The East Carolinian, September 14, 2006












.
EastCarolinian
V0LUME82JSSULZ
www.theeastcarolinian.com
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FOR CAMPUS
NEWS SINCE 1925
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 14, 2006
Check out who's
going upscale on
campusPage A5
Not a fan of the new
facebook? See who
else has something to
say about itPage A6
Crocodile Hunter
Steve Irwin will be
sorely missed. Read a
short biography about
the man who made
"Crikey a household
phrasePage B5
Did Hollywoodland
make the grade? Find
outPageB5
ECU opens up a
critical five-game
homestand starting
with Memphis on
Saturday at 7 pm.
Check out the
full page game
previewPageBI
The volleyball team
hosts the East
Carolina Classic, a
four-team round robin
tournament. Check
out the tournament
previewPage B2
t
NEWSPageA2
PULSEPageB5
SPORTSPageBI
OPINIONPageA4
COMICSPageA7
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Annual Walk to D'Feet
ALS quickly approaching
This year's annual Walk to D'Feet will take place on Sept. 30 at the Town Commons to raise funds to research Lou Gehrig's disease, a disorder that causes muscle tissue to degenerate.
Efforts of many
combine to support a
great cause
ELISA BIZZOTTO
STAFF WRITF.R 1
With this year's Walk to D'Feet
ALS approaching in less than tw-
weeks, participants throughout
eastern North Carolina are greatly
anticipating its arrival.
The annual walk, which is
held to raise funds to support
research of Amyotrophic Lateral
Sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's dis-
ease, has become a staple here in
Greenville every September since
2000.
This year's event is to be
held on Sept. 30 at its usual loca-
tion on the Town Commons and
will be administered by the Jim
"Catfish "Hunter Chapter of theALS
Association. Participants register
for the event as individuals or
as teams to walk the designated
route and subsequently donate
money or are sponsored by others
who donate to their effort. All
proceeds go to supporting ALS
research, patient support services
and to raise public awareness of
the disease.
Participants in the Down
East Walk gather from all over
Greenville, including the ECU
community, as well as from
neighboring towns across east-
ern North Carolina. According
to Jamie Ebert, a member of the
Catfish Chapter, 300 out of the
750 walkers last year were ECU
student athletes. Others involved
through the university are the
ECU Baseball team, several Greek
organizations, organizations
from Allied Health Sciences, the
Volunteer and Service
Learning Center and the family
and friends of former. ECU coach
Keith LeClair. Ebert is grateful
for the high level of awareness of
ALS in the community and hopes
that this year's Down East Walk
will attribute significant proceeds
to further the fight against the
disease.
ALS, which presently has nei-
ther a known cause nor a known
cure, affects as many as 30,000
people a year with an average of
IS new diagnosed cases each day.
According to the ALS Association,
the disease which claimed the life
of baseball legend Lou Gehrig, is
a progressive neurodegenerative
disorder that affects nerve cells in
the brain and in the spinal cord.
The most unfortunate part about
the disease is the fact that while
one's body gradually degenerates,
one's mind and thoughts remain
sharp and unimpaired.
Randall Martoccia, chair of
the local City Walk Committee,
emphasizes that while the event
is geared towards fighting a very
serious illness, the walk itself
is not only self-fulfilling, but is
also fun.
"The desirej to do good for
people need not be serious and
dull, nor may it require a lifestyle
revision Martoccia adds that
it is important to find any cause
that instills passion and find out
how to help.
Registration will begin at 9
a.m. and the walk begins at 10 a.m.
Refreshments will be provided
and entertainment will include
local musician Jennifer Licko and
Brian Bailey of Channel 9 will be
the master of ceremonies. Anyone
interested should register as soon
as possible, as early registration
will encourage opportunities for
a greater donation. Last year, the
event raised $43,000 and this
year's goal is $55,000.
To register for this year's
Walk to D'Feet ALS, visit the
Catfish Chapter Web site at
catfishchapter.org or to learn more
about ALS, visit alsa.org.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
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UNC Program seeks to bridge the language gap
between medical professionals and Latino patients
ECU Transportation is helping the environment by using gasohol.
The gas is greener
Young girls study Spanish to benefit their futures and careers.
ECU using gasohol,
refined oil
ZACK HILL
STAFF WRITER
Recently, "How 'bout them gas
prices?" has replaced, "How 'bout
the weather? " as the redundant con-
versational topic. The seemingly
endless rise in petroleum prices
have sent many around the world
in search of alternative sources
of energy.
One method is substituting
gasoline with ElO, also known
as gasohol. Gasohol is composed
of 90 percent gasoline and 10
percent ethanol and has the added
benefit of cleaner emissions. The
ethanol component is made up of
agricultural products, like corn,
which are grown in eastern North
Carolina.
George Harrell, senior asso-
ciate vice chancellor for campus
operations, sees gasohol as a
way to help in a statewide initia-
tive to reduce the state's reliance
on petroleum.
"It will burn in anything
said Harrell. "We use it in our
vehicles, our equipment and
our mowers
Harrell said the change should
save about 10,000 gallons of petro-
leum per year.
Because of the removal of
some additives in gasoline, it is
likely that there is at least a small
amount of gasohol in the gas you
pump everyday.
"There's a little bit in almost all
gasoline now Harrell said.
The costs of gasohol and
gasoline are comparable.
"The cost is very close, within
pennies Harrell said.
Gasohol should become
even more readily available
with the addition of a gasohol
plant in Aurora currently under
construction.
Gasohol is not the only
alternative into which the
university is looking.
"We're hoping the Student
Transit buses will covert to
biodiesel Harrell said.
Harrell also said that ECU
is moving toward the use of re-
refined oils.
"The oil is taken out, goes
back to the refinery and is then
returned Harrell said. "It
saves about 1,200 quarts of new
motor oil
So far, the program has
been working.
"We've had no problems since
the first tanker arrived in late
May Harrell said.
Though not yet readily avail-a
able to most consumers in North
Carolina, gasohol use is grow-J
ing nationwide, especially in the 3
Midwest. Along with E85, it is "1
the only type of gasoline sold in
the state of Minnesota, according
to Wikipedia.org.
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian.com.
LEE SCHWARZ
STAFF WRITER
"jAsu salud! "(To your health!),
Introductory Spanish for Health
Professionals, is a program to
help teach Spanish to health care
professionals.
The number of Spanish-
speaking patients in North
Carolina hospitals is rising dra-
matically. However, the number
of hospital interpreters is not
rising at the same rate. The Brody
School of Medicine has only six
full-time interpreters.
"The Latino population is
growing rapidly, and health care
providers are crying out for ways
to effectively serve them, 'jA
su salud creatively speaks to
the needs of both patients and
providers said Claire Lorch,
a clinical instructor at the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
"The need is astounding. We
believe health care providers
around the state and the country
will embrace this program with
open arms, and that will be a major
step toward relieving a situation
that is fast becoming a crisis said
Dr. Maria Clay of ECU.
Considering that North Caro-
lina quadrupled its Latino popula-
tion in the 1990s and that nearly
half of all babies born in North
Carolina in 2005 were Latino,
this program is long overdue and
its success will be very effective in
helping Latino patients and health
care professionals alike.
Funding for the program is
coming from the North Carolina
GlaxoSmithKline Foundation,
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of
North Carolina and the Aetna
Foundation.
The funding will make it pos-
sible for the course to be offered
at ECU starting in 2008.
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian.com.
Jacksonville Theological Seminary
classes rescheduled for Greenville
DR. MAX O. FLYNN
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
Dr. Max Flynn announces
the fall extension classes of Jack-
sonville Theological Seminary in
Greenville,
N.C. Classes
will begin
Sept. 21 and
run through
Dec. 7.
This
semester
will have a
four course
schedule,
with classes
being taught on Wednesday evening,
Thursday morning and evening,
and on Saturday morning as well.
Dr. Max 0. Flynn
The Wednesday evening class
will be from 7 to 8:30 p.m using
Dr. John Bevere's course, Under
Cover, The Promise of Protection
Under His Authority.
The Thursday morning
classes will be from 10 a.m. until
noon, teaching Dr. Mark Virkler's
course, Prayers That Heal the
Heart.
On Thursday evening, the
first course will be Step-by-Step
Through the Old Testament, from
7 to 8:15 p.m. This course survey
is with the renowned interna-
tional instructor. Rev. Gornold-
Smith, from the UK, giving us an
overview of the Old Testament.
The second class will be
another significant course by
John Bevere on The Bait of Satan:
Living Free from the Deadly
Trap of Offence, from 8:30 to
9:30 p.m.
The Saturday morning classes
will run from 9 a.m. to noon, using
the international curriculum to
train laborers from high school to
college and beyond in the basics of
ministry leading to an Associate of
Arts in Biblical Studies.
Jacksonville Theological Sem-
inary is an Accredited Interde-
nominational Religious School,
awarding degrees from Associate
through Doctorate.
Classes will be held at Radiant
Life Church, 2001 S. Charles Blvd
across from the Colonial Mall in
Greenville. For a free information
packet, call Pastor Max Flynn at
355-2888.





News
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 14, 2006 PAGE A2
Till
Campus & Community
Announcements:
Volunteer for Habitat for
Humanity on Friday, Sept. 15
3 - 5 p.m. at Mendentiall brickyard
Volunteer Fridays to benefit
Habitat for Humanity of ECU
will hold three Volunteer
Fridays this fall to increase
student awareness of volunteer
opportunities in the community.
The theme of the project is
"Houses to Homes Student
volunteers will help construct
and paint birdhouses.
Completed birdhouses will be
sold to raise money for the ECU
Chapter of Habitat for Humanity.
More information can be
found at volunteer@ecu.
edu or call 328-2735.
ECU'S Third Eastern Literary
Homecoming on Friday, Sept. 29
8:30a.m5 p.m. at ECU'S Willis
Building, First & Reade Streets.
The J.Y. Joyner Library at ECU
will host the Third Eastern North
Carolina Literary Homecoming.
The free event will feature
authors who have written
about eastern North Carolina.
Saturday's Featured authors
include: Michael Parker, Nancy
Roberts, Barbara Braveboy-
Locklear, Elisa Carbone, James
Ransome, Louise Shivers
and Linda Beatrice Brown.
Sponsored by the North
Carolina Humanities Council
and the North Carolinian
Society. A Friday night
reception will honor historian
William S. Powell at 7:30 p.m.
ECULoessin Playhouse
Presents: "Chicago"
Oct. 5-10
Based on the play "Chicago"
by Maurine Dallas Watkins.
When two murderesses have
been jailed, they compete for
the attention of the press and
their lawyer. Add to this a cast of
characters and a dazzling score,
you have "Chicago" and "All
That Jazz with music by Jon
Kander and lyrics by Fred Ebb.
