school?
Your first kiss, maybe? Now think of college: As much
as you love certain childhood moments, if you would
have stayed that age, you'd never be experiencing what
you love so much now.
Now is the time to finish your education and make
new memories. Begin a new chapter in life. After all, you
can't be the next Van Wilder, plus, it wouldn't do for you
to be in college until you're 40. That's a lot of money.
Sarah Bell
Editor in Chief
Rachel King
News Editor
Sarah Campbell
Features Editor
Eric Gilmore
Sports Editor
Sarah Hackney
Head Copy Editor
Rachael Lotter
Multimedia Web
Claire Murphy
Asst. News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Asst. Features Editor
Greg Katski
Asst. Sports Editor
Zach Sirkin
Photo Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Editor Production Manager
Newsroom 252.328.9238
Fax 252.328.9143
Advertising 252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, the East Carolinian prints
9,000 copies every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
during the regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednes-
days during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the
editor which are limited to 250 words (which may be
edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the right to
edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editor@theeastcarolinian.com or to the asf
Carolinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, N.C. 27858-
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of the East Carolinian is free, each additional copy is $1.
No more
Holi-P-D-Ays
Get your hands off each.other, so I can
get back to my shopping
JESSE PENCE
OPINION WRITER
I rather have someone running, yelling down
the street obscene vulgarities which you would have
thought came out of a Kevin Smith movie or the
colorful dialogue of Ari Gold from "Entourage
than to see you grabbing the ass of your girlfriend
ten times while shopping.
The holidays are a feeling of joy and love to most
everyone. Unfortunately, many times my euphoric
holiday feeling is shattered by the sight of people
being a little too affectionate with each other on
the streets or in a store.
I am not a cold-hearted man, I don't completely
mind a peck on the cheek, holding hands or other
reasonable things, but most of the time I don't (and
I can't imagine many other people) want to see you
groping your girlfriend. It makes me want to vomit.
I like to be considerate while I am out. There
is more than enough opportunity to show just how
much you love one another. Even if you can't keep
your hands off one another while you are out and
absolutely must show how much you love them, do
it a little less conspicuously. The worst is a smug
guy who grabs his girlfriend's, wife's or whoever's
ass in front of a ton of people, knowing they all
saw it and pretends he didn't do it, fully knowing
everyone saw it.
When did it become OK to do this in the first
place? In my humble opinion it is not showing
any respect to the person you are with or to those
around you. Anything which, if repeated during the
course of a two hour movie, would require an R'
rating, has no place on the streets, just as a person
swearing a blue streak has no place (and would get
the offender chastised in public by passer-bys).
Some argue that it really is a way to show the
world how much you love the person you are with.
Well I am sorry, but my immediate thought that
comes to mind when I see over the top PDA is cer-
tainly not two people who are in love.
This is the one all encompassing issue. PDA
does not discriminate for race, age, sexual orienta-
tion, while some might be a little easier on the eyes,
it is still not something, which should be acceptable
in public. Everyone just needs to be like the cute
old couples you always see holding hands walking
down the street.
There is a time and a place for groping and
over-the-top kissing. That place is not around me
and the time is when I am not around.
So this holiday season while you are walking
down the street while lightly snowing and all you
can think about is the warmth of your lovers body,
please, whisper into their ear how you can not wait
to get home and show how much you love them and
how romantic you can really be; that way I can get
my shopping done.
Eight simple cells
The key to saving lives.
JESSICA DUNLOW
OPINION WRITER
It seems that everyone is caught up in the idea
that all stem cell research is bad, and that it involves
"murdering" young embryos. However, there are
so many positives to this scientific discovery that
to not pursue the possible ways of perfecting this
procedure is unethical.
First, what are stem cells? Stem cells are nature's
master cells, capable of generating every one of the
many different cells that make up the body. They
have the ability to self-renew, which means that
they are "immortal" and can continue to divide
without end if provided with enough nutrients.
Since they are self-renewing, we should learn
to cure as many diseases as possible. According to
the International Society for Stem Cell Research,
Cancer, Parkinson's disease, Diabetes, Alzheimer's
disease, stroke, spinal cord injuries and heart dis-
ease can be cured through stem cells. What many
people who oppose stem cell research do not know
is that it is not only through embryos. There are
so many options. Fertility clinics around the world
have extra un-used embryos, and President Bush
stated that he will allow these "lifelines" to continue
to operate, but no government funds will go toward
stem cell research. We are a country that is based
on compassion and yet we will not take the step to
save the very ones that we love?
There are alternatives. For instance, after a
baby is born, we need to retrieve the umbilical
chord to harvest the stem cells. Through this way
of retrieval, we can gather the DNA needed without
harming any embryos. These cells will eventually
give scientists the ability to grow human organs for
those who need transplants. In addition, there is a
way that taking a cord-blood (spinal cord) sample
of the patient's own bone marrow to regenerate
healthy blood cells.
The best alternative is to pursue the idea of
harvesting adult cells. Duke University Medi-
cal Center utilizes this discovery to help resolve
patients' illnesses. That is spectacular, the idea
of being on the edge of death, but your own cells,
that betrayed you, fixed your problem! Successful
stem cell transplants occur every year, and with
the longevity of life being accelerated, they even
provide patient reunions.
Embryonic stem cells are the first priority.
They are the youngest of the cells, and I believe
that with the adult cells, there is a shorter life
expectancy. Politicians need to take action now,
because one of them may need their life saved by an
embryo sitting around in a fertility clinic not being
used. Stem cells are the key to saving lives. Why is
that in question? There should not be a question on
whether a person should live, versus the eight tiny
cells that could change their life forever.
Stem cells are the future of medicine. Would
you want your life to be sacrificed for eight cells?
Rather, would your family?





Pulse
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2006 PAGE A4
Campus Scene
Horoscopes:
Arias
You're anxious to get going
but there's work to be done
first. The more attention
you pay to this job now, the
better off you'll be later. It
does matter.
Taurus
Gather up the goodies,
without drawing attention
to yourself. Don't provoke
jealousies by bragging;
that could have disastrous
results.
Bernini
Conditions are more difficult
now, so carefully watch what
you're doing. Hold yourself
to high standards, and you'll
minimize errors your own
and everyone else's.
Cancer
You're naturally taking on
more and more, but are
you getting respect? Don't
let people pile the work
onto you; ask for it and take
credit for it.
Leo
Stash away as much as you
can, and you can buy more
free time. Think of it as a
game where you can insure
that you'll be the winner.
Virgo
As others notice how well you
take care of their problems,
they'll seek you out. They'll
remember you and try to get
you to do more. Ask for the
raise in pay then, not now.
Libra
As you realize what's
required, try not to be
intimidated. You don't have
to know how you'll do it, yet.
You're a quick learner.
Scorpio
A person you care very
much about has a lot of
expensive requests. Don't
say you will. Set up a time to
discuss them, much later.
Sagittarius
Not everybody goes along
with everything you try.
