The East Carolinian, January 26, 2006







www.theeastcarolinian.com
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 81 Number 44
THURSDAY January 26, 2006
Researching creepy crawlers at ECU
Big bucte go to
bug biologist
ZACKHILL
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Spiders and millipedes are
something that would rank very
high on many people's list of
creepy creatures.
But for some, these complex,
yet often tiny, bugs offer an end-
less world of interest.
One of those people is
Jason Bond, ECU professor of
biology.
Bond began studying insects
as an undergraduate at Western
Carolina University because of
his love of biodiversity and the
natural spectacle offered by spi-
ders and their relatives.
"I remember I thought spider
silk was fascinating said Bond.
"It has amazing chemical and
material properties
Bond has since traveled
around the world discovering
and studying bugs.
Bond said science has
not come anywhere close to
finding every kind of insect on
the planet.
"It's really like another
new day, another new species
Bond said.
Three grants from the
National Science Foundation
have already started helping
Bond and his team of seven stu-
dents in their research.
Two of the grants deal directly
with millipedes and spiders.
The Revisionary Syntheses
in Systematics grant has led
to the discovery of nearly
40 new species of trapdoor
spiders in places as close as right
here in North Carolina to as
far away as New Zealand and
Africa.
The Partnership for
Both items cause problems.
Econonic
impacts of
nuclear Iran
Economic obstacles of
Iran's nuclear ambitions
LEE SCHWARZ
STAFF WRITER
From left to right: Brent Hendrikson, Ph.D. biology student, Matt Walker, master's biology student, and Jason Bond, biology professor.
Enhancing Expertise in Taxon-
omy grant gives Bond $750,000
to conduct research on mil-
lipedes. Bond and his students
have discovered several new
millipede species while updating
what is currently known about
many types.
A $250,000 grant provided
benefits not limited to Bond.
Many researchers at ECU have
benefited from the addition of
an electron-scanning micro-
scope that was purchased with
the funds.
A major part of Bond's work
is studying how ecosystems work
and how biodiversity binds dif-
ferent species together. He is also
concerned about problems that
may stem from species disap-
pearing faster than they're being
discovered.
"We're going through a time
now that's been equated to the
sixth mass extinction Bond
said.
"We're losing biodiversity at
an alarming rate
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian. com.
Swedish artists visit ECU
Art dealsimth textiles, oil
and watercolor paintings
RACHEL KINO
STAFF WRITER
Last night in Speight Audito-
rium, Bjorn Lowgren and Kata-
rina Qvarnstrom were on hand
to discuss their latest project,
"Historical Damask which will
be on display in the Permanent
Collection Gallery of the Com-
munity Council for the Arts in
Kinston from Jan. 26 - March
18, 2006.
Lowgren is a contemporary
oil and watercolor painter and
Qvarnstrom is a professional
textile weaver. Both are from
Stockholm, Sweden. Their joint
project began in 1998 with a
trip to a local museum where
Katarina happened to stumble
upon some old textile patterns.
After making copies, she showed
them to Lowgren, and after some
discussion, they decided to start
traveling and weaving the his-
toric patterns they found.
Their first trip was a month-
long journey and was funded
by Bjorn's watercolor paintings,
which were converted and sold
as posters.
The three posters, which
depict a Harley Davidson motor-
cycle, an arch and a car, were
all done in the same shades and
sold both separately and as "The
Suite which is a long poster
showcasing all three works. The
process in creating just one of
these initially took over a year.
With the posters selling suc-
cessfully, Lowgren and Qvar-
nstrom visited Copenhagen,
Denmark, and found a few pat-
tern books in a museum. From
there they went to The National
Gallery in Amsterdam, Holland,
where they were also successful
and ordered copies of all the pat-
terns that interested them.
Perusing through the books
took time and care however, as
"some of them were so old that
you had to wear gloves just to
turn the pages Lowgren said.
To give an idea of exactly how
old these patterns were, Lowgren
dated some of them as being
originally published in 1527 and
even before.
With the patterns in his pos-
session, Lowgren began his share
of the work: pattern modification
and layout. In modification, he
made the pattern look a bit more
like "our times and gave each
a slightly more contemporary
look while still preserving the
historic design and significance.
He took each pattern, painstak-
ingly transferred it to paper, and
plotted out the exact design so
Qvarnstrom could weave it.
"You always finish a pat-
tern by dividing the pattern into
squares Lowgren said.
"Sometimes, it becomes a
question of a single square to
make the pattern look right or
wrong
Some of the designs Katarina
has woven on her custom damask
loom include dragons, castles,
Etruscans and Amazons, as well
as a maiden, presumably being
saved, by a man carrying some
water to her.
Some of these ideas came
from the pattern books them-
selves, but eventually, Lowgren
and Qvarnstrom began to search
for art from other sources. Some
came from paintings, napkins,
scarves, tablecloths, basically any
type of art from the time period
encompassing the Middle Ages
in Europe. '
"We don't know if some of
these textiles have ever been, or
if they are purely imagination
said Lowgren.
"But, we would like to think if
they never existed then it worked
in reverse for us, because now
they do
The two traveled from Hol-
land to Belgium and found an
interesting village there that
was had stood the test of time
and had not changed very much
since the middle ages, where it
was a metropolis on the Spice
Route, and diamonds were traded
regularly there.
"The town attracted many
great artists because of its popu-
larity then Lowgren said.
It even inspired his new
poster, the first he had ever done
in black and white. It is called
"Amsterdam and he received
such a positive response from it
that he was prompted to complete
another called "Prenzlauer
In 1999 they returned to
Amsterdam and began to check
out stone sculptures and any-
thing applicable to use in creat-
ing a new textile. In autumn of
2000 they made a third trip and
collected many new patterns
from Germany and Switzerland.
In Switzerland they visited
the Abegg Foundation, which is
one of the world's greatest sources
for textile art. They handle resto-
see LECTURE page A2
Students are told about future trips overseas at an information session in Mendenhall Great Rooms.
Students briefed on overseas studies
Students who participate
benefit immensely
EUSA BIZZOTTO
STAFF WRITER
Tuesday afternoon the Office
of International Affairs held an
information session for all stu-
dents regarding the study abroad
programs that will be taking place
this summer through ECU.
Faculty members from a
number of disciplines within the
university presented the programs
they have designed to lead this
summer, displaying trips to loca-
tions such as Italy, Ghana, Austra-
lia, London, Paris, Argentina and
Germany, among many others.
In all, 15 different programs
have been created, each led by
a separate department, but all
of which accept students from
just about every major. Some of
the faculty members who spoke
at the information session on
behalf of their trips represented
departments at ECU such as
the College of Business, Human
Ecology, Nursing, Fine Arts and
Communication, the Depart-
ment of Foreign Languages and
several more.
The summer programs are
specifically designed to func-
tion similarly to that of a normal
summer session. However, stu-
dents are able to fulfill academic
hours through a number of dif-
ferent means.
Some of the options men-
tioned at the information session
were those in which students take
courses, either before leaving the
country or once arriving at the
intended destination or those in
which they journal their experi-
ences while away.
Students also have the choice
of the number of hours they want
to complete, having the option of
a minimum of three to a maxi-
mum of six, depending on the
length of the program. All of the
completed hours transfer as easily
to ECU as if the students had
never left the campus. If students
are interested in participating in
a program that is being led by a
department in which they are not
pursuing a degree, then they have
the option of fulfilling elective
requirements or using the experi-
ence as an independent study.
All of the presenters at the ses-
sion stressed that taking advan-
tage of an opportunity such as
this is vital to a student's success
upon graduation because it sets
students apart from the majority.
Brandi Dudley, assistant
director for the study abroad
program at ECU, acknowledged
that because it is becoming so
common for students to achieve
high grade point averages, stu-
dents benefit immensely from
having international experience
and being able to show employers
that they took advantage of the
opportunities that were available
to them.
In addition to studying abroad
in the summer, the university
also offers semester and year-long
programs as well. ECU currently
arranges programs to 41 different
countries and is continuing to
broaden opportunities for stu-
dents. Almost every representative
present at the session touched on
the financial aspect of studying
abroad, encouraging students
not to shy away from the experi-
ence because they may not think
they have the financial means.
In actuality, the cost of study-
ing internationally is about the
same as it is for enrollment at
ECU. Also, students who are eli-
gible to receive federal financial
aid toward their education here
may be eligible to apply it to
studying abroad, and there are
scholarship opportunities avail-
able to students as well. Eligibil-
ity for the exchange programs
consists of students who are
enrolled full-time as undergradu-
ates or graduates and who are in
good academic standing with a
minimum grade point average
of 2.75.
If a specific program uses a
host institution whose courses are
not in English, applicants must be
able to sufficiently communicate
in the language of the host coun-
try or must have completed the
equivalent of two college years of
the language. Students interested
in participating in a study abroad
program should contact the Office
of International Affairs at 328-
1937 or studyabroad(ecu.edu.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Strong corporate profits in
spite of Iranian nuclear uncer-
tainty are a sign of just how
strong the economy is presently.
The S&P 500 companies are
showing a profit increase of 14
percent on average. Even tech-
nology companies, generally
known as volatile, are posting
robust earnings given the fact
that electronic gifts were popular
this past holiday season. One
market analyst spoke about the
uncertainty with Iran.
"Obviously, the Iranian thing
is a wild card and nothing's going
to get resolved in the short term,
but the earnings are really what's
key to the market and any longer-
term perspective said Marc
Pado, market strategist at Cantor
g Fitzgerald St Co.
1 While the upbeat corporate
a profits are good news, more
5 investors will be paying more
attention to the Federal Reserve
report on the Consumer Price
Index (CPI) and "beige book
which is a summary of economic
conditions as determined by the
Federal Reserve. The beige book
is published twice a quarter based
on the economic reporting of the
different federal districts.