"Hedda Gabler Nov. 16 - 21
Employing methods that
virtually defined the modern
psychological drama, this
masterpiece reveals the
conflicts and emotions that
lie below the surface of daily
life. Was it murder or suicide?
Originally by Henrik Ibsen, the
adaptation is being presented
by Christopher Hampton.
Gray Gallery Alumni Exhibition
The Wellington B. Gray Gallery
will host the 2006 Alumni
Exhibition, "Bringing it All
Back Home The exhibition
is scheduled for Sept. 6 and
will continue to run through
Oct. 7. This also becomes
an early kickoff for the ECU
centennial celebration.
Students passed and present
are invited, as well as the
public. Questions and concerns
can be directed to Susan
Nicholls at nichollss@ecu.edu
or Gina Cox at coxg@ecu.edu
Study Abroad Information
Wednesday, Sept. 27 from
3 - 5 p.m. in Bate 1032.
Have you always wanted to
study abroad, but you are not
sure where to start? Then come
to the Study Abroad Information
Session where all of your
questions about participating
in an ECU sponsored study
abroad program will be
answered. Refreshments will
be served. Open to the public.
For more information, contact
Brandi Dudley, dudleyb@ecu.edu
or visit ecu.eduintlaffairs.
ECU's Jarvis Lecture on
Christianity and Culture.
Monday, Oct. 2 at 7:30 p.m.
in the Willis building on
First and Reade Streets.
Theologian Phyllis Trible will
visit ECU as the speaker for
the annual Jarvis Lecture.
She will discuss the role of
the Bible in contemporary
American culture in her lecture
"Taking back the Bible
Free and open to the public.
For more information contact
Calvin Mercer at mercerc@ecu.
edu or 252-328-4310.
Homecoming Open house
at Taylor-Slaughter Alumni Center
at 9 a.m. Attend the Homecoming
Open House on Saturday, Oct.
21 from 9-11 a.m. Enjoy
a continental breakfast
and a front row seat for the
Homecoming Parade at 10 a.m
visit Homecoming.PirateAlumni.
com for more information.
14lhu 15Fri 16sat 17
Sun
4 O
Mon
in
Tue
20
Wed
City Council Meeting
City Council Cham-
bers
201 Martin Luther
King, Jr. Drive
7 p.m.
"The Constitution
and the Right to Die"
Presentation
A discussion on
ethics and Critical
Care Medicine.
Joyner Library 2nd
Floor
7 p.m.
Briefs
Volunteer Friday for
Habitat for Humanity
To sign up to partici-
pate in Volunteer Fri-
days, visit ecu.edu
volunteerVolunteer-
Fridays.cfm.
Mendenhall Brickyard
3 - 5 p.m.
Wachovia Freeboot
Friday
Evans Street & Martin
Luther King Jr. Drive
5 - 8 p.m.
Women's Soccer
ECU VS. UNC-W
Bjnting Field
4 p.m.
Women's Volleyball
ECU VS. WISCONSIN
GREEN BAY
Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum
7 p.m.
Women's Volleyball
ECU VS. GRAMBLING
ST.
Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum
12 p.m.
Football
ECU VS. MEMPHIS
Family Weekend
Dowdy-Ficklen Sta-
dium
7 p.m.
Women's Soccer
ECU VS. PENN
Bunting Field
1 p.m.
Constitution Day Rec-
ognition
Presentation by Ethics
professor on Constitu-
tional Issues.
Teaching Resources
Center - Joyner Library
2nd Floor
3 - 4 p.m.
World Community Day
Visit ecueducs-stu-
dentlifeStudentDevel-
opmentWorld-Com-
munity-Day.cfm for
more information
Mendenhall Brickyard
2-5 p.m.
Women's Volleyball
ECU VS. N.C. A&T
Wiliams Arena at
Minges Coliseum
7 p.m.
"Get A Clue!
Organization Fair
Mendenhall Brickyard
1 - 4 p.m.

Featured Event:
Get A CLUE! Organization Fair
Get A Clue, the organization fair which was originally scheduled for
yesterday on the mall has been postponed.
Get A Clue will now take place on Wednesday, Sept. 20, in the Mendenhall
Brickyard.
Autopsy finds former fire chief took
lethal dose of medication
(AP) The former fire chief
of Carrboro ingested a lethal dose
of medication before he was found
dead in a hotel room in June,
according to an autopsy report.
Rodney Murray, 58, had been
arrested several times for harass-
ing a former girlfriend before his
death. He retired in March after
spending several months on medi-
cal leave.
The medical examination
found that Murray had high doses
of diphenhydramine, a drug com-
monly found in sleep medication,
and alcohol in his blood. The
examiner wrote that police found
a package of sleep aid medication
in the hotel room at LaQuinta Inn
near Raleigh-Durham Interna-
tional Airport.
A month before his death,
Murray agreed to plead guilty to
stalking and other charges in a
deal that allowed his immediate
release from jail. He was placed on
probation for five years, ordered
not to drink alcohol and to stay
away from ex-girlfriend Gina
Ambrosecchia for the duration.
Murray was named chief in
Carrboro in 1994 and previously
worked 26 years for the Chapel
Hill Fire Department.
Duke Energy pitches need for new coal
plants to N.C. commission
(AP) Global warming
restrictions and even technology
that takes greenhouse gases out of
burned coal are probably around
the corner, but right now Duke
Knergy needs $2 billion from
ratepayers to build two coal-fired
power plants, company CEO John
Rogers said Tuesday.
Rogers made a pitch for regula-
tory approval of the plants to the
North Carolina Utilities Commis-
sion. The commission mu.st now
judge whether the costs to custom-
ers would be justified.
Rogers said the company needs
the 1,600 megawatts of extra
power, enough to power about 1.4
million North Carolina homes, at
the utility's Cliffside site on the
Cleveland-Rutherford county line
primarily to keep up with growth.
Duke Knergy said each year it adds
about 50,000 homes, stores and
industries to its customer base.
That would mean about 250,000
additional customers by 2011, the
year the first of the two proposed
plants is scheduled for completion.
"They're doing lip service to
energy efficiency Smith said.
"They're leading the commission
to believe "trust us on energy
efficiency' after they get into rate-
payers' pockets for $2 billion. They
need to be specific
Weird News:
Worker trapped in vat of
chocolate
Darmin Garcia, an employee
at a Wisconsin factory that makes
premium chocolate, got too much
of a good thing when he slipped
into a vat of the stuff.
Garcia spent more than two
hours chest deep in a vat of dark
chocolate at the DeBellis factory in
Kenosha, the Milwaukee Journal-
Sentinel reported.
"It was in my hair, in my ears,
my mouth, everywhere Garcia
said. "I felt like I weighed 900
pounds. I couldn't move
In addition to being weighted
down, Garcia was also hot, since
the temperature in the vat was 110
degrees, several degrees hotter
than a Jacuzzi.
Garcia's fellow workers tried
to pull him out but his clothes
were stuck on a roller and liquid
chocolate has a consistency some-
thing like quicksand. After the
workers added cocoa butter to the
vat to thin the mixture, firefight-
ers scooped enough out so Garcia
could be freed.
After his ordeal, Garcia
was examined at a hospital and
released.
Anti-DUI Trooper Arrested for DUI
A Utah state trooper com-
manding an anti-drunk driving
squad was charged with DUI
after he crashed an unmarked
police car.
Lt. Fred Swain has been on
administrative leave from the Utah
Highway Patrol since his arrest
last week, the Deseret Morning
News reported.
Officers responding to the
report of a crash found Swain in
the car. He had struck the barrier
separating two sides of a road.
Swain's blood alcohol tested at
.116, well over the legal limit.
"Speaking on behalf of the
Department of Public Safety and
the Utah Highway Patrol, the
administration is extremely dis-
appointed and extremely embar-
rassed by his actions Lt. Doug
McCleve said. "This is an indi-
vidual choice, for whatever reason
Fred made
Swain frequently spoke on
behalf of the highway patrol,
announcing campaigns against
drunk driving. At one news con-
ference in December last year, he
asked drivers to "save somebody
the tragedy of losing a loved one
"Before giving, I always look
for the Humane Seal
-NOAH WYLE. SuuotHBCSMoftowER
The Humane Charity Seal of Approval guarantees that a health charity
funds vital patient services or life-saving medical research, but never
animal experiments.
Because helping people doesn't
have to mean harming animals.
Council on Humane Giving
Washington. D.C. www.HumaneSeal.org
202-686-2210, ext. 335
ADMINISTERED BY PHYSICIANS COMMITTEE FOB RESPONSIBLE MEDICINE
v
60'sR
When Music MpireAH
An exciting multimedia trip thorugiH
the 60's with Barry Drake, one of
rock music's foremost historians
September 14th, 8:00PM
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi Purpose Room
ODEAf
Report news students need to know. c
Accepting applications tor STAFF WRITERS M ft
Learn investigative reporting skills
Must have at least a 25 GM
Com Uptown and apply t our otrtet kxnttd In ttw ittl Help Building Suite 100F - E. Jrd St.
Sponsored by Student Union Popular
Entertainment Committee 252.328.4715
-tHL
Nightly
Monday-
Tuesday-
Wednesday
Thursday-
Friday-
Saturday-
Sunday-
L
YOUR EVENING HANGOUT
Dinner Specials 6.95 758-2774 Daily Drink Specials
Chicken Parmesan
Country Fried Chicken
Spaghetti ft Meatballs
Greek or Caesar Salad Chix
Fish ft Chips
Meat or 5 Cheese Lasagna
Fried Shrimp Plate
301 South Jarvis Street
301 Jarvis (2 blocks from campus)
ENJOY OUR OUTDOOR PATIO
Monday- $1.75 Domestic bottles
Tuesday - $2.25 Imports
Wednesday - $1.25 Mug Bud Lt $4.50 Pitchers
Thursday - $2.50 House Hi-Balls $3 Wine
Friday - $2.50 Import of the Day
Saturday - $3 Lits ft $2.50 Import of the Day
Sunday - $2.75 Pints Guinness, Bass,
Stella Artois, Black and Tan





THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A3
gl
Saturday 91606 Eat Like A Pirate I
Get Ready For ECU Football with Pita Pit
and
University Meal Deal
Visit Pita Pit On
Saturday From 11-4 And Enjoy
Some Great Food Plus A Chance To
WIN A FREE SPRING BREAK TRIP
First 1,000 students to make a purchase
will recieve a FREE 16oz.Soda
ALL MEAL DEAL Members, Buy A Pita
Get The 2nd For Only $2.99
University Meal Deal
Greenville's 1 Off Campus Meal Plan
Sign Up Today & Receive Over $150 In Free Food And Coupons
redeye
BREAKS"
www.redeyebreaks.com
l&UfT
HtAirWYIAIW
214 East 5th Street
Univereity www.umealdeal.com
lElteal ' 1-877-632-5332
CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE 2006 ELITE PIRATES
VIRGINIA CARRAWAY SEAN RUSSELL NABEEL ARASTU
SPBCU

4
STEPHEN SHAHEEN SARAH RIGGS MATTHEW HERRMANN
DEBRANETTA GETHERS JANUARY RUSSELL APRIL PAUL BAER
BRIAN MITCHELL AADIL LODHI
rElite
Pirate
Nomination Applications
are now available and being accepted for
2006-2007 Elite Pirates
We are looking for exemplary students, who have
at least 30 completed credit hours and have shown
outstanding leadership abilities inside and outside
of the classroom. Eligible students must have a 3.0
GPA at ECU and hold at least one leadership
position in an ECU student organization.