You're very persuasive when
you want to be. Use those
skills now.
Capricorn
The more you study the
more you'll be able to avoid
trouble. You often learn by
making mistakes but you
can outgrow that. Proceed
with caution.
Aquarius
You're good at networking.
You know who has what
and where the needs are.
Investigate new leads and
take careful notes. You'll use
this information.
Pisces
You have to be rather
sensitive now, to other
people's feelings. Luckily,
you're naturally polite and
sympathetic. They'll really
appreciate that.
Campus Events:
Wednesday, Nov. 29
-Russian Film Series:
"Russian Ark"
Bate 2011 at 6:30 p.m.
-SGA Presents the Success
for Life Workshop:
Making the Grade
Bate 1032 from 7 - 8:30
p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 30
Study Abroad Information
Session
Bate 1028 at 7 p.m.
-CoffeehouseOpen Mic
Pirate Underground at 7
p.m.
Friday, Dec. 1
-World Fest
Mendenhall Student Center
at 4 p.m.
-The Never
Pirate Underground at 7
p.m.
Finals are fast approaching
Are you ready?
SHANNON DAVIS
STAFF WRITER
As the end of the semester
approaches most students are
swamped with final exams and
papers. This time of the semes-
ter tends to be overwhelming
and stressful for both the stu-
dents and instructors.
A quick way to alleviate any
unnecessary stress is to prevent
the dreaded plague called pro-
crastination; putting off a final
project or paper is the last thing
you want to do during finals week.
Procrastination ails most students
during midterms and finals, but
there are ways to keep it at bay.
The best solution to this universal
problem is time management.
Maintaining a calendar or an
agenda will help with proper time
management. Writing the due
dates down for various assign-
ments and test dates will reduce
the guessing games many stu-
dents put themselves through
when they do not know when
something is due or when a test
is scheduled
It will behoove many stu-
dents to study for a potentially
challenging exam ahead of time,
as opposed to the night before
because this will lighten the s
workload, therefore avoiding
superfluous anxieties.
For those who tend to distract
themselves with various objects
and personal thoughts perhaps
studying with a partner or a full
study group is the best bet. Every
student has their own strength
and weakness in a class. When
students come together to collab-
orate their notes they each add to
the dynamic of the study group.
' Study groups are best for
people who require reinforce-
ment of their knowledge of class
Joining a study group is a great way to gather important information that you may have missed throughout class.
materials. The major benefit of
study groups is that students can
discuss their course information
with one another and hash out any
uncertainties, which is impossible
to do alone.
Another helpful tip to study-
ing for exams is to make an
outline or note cards. An outline
and note cards are useful because
they are essentially a guideline of
pertinent information expected to
be on an exam. Writing the infor-
mation down is often an excellent
mechanism for long-term reten-
tion of the course material.
For rote memorization it
is sometimes helpful to use a
mnemonic device. A mnemonic
device is the use of common,
everyday words or phrases to help
memorize lists of words or
complex phrases.
It may be too late for this
semester, but one of the best
ways of studying material is to
use highlighters to highlight the
important sections of the book
as they are read throughout the
course. That way, when you go
back at the end of the semester,
the most important information
will stand out and it will not be
as hard to sort through pages of
information.
Regardless of your personal
study habits, final exams are right
around the corner and with them
there comes stress and the pres-
sure to do well.
Do not be overwhelmed by
this end of semester event because
if you start your study process
now you will be as well prepared
as possible when it comes time
for the exam. By avoiding pro-
crastination and allowing ample
study time you should be all set
for final season.
This writer can be contacted at
pulset heeastcarolinian.com.
This week in health: Seasonal Depression
Stress can leave you feeling exhausted at the end of the semester, just when you need rest.
Catch some ZzZzs before exams
Keys to sleeping better
SARAH CAMPBELL
FEATURES EDITOR
College students are in the age
group most susceptible to sleep
deprivation. Staying up into the
wee hours of the morning, waking
before the sun rises and pulling
"all nighters" have become a com-
monality for students. Although
it is impossible in most cases to
devote more time to sleeping, there
are ways to takes advantage of the
sleep that you are getting.
One of the most important
steps in getting the most out
of a night of sleep is establish-
ing a routine. If you go to bed
around the same time every
night, your body will adjust to the
cycle you have created, thus you
will be able to fall asleep faster
than if you go to sleep at a different
time every night
For college students, set-
ting a bedtime might seem like
an impossible task, but believe
that the feeling of refreshment
is well worth it. Another easy
way to get the most out of a good
night's sleep is by banishing caf-
feine from your diet for several
hours before bed. Drinking or
eating anything with caffeine
alerts your body and doing so
right before bed could keep you up
hours longer than planned.
Drinking alcohol before going
to bed may help you fall asleep
faster, but the problems associated
with it ensure that you will wake
several times during the night.
Stay away from alcoholic bever-
ages if you want to devote a full
night to sleep because it will leave
you tossing and turning tor a good
part of the night. Not to mention
getting up to go to the bathroom
for a variety of reasons.
Use your bed only for sleeping.
If your body associates your bed
with doing other activities such as
studying or watching television,
it may become harder for you to
fall asleep. Only sleeping on your
bed allows you body to recognize
that it is time to sleep when you
lay down, therefore causing you
to fall asleep faster and stay asleep
longer. Try buying a comfy, col-
lapsible chair to sit in when you
are studying or watching TV so
that you can still have somewhere
comfortable to sit but it will be
somewhere that doesn't take up too
much room and will not disrupt
your sleep patterns.
Do you ever sleep with the
television or computer on all night
long? Well, leaving these two
things on can deplete the quality
of sleep you are getting. The light
from them keeps you from achiev-
ing a deep sleep, which is needed
see SLEEP page A5
More than just the
winter blues
STACY DAIL
STAFF WRITER
Although we are still getting
a taste of warm weather, we all
have to face the fact that winter is
approaching accompanied by warm
sweaters and thick coats to keep us
warm on the coldest nights.
Many people go about
there everyday lives fairly
unaffected by the change in temper-
ature, while others suffer silently
from seasonal depression.
Seasonal affective disorder
occurs each year, usually start-
ing in the fall and ending in early
spring or summer. This disor-
der affects four to six percent of
Americans. Over three-quar-
ters of SAD surfers are women
between the ages of 20 and 40,
but it can also affect children,
especially those living in higher
latitudes where there are extreme
season changes.
The cause of SAD is not known,
but researchers have suggested
that it deals with the availability
of sunlight. Only about one percent
of people are diagnosed with SAD
in Florida, as opposed to Alaska,
where nearly 10 percent of the pop-
ulation suffers from the disorder.
A simple explanation for this
phenomenon is that those living
in Alaska are exposed to less
sunlight. This decrease in sun
exposure can cause their biological
clock, which regulates things such
as mood, sleep and even hormones,
to slow down.
In order to reset the biologi-
cal clock, those with SAD must
be exposed to light. The most
common solution for this problem
is light therapy. Those with the
disorder eat, read and do daily
activities sitting two to three feet
away from light that contains white
fluorescent bulbs.