The report is summarized by
district and by economic sector.
The last one came out at the end of
November and had mixed reports
about the economy. There was a
downtrend in financial stocks
due to uncertain interest rates,
credit losses and a slow down in
refinancing and equity loans.
Recently, the United States
and European Union, which
did not see eye to eye on Iraq,
agreed that Iran must desist its
nuclear program, as the world
simply is not very trusting of
the Iranian regime's intentions.
The United States and European
Union would like to see the
matter settled before the United
Nations Security Council.
They are now pushing for a
meeting to decide if Iran should
be sanctioned if it does not
abide by the UN decision. The
European Union has declared
talks with Iran have come to a
halt because of non-cooperation.
Russia and China have halted
economic ties to Iran. The United
States and European Union are
optimistic that Russia and China
will come around and refer Iran
to the Security Council.
Meanwhile, oil markets face
uncertainty as well regarding
the Iraqi insurgency and the Iran
nuclear showdown.
"The banner flying over the
region is one of instability and
uncertainty said Mustafa Alani,
analyst at Dubai-based Gulf
Research Center.
Instability in the Middle East
is nothing new to oil markets
though. Neither are the nuclear
ambitions of power-hungry
Middle Eastern regimes.
Investors are uncertain about
Federal Reserve actions. While
nearly everyone is sure that there
will be two more quarter point
raises in the Federal funds rate, no
one is sure what it will do after that.
The transfer of Federal Reserve
leadership from Alan Greenspan
to Ben Bernanke has already cre-
ated unrest in currencies like the
U.S. dollar. It is curious as to why
this leadership transfer would
create unrest considering the
similarity of Bernanke's ideals to
those of Greenspan.
Investors have reason tobe opti-
mistic like the fact that Ford auto
sales are up 46 percent in China.
"We're quite confident that
Ford Motor Company, as a whole,
will again see a significant growth
in total sales volume in China in
2006, reflecting our strong prod-
ucts, expanded dealer network
and strong support by Ford Auto-
motive Financing China said
Mei Wei Cheng, chief executive
of Ford Motor China Ltd.
This writer can be contacted at
newsStheastcarolinian. com.
INSIDE I News: A2 I Classifieds: A6 I Opinion: A4 I A&E: Bl I Sports: B4





1-26-06
Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366
CHRIS MUNIER News Editor ZACK HILL Assistant News Editor
THURSDAY January 26,2006
Announcements
Dance 2006
The week of Jan. 22 - 28 will
be the week of Dance 2006.
Highlights include choreography
by ECU School of Theatre and
Dance faculty and guest artists.
Sometimes serious, sometimes
funny, sometimes lyrical and
sometimes eccentric, this annual
dance showcase has become an
immensely popular event. Sure
to have something for dance
aficionados and newcomers
alike, this is a fast-paced and
unpredictable cornucopia of
dance styles.
Toying with Science
One-man marvel Garry Krinsky
juggles, mimes, dances and even
balances five ladders on his chin
to bring the laws of science to life.
Mr. Krinsky will be bringing his
show "Garry Krinsky's Toying with
Science" to ECU Saturday, Jan.
28 at 2 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Non-stop energy and audience
participation will keep all ages
engaged in this inventive and
informative show. Advance
individual tickets are $8 for faculty
and staff and $6 for students and
youth. All tickets at the door
are $9. Better ticket options are
available through subscriptions.
For more information, contact the
Central Ticket Office at 328-4788.
RHA Winter Trip
The Residence Hall Association is
sponsoring a Winter Trip to the Jan.
27 Charlotte Bobcats vs. Miami
Heat basketball game. Attendance
is open to all students. The cost
to attend is $27 for students
who live on campus and $40
for commuting students. The price
includes the cost of the basketball
ticket and transportation. If
interested, contact the RHA
office at rha@mail.ecu.edu or
328-1679. Dispersal of tickets will
be based on a first come, first
serve basis.
Great Decisions 2006
The second in a series of
discussions of major world political
moves hits ECU Saturday, Jan. 28
at 10 a.m. in Rivers Auditorium.
Professor Scott Sillman of Duke
University will present his lecture
entitled "Human Rights and the
Age of Terrorism The cost for
attending this and any individual
session is $15. The full eight-
week program costs $69, which
includes "The Great Decisions
Book Any full time student or
teacher may attend free of charge.
For more information, call 328-
2349, or visit ecu.educs-acad
cpegreat decisions.cfm.
Alumni Association
Scholarships
The ECU Alumni Association
annually awards scholarships
funded by alumni contributions.
Twelve $1,000 scholarships will
be awarded to deserving ECU
full-time undergraduate students
for the following academic year.
Applications for scholarships are
due by Tuesday. Feb. 28. For more
information and to download an
application, visit piratealumni.
com and click on "Awards and
Scholarships" or call the Alumni
Association at 328-6072.
Mentors Needed for
Elementary School
Mentors are needed to assist in the
after-school program at Northwest
Elementary. The program runs
Monday through Friday from 2:20
- 5:30 p.m but mentors do not
have to be available for the entire
week or during breaks. Persons
are needed with experience
coordinating physical activities
for children andor providing
nutrition education. There will
be a daily stipend to offset the
cost of transportation. For more
information, contact Correai
Moore at mooreco ecu.edu.
Contra dance
The ECU Folk and Country
Dancers are sponsoring a contra
dance on Friday, Jan. 27 at the
Willis Building, located on First
and Reade Streets in downtown.
Beginners lesson at 7:30 p.m and
the contra dance is from 8 -10:30
p.m. with live, old-time and Celtic
music by a string band. Entrance
for students is $3, FASG members
$5 and $8 for the public For more
information, call 752-7350. This is
a smoke and alcohol-free event.
News Tips Submissions
If you have a news tip or
announcement, contact
TEC news department at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
News Briefs
State
Vietnam deserter readjusting to
civilian life after jailing
RALEIGH, NC (AP) - Jerry Texiero's
last official military duty was to
complete a course on something he
had mastered more than 40 years
ago upon leaving the Marine Corps.
After dropping desertion charges
against Texiero, who was accused
of fleeing Camp Pendleton, Calif
in 1965 to avoid serving in Vietnam,
the military made the 65-year-old
go through discharge procedures
that included a class on adjusting to
civilian life.
They do this with everybody that's
leaving said Texiero, who was
released from Camp Lejeune last
week and traveled back home to
Tarpon Springs, Fla where he had
lived for years under an alias as a
boat salesman.
"They go into how to dress when
you leave the military. They tell you
how the civilian world is completely
different he said Tuesday. "The
instructor pulled me aside and said to
just go along with everything
Texiero's fiancee, Elaine Smith, said
military officials didn't seem to share
her sense of humor when she offered
an obvious joke: "I told them he
already knew how to leave
A military team that tracks down
deserters caught up with Texiero
last August through a fingerprint
match. Texiero, using the name
Gerome Conti, was serving 20 years'
probation after pleading no contest
to charges that he defrauded the
owners of classic cars he sold in the
mid-1990s.
Texiero was held in a Florida jail until
he was transferred to Camp Lejeune
in mid December. Military officials
declined to say why they decided
to drop the charges, which carried
a possible penalty of three years in
prison.
More NC patients notified of
possible Implant of stolen tissue
CLYDE, NC (AP) - Another North
Carolina hospital says it notified
patients that they may have received
stolen tissue or bone in transplants,
though a spokeswoman said none of
the affected people appear to have
suffered ill effects.
Five people who had been patients
at Haywood Regional Medical Center
were notified that they may have
received transplants of human tissue
that were stolen from funeral homes
in New York.
Hospital spokeswoman Robin Tindall
said Tuesday that all five were tested
for infectious disease but none
showed any signs of problems.
At least 80 people treated at more
than 10 North Carolina hospitals have
been told they may have received the
stolen tissue.
Biomedical Tissue Services of New
Jersey is under investigation for
allegedly removing bone and tissue
from corpses without permission
from families and selling them for
reconstructive surgery. No charges
have been filed.
The company provides tissue for
manufacturers that process It in
batches and package it for surgical
use.
Investigators with the district attorney's
office in Brooklyn, NY, and the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration are
trying to determine whether skin,
bones, tendons and other body
parts were illegally removed from
corpses and sold to five processing
plants around the country. The plants
test, sterilize and shape the material
before it is used in surgery.
National
Boston Scientific wins battle for
Guldant after J&J falls to boost
Its offer
NEW YORK (AP) - Heart device maker
Guidant Corp. said Wednesday it has
agreed to a $27 billion takeover offer
from Boston Scientific Corp breaking
off its deal with Johnson & Johnson
after J&J failed to raise its bid.
The decision appears to bring to an
end a two-month bidding war for
Guidant.
Johnson & Johnson let a midnight
deadline pass without boosting its
earlier $24.2 billion deal with Guidant,
and acknowledged that Guidant
terminated their agreement. It said
that topping its last offer would not
have been in the best interest of its
shareholders.
Boston Scientific will pay $80 per
share for Guidant, or $42 in cash and
$38 in Boston Scientific stock under
the agreement with Guidant.
Johnson & Johnson's last offer for
Guidant stood at $71 per share.
Boston Scientific will also pay J&J
a $705 million break-up fee owed
by Guidant for ending its earlier
agreement with J&J.
J&J had originally offered $25.4 billion
for Guidant in December 2004 but
started to express second thoughts
following a series of Guidant product
recalls last summer. Guidant sued to
close the deal and the companies
agreed to a revised J&J offer of $21.5
billion in November.