Inductions will occur during Homecoming Weekend!
Inductees will participate in an exciting
year of programs and growth opportunities
designed especially for them.
Pick up your application in MSC 207.
Applications are due no later than
Thursday, September 21, 2006.
Any questions, please email Adeea Rogers
at rogers a ecu.edu





THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 14,2006 PAGEA4
inion
Not for Pirate Rants today
The OOURIO EFFECT
America insists on making race an issue Contestant division in 'Survivor: Cook
When will it ever take a backseat
to the more pressing matters?
ELIZABETH LAUTEN
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
With Hollywcxxl abuzz about the new slant of'CBS's
"Survivor! Cook Islands" scheduled to air tonight, I
couldn't help myself but to talk about it as well.
For those of you aren't "E! News" addicts like
myself, you may not have heard about "Survivor's"
newest season, which is turning up controversy faster
than you could believe. In hopes of giving the show
a new edge, the tribes no longer divided by gender,
age, or even random. This season you will find them
divided by race - African-American, Asian-American,
Hispanic and Caucasian.
As s.i. in as word of this got out, people have begun
to throw fits all across the nation, from TV viewers to
the corporate sponsors of the show. General Motors,
a long time sponsor of the show, who accredits a good
portion of the business success the past few years to the
slum, has pulled out this year due to this divide. Pnxter
i Gamble refuses to air their commercials during at
least the first three episodes of the show, waiting to see
tl' larger public sentiment. Why is the big question.
Why do people have such a big problem with this divide?
Kace is perhaps the most obvious physical way to
separate a large group of people, so why must people
PIRATE RANTS
We received no other Pirate Rants today,
so enjoy the few we did get:
Dear Sorority Pledge, Your comment about
drinking downtown just validated the
negative opinion about your "sisters" or any
other shallow, cookie-cutter girl who would
join such an organization. If the reason
that you are pledging is to drink downtown
underage then thank you, silly freshman girl
for validating my opinion of you and others
like you. You will get so many more drinks
when your "sisters" haze you for the rest of
the year. Drink up! (PS. This is Greenville.
Its not that hard to drink downtown.)
To the person who stuck up for us smokers
on campus, I truly thank you. The way I
see it if people want it to be a non-smoking
campus, then why not "break bad" and
make it a dry campus with no alcohol too.
Then let's see how many people gripe and
complain about everything. Also if I'm
smoking and not bothering you and you
see it as anything more than that? Had the show
divided the cast by any other physical attribute, hair
color for example, no one would have cared, and the
blondes would have been left to fend for themselves.
As a society, we like to say that race doesn't matter
anymore, or rather, that is our ideal - that race shouldn't
limit and set boundaries. Yet it seems to me that at
every chance, we make it more of an issue than it needs
to le. How is race ever going to take a backseat to pol it-
ical or social issues if we keep making it a huge factor?
Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying people are not
discriminated against or that people are treated fairly
all the time, but 1 cannot believe that people have to
make such a big deal out of it. There are many more
important things to worry about in the world.
It's wits and strength that help players "outwit, out-
play" not their skin color, and if nothing else this season
wiil help prove that. "Cook Islands has the chance to
prove to the world that no one race is any better than
the other. So if one tribe goes on a winning streak,
don't think of it in terms of race, but rather look at the
individuals on the team and what they're doing right.
This season of "Survivor" shouldn't be viewed
any differently than any other in years past. Prove the
sponsors and America wrong, and lxk beyond race
when you root for your favorite contestant. Issues only
exist when we give it attention and power. Let race
stop being an issue.
come sit by me and tell me to blow my
smoke somewhere else, more than likely
I'll tell you not to breathe or to get over it
and move.
I am tired of those lazy bums at the NSO
being on Facebook instead of working
For my preppy needs its Burberry for me.
If Lacoste (French) can be American Prep,
so can Burberry (English).
To the person who gets annoyed when people
text message and walk at the same time.
Have you thought that maybe I'm trying
to go to class too and that's why I don't
sit down and "play with my cell phone
Glad to hear the Pirate Cub lost thousands
of people's information after they used their
credit cards online to purchase the ticket
package. Thank you for making me run
around and wait in line only to never end
up with anything. Doing a good job guys!
Islands' more primitive than environment
Initial focus on race, rather than
ability, is a disappointment
SARAH BELL
EDITOR IN CHIEF
Last season's promotion for CBS' "Survivor"
touted that 18 strangers would be "stranded on a
remote island in Vanuatu forced to band together
and carve out a new existence, using their collective
wits to make surviving in their rugged and primitive
environment a little easier
Unfortunately, this season's "Survivor" boasts
much more than a "primitive environment" - it builds
on a primitive concept as well.
Although the show has always revolved around
competition in a ruthless "may the best (most back-
stabbing, tough-yet-likable) man or woman win" fash-
ion, the new season has chosen to obscure its previous
focus on individual ability and teamwork in favor
of highlighting something far less important: race.
"Survivor. Cook Islands which premieres
tonight, will segregate its 20 contestants along racial
lines. The cast will be split into four teams: The
Aitutaki (Hispanic-American tribe), the Rarotonga
(Caucasian-American tribe), the Manihiki (African-
American tribe) and the Puka Puka (Asian-American
tribe).
Once criticized for collecting a cast that
was "too-white the creative team behind the
show divvied up the contestants in what
they say was a positive effort to diversify.
"We actually felt that dividing them ethnically was
a positive idea, because it came from our discussions in
casting, and we kept coming up with the same theme,
which was ethnic pride said "Survivor" host Jeff Probst.
Ethnic pride? As all the contestants are Ameri-
can, one would think they share more cultural
ties and life experiences together as Ameri-
cans than those had separately in racial groups.
Instead of a catalyst for promoting diversity (and
inclusion), the team selection seems more like a desper-
ate attempt to rejuvenate the show's declining ratings.
If the publicity surrounding the racial grouping
is any indication, CBS' ploy might be working. With
media hype going haywire more viewers will inevi-
tably tune in, but for the wrong reasons.
Usually viewers must watch "Survivor" for a few
episodes to decide which team they like, and for which
contestant they are ultimately cheering. Now, con-
fronted with teams chosen on the basis of race, view-
ers will immediately identify with the group whose
members' appearance reflects their own, instead of
the contestants with the best skills or personality.
Rather than challenging viewers to judge con-
testants on their abilities, this season's "Survivor"
regrettably makes something as shallow as a skin
color a reason to root for a specific team.
The idea seems like a step in the wrong direction.
As Alex Nogales, president & CEO of the National
Hispanic Media Coalition, said, "For years we've been
laboring to be integrated, an integrated society. Now
we are going to pit one group against the other. It
doesn't speak very well
CBS issued a statement saying it "recognizes the
controversial nature of the show's format, but has
full confidence in the producers and their ability to
produce the program in a responsible manner
I wish I shared their confidence.
Sarah Bell
Editor in Chief
Rachel King Claire Murphy
News Editor Asst. News Editor
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
252.328.9238
252.328.9143
252.328.9245
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Eric Gilmore
Sports Editor
Zach Sirkin
Photo Editor
Rachael Lotter
Multimedia Web Editor
Sarah Campbell
Asst. Features Editor
Sarah Hackney
Head Copy Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Production Manager
Serving ECU since 1925, the East Carolinian prints
9,000 copies every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
during the regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednes-
days during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the
editor which are limited to 250 words (which may be
edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the right to
edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editor@theeastcarolinian.com or to the East
Carolinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, N.C. 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for more information. One copy
of the East Carolinian is free, each additional copy is1.





6 PAGE A4
ment
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328.9238
328.9143
328.9245
rolinian prints
and Thursday
X) on Wednes-
the opinion of
iditorial board
letters to the
which may be
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be signed and
ay be sent via
or to the East
, N.C. 27858-
ation. One copy
nalcopyis$l.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A5
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Volunteer f ridays
September 15
September 29
October 20
3:00-5:00p.m. MSC Brickyard
Help us help others.
We need you to SIGN UP to build a birdhouse.
www.ecu.educs-studentlifevolunteerVolunteer-Fridays.cfm
FREE FOOD FREE T-SHIRTS
On three Fridays this fall, you can help buildpaint birdhouses
to raise money for the ECU chapter of Habitat for Humanity.
All money earned will go towards the building of a Habitat
house in Greenville.
Meet new people, "tool around develop leadership skills,
and discover that volunteering isn't just for the birds.
All skill levels welcome. All tools and equipment will be
provided. Free food and music will also be available. Free
t-shirts will be given to participants.
Lowes
i ' m
East Carolina University
Volunteer fridays
3i Habitat
Mil for Humanity
' Humanity
Campus Chapter
www. theeastcarolinian. com
World Community Day
Tuesday, September 19, 2006
MSC Brickyard 2-5p.m.
There's no place like home, it's true, but there's a great big world out
there, and the more you know about it, the better. Take a whirlwind trip
around the world at ECU's first World Community Day and immerse
yourself in the culture of these countries. Eat raw fish, if you dare, learn
how to write your name in Chinese calligraphy, speak to college students
in Morocco and Peru with a live hook-up, pick up mementos from your
travels, and much more. For more information please call the Office of
Student Development at 328-9928.
Free Food
Free Long Sleeved T-shirts to first 400 students
www.ccu.cducs-studentlifeStudentDevelopinentWorld-Comniunity-Day.cfin
0e Wo,c
ARAMARK
11 It EOF
STUDENT
iDLVriLOPMENT
Hsl
College dormitories going upscale
r
L
kI - m IT
I CH?Sf
-jtjIMi-ae
College students enjoying the aesthetics and privacy of new dorms.
(MCT) Amanda Johnson
was on a mission to find the gym
as she roamed a brightly lit hall-
way with a friend on move-in day
last week.