No worries, the device does
block ultraviolet light by a
screen, but side effects such as
irritability, headache and eyestrain
may occur.
In addition to light therapy,
antidepressants are another
common treatment. Perhaps the
easiest form of treatment is to
spend time outdoors and increase
the amount of time in sunlight.
Seasonal depression is much
more serious than "cabin fever" or
the usual "winter blues and can,
like any other depression, affect a
person's entire life and the lives of
those around them.
see DEPRESSION page A5
Light and exercise: Two good ways
to lift the winter blues
Many people feel depressed and run-down during the dark days
ot winter. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) affects about 10
of people in northern areas and 2 of those in sunny regions.
Exposure to bright light relieves it. Regular exercise also helps.
SAD is a temporary period of
depression produced by
disruption of the body's daily
"circadlan" cycles
Common symptoms:
Carbohydrate craving
Lethargy
Excessive eating
Excessive sleeping
Sadness
Most effective treatment: Seeing the light
Physicians often
recommend spending
45 minutes to 2
hours daily in
front of a
table-top electric
light box that
produces "full
spectrum" light
similar to sunlight
Lift your eyes
Getting outdoors, especially in the morning, can augment
the effects of a light box
For the greatest benefit, light from the sky - clear or
cloud-covered - needs to reach your retinaa.
PM'HMfl

Reflected light i
Looking directly at
, the sun can cause
r permanent
burns on your retinas
C
How exercise helps
Regular outdoor exercise helps
relieve depressed moods
for several reasons.
It enhances peripheral
circulation, increasing the
body's resistance to cold
H relieves the boredom
used by spending cold
months indoors
noroves appetite
and steep 5
ft boosts confidence
and swMmage
5
NOTE: People who are deeply depressed
to the point of having thoughts of harming "eB
Ihemse'ves, should get medical advice.
SOURCES Current Medical Diagnosis and Treatment 1808
Cosjmtaa-PnMbvtenan Madjcti Cankw






TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 20O6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
PAGE A5
DEPRESSION
continued from A4
SLEEP
continued from A4
Try getting plenty of exercise and increased sun exposure to help your mood.
Symptoms of winter SAD
include fatigue, tiredness,
decreased energy, increase in
appetite causing weight gain, as
well as difficulty concentrating
and the need to be alone.
Those who have these symp-
toms are advised not to assume
that they have seasonal depression,
but first see a doctor for an in-
depth assessment.
Although not as common as
winter SAD, there is a rare form
of SAD, called summer depres-
sion, which begins in late spring
and ends in early fall. Symptoms
to this type include decreased
Colon Cancer,
Get the test.
Get the polyp.
Get the cure,
1-800-ACS-235 or cancer.org
to feel rested and rejuvenated the
next morning. This deep sleep,
which is called rapid eye move-
ment sleep, is where the feeling of
being rested actually comes from.
If you disrupt it, your body will
not feel much rest.
A common misconception is
that working out right before bed-
time will tire you out, thus help
you fall asleep quicker. Working
out just before going to bed wakes
up your body and causes you to
stay awake longer.
You should work out a couple
of hours before bed in order to
give your body to proper amount
of time to calm down so that
you can fall asleep when you are
ready to sleep, rather than when
I you are able.
With exams coming up and
final projects being due stu-
dents are more likely to become
even more sleep deprived than
ever in the coming weeks.
However, by making these
adjustments to their routine
students can get the most out of
their sleep. You are busy and need
rest, even if it seems like you don't
have the time.
Think about it this way - if
you take some time each day for
sleep, you will have a decreased
chance of getting sick. Preventing
illness will help you avoid having
to waste two days or more getting
well again.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
appetite causing weight loss and
a decrease in sleep.
Living in North Carolina
where the weather isn't exactly
on the extreme side is a good
thing when it comes to developing
summer or winter SAD. So, be
thankful for our weather, and enjoy
the last bit of warm sunny days
before the cold weather settles in.
For more information about
SAD including a list of causes and
more treatment options log on to
the Website webmd.com.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
Stretch out
tension at bedtime
A person who has trouble falling asleep may
have gone to bed with tense muscles; some
slow, gentle stretches will help relax them.
Wall Start with
roll- back against
down wall
Roll forward; let arms
hang; gently roll back
12 In. (30 cm)
Inhale as you
lift over head,
do not force;
exhale and
return to front
7 0
1
-
-BL fMi&AjjjtMf
-c
The Gray Gallery might be a place to find some unique holiday gifts.
Holiday exhibition opens
Student artwork for
sale
JENNY AYERS
STAFF WRITER
If you are looking for some-
thing with a creative twist to
give your loved ones this holiday
season, make your way over to the
Jenkins Fine Arts Center where
art students will be selling every-
thing from jewelry to prints.
Not only will you walk away
with a unique, thoughtful gift,
but you will be supporting your
fellow students as all proceeds
benefit the art guilds and artists
of the School of Art and Design.
The holiday exhibition will
be held in the Wellington B.
Gray Gallery Thursday, Nov.
30 through Saturday, Dec.
2. Gift items include jewelry,
scarves, wood and metal sculp-
ture, paintings, prints, ceram-
ics and much more. All items
in the exhibition will be for sale.
The hours of the sale are 9 a.m.
- 8 p.m. on Nov. 30; 9 a.m. - 9
p.m. on Dec. 1 and 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
on Dec. t. All are welcome to
attend.
If you're looking for unique
gifts this holiday season, stop by
the art building this week while
you're on campus and scope out
the goods created by our very
own art students.
Months or even years in the
making, these gifts are certainly
one of a kind and you'll be able
to find something for anyone on
your list.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Sports
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2006 PAGE A6
ECU's Inside Source
BY THE NUMBERS
760
Number of receiving yards
for Chris Johnson in his col-
legiate career, setting a new-
school record for receiving
yards by a running back;
Johnson set the record in the
first quarter of the ECU-N.C.
State game with a 15-yard
reception, and has 20 recep-
tions for 168 yards on the
year
246
Points allowed by ECU on
the season, after the Pirates
gave up just 16 points against
N.C. State; this season's point
total is the lowest given up by
ECU since 2000 (229)
Pirates shut down Wolfpack
3
Number of victories for ECU
in November, pushing the
team towards a bowl berth;
it is the first time the Pirates
have had three wins in the
month since 1,9.97 (beat Lou-
isville, Houston and Cincin-
nati)
7.4
Average assists per game for
ECU point guard Darrell
Jenkins through the first five
games of the season, ranking
first in C-USA; Jenkins had
five assists against North
Carolina Central
24.5
Average points per game
for North Carolina Central
guard Brian Ayala in the first
two games of the season; the
Pirates held Ayala to two
points on 1-9 shooting in 36
minutes
1,731
Number of rushing yards
given up by the Pirates
defense this season, after
giving up 107 yards to N.C
State; ECU's defense gave up
the least amount of yards on
the ground since the 2001
season (1,628)
They said it
"I was really concerned about
their return game and I said if
we could get good field xisition
on our first punt, I wanted to
run a fake said Molt "I want
to get them to where they're
not coming after us, so even if
we miss it, we've got them on
their heels
- Skip Holtz, EC V head'foothill
coach
"The biggest thing we wanted to
do was contest shots. Naturally,
we wanted to be able to hold a
guy who was scoring close to
25 points per game under his
average. We had a lot of different
guys guarding him, but I think
the higgest thing was when he
(Ayala) was able to shoot the
basketball, to be able to get to
him quickly and contest his shot.