In December 2005, Boston Scientific
entered the picture and offered
$25 billion for Guidant, triggering a
bidding war
Ney announces re-election plans
despite Abramoff scandal
WASHINGTON (AP) - Undaunted
by speculation within his own party
that he may have to quit Congress
because of a corruption probe, Rep.
Bob Ney announced Wednesday he's
running for re-election.
"2006 promises to be a vigorous
campaign and I am ready for the
fight said Ney, R-Ohio. He planned
to hold his first formal campaign event
Thursday.
Ney's popularity has hardly dimmed
in his expansive rural district, even
after he was identified in disgraced
lobbyist Jack Abramoff's guilty plea
as the central figure in Abramoff's
scheme to bribe members of
Congress.
Supporters of Ney have been unfazed
by Ohio party chairman Bob Bennett's
pronouncement last week that Ney
should resign if he's indicted.
Bennett attempted to soften his
nationally televised comments Friday
by noting Ney hadn't been charged
with a crime, but he later reiterated
that Ney should leave Congress if
the Justice Department files criminal
charges against him.
Rep. Tom DeLay, R-Texas, who also
had ties to Abramoff, stepped down
temporarily as majority leader last year
when he was indicted on unrelated
charges in Texas, then made it
permanent after the Abramoff guilty
plea. But he has not relinquished his
House seat.
Earlier this month, Ney temporarily
stepped down as chairman of the
House Administration Committee.
He acknowledged that his ties to
Abramoff were a distraction from his
duties, particularly as Republicans
push an ethics reform agenda part of
which must be implemented by the
Administration Committee.
But Ney spokesman Brian Walsh
said no such distraction has affected
Ney's work for his district, where he's
known for hands-on constituent
service and independence from GOP
trade and labor policies.
World
Chile says Pinochet's daughter
detained in Washington
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) - The older
daughter of former dictator Gen.
Augusto Pinochet was detained
Wednesday upon arrival in
Washington after failing to obey a
summons by a Chilean judge, who
indicted her on tax evasion charges,
the government said.
Lucia Pinochet "was the target of an
international arrest warrant issued by
a Chilean judge" and was detained
at a Washington airport, presidential
spokesman Osvaldo Puccio said.
The daughter apparently traveled to
neighboring Argentina on Sunday,
hours before she and other relatives
were due to appear in court to be
served notice of her indictment on
charges of tax evasion and using a
false passport.
She then reportedly flew to
Washington.
Judge Carlos Cerda indicted
Pinochet's wife, also named Lucia,
and their grown children Veronica,
Jacqueline and Marco Antonio in
the case.
Charges also were filed against
Marco Antonio's wife and a lawyer
and a secretary for Pinochet. All are
free on bail.
Eight people killed In rebel attack
in western Nepal; security forces
claim to repel attack
KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) - Communist
rebels fighting to topple Nepal's
monarchy staged a major assault on
a western border town that left at least
eight people dead, but security forces
repulsed the insurgents, officials said
Wednesday.
Two policemen, an army soldier, four
rebels and a civilian were killed in
the large-scale, coordinated attacks
Tuesday night on key security
installations at Nepalgunj, near the
border with India.
The rebels hurled grenades and fired
automatic weapons at police stations
and the city jail, said Binod Kumar
Adhikari, chief government official in
the area. He added that troops had
regained control of the area.
Five policemen were also wounded
in the attacks, one of them seriously,
Adhikari said.
Officials said the bodies of four
insurgents had been recovered and
witnesses saw other bodies being
carried away by rebel forces.
Rebels abandoned a four-month
unilateral cease-fire on Jan. 2 and
intensified attacks in the area.
Security has been stepped up and
police stations reinforced with army
soldiers and more firepower.
Officials said the heightened alert
helped security forces repel the
rebels, keeping casualties to a
minimum.
The attacks follow a government
crackdown over the weekend on pro-
democracy activists in which several
top dissidents were briefly placed
under house arrest and hundreds of
protesters were detained.
The activists want King Gyanendra to
step down as absolute ruler, a position
he assumed after seizing control of
the government in February 2005.
Gyanendra has promised to crush
a communist insurgency and halt
political corruption.
Documentary marks sjs;
20th anniversary of
Challenger explosion
ration and new works, and have a
library and museum there, as well
as work on permanent display.
It is thought that damask
textiles originated during the
Sasanid Empire, in what is now
Iran. "Damask" is taken from
the name of the ancient city of
Damascus, which is one of the
originating locations for this
type of art.
It takes Qvarnstrom months
to complete a damask tapestry,
depending on the size and detail.
She works on it for four to six
hours each day, and uses a loom
specially made to give her work
the feel she wants it to have.
"When I draw with a pencil,
I focus on the forms, but when
I paint, I express myself with
colors. I paint with my hands and
fingers and I like that because I
don't get hung up on details
Lowgren said of his art.
"My works are about meeting
different people and the inspira-
tions I get from them
The artists will both have
their separate works on display
in Kinston from today through
March 18, and there is a special
artist reception and presentation
at the Community Council for
the Arts from 5 - 7 p.m.
They are here in the States
to serve as jurors for the Com-
munity Council for the Arts in
2006.
This write can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Palestinians choose between peace,
confrontation in parliamentary election
The Challenger exploded 20 years ago today.
FRAM1NGHAM, Mass. (AP)
The Challenger explosion left
an indelible impression on Renee
Sotile who, like so many starry-
eyed students in 1986, had been
captivated by a teacher who was
part of the ill-fated crew heading
to space.
What stuck with Sotile, then
a teenager In Rochester, N.Y
wasn't Christa McAuliffe's very
public death in a corkscrew-
shaped column of smoke.
Instead, it was memories of
McAuliffe's life that endured - a
37-year-old woman bubbling with
confidence who ventured boldly
into a realm that had been largely
a man's world. A teacher who had
her students read the journals of
pioneer women because history
textbooks paid too much atten-
tion to men.
"I just always wondered what
kind of person she was said
Sotile, a former videographer
for CNN, who had been making
short films in Los Angeles with a
friend, Mary Jo Godges.
Armed with gumption and
bankrolled by credit cards, the
pair started shooting a full-length
documentary in 2001. It took five
years, but they were buoyed by
luck, the cooperation of McAu-
liffe's family and some help from
the likes of Carly Simon and
Susan Sarandon.
The result is a 75-minute film,
Christa McAuliffe: Reach for the
Stan, that was shown Tuesday '
night at Framingham State Col-
lege, McAuliffe's alma mater.
"It brought her alive said
McAuliffe's mother, Grace Cor-
rigan, who'saw an early screening
of the film.
"It's was very well done. What
a wonderful celebration of her
legacy
Tuesday night, she greeted
her daughter's classmates from
high school, college and the
NASA at the screening.
see EXPLOSION page A3
Palestinians are taking part in their first elections in years.
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP)
Palestinians cast ballots amid
tight security Wednesday in
their first parliament election
in a decade, a cliffhanger vote
on whether to pursue peace or
confrontation with Israel.
The battle between the ruling
Fatah Party and its Islamic Hamas
rival was sure to tilt the balance
of a Middle East torn between
reform and traditionalism. But
concerns over lawlessness, cor-
ruption and unemployment also
weighed on voters' minds.
Both Hamas and Fatah were
confident of victory, but pollsters
said the race was too close to call.
Despite the bitter rivalry, both
parties said they would consider
a coalition if no clear victor
emerges.
Polls opened at 7 a.m. across
the West Bank and Gaza, with
some 1.3 million voters eligible
to choose a 132-member parlia-
ment.
Hamas' campaign has been
well organized, focusing on inter-
nal issues like improved public
services and cleaner government,
while Fatah has been plagued by
disarray and infighting.
Those differences were evi-
dent at a polling station in the
upscale Rimal neighborhood of
Gaza City where about a dozen
see ELECTIONS page A5
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HANGOUT HEAD0UARTERSK8iOBi
V





1-26-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A3
2006
EXplOSiOII from page A2
"I love the portrayal of
Christa as a person said Bob
Veilleux, 62, one of NASA's 114
finalists for the teacher in space
program.
"She was incredibly charis-
matic. That's why they chose her
The showing marks Satur-
day's 20th anniversary of the
Challenger explosion. More than
that, it is the completion of a
journey for Sotile and Godges,
who started filming at Framing-
ham State on the 15th anniver-
sary of McAuliffe's death.
The film tries to shed light on
why this high-school teacher from
Concord, N.H was picked from
the 12,000 educators who applied
for President Reagan's teacher-
in-space program. It is a portrait
of a dynamic woman whose
enthusiasm for learning and
life was infectious, even coming
through on old news footage.
"Reach for it McAuliffe is
seen telling students in the film.
"Push yourself as far as you
can
At Concord High School,
McAuliffe taught economics, law,
American history and The Ameri-
can Woman, acourseshedesigned.
Beyond the public persona, the
film also gives a glimpse of McAu-
liffe's life before the space program.
"Christa was so much more
than an astronaut running
around in a blue suit said Mar-
garet Gilmore, 55, a high school
classmate in Framingham.
The crowd Tuesday night
gushed at the documentary's
intimate details, such as McAu-
liffe's baby pictures, her wedding
dress and her images of her own
two children, who were 6 and 9
when she died.
The crowd laughed know-
ingly when one McAuliffe's
students recalled that she had a
penchant for running into class
late with her hair still wet from
the shower. A friend remembered
that McAuliffe wore a strapless
dress, for example, to her high
school prom, a scandal at her
Catholic school in 1966.
And here in Framingham,
where McAuliffe grew up, her
old neighbors still covered their
eyes when the fateful explosion
covered the screen.
Even with the richness of the
subject, the documentary was
difficult for Sotile and Godges,
who had never made a film
longer than 10 minutes.
"This was a big story that
needed to be told said Godges.