"I can't wait to go swimming
Heather Schmoele told her as they
checked out their new living quar-
ters at the University of Missouri
at St. Louis. A glistening pool
beckoned outside.
Today's residence halls offer
not only fancier amenities but also
more intimacy and convenience,
with more single rooms and pri-
vate bathrooms. In ways small
and large, trends in student hous-
ing reflect changing lifestyles of
today's youths, from increased
desires for privacy to the respect
for choice and flexibility to the
premium plated on aesthetics
and design.
"We put a lot of research
and study into it Dey said. "We
looked at demand, what students
say they want, but also what we
felt was an important part of being
educated at a university, which is
to be flexible and to learn how to
get along with others of diverse
backgrounds. So while they may
have wanted to live alone, we
decided this was better
David Szwarsztein, a senior
at Washington University, spent
his freshman year in a traditional
style residence hall with two to a
room and a community bathroom
down the hall. He liked the nar-
rower hallways, it made people
feel closer by, he said.
Some of the newer dorms
with their wider hallways and
closed doors make it feel more like
a hotel and less homey, he said.
Indeed, some nostalgia exists
for the "rustic" experience of com-
munity bathrooms and cramped
quarters, and administrators
say they realize they might be
missing out on something in the
new halls.
Schools are in the midst of a
building boom in student hous-
ing. In part, it is a response to the
swelling college student popula-
tion. About 17.6 million students
are projected to be enrolled in
U.S. colleges and universities this
fall, up from 12.4 million just 25
years ago.
Also, much of the college
housing stock is from the 1950s
and 1960s, during a previous
wave of increasing enrollment.
Many of those facilities are
aging, so schools are building
replacements.
see DORMS page A6
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We're Ready for Football Season.

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Student Football Ticket
Pick-Up
I Student tickets are available at the
Dowdy Student Store, 10 am - 7 pm,
Tuesday throush Thursday of each
home same week, your ECU 1 Card
is required.
Student tickets are also available at the Mendenhall
Student Center Ticket Office and the Minges Ticket Office.
Hours at those locations vary.
OFF
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Thursday, Friday & Saturday
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Visit us in the FUN ZONE
outside the stadium this
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Student Stores
Where your Dollars support Scholars!
Store Hours:
Mon. - Thus 7:30 am - 7 pm
Fit 7:30 am - 5 pm
Sat 11 am- 3pm
Visit us at the Souvenir Shops at Dowdy-fioWen Stadum on
nome same days!
Wright Building (252) 328-6731 www.studentstores.ecu.edu
FamlfrWeekend Sale runs 91406-91606 Discount off xt regular price apparel and sifts only. Special orders I prior purchases excluo






PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2006
Facebook users want about-face on tattle tool
(MCT) Ben K. may have
changed his relationship status to
single, but, really, does every one
of his friends on Facebook need to
be informed of it in a headline at
t 3.r in the morning?
Yet, this week, the hanging-
all-our-laundry-out-there genera-
tion got a little too much face in
its Facebook as the popular Web
site added a feature that, like a
personal news ticker, chronicles
every online move they and their
friends make.
Nine million students hang
out online on Facebook, each
with his or her own Facebook
"wall" of pictures and posts.
The new feature allows users,
leaves them no choice, really, to
find out what friends have been
doing through "news feeds" and
"mini feeds" that appear on their
page automatically.
"It's so extreme said Mike
Carley, 22, a Penn senior from
Los Angeles. "1 don't really need
to know my friends at USC are
going to a party. It's really too
much information. A bunch of
people don't care whose wall I
posted on at 3:45 a.m. What if I
reject a friend request, will it say
that too? That's ugly
This made personal news
travel faster, and more awkwardly,
through their network of friends
than a lot of Facebook fans were
ready for.
"I absolutely hate it said
Nawad Maalouf, 19, a junior at
I'enn. "I don't want every detail
out. It used to take some effort
to stalk someone. Now the stalk-
ing just conies to you. You see if
people have declined invitations,
updated their relationship status,
written on other people's walls
But isn't sharing information
the whole point ofFacebook.com?
That you can know all about
people, when they're online, who
their friends are, what music
they're into, before you've even
gone out for coffee?
"All the things they are
making public are things that
are already public. What is also
important is that Facebook took
away a measure of their control
The changes also brought
up some serious privacy issues:
Maalouf said she had friends who
had accepted invitations to gay
events who did not necessarily
want their sexual orientation
broadcast to a vast network of
casual acquaintances.
Then again, the whole nature
of what is a "friend which on
Facebook means you have autho-
rized a person to hang on your
online wall, may be at the heart
of the controversy.
"On Facebook, you only have
one kind of friend said Pew's
Lenhart. "It assumes this intense
level of friendship for everyone
on the network. People can't do
things that might not be noticed.
What Facebook has assumed
is that everyone cares. And
they don't
The fury of the backlash led
A nueva generation poised to shape pop culture
(MCT) In the 1960s and
'70s, it was baby boomers with
rock and disco, sexual liberation
and political activism. In the '80s
and '90s, it was African Ameri-
cans and hip-hop that trans-
formed the way we sang, danced,
talked and dressed.
And now, at the start of the
21st century, it's a new gen-
eration of Hispanic who are
poised to become the next major
cultural drivers.
While the political spotlight
has been on Hispanic immigrants,
social scholars and purveyors
of media and entertainment are
already focusing on their chil-
dren, an exploding generation of
bilingual, bicultural Hispanics
who are rapidly emerging as a
force that will affect music, televi-
sion, movies, fashion, advertising,
slang, and just about everything
else in American pop culture.
Because they grew up in the
United States fluent in two lan-
guages and two cultures, young
American born Hispanics, who
often call themselves Latinos,
rather than Hispanics, form a
kind of bridge. Not only are they
Latinizing the American main-
stream, they are Americanizing
what it means to be Hispanic in
the United States.
Whether it's the beat of reg-
gaeton booming across America
or the dark-haired, dark-eyed
Mexican-American actress Eva
Longoria becoming the hottest
thing on "Desperate Housewives
Hispanics are happening.
The signs of that redefinition
are everywhere:
MTV en F.spanol, the U.S.
Spanish language branch of the
trendsetting musiclifestyle net-
work, is changing its name to
MTV TrSs and revamping its
programming to appeal to kids
as hot for 50 Cent as they are for
Juanes, the multimillion-selling
Colombian rocker who fills venues
like Madison Square Garden.
Corporations are shifting
from marketing exclusively to
Hispanics in Spanish and in
traditional Hispanic media to
reaching them in Knglish in
mainstream outlets.
Toyota ran an ad for its new
2007 Camry Hybrid on the
Super Bowl telecast that used the
way a Hispanic father and son
switch languages as a metaphor
for the car.
"Mira aqui (look here)
the father says to his son, as he
explains how the car switches
between gasoline and electric
power and how it's "better for
our future
"Like you with Knglish and
Spanish the boy chirps.
Kim McCullough, corporate
manager of marketing commu-
nications for Toyota, says the
bicultural, bilingual message
is important. "We recognize
this is a huge trend that we
need to be ahead of and not just
responding to she says.
"Companies are definitely
realizing that some Hispanics
are more comfortable if they
are spoken to in English says
Carlos Martinez, general man-
ager of the Hispanic advertising
agency Conill LA, which cre-
ated the Toyota spot. "So, you
will definitely see more of this
bilingual advertising
The message goes both ways.
Reebok signed reggaeton star
Daddy Yankee to put his name
on a line of sneakers primarily
because the company thought he
would appeal to Hispanics, but also
because it thought he would con-
nect with mainstream customers.
But figuring out how to reach
this generation can be difficult,
in part because these children
of immigrants are still figuring
out the unique mix of language,
culture and identity that goes
with being Hispanic, or Latino,
in this country.
" The word Latino doesn't
exist outside of the United States
says Jose Tillan, senior vice presi-
dent of music programming and
talent strategy for MTV Latin
America and MTV TrSs. "It's like
a new world. The definition of the
word Latino is up for grabs
Facebook's founder, a former
Harvard University student
named Mark Zuckerberg, to post
an e-mail assuring the angry
crowd that the company was
"listening to all your sugges-
tions about how to improve the
product
He headlined the post, "Calm
down. Breathe. We hear you
Yesterday, Facebook spokes-
woman Melanie Deitch said
the company was "aggressively
evaluating" the change.
But she stressed that the news
feed addressed "one of the main
reasons people use Facebook,
which is to find out what's happen-
ing with their friends She said
privacy controls were available
to screen out information among
categories of people.
And she added that at least one
of the signature Facebook interac-
tions was still and would always
remain private, that nonverbal
heyhowyadoin' known, affection-
ately, as "the poke
DORMS continued from
A5
Colleges are also paying more
attention to the little things: the
details and finishing touches
like accent walls, fabrics and
color schemes.
"Students don't want their
home to look like a prison said
Frankie Minor, housing director
at the Mizzou.
"These things serve no func-
tional purpose he said, pointing
to a row of green tile accenting a
wall of white in a bathroom, "But
they look nice
Webster hired an interior
design consultant to make sure
the colors, paints, and fabrics all
flow together in its new halls.
John Buck, associate dean of stu-
dents, explained that they chose
more exciting, vibrant colors for
the freshman building and more
subdued, mature colors for the
upperclassmen hall.
Before, there was little thought
to such decision, it was just the
cheapest fabric, he said. "There
was no pop, no attraction
And this generation
looks for those kinds of small
details, he said.
"The last thing they want
is a drab, green couch with
wooden sides he said. "They
would say, 'How much am I
paying for this?
You drank.
You danced.
You had r
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Carolina Pregnancy Center
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2710 E. 10th. Street
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Classifieds
Want it, get it! Only in our Classifieds.
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 14,2006 PAGE A7
THE EAST CAROLINIAN, SELF HELP BUILDING
PHONE (252) 328-9238 FAX (252) 328-9143
FOR RENT
Available Now- 2bed2bath duplex
@ Eastgate off Moseley Dr on ECU
bus route, short term lease thru May
07. new carpet, energy efficient,
sorry no pets. $595.00 Pinnacle
Property Mgmt 561-RENT (7368)
DON'T WORRY ABOUT YOUR
UTILITY BILL! UTILITIES
INCLUDED! VERY CLOSE to ECU
IN A SAGE AREA! 608 Enrul St.
3 Bedrooms, 1 12 baths PLUS a
study! Central Air, washer & dryer
hookups. Fenced yard. Pets wfee.