I think we did a pretty good job
of that
- Ricky Stokes, ECU basketball
coach
Steven Rogers hauls down one of his three receptions and stiffs arms a Wolfpack defender. Rogers was one of nine receivers who competed a pass from James Pinkney on Saturday.
Win at Carter-Fin ley
Stadium gives ECU
seventh win
RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
When the goalposts were low-
ered at Carter-Kinley Stadium with
14 seconds still left on the clock, it
set offa celebration felt from Raleigh
to Greenville.
ECU beat N.C. State, 21-16,
Saturday night to dose the regular
season and secure a Ixml bid for the
first time since 8001,
"I can't Ik- more proud of these
seniors said Molt. "I thought the
defense was awesome. They stepped
up time and time again and they were
great They knew we needed this win
for a bowl game I'm so excited to go
bowling Tonight's win is about the
guys in tlie locker room. They did such a
great job and I'mso proud of all of them
The win, coupled with Southern
Mississippi's 42-7 thumping of Mar-
shall, does not land ECU in the Con-
ference USA Championship game,
but does put them in position to be a
likely selection by the Papajohns.com
Howl in Birmingham on Dec. 23.
Taking advantage of an aggres-
sive N.C State defense, ECU stole
moment inn right before halftinie and
never looked back as the Pirates won
in Kaleigh lor the first time since 1999.
Responding to an N.C. State field
goal to give the Wolfpack (3-9) a 10-
7 lead with 84 seconds remaining in
the half, James Pinkney connected
with Aundrae Allison 80 seconds
later for a 53-yard touchdown strike
and ECU went to the locker room
with a 14-10 lead.
"It was huge said Allison of his
touchdown. "I knew it was going to
be hard for them to move the ball in
the second half because we took the
momentum. James put it right on
there. I told him to squeeze it right
in there and he did
Allison beat Jiinmie Sutton,
who went for the interception,
then sprinted the rest of the way
to out-run the State second-
ary to give the Pirates the lead
and the momentum heading to
the locker rooms.
"We didn't make the plays we
needed to, and we had opportunities
for six interceptions said N.C. State
coach Chuck Aniato. "If we had gotten
one, it could have changed the game
The Pirates (7-5) did not turn
the ball over once as Pinkney threw
for 220 yards on 14-of-29 passing
and two touchdowns while Brandon
Fractious ran for 92 yards and the
game-winning touchdown. Pinkney
completed passes to nine different
receivers, finding Allison and Steven
Rogers each three times.
"I thought James was really
dialed in Holtz said. "Me was
focused and Brandon Fractious was
awesome. Me broke tackles, and he
read plays. Me just played really well.
That shows how bad he wants it
The Pirates were able to salt the
game away as a Ryan Dougherty
punt pinned the Wolfpack deep
inside their own territory. The
Pirates pressured N.C State quarter- '
back Daniel Evans and Nick Johnson
knocked down the third down pass.
Following a first-down catch by
Rogers and a long run by Dominique
Lindsay, Fractious got around the
see FOOTBALL page A7
Bowl Possibilities
With the win against N.C.
State, ECU assured their first
bowl since the GMAC Bowl
in 2001. Conference USA
has five bowl tie-ins and the
Pirates will likely not know
their destination until after
Friday's C-USA Championship
game when Southern Miss
travels to Houston. Speculation
has been rampant, but the
most likely scenarios have
the Pirates either traveling to
Birmingham or Mobile, Ala.
For ECU, the worst case scenario
would be that the GMAC
Bowl picks Tulsa, giving the
Papajohns.com Bowl to Southern
Miss and the Bell Helicopter
Armed Forces Bowl to Rice.
Second-half surge lifts
Pirates over NCCU
Darrell Jenkins drives on NCCU.
Captain leads way with
16 points
RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
T he ECU men's bas-
ketball team completed a
near-perfect sports weekend
Sunday afternoon.
The Pirates used a second-half
surge to run past North Carolina
Central, 68-47, at Minges Coliseum
to improve to 4-1 on the season.
Before the men's game, the ECU
women upped their mark to '2-4 with
a 78-41 win over Florida A&M, in
w 11 ich Cherie Mills led all players with
'23 points and 10 rebounds. Saturday
night, the ECU fixrtball team beat
N.C State21-16.
ECU handed N.C. Central (2-1)
its first loss of the year by holding
the Eagles to 3fi-percent shooting
from the floor. The Pirates kept
Centrals leading scorer, Brian Ayala,
in check. Ayala came in averaging
24.5 points per game, but scored just
two on Saturday.
"The biggest thing we wanted
to do was contest shots ECU coach
Ricky Stokes said. "Naturally, we
wanted to be able to hold a guy who
was scoring close to 25 points per
game under his average. We had a lot
of different guys guarding him, but I
think the biggest thing was when he
(Ayala) was able to shoot the basket-
ball, to be able to get to him quickly
and contest his shot. I think we did
a pretty good job of that
The Pirates never trailed
as Courtney Captain, who fin-
ished with a team-high 16 points,
nailed a 3-pointer on ECU's
first possession. Drew Johnson
led the Eagles with 16 points
and eight rebounds.
The trey by Captain, who also
had six rebounds and three assists.
was the first of 80 attempts from
downtown as the Pirates relied on
their perimeter shooting to win.
The Pirates, and the Eagles, shot
poorly in the first half ECU was 29
percent from the floor while NCCl'
was 32 percent, A low-scoring first
half came toaclote with ECU holding
a 23-17 edge.
After halftinie, the Pirates went
on a tear, shooting 57-percent from
toe floor and 6-of-9 from 3-point
land to outscore the Eagles, 45-30.
see BASKETBALL page A7
Former Miami Head Coach Butch Davis is introduced at UNC.
With disappointing season now over,
Tar Heels become Butch s team
(AP)North Carolina's season
begin with the "New Blue It ended
w ith a new coach.
And in between, there were
plenty of the same old struggles that
plagued the Tar Heels during the
past several seasons and wound up
costing coach John Bunting his job.
Now, the Butch Davis era in
Chapel Hill begins Monday, two
days after North Carolina wrapped
up a 3-9 season with a 45-44 win
over rival Duke.
The Tar Heels dosed the cam-
paign with consecutive victories
against two big rivals after also
beating North Carolina State in ust
the kinds of inspired efforts that,
had they been put forth earlier in
the season, might have kept Bunting
employed at his alma mater.