"But there were plenty of times
when it felt like Renee and I were
the only ones who felt like that
They were turned down
for grants, rejected by funders
and their personal credit cards
neared their limits.
Then Carly Simon called.
Sotile had written her a
letter explaining that McAu-
liffe had carried a cassette of
Simon's music to space because it
soothed her. Simon asked about
the project, pushed for some
narrative details and wrote a
song titled "You're Where I Go"
for the film.
Other things started to fall
into place. At a film festival
in Harlem, Sotile and Godges
bumped into Sarandon and told
the actress about their project.
She agreed on the spot to narrate
the documentary for free.
Sotile and Godges ended up
using parts of about 40 inter-
views and footage from some 75
hours of tape.
In large part, the film gives
McAuliffe a chance to speak for
herself.
"I touch the future. I teach
McAuliffe tells an interviewer. "I
really appreciate that sentiment.
That's going with me
Art therapy helps students in trouble
Artwork by students at Griffith Highschool in Winston-Salem.
WINSTON-SALEM, NC (AP)
Art class might be the last
place that you would expect to
find Antonio Huling.
Huling, 15, was sent to the
Middle School Academy in the
fall after a fight at Philo Middle
School. He said he has had prob-
lems with anger.
But in the art-therapy class-
room at the academy last week,
Antohfo was putting a coat of glaze
on a sculpture of a dog that looks
like his German shepherd, moving
the brush carefully to make
sure that he hit the right spots.
"It's easier for me to draw
things because any time I make
a stroke, it releases anger said
Antonio, who lives in a group
home. He discussed family issues
that he has had to deal with.
"I used to have thoughts about
hurting myself, but I don't any-
more because of this school and
the art therapy
At least once a week, Anto-
nio and the other students at
the academy go to see Sammie
Goodwin, a certified art thera-
pist. Goodwin helps the students
who end up there after they have
had problems at their home
schools.
"The concept was to create
a program that was both edu-
cational and therapeutic said
John Siskind, the system's direc-
tor of alternative education.
Art therapy has been used in
various settings since the 1940s.
o. Experts believe that the therapy
allows people to express feelings
in different ways.
Goodwin has said that the
technique works very well with
students.
"In therapy, it's much easier
to talk about here than eye to
eye she said, tapping a student's
drawing.
Goodwin can tell a lot from
the drawings. She said she has dis-
covered child abuse, suicidal ten-
see ART page A5





OPINION
Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinlan.com 252.328.9238
JENNIFER L HOBBS Editor In Chief
THURSDAY January 26,2006
Our View
Visors should be
mandatory in NHL
Let's face it, hockey is one of the rough-
est sports on the planet. Consider also
pucks flying around that can top speeds
of 98, 99 and even 100 mph, and these
athletes are in serious danger night in
and night out. Past incidents attest to that.
Bryan Berard had his retina reattached in a
four-and-a-half-hour surgery after taking a
stick blade to his eye from Marian Hossa back
in 2000. Mats Sundin was struck in the eye by
a puck in the season opener this year, putting
him out of commission for a month. Even more
recently, Jim Slater of the Atlanta Thrashers
was almost rendered blind after getting hit
by a stick blade last Wednesday, but luckily
only suffered a severe gash on his eyelid.
All three players are now swearing by visors,
and Slater hit the nail on the head as to why
he should wear one.
"When you don't have to, why risk it?" said Slater.
But there are still plenty of NHLers who risk
it every night.
According to a study done by The Hockey
News, only 38 percent of players wear visors.
That number is much improved from where it
used to be 10 years ago, but even so, wouldn't
it make sense for players to want to provide
protection to one of the only exposed areas
of their bodies when they play the game?
Many players complain that visors impede
their vision, it gets foggy or scratched or is
too much trouble to keep clean overall. Some
argue that visors hinder vision on the ice or
scoring ability. Yet it doesn't seem to be slow-
ing down NHL points-leader Jaromir Jagr or
the league's leading goal-scorer llya Kovalchuk.
Perhaps a larger problem is this tough guy
attitude in the NHL that guys like Don Cherry
promote ad naseum, which fosters this ridicu-
lous machismo attitude that guys who risk
debilitating injury are somehow superior to
those who wear the protective half-shields.

Thrashers defenseman Andy Sutton
recently called Cherry a "caveman Cheers,
Andy. Don, keep your mouth shut.
In many cases, decisions of this nature
should be left up to the players. But in this
case, when the risk of serious injury is so
high, the NHL should push for a visor man-
date not to limit their players, but simply to
protect them.
Pirate Rant
Opinion Columnist
Hollywood: stop glorifying horrible human beings
New iDhan film is awful
in a different way this
time
GARY MCCABE
BITTER BOULEVARD
Our Staff
Jennifer L Hobbs
Editor In Chief
Chris Munier Zack Hill
News Editor Asst. News Editor
Carolyn Scandura Kristin Murnane
Features Editor Asst. Features Editor
This week's offering underwent
a of couple changes before it became
the series of words you're currently
holding in your eager little hands
(or, quite possibly, on your computer
screen). At first, I wanted to take
the opportunity to write about the
biggest half-wit in recent memory,
Mayor Nagin of New Orleans, who
recently said that God sent Hurricane
Katrina because he's not too happy
with black people.
Blaming God for all the deaths
in New Orleans is a really tough pill
to swallow, especially when I seem
to recall a field full of buses sub-
merged in five feet of water because
Nagin wouldn't pull the trigger early
enough and use them to evacuate
local residents days before Katrina
hit. Don't blame God for your own
shortcomings as a public official,
Mayor Nagin.
And while you do that, learn
how to speak properly. Maybe I'm
wrong, but I don't put very much
stock into any elected official who
uses phrases like "you can't have
New Orleans no other way I hon-
estly have papers from second grade
with better use of grammar than
Mayor Nagin and his speeches.
So I was all set to write about
Mayor Nagin, but then I saw a story
that irked me even more. Apparently
before they became man and wife in
June of 2002, political activist and
prosthetic leg aficionado Heather
Mills gave fiance Paul McCartney
an ultimatum, either he gives up
smoking marijuana or she "walks"
out the door.
I almost had an aneurysm when
I read about this. It's never been a
secret that Sir Paul enjoys a good
clam bake - he was even arrested
in Japan for possession - and if she
disagrees so much with his choice
of lifestyle, why would she even date
him, let alone agree to marry him?
That is, of course, aside from the
fact that he was rock 'n' roll's first
billionaire.
More importantly, though,
why would he put up with that?
Paul McCartney was a Beatle.
He's written more great songs
than any man not named John
Lennpn. He's rich and still looks
pretty good for his age. He'd have
no problem finding a younger,
more beautiful, two-legged
woman who would gladly love
him for who he was, not who she
wanted him to be.
So maybe it's because I'm a
huge Beatles fan or maybe it's
because I'm a man who doesn't
enjoy being told what to do, but
that story hit a nerve. Unfor-
tunately, a bigger story piqued
my interest while planning this
piece, so I changed the plan once
again. You'll just have to go to my
"Myspace" page if you want to
hear more Heather Mills jokes.
I've been reading in the rags
that a film about Mark David Chap-
man - the man who gunned down
the incomparable John Lennon
outside his New York City apart-
ment - is currently in the works.
It's called Chapter 27 - a reference
to "The Catcher in the Rye the
book Chapman carried with him
at the time of the murder - and
will star Jared Leto and my favor-
ite cute little redhead not named
Conan O'Brien, Lindsay Lohan.
My apprehension to Chapter 27
goes beyond the simple fact that
the film will be little more than
the film equivalent to a botched
abortion. Seriously, if it was going
to be good, wouldn't the produc-
tion company have been able to get
better actors than Jared Leto and
Lindsay Lohan?
If the script had any prom-
ise whatsoever, you know that
someone like Scarlett Johansson
or Reese Witherspoon would
have jumped at the chance to get
involved. But they didn't. The best
they could do was the girl who
drove Herbie. That's a bad sign,
my friends.
When I was a much younger,
my friend Jacob told me that
the only way I would be ever
be famous is if I killed someone
that was. In a nutshell, that's all
Mark David Chapman is and all
he's ever aspired to be. He is a
fat, unrepentant piece of garbage
who, with one squeeze of his sau-
sage-like finger, affected millions
of people around the world.
Chapman didn't kill Lennon
because he hated him. Rather, he
killed him because he loved him
too much. Chapman wanted so
badly to be a part of Lennon's
celebrity that killing him seemed
the only plausible way to do so.
Making this film is not only a
slap in the face of the legacy of
John Lennon, it gives Chapman
exactly what he wants - more
fame and more attention.
What's even more disgust-
ing is that the film is currently
shooting in New York City outside
of the Dakota Building, where
Lennon was shot and where his
wife Yoko Ono still resides, despite
begging and pleading from Ono
to consider filming elsewhere.
While her singing style may
lead you to believe otherwise,
Ono is a human being and as a
human being, shouldn't be sub-
jected to a recreation of the most
traumatic experience of her life
right outside of her window. She
tried to block the filming, but
legally all the filmmakers needed
was permission from the city so
filming went on with little to no
regard for Ono, who most likely
will have to be portrayed in the
film in some capacity. After all,
she was standing next to him
when he was shot.
I just have the sinking feeling
that Hollywood is going to attempt
to humanize Chapman with this
film - that's what they always do,
whether it's intentional or not. I
don't care about him that much.
I don't want to know that he had
a dog named "Cuddles" or that
Daddy hit him when he was little. I
already know everything I need to
know: he killed John Lennon and
he's going to be in jail for a long,
long time (and that's more for his
protection than anyone else).