$1100 Month 830-5540
One, two Brs. on-site management
maintenance Central heat air 6,
9, 12 month leases Water Cable
included ECU bus Wireless Internet
pets dishwasher disposals pool
laundry (252) 758-4015
WILDWOOD VILLAS -1450 square
foot, two bedrooms, 3 12 baths,
recreation room, furnished kitchen
remodeled, on ECU bus route,
$675, no pets. 717-9872
For Rent Twin Oaks Laura Ln. 2 Br,
1 12 baths, furnished townhouse.
All appliances washerdryer included
central air and heat. Pool. A must
see. Great location. On ECU bus
route. $650 month, plus deposit.
First month free with contract.
(757) 654-6204 or (757) 654-
9162 leave message if no answer.
FOR RENT 3 bedroom 2 bath
Duplex on Moseley Dr. recently
repainted on ECU Bus Route- Will
consider pets 750month plus
security deposit- Call 717-2587
Duplex 2 Bdrm 1 Bath $400-450
3 Bdrm 4 Bdrm 5 Bdrm Houses
$750-$1250 call 252-361-2138
HELP WANTED
AREA HIGH school needs field
hockey and boys' lacrosse officials
for 2006-2007 school year. Great
way for past players to earn $. Call
Lydia Rotondo at 252-714-8180 if
interested.
Sylvan Learning Center is hiring
part time reading and math tutors
for after school programs at various
schools in Pitt, Greene, Lenoir and
Edgecombe Counties. Applicants
must be positive, hard working,
able to multitask and have a strong
desire to help children. Perfect
for Education, English, Math, and
CDFR majors. Pick up application
or mail resume to: 1925 B Turnbury
Dr. Greenville NC 27858 or fax
to: 252-439-0957. NO PHONE
CALLS
Do you need a good job? The
ECU Telefund is hiring students
to contact alumni and parents for
the ECU Annual Fund. $6.25hour
plus cash bonuses. Make your own
schedule. If interested, visit our
website at www.ecu.edutelefund
and click on JOBS.
WANTED: student strong in English
Grammar to help kids ages 14,13,
and 9 with homework. Minimum
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PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2006

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Sports
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 14, 2006 PAGE B1
ECU's Inside Source
BY THE NUMBERS
64.1
PERCENT
Amount of freshman and
sophomores on the active
football roster (75 of 117
total)
6
Career touchdown passes
James Pinkney needs to pass
Jeff Blake to move into third
in school history
100
Percentage (2 of 2) that ECU
has been successful complet-
ing 3rd and 7
7,
GAMES
Amount of time since an ECU
quarterback has thrown for a
touchdown, which last occurred
at Memphis on Oct. 22,2005
3
Scoring margin between ECU
and Memphis for the past two
years, Memphis won 38-35 in
2004 and 27-24 in 2005
4th
Conference USA rank in hit-
ting percentage (.400) by ECU
volleyball player Mignon
Dubenion
8-3-1
ECU women's soccer all-time
series with UNC Wilmington,
which ECU leads
0.67
Average goals allowed by the
ECU women's soccer team in
six games, which translates to
a 1.33 scoring margin
They said it
"There's not thing as a defen-
sive huddle. We call it the
muddle. You sort of muddle
around out there. Youtonow, we
wait. We disguise too. We have
multiple fronts, multiple cover-
ages. They check, we check. To
me, it sort of takes away from
football. Let's get back to lining
up and letting the kids play
and try not to be geniuses. We
want to play base fundamental
football and let our talent go
out there and play. We're going
to have our adjustments. You'll
see some standing around.
You'll see adjustments. You'll
see calls changed. That's the
way it is nowadays
-Greg Hudson, ECU defensive
coordinator
"We're going to take three
blocking schemes in here and
let it roll because you can't
practice all the different things.
The Memphis defense is not
that complicated. There's so
many looks that if you prac-
ticed every run against every
thing, you'd be out there to
midnight everyday. You've got
to simplify things
-Steve Shankweiler, ECU
offensive coordinator
"There's a comfort level of
playing at home. This is where
we've been practicing. This is
where we've been playing, some
of them for the last two, three
and four years. When you have
the opportunity to come play at
home, you don't have to travel.
Friday's not an all day on the
plane, getting home at 3 o'clock
in the morning Saturday night.
There's a comfort zone of play-
ing at home
-Skip Holtz, ECU Head
Coach
FOOTBALL PREVIEW
MEMPHIS
MEMPHIS SCHEDULE
SEPT. 3 SEPTAAT MISSISSIPPI VS CHATTANOOGA AT ECU VS. TENNESSEEL, 24-17 W, 33-14
SEPT. 16 SlPT.Sfj7 PM TBA
OCT. 7 OCT. 14ATUAB VS. ARKANSAS STATE7 PM 2 PM
OCT. 21 OCT. 28VS. TULSA VS. MARSHALL8 PM 4:30PM
NOV. 5VS. SOUTHERN MISS.8 PM
iiov.livs;ucr8 PM
NOV. 18VS. HOUSTON2 PM
NOV. 25ATUTEP9:05PM
Pirates look for first win of
season in home opener
ECU looking to bounce
back after heartbreakers
ECU SCHEDULE
fWf Turnovers:
rtns tiffinfe &mm0iot1 uif
offenses and forcing turnovers and getting an early
turnover against an ECU team which could have a
fragile psyche could be the difference maker.
2. Pressure James Pinkney:
If the Tigers can take advantage of ECU'S youth on the
offensive line and get pressure on Pinkney, they may be
able to force him into bad throws like the interception he
threw at UAB and not allow him to hit open receivers. By
getting to the quarterback, they may be able to prevent
ECU from utilizing its talent at wide receiver.
3. Run the ball:
The Pirates have struggled to stop the run, allowing
an average of 263 yards on the ground. If the Tigers
can get their running game going with Joseph Doss,
it could be another long day for the ECU defense. In
order to keep pressure on ECU to score, the Tigers
must find a way to have more than two "home
run" plays.
BY RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
After suffering two close losses
on the road, the ECU football team
returns home Saturday for its
home opener against the Memphis
Tigers.
"It'll be nice to be back at home
after losing two really close games
on the road said ECU head coach
, Skip Holtz.
Memphis (1-1, 0-0 Conference
USA) has a different look than
it did a season ago. Gone to the
Carolina Panthers is all-everything
running back DeAngelo Williams,
but Holtz thinks that makes the
Tigers a much more diverse and
fcnt offense t?
"They're a lot more balanced
because it's not just the DeAngelo
Williams show anymore Holtz
said. "We're really gonna get tested
with their offense Saturday
The Tigers, who opened the
season with a 28-25 road loss to
Ole Miss before thumping 1-AA
Chattanooga last week, are led by
quarterback Martin Hankins.
The redshirt junior has
passed for 553 yards
and five touchdowns
with just one inter-
ception. Nearly 300
yards, three touch-
downs and the pick'
came against the Moccasins, but
Hankins had just six incompletions
in 27 attempts versus Ole Miss.
Holtz said Hankins' accuracy
and ability to make plays has
opened up the play book for Mem-
phis head coach Tommy West.
"They're much more balanced
as a football team than they did a
year ago Holtz said. "They are
more heavily throw oriented than
they are run oriented
When the Tigers do run the ball,
it is in the hands of Joseph Doss.
The 200-pound junior pounded
his way for 112 yards against the
Rebels, but carried the ball only six
times versus UTC.
One thing the Tigers have done
in each of their first two games is
run trick plays. Wide receivers have
thrown a touchdown pass in both
games, which should have the ECU
secondary watchful:
"I guess we have the wrong guy
playing quarterback West joked.
West expects a close game from
the Pirates, who are a two-point
favorite at home. Like Holtz, West
isn't happy with the consistency of
the running game and the absence
of Williams is obvious.
"We don't have the guy to
make the breakaway run
West said. "We gotta
be closer to perfect
to have a chance to
SEPT. 2AT NAVYL, 28-23
SIFTSWWI1,17-12
SEPT. 18VS. MEMPHIS7 PM
SEPT. 23 OCT. 7VS. WEST VIRGINIA VS. VIRGINIATlA 6 PM
0CT714VS. MSA3 PM
OCT. 21VS. SMU3 PM
OCT. 28AT SOUTHERN MISS8 PM
NOV. 4ATUCF4 PM
NOV. 11VS. MARSHALL1 PM
NOV. 18AT RICE3 PM
NOV. 25AT NX. STATE1 PM
see HOME page B3
KEYSTO
llilVfilNi:
ECU
1. Eliminate Turnovers:
The Pirates ere on the plus side of the turnover ratio
through two games, but they cannot afford to make any
turnovers against Memphis because they seem to come
at the most inopportune times. The Tigers have forced
a turnovers in 122 of their last 141 games, including
both this year.
2. Be consistent up front:
The offensive line for the Pirates must not only protect James
Pinkney, who sprained his right ankle against UAB, but they
need to open holes for the stagnant running game.
3. Utilize Aundrae Allison:
Allison was shut out against UAB for the first time in
his ECU career. The ECU coaching staff needs to take
advantage of Allison's quickness with quick-hitting
routes to get the ball in the hands of their most danger-
ous play-maker.
"I think tht four-man front gave
us a chance to get our best
players on the field because
we are a little bit short, from a
depth standpoint right now, at
linebacker Pinkney can create
plays when they aren't there, and
I don't think our guy (Hankins)
can do that
WEST
HOLTZ
"UAB is the heavyweight,
fighter that's going to stand
in the middle of the ring with
you and go toe-to-toe and get
into a slugfest. They're pretty
good at doing it. Navy is that
featherweight that's going to
run all over the ring ami say
Q 'you can't hit me They're
totally different defensive
football teams






I
PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2006
Fraternity Rush Week
September 17 - 21 2006
Orientation 9-17-06 at 8:00PM
in MendenhallHendrix Theatre
Information will be provided for the entire week
V
Ricky Stokes, ECU Men's Head Basketball
Coach will speak on Sunday night
Slide show of each Fraternity
Fraternity tables - Take a
tour and meet members
Refreshments will be served.
Got Questions?
Call Greek Life at 328-4235
Check us out
i
www.ecu.eduStudentLifegreek





THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE Bs
dXQir (Connection
HOME
continued from Bl
be close to the team we were a
year ago
The Pirates do have a run-
ning back with breakaway speed,
but he has his own issues. Chris
Johnson, who Holtz said "dances
too much" in the backfield has
appeared hesitant in the first two
games and Holtz wants him to be
more decisive.
"Chris is always looking for
the homerun ball Holtz said.
"Chris gets in the backfield and
he is dancing too much and cut-
ting too much. I will live with
whatever decision he makes as
long as it is decisive. 1 think he
played better (at UAB) but we
need to grow on that. He is still
not were he needs to be as far as
his decision-making. He wants
to do well and get the running
game on track but in doing so
he hurts himself. We just have to
keep working with him and get
him working downhill
Johnson is aware of the criti-
cism and says it's something he's
working on. With Dominique
Lindsay out an expected six
weeks with a torn MCL and
Brandon Fractious' proclivity to
fumble, Johnson knows a lot of the
load will fall on him. The 200-
pound junior tailback is confident
that the big plays will be there
against the Memphis defense.