"If we played with this type of
energy and consistency all year
long, we'd probably be heading to a
bowl game quarterback Joe Dailey
said. "But it's a great springboard tor
next season"
Hopes were high back in the
preseason when Dailey, a Nebraska
transfer, was named the starter and
the seniors chose the "New Blue"
motto to reflect a renewed commit-
ment to reversing North Carolina's
woeful fortunes.
Instead, it was more of the same
old results for the mistake-prone
Tar Heels, who opened with a loss
to Rutgers that in hindsight looked
better as the season developed, then
were dominated by Virginia Tech
More beating Furman for their only
victory until late November.
By that point, it had become
evident that the Tar Heels would
Qr
see UNC page A7





TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 200G
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE A7
FOOTBALL
continued from A6
right corner and scampered 12
yards into the end zone to give
the Pirates a 21-10 lead with 2:37
remaining in the game.
"We went to work and played
hard and knew we had to get it
done said Fractious, who ran for
83 yards in last week's lost to Rice,
but did not carry the ball at all in the
second half. "It's been a long time
since we were able to go bowling and
now we're doing it and it's exciting
The Pirates ran for over 100
yards in the second half as ECU's
offensive line, playing without
injured starting left tackle Eric
Graham, was able to take over.
"There were times when they
looked like we reshuffled them
around this week, but for the most
part, they did a gexxl job Holtz said.
ECU did not move the ball well
on the ground in the first half. N.C.
State limited the Pirates ground
game to 23 yards and just seven
by Fractious on five carries. The
Wolfpack, conversely, ran for 63
yards while only netting SO in the
second half
"It's hard to put a finger on what
changed in the second half Amato
said. "They woke up and started
using three linemen to create
problems lor our passing game.
We should have stayed with the run
because it was such a close game
N.C. State was unable to pick
up a first down in the third quarter
with tour straight three-and-outs.
The Pirates were unable to capital-
ize on the good field position as the
Wolfpack got continuous pressure
from their front four led by Tank
Tyler. The ECU receivers could
not find holes as the N.C. State sec-
ondary did its part to knock down
Pinkney passes.
The Pirates were finally able
to get something going following
Deraney's fourth punt of the quar-
ter. A 13-yard return by junior cor-
nerback Travis Williams gave ECU
the ball at the N.C. State 49 and,
on the next play, Fractious broke a
tackle and ripped off a 26-yard run.
Stalling in the red zone again,
the Pirates had to settle for a short
field goal, but Robert Lee continued
his struggles and missed a 24-yarder.
The Wolfpack tried to capitalize
on the miss, but had some trickery
go against them as a reverse pass
by Marcus Stone was picked off by
Kasey Ross at the ECU 36.
The game didn't go ECU's way
to start as the Pirates opened at
their own 13. Pinkney ran a quar-
terback bootleg on the first play
from scrimmage for a seven-yard
pickup and an N.C. State offsides
penalty gave the Pirates a first
down. Pinkney then hit a wide-open
Kevin Roach fora 19-yard gain near
midfield. The drive stalled from
there, and a failed fake punt gave the
Wolfpack the ball at midfield.
"I was really concerned about
their return game and I said if we
could get good field position on our
first punt, I wanted to run a fake
Holtz said. "I want to get them to
where they're not coming after us,
so even if we miss it, we've got them
on their heels
It looked like the call was going
to cost the Pirates dearly because four
plays later, State found the end zone.
A blown coverage allowed N.C
State to convert a third-and-3 with
a 41-yard pass from Daniel Evans
to Darrell Blackmail down to the 2.
Toney Baker ran it in from there and
the Wolfpack took the early lead, 7-0.
"I'm not sure what hap-
pened said Wijliams. "Things
happen like that and we just had
to bounce back from that and
not let it beat us the next play
The Pirates tried to respond on
their ensuing possession, but were
forced to punt and N.C. State took
over at its own 19.
A 23-yard pass from Evans to
Anthony Hill appeared to have N.C.
State poised to march again, but the
F-CU defense stiffened as Pierre
Bell took down Baker short of the
first-down mark. Bell had missed a
tackle on Hill three plays prior to
allow the big gain.
The first quarter came to an
end with the Wolfpack laying the
lumber, with both legal and illegal
hits. State's Tank Tyler was drawn
offsides by a false start, but the big
defensive tackle knocked Pinkney
to the turf, resulting in a personal
foul. After Brandon Fraction! was
snuffed for a four-yard loss, Pinkney
found Steven Rogers for a 44-yard
pickup down the State sideline to
open the second quarter anil the
Pirates were set up inside the N.C.
State 30.
Another Wolfpack personal
foul on John Amanchukwu put
the Pirates inside the red zone
and a two-yard pass from Pinkney
to Jay Sonnhalter on third-and-
goal knotted the game, 7-7, less
than three minutes into the
second quarter.
Both teams traded punts on
their next two possessions, with
a 55-yard punt by Ryan Dough-
erty pinning the Wolfpack inside
their own 20, Dougherty later
booted a 60-yard punt in the third
that pushed State back to its own
16. On the day, Dougherty averaged
43.6 yards on seven punts.
ECU had a lot of angled
kicks and punts to take away
N.C. State's return game and the
dangerous Blackmail. Blackmail
leads the Pack in returns and has
a kick and punt return for touch-
downs this year.
"The punt team may have won
this game for us Holtz said. "It was
one of the diflerences in the game and
Ryan madeaditlerence for us tonight"
Aside from its first possession,
Senior running back Brandon Fractious dominated the second half against N.C. State, racking up 92 yards.
N.C. State was deep inside its own
territory most of the game as the
ECU special teams kept the Wolf-
pack at bay.
"Field position was an advan-
tage for them said Amato,
whose job security is in question at
State. "They were always starting
outside the 40 in the second half.
We weren't able to get done what
we needed to and we couldn't get
points on the board
The Wolfpack just fed
their running backs late in the
second quarter to move the ball
down the field as both Baker
and Brown picked up yards in
fivc-and-six-yard increments. The
runs softened the ECU secondary
as Travis Williams and Kasey Ross
were beaten for first-down gains to
give State the ball at the FXU 24.
Baker finished with .52 yards on 13
carries while Andre Brown picked
up 42 on 12 attempts.
A slip by N.C. State's John
Dunlap cost the Wolfpack a
first down and they had to
settle for a 34-yard John Deraney
field goal to take the 10-7 lead.
Several players found it hard
to get their footing on the Carter-
Finley Stadium turf, especially
Chris Johnson, who slipped
and fell three times in the first
quarter. A slip by Leon
Best cost the ECU sophon lore corner-
back an interception late in the first.
Bobby Good played for
the first time in five weeks
fiir the Pirates, and had several
passes thrown his way, but was
unable to catch any. Good had been
out with a broken foot.
N.C. State added a late touch-
down on a Jamelle Eugene run
with 19 seconds remaining, but the
Purple-Gold chants had already
begun as the ECU contingency
overtook the crowd of 54,264.