Instead of this stupid film,
why not make a positive film
about John Lennon? I've only
seen one - the superb indepen-
dent film Two of Us - and would
probably sit through anything
that has to do with him. Hell, I
might even go and see Chapter
27. It's not like I have anything
to do on a Friday night. And who
knows, since this is her first stab
at an independent film, maybe
Lindsay Lohan will make her
indie flick debut the right way:
naked. Then I'm there whether
Yoko likes it or not.
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Sarah Bell
Head Copy Editor
Herb Sneed
Photo Editor
Alexander Marciniak
Web Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst. Sports Editor
April Barnes
Asst. Copy Editor
Rachael Letter
Asst. Photo Editor
Dustln Jones
Asst. Web Editor
Edward McKim
Production Manager
Newsroom
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252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular
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summer. "Our View" is the opinion of the editorial board
and is written by editorial boaid members. TEC welcomes
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copy of TEC is free, each additional copy is $1.
In My Opinion
(KRT) The rich are forever
being portrayed in books, movies
and television as truly miserable
when the truth is that, in real life,
they seem to be happy all the time.
Or much of the time. Certainly
when they need to pay the bills. Or
fix the roof. Or plan a trip. Travel
for them is an orgy of choice.
You won't find rich people
paying top dollar to squeeze into
the middle seats in the middle of
"economy" on a long transconti-
nental flight, with unidentifiable
"food" and an unwatchable "movie"
placed before them while the "gen-
tleman" in the seat behind them
kicks their seat incessantly while
singing along, badly, to his iPod.
Not that I'm familiar with the
experience.
Reporters love to luxuriate
in breathlessly documenting
indictments, divorces and come-
uppances, to say nothing of
cataloguing a rogues' library of
celebrity mug shots. It's an entire
beat carved out by the tabs, daily
gossip columns and Vanity Fair
- Rich People Messing Up, with
subspecialties in Dead Heiresses
and Dynastic Gene Mutations.
I've interviewed many rich
people and they often seem quite
content, delirious even. You might
be, too, if you knew you never had
to do the laundry or go to the gro-
cery store again.
We want to believe that the
rich are not better or happier but,
contrary to logic, emotionally
worse, their woes rivaling those of
the poor. We want to believe the
wealthy pay for their good fortune
through misery, like the Kennedys,
when many of them, Maria Shriver
for one, seem quite content in addi-
tion to having spectacular hair.
Woody Allen's bracing Mafdi
Point is one of those rare movies
in which the rich are portrayed
as joyous, with barely a concern
in the world while being in pos-
session of stupefying gardens,
excellent scotch, Asprey baubles
and superior upholstery.
Emily Mortimer plays Chloe,
a beautiful, slim, smart, eternally
sunny and kind rich woman,
loved by all, with exquisite taste
and better skin, whose only blem-
ish is a fondness for Andrew Lloyd
Webber - which, to be fair about
it, could happen to anyone.
In the past, Allen has
mocked such luck and loveli-
ness, stripping away the golden
patina to reveal a family or mar-
riage or character in utter crisis
despite the excellent real estate.
The truth is, anyone is capable
of being unhappy. Luck, as well
as the absence of luck, as Match
Point stresses, can easily happen
to someone born with nothing
as well as to someone in pos-
session of it all and then some.
Class warfare, as I've observed
before, is a simmering stew in this
countiy where everyone is entitled
to advance but few actually do. It's
the illusion of being able to quickly
attain wealth - the lottery ticket,
online poker, some "Antiques Road-
show" junk found in the attic - that
thwarts us, because the truth is this
never happens. It's a bait, a lure,
shimmering, beguiling and elusive.
That's when the bitterness sets in, as
well as an advanced case of schaden-
freude, which is German for "Hope
the Rich Chick Gets Fat Thighs
These are the lies we tell our-
selves to feel better about being
permanently stuck in a state of
being not rich, not being catered
to, not feeling special, as well as
having to pay full price to feel like
sheep on commercial airplanes.
We want to believe that the
only people who are happy, true,
and on the path to righteousness
are people who, if not us, are pretty
much like us. It's a way of validating
who we are, the way we live, the
choices we make. If other people
are mired in suffering, even those
people who seem to have more, then
we must be doing something right.
It's reductive, though, to think
that one group of people, linked
by a tax bracket (and sometimes
the ability to get out of paying),
is uniformly the same, that is, as
miserable as anything an eternally
envious Fitzgerald could concoct.
People need to get over the rich,
obsessing as they do about their
foibles. After all, they're probably
not concerned about ours.
It seems to me that the guy who said he sees the same
freshmen girls out at Cabanas or the Cavern every night
might need to get a life too don't be a hypocrite why
can you be at those same clubs every night but they can t?
I don't trust HigherOne. I think there's something fishy
about that company. First they took our social security
numbers and now they want our driver's licenses. It'll be
in the best interest of ECU and its students if ECU stops
doing business with HigherOne.
McDonald's commercials are so false it's disgusting.
If they wanted to show the truth on their ads, theyd
show rude, angry people serving food to people that
have waited way too long. Giving them smaller portions
than they paid for, with incorrect items, even when they
know it's wrong. If you hand me my drink and ask, "Hi-C
Orange?" make sure it is not the Fruitopia. Obviously,
reading is not a requirement for employment with
McDonald's. Also, before the rants attacking me come,
I work in a restaurant, so I know how busy they are, but
care about what I'm doing.
Thank you, local Carmike employees, for clearing up
the movie mystery. It's someone in Georgia's fault.
Now, how about your stinky theaters. Why is it that
all of them smell like a gym locker? Is that someone in
Georgia's fault, too?
Did you not get the first spelling memo? It is 'spring' not
'sring You need a new person to write your advertise-
ments and someone else who can spell needs to check
them.
1 can't wait for ECU baseball to start, finally a sport other
than swimming that our school is good at!
I would like to say to the girl who made the comment
about all of the guys at ECU looking like rednecks - that
is partially true or they look like Guido's from jersey
- luce grease balls. And since you were so quick to com-
pliment yourself, my opinion is that all of the girls here
try to Iook exactly the same - and that is boring and dull
and void of character or personality, so those guys who
are rednecks would at least add a little color to you.
ToSgt. Dan Blalock: Thank you foryour letter to the editor
and for your years of service to our country. While a small
few may not understand the purpose of men and women
wearing their uniforms on campus, the vast majority of us
do andappreciate what you do for us here and abroad.
ECU will have its first yearbook in more than 10 years avail-
able to order within the next month or so. Cherish the pres-
ent and remember the past! Look for advertising coming
soon around campus and purchase a copy for yourself!
Why is it that more students can't show up to sup-
port our Pirates at games? Maybe with a little student
support they would do better. These basketball games
should be filled up every week with students.
Although I should have paid more attention to the
"Sports title at the top of the page, I still think the
title for Eric Gilmore's article "Death to the blog" was
misleading. For a minute there, I thought he was criti-
cizing the Livejournal, Xanga etc. blogger world. After
reading the article, I now realize he was referring to
sports blogs. However, regardless of what type of blog
it may be, they are meant for expression and creativity.
So saying they carry "very little journalistic integrity"
is a little harsh. Freedom of speech?
I can relate to at least one thing in the "My Random
Column" section every time I read it. That girl is a
freak'n genius! Someone give Jennifer Hobbs a raise!
It's sad that a writer for the ECU paper can't find
something to write other than a column trashing
another school's ex-quarterback. Yes, Marcus has
made many mistakes and his stepping on the other
player's leg during the bowl game was wrong, but at
least that is not something we have to worry about
with our players. They don't make it to bowl games
in the firs! place.
Before you start complaining about my driving, be
thankful I was there fo pick you up at all. And then,
a simple thank you wouldn't hurt.
To all of you who are too stupid to understand the
concept of "sign-up sheets" at the REC, they are there
for a reason. Just because I am smart enough to sign
up for a time and you just hop on the equipment
without even signing up, doesn't give you a reason
to give me dirty looks when I make you get off. Don't
waste my time, be considerate or go do your cardio
workout in traffic.
Can the Wright Place Java City please get a banner to
hang that says "espresso machine broken" so that I
don t stand in line for 10 minutes only to be turned
away?
Those of you waiting to get on a bus at the bottom of
Christianbury, please step away from the bus so that
everyone can get off. You're just delaying the process
by being in the way.
To the frat boy who attempted to recruit me last
week, asking me to think about joining your frat is
one thing, but to mutter obscenities after I decline
the depressive nights of getting wasted with a pair of
boys wearing boat shoes that have never gotten wet
and indulging in conversations about DMB, I ask
thee, why are you standing out by the dining hall
doing the recruiting?
Ben McCormick, for an opinion columnist, you have
the right to your own views no matter how distorted,
biased or leftist they may be. Your artide on "peace with
Al-Qaeda" is outrageous to say the least. You know noth-
ing about how these people operate or what is really
happening in the world today. Those people are our
enemies and have sworn to their gods to ctestroy every
aspect of our lives. It is a part of their faith and the entire
basis of their society. There can be no "mutual" peace
between our two very different views on life and the world.
Lucky for me my professor knows everything. Yeah it
was funny, but any idiot should know not to go their
job drunk. Duh.
Who is the "Carolina several folks have mentioned in
their previous rants? ItistheUniversityofNorthCarolina
at Chapel Hill. There is only one. There is no Carolina-
Pembroke, Carolina-Greensboro, Carolina-AsheviJle or
Carolina-Charlotte and Carolina-Wilmington for that
matter. All these schools are member institutions of the
UNC System and chose to use that designation in their
names. ECU was given that option too, but thankfully
ECU has a strong enough identity of its own that it did
not have to rely on the letters "UNC" to add credibility to
its existence. Show a little pride and be more respectful of
where you chose to enroll. If you want to wear that other
university's t-shirt, then wear it underyour ECU gear. The
first shirt will be doser to your heart, but the top shirt
will be a true testament as to where you actually attend
and where you are receiving your college education.