"We just gotta run straight
down hill at them Johnson said.
"They move around a lot, so as far
as the stretch plays go and such,
we just gotta run straight at them
and the big plays will come
While the ECU running
game has been inconsistent, the
passing game riding the right
arm of senior quarterback James
Pinkney has put up good numbers.
Pinkney has passed for 563
yards with three scores and
a pick while hitting nine dif-
ferent receivers in each game.
West knows that some of those
plays were created by Pinkney's
mobility.
"I think their quarterback
is a really great player West
said. "He's a guy who can create
plays. I'm not sure our guy can
do that
West added that defen-
sively, the Tigers may "switch
up defense between 3-4 and 4-3
looks depending on what the ECU
offense shows
Holtz knows that Memphis
defensive coordinator Joe Lee
Dunn will present multiple looks
to the ECU offense.
"When you look at their
defense about the only thing that
you can guarantee is that they
will have eleven guys on defense
Holtz said. "They may seem like
they have twelve or thirteen at
times with they way that they
run around. They may have one
defensive lineman or they may
have eight defensive linemen. I
think that we are going to have to
be very simplistic in our approach
with what we ask our guys to do
up front with all the confusion
they try to create.
"They create a lot of confusion
and disruption and make it very
hard to put a drive together to turn
and monopolize the football and
keep their offense off the field
He does see a common weak-
ness in the defenses.
"They are similar to us in that
they are young up front in the
front seven Holtz said, "and they
are experienced in the secondary
because everybody returned from
a year ago
One area the Pirates have a
clear edge in is special teams.
Tigers place kicker Trey Adams
has not attempted a field goal
of more than 36 yards, but has
missed twice on five attempts.
ECU kicker Robert Lee, who is
on the Lou Groza Award watch
list, has missed just twice in his
last 22 attempts, and is perfect
on the 2006 season including a
48-yarder at Navy. Senior punter
Ryan Dougherty, who struggled
at Navy but rebounded well
against the Blazers, was placed
on the Ray Guy Award watch list
earlier this week.
The Pirates lead the all-time
series between the two schools,
8-6, but Memphis has won four
of the last five and ECU has not
beaten the Tigers since a 32-11
home win in 2001. Game time
is 7 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
ECU volleyball hosts East Carolina Classic
TEC Is Faring Photographers
Looking for upbeat people to join our team.
Must have a flexible schedule and a 2.25 GPA
Call 328-9238 or come by our office in the Self-Help Building
Pirates to play four
games in four days
ROBERT MATTHEW PARKS
STAFF WRITER
The ECU volleyball team will
open the Conference USA season,
as well as the East Carolina Clas-
sic, Thursday at 7 p.m. against
Marshall. The team will also
play Wisconsin-Green Bay at 7
p.m. on Friday, Sept. 15 as well as
Grambling State on Saturday at
noon as part of the tournament.
The Marshall Thundering
Herd storm into Greenville sport-
ing a 5-6 record, having recently
recorded wins over Miami (Ohio),
Lehigh and Pittsburgh. The Herd
also includes C-USA Setter of
the Week Christin Bimberg who
will be looking to sink the Lady
Pirates in the conference and
tournament opener Kelly-Anne
Billingly, one of the Herd's out-
side hitters, leads the conference
in kills and points per game.
The Lady Pirates will also
clash with Wisconsin-Green Bay
of the Horizon League, who will
be looking to improve on their
4-4 overall record. They have
lost two of their last three games,
losing to Delaware and Univer-
sity of Tennessee-Martin while
recording a victory over Indiana
UniversityPurdue University at
Indianapolis.
The Lady Pirates will wrap
up the weekend with Grambling
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State. After the tournament, the
team will turn its eyes to North
Carolina A&T. The Aggies will
visit Greenville on Sept. 19 at
7 p.m.
Senior co-captain and setter
Heidi Krug will not be available
for the Grambling State game so
freshman setter Hannah Fenker
will fill in, getting the start for
the Lady Pirates. Krug's absence
could create difficulty for the
team, as Krug is the school's all-
time assists leader and 12th on the
C-USA list. In addition she is also
the reigning C-USA Defensive
Player of the Week.
The Lady Pirates moved to
30-6 all-time against the Camp-
bell Fighting Camels in a 30-19,
30-24, 30-23 three-game rout in
Minges Coliseum on Tuesday.
Mignon Dubenion and Kelly
Wernert had IS kills apiece to
lead ECU to victory. Wernert,
a junior outside hitter recorded
her sixth double-double by tal-
lying 11 digs. Freshman Peyton
Thompson added a career-high
11 kills.
It was especially Dubenion,
junior middle blocker who stood
out as she racked up nine kills in
a matter of minutes in the first
game. Led by Dubenion's vicious
kills and Krug's 21 first game
assists, the Lady Pirates had no
problem taking out the Camels
in under 20 minutes to take the
see VOLLEYBALL page B4
ECU women's
soccer looks to build
on strong start
Pirates set to host
UNC Wilmington,
Penn over weekend
TOMMY GRAHAM
STAFF WRITER
Sarah Kirkley hasn't waited
to make an impression in the
ECU women's soccer program.
Since joining the Pirates, the
freshman has notched a team-
high seven points. Forced into the
fire after coming from Needham
Broughton U.S. in Raleigh, she
has already made her mark on
the program. She recorded three
of those points in the game this
past weekend against Georgia
State.
Senior Tara Shaw also added
two additional goals in the game
amazingly only five minutes
apart. Behind Shaw's goals, the
Pirates beat Georgia State by
a score of 3-2, bringing their
season record to 4-2.
However, it wasn't a perfect
weekend for ECU when they
traveled to Raleigh to compete
in tournament hosted by N.C.
State. The Pirates fell in the first
game to American University by
a score of 1-0. ECU managed
only six shots on goal and none
of those were on net.
"I believe we came out really
flat at the start of the game
head coach Rob Donnenwirth
said. "We just couldn't get it in
the goal
Donnenwirth cited his team's
improved enthusiasm in the
second half. He was frustrated
by the inability for the Pirates
to score on several scoring
chances.
The Pirates will host two
teams over the weekend. They
face instate rival UNC Wilm-
ington Friday at 4 p.m. and will
match up with Penn on Sunday
at 1 p.m.
The Seahawks have been a
perennial rival of ECU's going
back to the old Colonial Athletic
Association days. The Pirates
dropped a heartbreaker in over-
time 3-2 early last season in
Wilmington. However, with the
close location of the schools, the
rivalry is always a dogfight.
Donnenwirth feels the same
way noting that in all the games
that these two have played against
each other since he has been at
ECU, have always been similar
to two heavyweights trading
blows.
"It's going to be extremely
physical said Donnenwirth, as
he remarked that at the end of
the game the officials are still
making sure no one is missing
any limbs.
UNCW is coached by Paul
Cairney, a two-time all confer-
ence performer for the men's
team from 90-93. He has been
the women's head coach from
1996 with an overall record of
94-90-12. His teams have also
excelled in the classroom even
receiving the College Team Aca-
demic Award in 2000, 2001,2003
and 2004.
Adding to the heightened ten-
sion of this weekend's game is the
fact that it is Parents' Weekend.
For some of the freshmen players
on the team this will be the first
chance that their parents will
have to see them play at the col-
legiate level.
Not to draw attention away
from the 'other' game this week-
end, the Pirates play host to
Penn coming in with a record of
2-0-1, with two wins being over
former CAA foe Richmond and
also Hofstra. The Quakers will
enter Bunting Field looking to
continue their unbeaten streak,
being led by Head Coach Darren
Ambrose.
The Quakers, who finished
8-6-3 in 2005 return 11 letter-
winners and six starters. Penn's
experience coqeerns Donnen-
wirth, who has 15 freshmen on
the roster.
The Lady Pirates are off to
their best start since the 2000
season when they were also
started the season with a 4-2
record. Rachel Hils returned to
the field against American after
missing some time with an injury.
She and Shaw give the Pirates
veteran leadership and game
experience on the field. Shaw
has scored three goals already
this season almost matching
her career total of four in three
season with the Pirates. Shaw is
a graduate of Great Valley H.S.
in Malvern, Pa.
After Friday's game there will
be an opportunity to "Meet The
Pirates" with a free autograph
session. With it being Parent's
Weekend, the Seahawks coming
to town, and the autograph ses-
sion to follow, if you are going to
come to only one game this year,
this should be the one.
This writer can be contacted at
sportsetheeastcarolinian.com.





PAGE B4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2006
VOLLEYBALL
continued from B3
quick 1-0 lead.
The second and third games
saw much of the same, with
the Lady Pirates able to have
their way with the Camels. In
game three. Coach Chris Rush-
ing elected to switch his lineup
around a little bit by substituting
youth into the lineup. Freshmen
1-enker, Katie Prast, Holly Paton
and sophomore Kim Jefferson
entered the game, while Krug
and the rest of the starters rested
on the bench. Prast recorded two
kills, including the decisive kill
that ended the Camels' night in
the third game.
Tlic Camels, of the Atlantic
Sun Conference, fell to 3-8 on
the season Of the Camels first 11
games, only one has been played
on their home court in Buies
Creek, N.C. The Lady Pirates as a team
OPINION
improved to 6-5, after coming off
a weekend in which they dropped
two of three in the Comfort
Suites Invitational in Charlotte.
ECU lost to North Florida and
Charlotte, but did take the finale
against the University of Penn-
sylvania.
"I thought that we definitely
came out strong Krug said of
her team's Tuesday night perfor-
mance. "We kind of had a rough
weekend
As for taking a seat in the third
game, Krug didn't seem to mind.
"I think it was a really good
chance for us to get some of our
other freshman in and even some
of our older players playing other
positions Krug continued, "The
farther we can go into our lineup
off the bench, the stronger we are
While Dubenion and Wernert
paved the way on offense, Rushing
seemed pleased with the defensive
effort his team put out.
"We have needed to get better
on defense, and that is all fMon-
day'sj practice was about and I
thought that is really where we won
this game today said Rushing.
As for the substitutions in the
third game, getting his younger
players in is something Rushing
has wanted to do.
"For one of the first times
this year, 1 felt pretty confident
and comfortable that we were
going to win the match Rush-
ing said. "It was just nice to get 3
everybody a little bit of playing ,
time tonight
This writer can be contacted at
sportst heeastcarolinian.com.