"They were going Purple and
Gold, they were in both end zones
and those upper tiers, and the crowd
was awesome Holtz said. "There
were times in the second half where
it was loud enough and it was like a
home crowd for us
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
BASKETBALL
continued from A6
While ECU finished g-of-SObehind
the arc, Central was just l-of-14.
"The first half, we weren't
making shots Captain said. "We
had a lot of open shots, but we just
kept shooting. There wasn't any-
thing to stress except making shots.
We were playing good defense, but
we were just missing shots. Coach
Stokes told us tojust relax and make
the open shot. Just keep shooting
After an 8-2 run to open the
game, the Pirates went cold, going
scoreless for six minutes until Gabe
Blair put back a Jeremy Ingram
miss to put the Pirates back up, 10-
8. Blair finished with six points and
a team-high seven rebounds. The 6-
8 freshman from King's Mountain
also had a team-high three steals.
A big dunk by Billy Wilson early
in the second half on a putback cut the
ECU lead to three xints and appeared
to get the Eagles back into the game.
Once N.C. Central cut the
lead to two, Captain pushed the
lead back up to eight with a pair of
threes. Sam Hinnant added a pair
of threes himself, one from NBA
range, as the Pirates built a 12-point
lead while going on a 14-3 run
before a timeout was called.
A Jeremy Ingram dunk followed
by a 3-pointer from the Kinston
native energized the Pirates and the
crowd at Minges Coliseum. When
Fields slammed home a miss and
Blair threw down on the next pos-
session, the Pirates had a 19-point
lead with seven minutes remaining.
"I thought in the second half
when we made some shots, we
kind of relaxed a little bit Stokes
said. "Tilings opened up for us. We
continued to defend and got some
easy baskets in transition. I think
you play harder defensively when
you're making shots
Fields blocked five shots in the
game, including three in the game's
first two minutes, and is developing
a reputation as defensive force. The
6-9 freshman also scored 10 points
while hauling in five rebounds,
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three on the offensive glass.
"I came here to play defense
and rebound, but now I'm adding
a little scoring threat to my game
Fields said.
N.C. Central, which is making
the jump from Division II to Divi-
sion I next year, could not run with
the Pirates in the first-ever official
meeting between the schools, and
turned the ball over 17 teams.
"I was glad that Coach Stokes
and QMackj McCarthy gave us an
opportunity to play here NCCU
coach Henry Dickerson said. "They
took a risk in playing us. They've
got some good, athletic people and I
thought we played hard. But a game
like this lets your Division II kids
know what Division I is all about
The Pirates are off until Satur-
day when they travel to Liberty for
a 7 p.m. tip and the next home game
is Dec. .9 against South Florida.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
UNC
continued from A6
have trouble taking care of the ball,
keeping other teams out of the end
zone and generating yards. North
Carolina finished the season ranked
101st nationally in total offense.
104th in scoring defense and tied
for lllth in turnover margin, and
no ACC team threw more intercep-
tions than the Tar Heels' 18.
Bunting was fired'Oct. 22,
midway through a seven-game
losing streak that dropped the Tar
Heels' record to 1) before their two
season-ending victories over the
Wolfpack and Blue Devils.
Kevin Roach named to C-USA
All-Academic team
(SID) Houston's Wade
Koehl and Tulsa's Paul Smith
were unanimous Conference
USA Football All-Academic
selections, as voted upon by the
school's sports information direc-
tors and released by the league
office Monday. Memphis and
Tulsa each had two representa-
tives on the inaugural squad ami
nine of the 12 C-USA institu-
tions are represented on the
prestigious list. The all-academic
team consists of 11 student-
athletes that have earned a 3.2
cumulative grade point average
or better artd are a starter or key
reserve on the volleyball team.
Kevin Roach of ECU and
Travis Cooley of Southern Miss
arc currently working on their
master's degrees. Roach's focus
is in accounting and holds a 3.44
GPA. He was recently named to
the 20Ofi ESPN The Magazine
C'oSIDA Academic All-District
HI first team and has been a
C-USA Commissioner's Honor
Roll member four times. Roach
ranks fourth on his team in
receiving yards and receptions.
Cooley has a 3.66 GPA in human
resource management. He was
an All-Conference USA second-
team member in 200.5 and is
part of ECU's offensive line that
is No. 3 in C-USA and No. 33 in
the nation in rushing offense.
Roach and three others
are finalists for ESPN The
Magazi neCoSI DA Aca-
demic All-America honors.
2006 CONFERENCE USA FOOTBALL ALL-ACADEMIC TEAM
Name Year School GPA Major
KEVIN ROACHSR.ECU3.44ACCOUNTING (GRAD)
WADE KOEHLSR.HOUSTON3.52ACCOUNTING
RUSTY CLAYTONSR.MEMPHIS3.61CRIMINAL JUSTICE
BRANDON PATTERSONSO.MEMPHIS3.73FINANCE
THOMAS MORSTEADSO.SMU3.55MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
TRAVIS COOLEYSR.SOUTHERN MISS3.65HUMAN RESOURCE MGT. (GRAD)
MICHAEL PURCELLSR.TULANE3.64FINANCE
MIKE MENGERSSR.TULSA3.74MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
PAUL SMITHJR.TULSA3.80COMMUNICATION
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The Humane Charity Seal of Approval
guarantees that a health charity funds
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medical research, but never animal experiments.
Council on Humane Giving www.HumaneSeal.org
Washington, DC. 202-686-2210, ext 335
PHYSICIANS COMMITTEE FOR RESPONSIBLE MEDICINE
Community Amenities
Tanning beds
Game and recreational room
Fully-equipped fitness center
Sparkling swimming pool
Basketball and volleyball courts
Located on ECU Shuttle and Pirate
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Apartment Features
- Fully furnished 2,3, and 4 bedrooms
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Pet friendly
AlgikStflROLINA






PAGE As
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2006
Delhomme not to blame
Chuck Amato was removed as N.C. State head football coach following the team's loss to ECU on Saturday.
N.C. State chucks Amato
Jake Delhomme throws a screen pass in the face of Redskins defensive tackle Corm
jnffin.
(AP) Jake I)elhcimme is get-
ting tixi much ol the blame for (aroli-
na'soflensixcwoes and will remain the
Starter, Coach John fox said Monday
"When you drop back to pass
the ball it's B team effort Kox said
a day after the Panthers mustered
only 864 yards in a IT-li loss to
Washington, which has the .SOth-
ranked defense.
Whenever you don't play Well
enough to win I'm not sure it's one
guy. It's definitely not just Jake
Delhomme was 83-of-38 for
1(M yards, one touchdown and
two interceptions against the Red-
skins His second pick was costly.
On first down from the Washing-
ton H, Delhomme Wal pressured
and his badly overthrown pass for
Steve Smith into double coverage
uas c aught by Washington safety
Sean Taylor with 8:08 left.