I am addicted to ebay.
Thank God for those construction management boys
They are so much more attractive in their dirty boots
and Carhartt jackets than the majority of the other
guys on this campus.
The only reason I get out of bed at 6:30 on Wednesday
is to get ready for my 8 a.m. class because of the Army
boysln it. I love Wednesdays. I think the boys should
be in uniform every day! I love it!
Editor Note. The Pirate Rant Is an anonymous way for students and staff In the
ECUcommurmy to yoke their opinions. Submissions can be submitted anonymously
online at www.theeastcawllnian.com. or e-mailed to edltonmheeastcamtlnlan.
com. The editor reserves the right to edit opinions for content and brevity
1-26-06
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1-26-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
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EleCtiOnS from page A2
Hamas activists, wearing the
group's trademark green hats and
bandanas, greeted voters. The
volunteers held computerized
lists of voters and assigned volun-
teer drivers to transport support-
ers to the station. Fatah activists
were nowhere to be seen.
Hamas organizers said they
planned a similar presence at
every polling station in Gaza.
Some 13,000 police officers
were deployed at 1,008 polling
stations, taking up positions
on rooftops and at entrances to
enforce a weapons ban.
Rival militant groups pledged
to keep their guns out of sight
Wednesday, but several pre-
election skirmishes and two
killings, including the shooting
of a Fatah politician in internal
fighting Tuesday, kept security
forces on alert. Palestinian police
arrested eight Fatah activists early
Wednesday in connection with
the killing, security officials said.
Pollsters predicted a turn-
out of at least 75 percent, Rain
forecast for Wednesday could
give an edge to Hamas with its
ideologically more committed
electorate.
Nearly 20,000 local observers
and 950 international monitors,
led by former President Jimmy
Carter, were watching the vote.
There were some allegations of
fraud in the 1996 parliament
election and the 2005 presiden-
tial election that brought Pales-
tinian leader Mahmoud Abbas to
power, but international moni-
tors said at the time the problems
weren't widespread.
Wednesday's election marked
the first time Palestinians have a
clear choice between two politi-
cal camps since Hamas boycotted
the 1996 vote.
The Palestinians are at a cross-
roads, said pollster Nader Said of
the West Bank's Bir Zeit Univer-
sity. "For the Palestinians, the
whole national agenda is on the
table he said. "Do they want con-
tinuity or do they want change?"
Hamas spokesman and par-
liament candidate Mushir al-
Masri said he expected his group
to win up to 50 percent of the
seats, but that even then it would
not want to rule alone. He said
Hamas leaders in Gaza and
abroad have spoken with Abbas
by phone in recent days about
possible cooperation.
"We could find common
ground al-Masri said Tuesday,
sitting in a large green campaign
tent in the town of Beit Lahiya in
northern Gaza. "Hamas will not
be in the government by itself
Hamis is expected to ask
for service ministries, health,
education and welfare to leave
diplomacy, including contacts
with Israel, to others. The group,
which has long ruled out nego-
tiations with Israel, has signaled
some flexibility on the issue
in recent days, but may not be
ready yet for a dramatic shift of
positions.
Fatah leaders have also pre-
dicted they'll get more than half
the parliament seats. But if forced
to form a coalition, Fatah prefers
to govern with smaller parties
and would invite Hamas only if
left with no other choice.
Former Gaza strongman
Mohammed Dahlan, a leading
Fatah candidate, said he's not
opposed to bringing Hamas into
the government. "Hamas can't
behave like an opposition (party)
if it's in the PNA Dahlan told
the British Broadcasting Corp
referring to the Palestinian gov-
ernment.
Israel has said it would not
deal with Hamas politicians.
Israel's acting prime minister,
Ehud Olmert, said Wednesday
he hoped Palestinians would
not "choose again the extrem-
ists who have led them from
tragedy to tragedy and to sor-
rowful lives
Many in Fatah said that
despite the risks of losing power,
the election would finally gauge
Hamas' strength and force it to
assume responsibility. "We want
to face the boogeyman said
Fatah voter Rafik Abu Mariam, a
policeman from the West Bank
city of Jenin.
The pollster said that after
competing in the election, Hamas
cannot revert to its militant
ways. For nearly a year, Hamas
has suspended attacks against
Israel as part of an informal truce
brokered by Abbas.
"Hamas has accepted to play
within the rules of the game
said the pollster. "There is no
going back for Hamas
However, others feared a vic-
torious Hamas would eventually
impose Islamic law, despite its
attempt to cloak itself in mod-
eration.
"They gave shown political
pragmatism in many ways, they
will talk to the West and there
will be periods of calm, but
ultimately, Hamas will change
the nature of Palestinian soci-
ety warned outgoing legislator
Hanan Ashrawi, a candidate for
the moderate Third Way Party.
"It might be a serious indica-
tor of what will happen to the
rest of the Arab world
Aft from page A3
dencies, mental illness and other
things from the students' art.
"Some people think of it as a
modality, an adjunct, something
you use in conjunction with
therapy. It's not Goodwin said.
"When I look at pictures, I can
see where the child is develop-
mentally and their pathology
Students usually see Good-
win one on one at first, then in
small groups. Many are at the
academy because they've gotten
into fights or been kicked out
of their home schools for other
reasons. Most have problems
that run deeper. Some have lost
siblings or parents while others
live in violent environments and
have been injured or seen friends
get hurt, or worse.
Whenever a student comes
into the program, Goodwin has
them draw a picture of what
brought them to the academy.
For most,v it's fighting, but
the sketches can tell Goodwin a
lot about the student as well as
the incident.
"That's a very good way for
me to see if they know what they
did, where they are and how they
view what they did she said.
The students come in and
choose a project to work on. They
can have several in progress at
once, or they can select supplies
from a well-stocked shelving unit
to make something new.
The class is more self-directed
than most art classes, Goodwin said.
"It's not like your traditional
classroom where the teacher
hands out the white paper and
says 'We're going to do this
project today she said. "While
they're doing this stuff, there's a
lot of cooperative learning and a
lot of etiquette
Goodwin tries to teach the
students some art techniques
while doing the therapy.
"They learn a lot, I try to
teach them she said. "A lot of
them missed out, they were inat-
tentive or in the office
The projects range from sculp-
ture to drawing to more unique
ideas. Goodwin brought in coat
hangers and yarn and had stu-
dents bend the coat hangers to
make sculptures. Then they filled
the projects in with yarn pom-
poms that they made. Goodwin
said that using clay and wire hang-
ers can help students get their
frustrations out because the mate-
rials are difficult to work with.
She got a half-finished wire
and yarn baseball cap down
from a high shelf and handed it
to Carlos Martinez, 13, saying,
"I couldn't believe how strong
you were
A flicker of pride slid across
his face. "I said I want to wear a
hat Carlos said shyly. "Maybe
I'll put it on
The students said that coming
to the class is the best part of
their days.
"I'll be waiting to go to art. It
takes away all the stress Anto-
nio said.
"Before giving, I always look
for the Humane Seal
E, Star of NBC 3 hit show EH
The Humane Charity Seal of Approval
guarantees that a health charity funds
vital patient services or life-saving
medical research, but never animal experiments.
Council on Humane Giving vmvw.HumaneSaai.org
Washington. DC. 2O2-686-2Z10. ext. 335
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OPINION
Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.9238
JENNIFER L HOBBS Editor In Chief
THURSDAY January 26, 2006
Our View
Visors should be
mandatory in NHL
Let's face it, hockey is one of the rough-
est sports on the planet. Consider also
pucks flying around that can top speeds
of 98, 99 and even 100 mph, and these
athletes are in serious danger night in
and night out Past incidents attest to that
Bryan Berard had his retina reattached in a
four-and-a-half-hour surgery after taking a
stick Wade to his eye from Marian Hossa back
in 2000. Mats Sundin was struck in the eye by
a puck in the season opener this year, putting
him out of commission for a month. Even more
recently, Jim Slater of the Atlanta Thrashers
was almost rendered blind after getting hit
by a stick blade last Wednesday, but luckily
only suffered a severe gash on his eyelid.
All three players are now swearing by visors,
and Slater hit the nail on the head as to why
he should wear one.
"When you don't have to, why risk it?" said Slater.
But there are still plenty of NHLers who risk
it every night.
According to a study done by The Hockey
News, only 38 percent of players wear visors.
That number is much improved from where it
used to be 10 years ago, but even so, wouldn't
it make sense for players to want to provide
protection to one of the only exposed areas
of their bodies when they play the game?
Many players complain that visors impede
their vision, it gets foggy or scratched or is
too much trouble to keep clean overall. Some
argue that visors hinder vision on the ice or
scoring ability. Yet it doesnt seem to be slow-
ing down NHL points-leader Jaromir Jagr or
the league's leading goal-scorer Irya Kovalchuk.
Perhaps a larger problem is this tough guy
attitude in the NHL that guys like Don Cherry
promote ad naseum, which fosters this ridicu-
lous machismo attitude that guys who risk
debilitating injury are somehow superior to
those who wear the protective half-shields.
Thrashers defenseman Andy Sutton
recently called Cherry a "caveman Cheers,
Andy. Don, keep your mouth shut.
In many cases, decisions of this nature
should be left up to the players. But in this
case, when the risk of serious injury is so
high, the NHL should push for a visor man-
date not to limit their players, but simply to
protect them.