Memphis match-up is a must win
ECU can't afford to go
0-2 in conference
ERIC GILMORE
SPORTS EDITOR
Skip Holtz knows that his
Pirate football team can't win
a national championship. With
two heartbreaking losses already
logged, a BCS bowl is likely out of
the question as well.
While the ECU head coach may
have had lofty preseason expecta-
tions, another loss would start
eliminating some more realistic
results. The team's yearly goal of
advancing to the Liberty Bowl in
Memphis as a conference champion
would fizzle should the Pirates fail
to end up victors on Saturday.
Forgive the added pressure
c oach, but Memphis is a must win.
This team needs an adrenaline
shot in the arm to pick up some
momentum because another loss
could break the team's already
fragile morale. Holtz has talked
repeatedly about reaping the
rewards of hard work. Not win-
ning could be detrimental to the
team's mindset heading into its
biggest home game since UNC
traveled to Greenville for the first
time in 2003.
The team had an added bounce
during the offseason after win-
ning consecutive games to close
the 2005 season for the first time
since it won back-to-back contests
against Rice and SM U midseason.
Before the separate two-game
winning streaks, ECU hadn't won
two straight since 2001.
With the two losses to open
the season, the smiles have been
replaced by grit and determination.
"Even with all the mistakes
we made we still had an opportu-
nity to win Holtz said referring
to the UAB game. "I think that
speaks volumes for these players'
attitudes and their competitive
nature
A home date with a top ten
West Virginia squad looms as an
ESPN audience will watch the
Pirates for the first time since a
home loss to Houston 27-13 in
2003. A renewed rivalry with
Virginia, an ACC opponent also
serves as a sobering reminder that
the scheduling upgrade remains
an uphill battle.
Lose to Memphis and ECU
could be staring 0-5 in the face
with a tough out against defend-
ing Conference USA champion
Tulsa renewing the conference
slate. If the Pirates were still
starving for a win, standing 0-
6 halfway through the season,
doubters will start to question
Mark A. Ward
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the team's toughness, leaders and
coaching staff.
"My eighth grade football
coach text messaged me on Sat-
urday night and he talked about
that being disappointed is a part
of life but being discouragement
is a choice Holtz said. "Right
now UABj was a disappointing
loss but we are not going to get
discouraged, we are not going to
turn on each other and we are not
going to fall apart from within
With increased expectations,
six consecutive losses could cause
most teams to cave in. That's why
stopping Memphis quarterback
Martin Hankins and running
back Joseph Doss is so important.
Because the team lost two gut
wrenchers doesn't necessarily
mean that Pirate fans need to
jump off the bandwagon. They
need patience, which by mid-
October many might be consid-
ered a lofty virtue.
"You've got to take it one at a
time said offensive coordinator
Steve Shankweiler, when asked
about the importance of the Mem-
phis game. "Let's leave it at that.
One at a time
Looking down the pike, the
next month is brutal because the
schedule is so top-heavy. The
combined record of the first six
opponents is 8-4 while the last six
stands at 4-8.
"We're the pro team here in
town said defensive coordinator
Greg Hudson. "It's our job to put a
product out there that they can be
proud of. They spend their money
on us and watch us play. We've got
to perform for them
Aside from the future con-
ference implications, the game
should have added weight because
it's the home opener. ECU is 40-
28-2 all-time in home openers,
but has only gone 2-4 over the
last six seasons.
ECU also has a revenge factor
that it owes Memphis. The Tigers
won by three points in the last two
seasons. Two years ago, Memphis'
Stephen Gostkowski booted a 35-
yard field goal with six seconds left
to down ECU 38-35. In 2005, Mau-
rice Avery scored a one-yard touch-
down run with just over two minutes
remaining to seal the 24-21 win.
"When things get difficult
that's when its time to circle the
wagon, to bring everybody in
tighter together, and to form a
bond and a closeness Holtz said.
"The only way to get through it all
is to go out there on those practice
fields, work hard and to continue
to try and get better
This writer can be contacted at
sportstheeastcarolinian.com.
ELTORO
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Life is calling.
How far will you go?
800.424.8580
peacecorps.gov
Peace Corps at
East Carolina University
Visit with a recruiter to learn how
Peace Corps might fit into your future.
Tuesday, September 19
World Community Dav
Mendenhall Brickyard
(if rain - Multipurpose Room)
East 5th Street
Greenville, NC
2 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
For information, contact: amooreepeacecorps.gov
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14,2006
K
6ej- l&
Library
IS EAIIII
Pulse
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 14, 2006
Horoscopes
ARIES .
Changes are required, but don't
simply react. Have a definite
objective in mind, and be patient.
This may take several tries.
TAURUS
Resist the urge to buy pretty
things that you don't really need.
Build a strong foundation now;
you can add the frills later.
GEMINI
The assignment is to not only
do the tough job, but to actually
have fun at it. This may require a
shift in attitude. You can do it.
CANCER
You're right, costs can be cut
even further. Some associates
are afraid this means they'll have
to do without. Be persistent,
they'll survive.
IEO
You certainly don't like somebody
else to tell you what to do. When
that person's right, however, it
would be wise of you to listen.
VIRGO
You don't like to stir up
controversy, but it may be
necessary. Don't allow somebody
else's lack of interest to ruin your
grade.
LIBRA
Pay attention to what you're
doing. There are lots of
distractions, but if you give in
to them you'll be sorry you did.
Keep your eyes on the prize.
SCORPIO
Don't talk about being frugal and
nobody will even notice. You're
looking good, so you don't have
to tell them you got the outfit
on sale.
SAGITTARIUS
You can't do everything, nor
should you. Let somebody else
assist by running errands and
bringing you what you need. This
includes colas and pizzas.
CAPRICORN
Don't be stopped by a failure,
they happen all the time. Don't
run away from a tough situation,
either. You can figure it out.
AOUARIUS
Managing time and money are
excellent skills to master. You'll
get a chance to practice new.
Don't complain; it's a valuable
lesson.
PISCES
You have a spiritual advantage,
but learning to use it takes
practice. With help from those
who love you, life will get a lot
easier.
Local Concerts:
Rascal Flatts will perform on
Saturday Sept. 16 at 7:30 p.m.
at the Alltel Pavillion at Walnut
Creek in Raleigh.
Friday, Sept. 15 and 22, organist
Ludger Lohmann will perform at
3 p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church.
Thursday, Sept. 21, Karen Rouse
will perform her student voice
recital at 7 p.m.
Sept. 22 - 23; Congressional
Black Caucus of the Jazz Studies
Department will hold a concert.
Visit music.ecu.edu for more
information.
Staind will perform on Sunday,
Oct. 1 at the Alltel Pavillion at
Walnut Creek in Raleigh.
Arts & Entertainment
Mendenhall Movies:
Cars
Thursday914 at 9:30 p.m.
Friday915 at 7 p.m.
midnight
Saturday916 at 9:30 p.m.
Sunday917 at 7 p.m.
The 03 Vinci Code
Thursday914 at 7 p.m.
Friday915 at 9:30 p.m
Saturday916 at 7 p.m.
midnight
Sunday917 at 9:30 (Ml.
'HollywoodlancT
Shock and Awe
SARAH CAMPBELL
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
On Saturday, when I realized
that one of my friends had planned on
dragging me, kicking and screaming
to an evening showing oiHollywood-
land, the thought of going to the
dentist suddenly looked like a pleas-
ant alternative. Spending a couple
hours of my precious time watching
Ben Affleck in what I assumed to be
yet another disappointment left me
feeling more than a bit anxious.
As everyone began piling into
the theater, I could tell that some
people were ecstatic to be there,
while others, like myself, were a bit
weary of the presentation on hand.
However, I have to say that by the
end of the movie I wasn't running for
the nearest exit, but rather savoring
the work.
Allen Coulter sparkles in his
directorial debut based on the life of
George Reeves (Affleck), the star of
television's original Superman, who
becomes caught up in Hollywood's
expectations and commits suicide, or
so everyone thinks at first.
When Reeves' mother begins to
question the circumstances behind
her son's death, she hires Louis
Simo (Adrian Brody) to investigate.
Simo slowly begins to unveil Reeves'
scandalous affair with Toni Mannix
(Diane Lane), the wife of Eddie
Manix (Bob Hoskins) an MGM
studio executive.
Throughout the movie, 1 was t
astonished to see the negative light
that Hollywood was portrayed in.
Often movies sugarcoat the truth
into a glamorous distortion of reality,
but 1 was pleased to see how Coulter
used the darker side of Holly wood to
depict more realistic characters.
One stale part of the movie that I
want to point out is that the plot gets
a bit confusing at times. While Simo
is investigating in the present, there
are flashbacks to Reeves' life and the
two worlds start to become confus-
ing and unravel almost completely.
Overall, I found that the actors
gave pretty remarkable perfor-
mances, with Affleck gaining back
Visitors to Australia Zoo lay flowers and notes of condolence at his shrine.
Celebrity Profile:
Remembering Steve Irwin
Louis Simoa a detective who, investigating the death of "Superman
some of the respect he lost after
doing box office busts including
Surviving Christmas and the infa-
mous Gigli. However, Brody and
Lane stole the spotlight with their
intense portrayals of desperation
and secrecy.
Despite the confusing plot
twists, I found this movie to be
entertaining and intriguing. The
murdermystery genre that it
encompassed gave it some origi-
nality against the backdrop of teen
movies and horror flicks. This
movie kept me on the edge of my
seat and in the end, despite my pre-
conceived notions, I was without a
doubt proven wrong.
For more information about
Hollywoodand including a full
synopsis and cast biographies, visit
hollywoodlandmovie.com.
Movie Grade: C
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinain.com.
Remembering
everybody's favorite
man in khaki
LIZ FULTON
STAFF WRITER
Who can believe that only a
week and a half ago, the world
received the terrible news that
Steve Irwin, the Crocodile Hunter,
had died. For some, they believed it
was a joke or a rumor such as Will
Ferrell dying in a hang gliding
accident. Sadly, it was true as major
news outlets across the country
confirmed the death of Irwin from
cardiac arrest after he was attacked
by a sting ray.
Animal lovers and environ-
mentalists alike will miss the man
who made the phrases "Crikey
and "Isn't she a beauty?" part
of American pop culture and
daily conversation.
Irwin was born in 1962 in Aus-
tralia to parents Bob and Lyn, who
ran a wildlife park in Queensland.
Growing up around the Queensland
Reptile and Fauna Park, Irwin
developed his love for animals. At
the age of nine; he handled his first
crocodile and became a crocodile
trapper after graduating from high
school. Later, he became involved
with Queensland's government to
help with their Crocodile Relo-
cation Program that trans-
fers crocodiles to better loca-
tions as humanely as possible.