"1 got hit and it obviously
didn't go where I thought it wal
going to go Delhomme said. "But
they were playing coverage to him
all day long, maybe once or tw ice
they didn't. He was running and
I was trying to throw it down
the seam. I didn't anticipate it to
go there. But I was giving him a
chance on that play
"That's why that fthrow
looked like a kickofT"
The loss against the down-
trodden Redskins dropped the
Panthers ((ir) a game behind
New Orleans in the NFC South
and continued a maddening,
inconsistent season.
Delhomme has 18 touchdown
passes, nine interceptions and a
passer rating of only 7S.7 But Fox
said that, barring injury, he'll remain
the starter ahead of Chris Weinke.
"I think he's proven lie's the
right guy fox said. "Until he
proves otherwise, we'll stay the
same. I can't sit here and predict
the future, but I don't want to
give any inclinations that we're
thinking about changing the
quarterback. We evaluate as we go
with everybody, but I think it's not
all Jake's fault that we lost the
five games or all because of him
that we won the six. It's been a
team effort. By no means can we
stick it all on the quarterback
Delhomme has struggled
with his accuracy all season,
but the Panthers have also been
plagued by a lack of a running
game. When left tackle Travelle
Wharton was lost to a season-
ending knee injury in Week 1,
the Panthers were forced to make
major changes on the offensive
line. While the Panthers did
rush for a franchise record 848
yards against St. Louis, the team
was held to 101 yards Sunday
and Delhomme was pressured
all day.
(AP) In the end, Chuck
Amato couldn't just shrug off all
the criticism of his up-and-down
North Carolina State program.
The school fired Amato on
Sunday, a day after he completed
his seventh season at his alma
mater. The former Wolfpack line-
backer had a 49-87 record at the
school and led the team to five
bowl games, but his squads were
.2.5-31 In the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference and never finished higher
than fourth.
N.C. State (3-9) lost seven
straight games this season to finish
with a losing record for the second
time in three seasons since quarter-
back Philip Rivers went to the NFL.
On Saturday, the Wolfpack finished
the season with a'21 - Hi home loss to
East Carolina.
After the game, Amato was
asked if he expected to be back for
an eightli season.
"Why not?" he said, fol-
lowing a two-year pattern
of deflecting criticism with
barrel-chested bravado.
In a statement Sunday, ath-
letic director Lee Fowler credited
Amato with helping to improve
the program's football facili-
ties and ticket sales, but said a
change was needed. He said a
search for a replacement would
begin immediately.
"No Wolfpack tan can question
the excitement and enthusiasm that
Chuck Amato brought to the N.C.
State football program when he
came here in 2000 Fowler said.
"However, because the results on
the field in two of the last three sea-
sons have fallen far below where we
feel our program should be at this
point, we have decided to take the
program in a new direction
Amato, who had three years
remaining on his contract, said he
was disappointed by the decision
but proud of what he accomplished
during his tenure.
"My vision was to take this pro-
gram to places that it had never been
before in 100-plus years of playing
football he said in a statement. "I
didn't come here to use this job as
a stepping stone like many others
have or could. I wanted to surround
myself with people who would help
me stretch my vision and not choke
my dreams. This is obviously a
disappointing decision for me, but
I would never do anything to hurt
North Carolina State University
Amato met with the players
Sunday night at Carter-Finley
Stadium; most emerged from the
meeting dejectedly and declined
to comment.
"It's disappointing said Curt
Cignetti, Amato's tight ends coach
and recruiting coordinator. "I think
Chuck did a lot of great things for
this program and right now 1 really
feel for him"
Ernest Jones, a junior line-
backer, said Amato was positive
as he addressed the players and
offered his best wishes. Jones said
the Wolfpack's struggles this
year shouldn't be blamed entirely
on Amato.
"It's not only the coaches' fault,
but the players Jones said. "We let
the coaches down, so it's coaches
and the players also
From the day Amato arrived
after IS years as an assistant to
Bobby Bowden at Florida State,
he talked of building a program
that would contend for conference
championships and more. Soon,
Carter-Finley underwent about
$87 million in renovations and
upgrades, from the construction of
the l()3,2.r)4-s(iuare-fbot Murphy
Center to house the football offices
and the four-story Vaughn Towers
with press and luxury seating,
as well as permanent seats that
bowled in the last open end of the
stadium for this season.
Behind Rivers, who rewrote
the school's passing records, the
Wolfpack went to bowl games
in Amato's first four seasons.
The highlight was an 11-3 cam-
paign in 2002 that included a
top-l() ranking and a Gator
Bowl win against Notre Dame.
But after Rivers graduated, the
Wolfpack suffered its first losing
season under Amato at 5-6 in 2004.
Then, the Wolfpack bounced back
from a bad start and won five of six
to close the year with a win against
South Florida in the Meineke Car
Care Bowl. But with each loss, the
criticism seemed to increase even
as Amato shrugged it off.
When asked this season
whether he felt he was on the hot
seat, Amato quipped, "The hottest
seat I've been in is when I drove
my 1969 Corvette from my house
to this football office on a Sunday
and it was 98 degrees and I don't
have air conditioning
His program looked poised to
take another step this season when
the Wolfpack beat Boston College
on a last-second touchdown pass
and rallied to beat Florida State in
a pair of nationally televised games.
But the 24-20 win against the Sem-
inoles on Oct. ! was Amato's last.
Each year, Americans lose
61,000,000 days
of production due to
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Dr.James O'Doiitiliuc
at your job
Become an
AdRep lJELXZ.
Eka
Major at ECU:
Family and
Community Service
Hobbies:
Listening to music &
eating.
Why I donate:
To help other people
vim need.
Donate Plasma
and earn up to170mo
Last month, we paid out $33,035 to 734
good people.
DCI Biologicals is always paying out this
kind of cash. All you do is come, sit in a
lounge chair and donate your life-saving
plasma. It's like having a part-time job
without a boss.
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We are looking for new ad reps!
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Self Help Building
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ads@theeastcarolinian.com

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pro
16 Nig
17 Asi
cas
18 Ma
20 Hu
21 Inv
22 Litt
24
25 Po
lot
30 Sel
35 Aw
36 3rd
Ro
38 Ma
Ma
39 Bla
40 Cit'
42 Poi
43 Mu
wo
45 Fre
46 Ge
47 Fire
49 Hin
51 Ch
53 Ge
54 Re'
59 Fis
64 Cre
par
65 Jor
Ma
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67 Act
68 Bat
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71 III Li
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listi






Classifieds
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2006
Want it, get it! Only in our Classifieds.
FOR RENT
Need a place for next semester?
Move in now and have free rent
for November and December.
We have 1, 2, 3 and 4 bedroom
houses within one block of
ECU that have been completely
renovated and real nice with new
kitchens and bathrooms. 405 S.
Jarvis and 804 Johnston (next to
4th Street) Call 252-341-8331
$350 Each all inclusive 4 bedroom
Walk to campus! $350mo. each
INCLUDES Utilities, Cable, High
Speed Internet, and Phone with
Unlimited Long Distance! Washer
Dryer Included Call 258-4373
Nice House! 3Bdrm 2Bath.