Our Staff
Jennifer L Hobbs
Editor in Chief
Chris Munier Zack Hill
News Editor Asst. News Editor
Kristin Murnane
Asst. Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst. Sports Editor
April Barnes
Asst. Copy Editor
Rachael Letter
Asst. Photo Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Sarah Bell
Head Copy Editor
Herb Sneed
Photo Editor
Alexander Marciniak Dustin Jones
Web Editor Asst. Web Editor
Edward McKim
Production Manager
Newsroom 252.328.9238
Fax 252.328.9143
Advertising 252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular
academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays during the
summer "Our View" is the opinion of the editorial board
and is written by editorial board members. TEC welcomes
letters to the editor which are limited to 250 words (which
may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed
and include a telephone number Letters may be sent
via e-mail to editorctheeastcaroliniaacom or to The East
Carolinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, NC 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for more information. One
copy of TEC is free, each additional copy is $1.
Pirate Rant
Opinion Columnist
Hollywood: stop glorifying horrible human beings
New Lohan film is awful
in a different way this
time
GARY MCCABE
BITTER BOULEVARD
This week's offering underwent
a of couple changes before it became
the series of words you're currently
holding in your eager little hands
(or, quite possibly, on your computer
screen). At first, I wanted to take
the opportunity to write about the
biggest half-wit in recent memory,
Mayor Nagin of New Orleans, who
recently said that God sent Hurricane
Katrina because he's not too happy
with black people.
Blaming God for all the deaths
in New Orleans is a realty tough pill
to swallow, especially when I seem
to recall a field full of buses sub-
merged in five feet of water because
Nagin wouldn't pull the trigger early
enough and use them to evacuate
local residents days before Katrina
hit. Don't blame God for your own
shortcomings as a public official,
Mayor Nagin.
And while you do that, learn
how to speak properly. Maybe I'm
wrong, but I don't put very much
stock into any elected official who
uses phrases like "you can't have
New Orleans no other way I hon-
estly have papers from second grade
with better use of grammar than
Mayor Nagin and his speeches.
So I was all set to write about
Mayor Nagin, but then I saw a story
that irked me even more. Apparently
before they became man and wife in
June of 2002, political activist and
prosthetic leg aficionado Heather
Mills gave fiance Paul McCartney
an ultimatum, either he gives up
smoking marijuana or she "walks"
out the door.
I almost had an aneurysm when
I read about this. It's never been a
secret that Sir Paul enjoys a good
clam bake - he was even arrested
in Japan for possession - and if she
disagrees so much with his choice
of lifestyle, why would she even date
him, let alone agree to marry him?
That is, of course, aside from the
fact that he was rock 'n' roll's first
billionaire.
More importantly, though,
why would he put up with that?
Paul McCartney was a Beatle.
He's written more great songs
than any man not named John
Lennpn. He's rich and still looks
pretty good for his age. He'd have
no problem finding a younger,
more beautiful, two-legged
woman who would gladly love
him for who he was, not who she
wanted him to be.
So maybe it's because I'm a
huge Beatles fan or maybe it's
because I'm a man who doesn't
enjoy being told what to do, but
that story hit a nerve. Unfor-
tunately, a bigger story piqued
my interest while planning this
piece, so I changed the plan once
again. You'll just have to go to my
"Myspace" page if you want to
hear more Heather Mills jokes.
I've been reading in the rags
that a film about Mark David Chap-
man - the man who gunned down
the incomparable John Lennon
outside his New York City apart-
ment - is currently in the works.
It's called Chapter 27 - a reference
to "The Catcher in the Rye the
book Chapman carried with him
at the time of the murder - and
will star Jared Leto and my favor-
ite cute little redhead not named
Conan O'Brien, Lindsay Lohan.
My apprehension to Chapter 27
goes beyond the simple fact that
the film will be little more than
the film equivalent to a botched
abortion. Seriously, if it was going
to be good, wouldn't the produc-
tion company have been able to get
better actors than Jared Leto and
Lindsay Lohan?
If the script had any prom-
ise whatsoever, you know that
someone like Scarlett Johansson
or Reese Witherspoon would
have jumped at the chance to get
involved. But they didn't. The best
they could do was the girl who
drove Herbie. That's a bad sign,
my friends.
When I was a much younger,
my friend Jacob told me that
the only way 1 would be ever
be famous is if I killed someone
that was. In a nutshell, that's all
Mark David Chapman is and all
he's ever aspired to be. He is a
fat, unrepentant piece of garbage
who, with one squeeze of his sau-
sage-like finger, affected millions
of people around the world.
Chapman didn't kill Lennon
because he hated him. Rather, he
killed him because he loved him
too much. Chapman wanted so
badly to be a part of Lennon's
celebrity that killing him seemed
the only plausible way to do so.
Making this film is not only a
slap in the face of the legacy of
John Lennon, it gives Chapman
exactly what he wants - more
fame and more attention.
What's even more disgust-
ing is that the film is currently
shooting in New York City outside
of the Dakota Building, where
Lennon was shot and where his
wife Yoko Ono still resides, despite
begging and pleading from Ono
to consider filming elsewhere.
While her singing style may
lead you to believe otherwise,
Ono is a human being and as a
human being, shouldn't be sub-
jected to a recreation of the most
traumatic experience of her life
right outside of her window. She
tried to block the filming, but
legally all the filmmakers needed
was permission from the city so
filming went on with little to no
regard for Ono, who most likely
will have to be portrayed in the
film in some capacity. After all,
she was standing next to him
when he was shot.
I just have the sinking feeling
that Hollywood is going to attempt
to humanize Chapman with this
film - that's what they always do,
whether it's intentional or not. I
don't care about him that much.
I don't want to know that he had
a dog named "Cuddles" or that
Daddy hit him when he was little. 1
already know everything I need to
know: he killed John Lennon and
he's going to be in jail for a long,
long time (and that's more for his
protection than anyone else).
Instead of this stupid film,
why not make a positive film
about John Lennon? I've only
seen one - the superb indepen-
dent film Two of Us - and would
probably sit through anything
that has to do with him. Hell, I
might even go and see Chapter
27. It's not like I have anything
to do on a Friday night. And who
knows, since this is her first stab
at an independent film, maybe
Lindsay Lohan will make her
indie flick debut the right way:
naked. Then I'm there whether
Yoko likes it or not.
In My Opinion
(KRT) The rich are forever
being portrayed in books, movies
and television as truly miserable
when the truth is that, in real life,
they seem to be happy all the time.
Or much of the time. Certainly
when they need to pay the bills. Or
fix the roof. Or plan a trip. Travel
for them is an orgy of choice.
You won't find rich people
paying top dollar to squeeze into
the middle seats in the middle of
"economy" on a long transconti-
nental flight, with unidentifiable
"food" and an unwatchable "movie"
placed before them while the "gen-
tleman" in the seat behind them
kicks their seat incessantly while
singing along, badly, to his iPod.
Not that I'm familiar with the
experience.
Reporters love to luxuriate
in breathlessly documenting
indictments, divorces and come-
uppances, to say nothing of
cataloguing a rogues' library of
celebrity mug shots. It's an entire
beat carved out by the tabs, daily
gossip columns and Vanity Fair
- Rich People Messing Up, with
subspecialties in Dead Heiresses
and Dynastic Gene Mutations.
I've interviewed many rich
people and they often seem quite
content, delirious even. You might
be, too, if you knew you never had
to do the laundry or go to the gro-
cery store again.
We want to believe that the
rich are not better or happier but,
contrary to logic, emotionally
worse, their woes rivaling those of
the poor. We want to believe the
wealthy pay for their good fortune
through misery, like the Kennedys,
when many of them, Maria Shriver
for one, seem quite content in addi-
tion to having spectacular hair.
Woody Allen's bracing Match
Point is one of those rare movies
in which the rich are portrayed
as joyous, with barely a concern
in the world while being in pos-
session of stupefying gardens,
excellent scotch, Asprey baubles
and superior upholstery.
Emily Mortimer plays Chloe,
a beautiful, slim, smart, eternally
sunny and kind rich woman,
loved by all, with exquisite taste
and better skin, whose only blem-
ish is a fondness for Andrew Lloyd
Webber - which, to be fair about
it, could happen to anyone.
In the past, Allen has
mocked such luck and loveli-
ness, stripping away the golden
patina to reveal a family or mar-
riage or character in utter crisis
despite the excellent real estate.
The truth is, anyone is capable
of being unhappy. Luck, as well
as the absence of luck, as Match
Point stresses, can easily happen
to someone born with nothing
as well as to someone in pos-
session of it all and then some.
Class warfare, as I've observed
before, Is a simmering stew in this
country where everyone is entitled
to advance but few actually do. It's
the illusion of being able to quickly
attain wealth - the lottery ticket,
online poker, some "Antiques Road-
show" junk found in the attic - that
thwarts us, because the truth is this
never happens. It's a bait, a lure,
shimmering, beguiling and elusive.
That's when the bitterness sets in, as
well as an advanced case of schaden-
freude, which is German for "Hope
the Rich Chick Gets Fat Thighs
These are the lies we tell our-
selves to feel better about being
permanently stuck in a state of
being not rich, not being catered
to, not feeling special, as well as
having to pay full price to feel like
sheep on commercial airplanes.
We want to believe that the
only people who are happy, true,
and on the path to righteousness
are people who, if not us, are pretty
much like us. It's a way of validating
who we are, the way we live, the
choices we make. If other people
are mired in suffering, even those
people who seem to have more, then
we must be doing something right.
It's reductive, though, to think
that one group of people, linked
by a tax bracket (and sometimes
the ability to get out of paying),
is uniformly the same, that is, as
miserable as anything an eternally
envious Fitzgerald could concoct.
People need to get over the rich,
obsessing as they do about their
foibles. After all, they're probably
not concerned about ours.
It seems to me that the guy who said he sees the same
freshmen girls out at Cabanas or the Cavern every night
might need to get a life too don't be a hypocrite why
can you be at those same clubs every night but they can t?