In 1991, the park was renamed
the Australian Zoo when it was
turned over to Irwin. Also in 1991,
he met Terri Raines, an American
naturalist, and they married the
next year. Together, they created
"The Crocodile Hunter which
aired on television in 1996.
As the series became more
and more popular, Irwin man-
aged to expand the franchise to
include the zoo, the television
series, the Steve Irwin Conservation
Foundation and the International
Crocodile Resdfc.
In addition to "The Crocodile
Hunter Irwin and his family
have made several documentaries
anj shows such as "The Croc
Files "New Breed Vets" and
"The Crocodile Hunter Diaries
Irwin and his wife have two
children. Bindi Sue was born
see IRWIN page A6
Hundreds rock out
at local music festival
Tom Petty's CD an
introspective journey
Highway Companion
marks the new direction
of a legend's sound
LIZ FULTON
SENIOR WRITER
The old Heartbreaker is back
and his newest solo effort is a
welcome addition to his library of
music that has established itself
among the essentials of classic rock.
Tom Petty is amazing to say
the least. He bridges generation
gaps and allows for young and old
alike to enjoy his music and each
take something different from it.
I'll admit that I will always love the
old stuff, but the series of tracks
on Highway Companion symbolize
the strange journey of an offbeat
musician who has lived hard and
learned lessons along the way.
Highway Companion can be
described as Petty reaching
through his music to make the
listener experience and iden-
tify everything he feels. The
opening track, "Saving Grace
sets the tone for the rest of the
album, and its upbeat, infectious
groove prepares the listener for a
glimpse into a man's soul trapped
at a crossroads.
The whole album is really a
mini road trip into a place that
Petty wants us to see and feel.
"Down South" describes a
person who is traveling back home
and reaching out to his roots to
rediscover himself.
There are also deep themes of
love and loss that shine through
songs like "Flirting with Time"
and "Damaged by Love Even
though they have a sense of mel-
ancholy, these tracks also resonate
with honest-to-goodness rock and
roll that reminds you why you love
Tom Petty in the first place.
If you listen to Highway Com-
panidn from start to finish, it is
difficult to remember where one
song ends and the next begins.
Just like life, one chapter closes
and the next begins before you
register it happening. The flow
is part of what makes this album
so good and why every time
you listen to it, a new theme or
sound will be imprinted into your
mind. Highway Companion finds
Petty reuniting with old friends
- notably Mike Campbell, a former
Heartbreaker, who plays slide
RiverRock brings
community together for
good cause
LLOYD NEWMAN
STAFF WRITER
Hundreds gathered at Greenville
Town Commons Saturday, Sept. 9, to
celebrate music and community at
the first annual RiverRock Music
Festival. The free concert, expertly
organized by local consulting firm
The Axis of Stevil, featured eight
bands from the region ranging
from the inspired acoustic ballads of
Someone's Sister to the hard-rocking
headliners, Katharsis.
Emceeingtheaffairwaslocal mete-
orologist Skip Waters, who brought an
eagerness and humility that helped
solidify the attendees as a community
and expose the real winners of this
event, the Magnolia Arts Center, who
benefited from the proceeds.
Waters also moved things along
Ietween sets, hostinga good-hearted,
but often humorously pathetic Kara-
oke contest (RiverRoke) as well as a
chicken wing eating competition. OfF
stage, organizations and businesses
from all over the city set up tables
offering information on their cause
as well as a variety of freebies that
were continuously circulated around
the grounds throughout the day.
One of the most prominent
themes of the day was the support of
local music. In addition to the entire
lineup being from eastern North
Carolina, bands that were not invited
to play on stage were given the
opportunity to promote themselves
to the large group of attendees.
Multiple artists took advantage
by selling CDs, t-shirts and other
merchandise while celebrating the
underappreciated musical talent that
Greenville has to offer.
The lineup itself, however, had
been a point of concern from the
very beginning. Organizers had to
walk a fine line between a diverse
roster that could draw people for
a short time and a more thematic
one that could bring a smaller,
more dedicated group. They opted
for the former, and as a result, for
better or for worse, no two groups
were alike.
But watching kids as young as
three show the same enthusiasm for
the bluegrass trio Carolina Still as
they did the heavy metal band Black
Sky Radius, it became obvious that
to most of the attendees, this festival
was less about the music and more
about the opportunity for Greenville
citizens to spend the afternoon
among one another.
This was not a hip occasion, but
instead a wholesome and family-
friendly affair that provided great
fun to be had, even separate from
the live music.
With a great sense of charity and
community, and outstanding man-
agement, the RiverRock Festival
has the potential to one day become
a city-defining event.
With the success of the event
this year, there is sure to be another
RikerRock Festival next year. Be
sure to keep reading the East Caro-
linian for more information about
upcoming events.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
Ten Silver Drops of garbage
see PETTY page A6
Secret Machines latest effort a dud
BEN HARRIS
STAFF WRITER
College has been a time of great music exploration
for me. Since I have been here, I've discovered many
different bands that dwell outside the mainstream.
Some of the bands I liked, some, not so much. So it's
no surprise that w hen I decided to do a CD review, I
desperately wanted to take a chance on a band that
I had never heard before in the hopes that I would
find something that would truly blow me away. Sadly,
Secret Machines took my hope, beat it into whimper-
ing submission and left it for dead on the bloodied
pavement of the parking lot outside my apartment.
Based in New York, Secret Machines is comprised
of bassistkeyboardistvocalist Brandon Curtis, his
brother, guitaristvocalist Ben Curtis and drummer
Josh Garza. The experimental trio was formed in
'2000 and released their first KP, in September '200-2
on the indie label Ace Fu records. They secured
a deal with Reprise in '2003 thanks largely to the
increasing buzz about their live shows. Since then,
the band has released one KP, The Road Leads H'here
it's Led, and two full-length studio albums. Now
Here is Nowhere and their latest, Ten Silver Drops.
-
Ten Silver Drops, their sophomore effort, is the CD
I decided to bravely devote my time to reviewing. The
CD first caught my eye thanks to its cover. The bright
green and silver design stood out to me like piece
of coal in a snowdrift. The cover lured me in with
the promise of something good and refreshing that
see 10 DROPS page A6





PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2006
10 DROPS
continued from A5
l
would satisfy my musical appetite
only to disappoint me in the end
with a plate full of garbage topped
with a dash of feces. How does
the cover designer sleep at night?
I knew from the first track,
"Alone, Jealous and Stoned that I
was in for thirty minutes of musi-
cal hell. The song opened with a
soft- guitar, which lead to a steady
psychedelic drumbeat. This sound
would permeate through seven of
the eight tracks on the album, seri-
ously limiting the musical variation
one would expect from a good
album; right from the beginning
of the song,
I noticed that the band had
several extremely different musical
influences including Dave Mat-
thews Band, Led Zeppelin, Pink
Floyd and even a hint of Nine Inch
Nails. To include Nine Inch Nails
in the list really doesn't make much
sense, but then neither does most of
the "music" on this time killer.
After "Alone, Jealous and
Stoned the CD took me through
the songs "All at Once" and "Light-
ning Blue Eyes The songs sounded
nearly identical to "Alone, Jealous
and Stoned again indicating the
extreme lack of musical variation
within the album. The fourth
track, the Pink Floydish "Daddy
in the Doldrums represents the
only bright spot on this otherwise
dark-as-death album. The track
relies heavily on synthesizers and
is decidedly different than anything
else on the album.
By the time I got to the seventh
track, "I Want to Know iftt's Still
Possible again basically the same
song as the first just with different
lyrics, I had completely given up on
the album and my brain, not want-
ing to take any more abuse, began
to cause me to fade in and out to the
point where I sometimes didn't even
realize the album was still playing.
Around this time I noticed
my eel, Mr. Slithers, had begun
to severely convulse in his tank.
Sadly, Mr. Slithers passed away that
night. Maybe he was the victim of
extremely dirty water, or maybe he
was the victim of his tendency to
IRWIN
continued from A5
in 1998, and she was named
after Steve's favorite animals.
Bindi is a saltwater crocodile,
and Sui was a Staffordshirre bull
terrier who died in June 2004.
Their second child, Robert Clar-
ence "Bob" Irwin, was born in 2003
and unknowingly became part of
controversy when Irwin held him in
his arms while feeding a crocodile.
Irwin became a media fixture
in the United States that resulted
in being parodied on shows such as
"South Park" and "The Simpsons
For a time, there was also a drink-
ing game that centered around
how often one of his famous catch
phrases were uttered in an episode
of "The Crocodile Hunter
He appeared in two films, one
as himself in Dr. Doolittle 3 and
starring in The Crocodile Hunter:
Collision Course. The film had Irwin
and his wife starring as themselves
and the humor that follows after
getting tangled up with the CIA.
In 2001 Irwin was awarded
the Centenary Medal for his "ser-
vice to global conservation and to
Australian tourism He also was
the Toutfsm Export of ihe Year for
Australia in 2004 and was- nomi-
nated for Australian of the Year.
Even regarding his own death,
Irwin displayed a sense of humor.
He once insisted, "My number one
rule is to keep that camera rolling.
Even if it's shaky or slightly out of
focus, I don't give a rip. Even if a
big old alligator is chewing me up,
I want to go down and go, 'Crikey
just before I die. That would be the
ultimate for me
This writer can be contacted at
pulseOtheeastcarolinian.com.
never eat, but I know Mr. Slithers
knows that he was the victim of
having to listen to a half hour of
horribly bad music.
His little eel-brain simply could
not take the horrible punishment
any longer. Rest in peace in the
land of endless ghost shrimp my
slimy friend. If there is one thing I
learned from listening to Ten Silver
Drops and subsequently doing the
review, it's that there is a reason
most bands aren't well known. That
is because they simply just aren't
good, enough for anyone to really
listen to or care about.
Sadly, Secret Machines has
soured me forever when it comes to
listening to new bands. The album
almost poisoned any faith I had in
music at all but thankfully, I had the
medicine, and as soon as I finally
finished listening to the album, I
promptly put in some Nirvana and
I knew everything was going to
be all right.
This writer can be contacted at
pulseOtheeastcarolinian.com.
PETTY
continued from A5
guitar. Jeff Lynne plays bass and
really makes his presence known
on the song "Night Driver
Petty astoundingly plays
drums for the entire album,
and the three create a sense of
intimacy that keeps the album
refreshingly honest.
Like with any musician
that has been recording for 30
years, Petty has reached the
milestone where his music has
become richly autobiographical
and introspective.
It is amazing to chron-
icle the career and art of
such a musician and in doing
so, there can only be profound
appreciation and respect for High-
way Companion.
This writer can be contacted at
pulseOtheeastcarolinian.com.
Report news students need to know jgc
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 14, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 14, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1918
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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