Available Jan 1. $325Rm
Walking distance to campus,
Large driveway, Corner house.
202 Meade St. (252) 327-2992
New three story Townhomes for
rent. 3 Bed 3 Bath with over 1500
sq. feet. Monthly Rates starting at
$340bedroom. Convenient to
ECU with shuttle bus. Roommate
Matching Available. Great Leasing
Specials! Call now 252-551-3800
3 bedroom 3 bath condo
convenient to ECU watersewer
included, washer dryer hookups
walk in closets, energy efficient,
short term lease thru May 2007
available also ask about our 2
bedroom rate Pinnacle Property
Mgmt 561-7368 or 526-1915
Blocks to ECU, 1, 2, or 3 Bdrm
Homes, Central HeatAC, Washer.
Dryer, Dishwasher, We mow the
yard! Available December to
January; Call 321-4712, or see
at collegeuniversityrentals.com
Awesome 2BD 1BA Apt. available
Jan. 1st. $650 month incl.
water, sewage, DSL, cable. One
block from library. Wood floors,
new Dish washer and Washer
and Dryer. Call 831-566-2168
One, two Brs. on-site management
maintenance Central heat air
6, 9, 12 month leases Water
Cable included ECU bus Wireless
Internet pets dishwasher disposals
pool laundry (252) 758-4015
BLOCKS TO ECU Newly renovated
1, 2, 3, 4, &5 bdrm houses
available with short-term lease
options. Includes all appliances
with washerdryer & dishwasher.
Lawn maintenance provided
weekly. Call 252-327-4433.
WALK TO campus! 1 block
from the Library. 2 bedroom
apartment with hardwood floors
and central heatair. Washer,
dryer, dishwasher, high-speed
internet, basic cable, water &
sewer all included. Available
January 1st. Call Mike 439-0285.
1 BR in 3BR 2BA House $400
mo, Utilities included. All major
Appliances. No Pets. Professionals
only. Call David 252-412-5877
ROOMMATE
WANTED
Roommate Wanted in 4 BR
2 Bath house off of 10th
Street. ECU bus route, close to
campus! Call 757-374-4777
Roommate wanted to share a
4BD4BA all inclusive apartment
for $349mo. Male or female,
Close to ECU, on ECU bus route,
great amenities. Call 752-9995.
Need Roommate- Clean,
respectful. Big kitchen, nice
livingroom 2BD 1BA $325month.
Utilities approx. $50 month.
Includes central heating air.
One block from campus. Happy
Hunting! Call 919-669-2569
FOR SALE
School of Art and Design's Annual
Holiday Sale in Jenkins Fine
Arts Building Nov.29-Dec.2.
Find great gifts like handmade
jewelry and so much more!
HELP WANTED
WZMB will be accepting
applications for an Office
Assistant. You must be a full-
time registered ECU student,
with a 2.25 gpa. The hours
will be in the afternoon during
the Spring. You also must be
good in math. If interested
please apply in the basement
of Mendenhall Student Center,
between the hours of 8 and 5
pm. Deadline for this position will
be November 29, 2006 @ noon.
Library Page- Shelve books,
help patrons find books in
Children's Department. Monday
and Tuesday nights and every
other weekend. Complete
application at Sheppard Memorial
Library Children's Library,
530 Evans Street Greenville.
Food delivery drivers wanted
for Restaurant Runners. Part-
time positions $100-300week.
Perfect for college students
Some lunchtime (llam-2pm)
Mon-Fri advantageous and
weekend availability required.
2-way radios allow you to be
anywhere in Greenville when
not on a delivery. Reliable
transportation a must. Call 252-
Crossword
ACROSS
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7 Guy's date
10 Notoriety
14 City on the Rio
Grande
15 Gl's recreation
provider
16 Nights before
17 Asian apes,
casually
18 Make familiar
20 Hundred: pref.
21 Invoice phrase
22 Little guy
24 Mahal
25 Position with a
lot of perks
30 Set aside
35 Aware of
36 3rd baseman
Rodriguez
38 Mary Tyler or
Marianne
39 Black Sea arm
40 City NE of Cadiz
42 Poetic tributes
43 Multiplication
word
45 French half
46 Get lovey-dovey
47 Fire starters
49 Hints at
51 Charged particle
53 Genetic letters
54 Reverses
59 Fish, in a way
64 Create new
parameters
65 John and
Maureen
66 Declare
67 Actress Ruby
68 Backslide
69 Thailand, once
70 Cardinal cap
letters
71 Illusions
DOWN
1 Political group
2 Unusual
3 Algerian city
4 Strongest man
on the Planet?
5 In an irritable
way
6 Phone bk.
listings
1234567891 19111213
1415I.
1718
20293132
222324 37
2526272830 413334
353638 SO
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43444546
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66168
6971
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7 U.S. territory
8 British
racetrack
9 Chinese fruit
10 Deed
11 All fired up
12 Computer list
13 Puntadel
19 Relieve gridlock
21 Was silly over
23 Comet rival
25 Layers
26 Open, in a way
27 Leaf pore
28 Float like a
hummingbird
29 Induces ennui
31 PatorDebby
32 Ore deposits
33 Humanoid
posture
34 Office
purchases
37 Objects to
41 Omen
44 Small rowboat
48 Some pool balls
50 Assemble
Solutions
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52 Composition for 57 Long-lasting do
nine
54 Monks' titles
55 Jeans purveyor
Strauss
56 Something to
think about
58 Outer banana
60 Talk wildly
61 Field of study
62 Toasty
63 WWII vessels
65 FortCA
olon Cancer.
the test,
the polyp.
Get the cure.
X-r?00-ACS-2315 or oaneer.org
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551-3279 between 2-5pm only.
Leave message if necessary.
Sorry Greenville residents only.
Do you need a good job? The
ECU Telefund is hiring students
to contact alumni and parents
for the ECU Annual Fund. $6.25
hour plus cash bonuses. Make
your own schedule. If interested,
visit our website at www.ecu.
edutelefund and click on JOBS.
Project Manager Assistant for
Regional Concrete Contractor
Requires field and office duties.
Experience in construction
needed Good starting pay based
on Qualifications. Call 830-
5297 for information Good
pay based on qualifications.
Bartenders wanted! Up to
$250day. No experience
necessary. Training provided.
Call (800) 965-6520. ext. 202
100 College Tuition, money for
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while attending college full time
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PAGE A10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2006
SUCCESS FOR
LIFE WORKSHOPS
Tour key to
the Future
Making the Grade
Partnership with the Academic
Enrichment Center and the Freshman Class
When: Wednesday, November 29th
Where: Bate Room 1032
FREE GIFT FREE FOOD
Time: 7:OOpm-9:30pm
A Student Government Association
Sponsored Event
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It's not all up to you.


Title
The East Carolinian, November 28, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 28, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1945
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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