I don't trust HigherOne. I think there's something fishy
about that company. First they took our social secunty
numbers and now they want our driver's licenses. It'll be
in the best interest of ECU and its students if ECU stops
doing business with HigherOne.
McDonald's commercials are so false it's disgusting.
If they wanted to show the truth on their ads, theyd
show rude, angry people serving food to people that
have waited way too long. Giving them smaller portions
than they paid for with incorrect items, even when they
know it's wrong. If you hand me my drink and ask, "Hi-C
Orange?" make sure it is not the Fruitopia. Obviously,
reading is not a requirement for employment with
McDonald's. Also, before the rants attacking me come,
I work in a restaurant, so I know how busy they are, but
care about what I'm doing.
Thank you, local Carmike employees, for clearing up
the movie mystery. It's someone in Georgia's fault.
Now, how about your stinky theaters. Why js it that
all of them smell like a gym locker? Is that someone in
Georgia's fault, too?
Did you not get the first spelling memo? It is 'spring' not
'sring You need a new person to write your advertise-
ments and someone else who can spell needs to check
them.
I can't wait for ECU baseball to start, finally a sport other
than swimming that our school is good at!
I would like to say to the girl who made the comment
about all of the guys at ECU looking like rednecks - that
is partially true or they look like Guido's from jersey
- like grease balls. And since you were so quick to com-
pliment yourself, my opinion is that all of the girls here
try to Iook exactly the same - and that is boring and dull
and void of character or personality, so those guys who
are rednecks would at least add a little color to you.
To Set. Dan Blalock: Thank you for your letter to the editor
and for your years of service to our country. While a small
few may not understand the purpose of men and women
wearing their uniforms on campus, the vast majority of us
do andappreciate what you do for us here and abroad.
ECU will haveitsfirstyearbookinmorethan lOyearsavail-
able to order within the next moi ith or so. Cherish the pres-
ent and remember the past! Look for advertising coming
soon around campus and purchase a copy for yourself!
Why is it that more students can't show up to sup-
port our Pirates at games? Maybe with a little student
support they would do better. These basketball games
should be filled up every week with students.
Although I should have paid more attention to the
"Sports title at the top of the page, I still think the
title for Eric Gilmore's article "Death to the blog" was
misleading. For a minute there, I thought he was criti-
cizing thelivejournal, Xanga etc. blogger world. After
reading the article, 1 now realize he was referring to
sports blogs. However, regardless of what type of blog
if may be, they are meant for expression and creativity.
So saying they carry "very little journalistic integrity"
is a little harsh. Freedom of speech?
I can relate to at least one thing in the "My Random
Column" section every time Tread it. That girl is a
freak'n genius! Someone give Jennifer Hobbs a raise!
It's sad that a writer for the ECU paper can't find
something to write other than a column trashing
another school's ex-quarterback. Yes, Marcus has
made many mistakes and his stepping on the other
player's leg during the bowl game was wrong, but at
least that is not something we have to worry about
with our players. They don't make it to bowl games
in the first place.
Before you start complaining about my driving, be
thankful I was there to pick you up at all. And then,
a simple thank you wouldn't hurt.
To all of you who are too stupid to understand the
concept of "sign-up sheets" at the REC, they are there
for a reason. Just because I am smart enough to sign
up for a time and you just hop on the equipment
without even signing up, doesn't give you a reason
to give me dirty looks when I make you get off. Don't
waste my time, be considerate or go do your cardio
workout in traffic.
Can the Wright Place Java City please get a banner to
hang that says "espresso machine broken" so that I
don t stand in line for 10 minutes only to be turned
away?
Those of you waiting to get on a bus at the bottom of
Christianbury, please step away from the bus so that
everyone can get off. You're just delaying the process
by being in the way.
To the frat boy who attempted to recruit me last
week, asking me to think about joining your frat is
one thing, but to mutter obscenities after I decline
the depressive nights of getting wasted with a pair of
boys wearing boat shoes that have never gotten wet
and indulging in conversations about DMB, I ask
thee, why are you standing out by the dining hall
doing the recruiting?
Ben McCormick, for an opinion columnist, you have
the nght to your own views no matter how distorted,
biased or leftist they may be. Your article on "peace with
Al-Qaeda" is outrageous to say the least. You know noth-
ing about how these people operate or what is really
happening in the world today. Those people are our
enemies and have sworn to their gods to destroy every
aspect of our lives. It is a part of their faith and the entire
basis of their society. There can be no "mutual" peace
between our two very different views on life and the world.
Lucky for me my professor knows everything. Yeah it
was funny, but any idiot should know not to go their
job drunk. Duh.
Who is the "Carolina several folks have mentioned in
their previous rants? It is the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill. There is only one. There is no Carolina-
Pembroke, Carolina-Greensboro, Carolina-Asheville or
Carolina-Charlotte and Carolina-Wilmington for that
matter. All these schools are member institutions of the
UNC System and chose to use that designation in their
names. ECU was given that option too, but thankfully
ECU has a strong enough identity of its own that it did
not have to rely on the letters "UNC" to add credibility to
itsexistence. Show a little pride and be more respectful of
where you chose to enroll. If you want to wear that other
university'st-shirt,thenwearitunderyourECUgear. The
first shirt will be closer to your heart, but the top shirt
will be a true testament as to where you actually attend
and where you are receiving your college education.
1 am addicted to ebay.
Thank God for those construction management boys.
They are so much more attractive in their dirty boots
and Carhartt jackets than the majority of the other
guys on this campus.
The only reason I get out of bed at 6:30 on Wednesday
is to get ready for my 8 a.m. class because of the Army
boys in it. I love Wednesdays. I think the boys should
be in uniform every day! I love it!
Editor's Note. The Pirate Rant is an anonymous way for students ami staff In the
KUcomtmmhytowicctlielroptnsonsSubmlsskmcanbesiirmltM
online at www.theeastcarollnlan.com. or e-mailed to edltormheeastcarolmlan.
com. The editor reserves the right to edit opinions for content and brevity.
1-26-06
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1-26-06
THE EAST CAROUNIAN NEWS
PAGE A5
Pregnant and scared?
You have options.
fe
Elections
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H4IREME
80s Metal Karoke Contest
So, you want to be a rockstar?
Get a chance to sing with members of
Jump Little Children Live!
Thursday, January 26th 8pm
In Mendenhall's Pirate Underground
Have a.chance to win $200 in cash and prizes!
from page A2
Hamas activists, wearing the
group's trademark green hats and
bandanas, greeted voters. The
volunteers held computerized
lists of voters and assigned volun-
teer drivers to transport support-
ers to the station. Fatah activists
were nowhere to be seen.
Hamas organizers said they
planned a similar presence at
every polling station in Gaza.
Some 13,000 police officers
were deployed at 1,008 polling
stations, taking up positions
on rooftops and at entrances to
enforce a weapons ban.
Rival militant groups pledged
to keep their guns out of sight
Wednesday, but several pre-
election skirmishes and two
killings, including the shooting
of a Fatah politician in internal
fighting Tuesday, kept security
forces on alert. Palestinian police
arrested eight Fatah activists early
Wednesday in connection with
the killing, security officials said.
Pollsters predicted a turn-
out of at least 75 percent, Rain
forecast for Wednesday could
give an edge to Hamas with its
ideologically more committed
electorate.
Nearly 20,000 local observers
and 950 international monitors,
led by former President Jimmy
Carter, were watching the vote.
There were some allegations of
fraud in the 1996 parliament
election and the 2005 presiden-
tial election that brought Pales-
tinian leader Mahmoud Abbas to
power, but international moni-
tors said at the time the problems
weren't widespread.
Wednesday's election marked
the first time Palestinians have a
clear choice between two politi-
cal camps since Hamas boycotted
the 1996 vote.
The Palestinians are at a cross-
roads, said pollster Nader Said of
the West Bank's Bir Zeit Univer-
sity. "For the Palestinians, the
whole national agenda is on the
table he said. "Do they want con-
tinuity or do they want change? "
Hamas spokesman and par-
liament candidate Mushir al-
Masri said he expected his group
to win up to 50 percent of the
seats, but that even then it would
not want to rule alone. He said
Hamas leaders in Gaza and
abroad have spoken with Abbas
by phone in recent days about
possible cooperation.
"We could find common
ground al-Masri said Tuesday,
sitting in a large green campaign
tent in the town of Beit Lahiya in
northern Gaza. "Hamas will not
be in the government by itself
Hamis is expected to ask
for service ministries, health,
education and welfare to leave
diplomacy, including contacts
with Israel, to others. The group,
which has long ruled out nego-
tiations with Israel, has signaled
some flexibility on the issue
in recent days, but may not be
ready yet for a dramatic shift of
positions.
Fatah leaders have also pre-
dicted they'll get more than half
the parliament seats. But if forced
to form a coalition, Fatah prefers
to govern with smaller parties
and would invite Hamas only if
left with no other choice.
Former Gaza strongman
Mohammed Dahlan, a leading
Fatah candidate, said he's not
opposed to bringing Hamas into
the government. "Hamas can't
behave like an opposition (party)
if it's in the PNA Dahlan told
the British Broadcasting Corp
referring to the Palestinian gov-
ernment.
Israel has said it would not
deal with Hamas politicians.
Israel's acting prime minister,
Ehud Olmert, said Wednesday
he hoped Palestinians would
not "choose again the extrem-
ists who have led them from
tragedy to tragedy and to sor-
rowful lives
Many in Fatah said that
despite the risks of losing power,
the election would finally gauge
Hamas' strength and force it to
assume responsibility. "We want
to face the boogeyman said
Fatah voter Rafik Abu Mariam, a
policeman from the West Bank
city of Jenin.
The pollster said that after
competing in the election, Hamas
cannot revert to its militant
ways. For nearly a year, Hamas
has suspended attacks against
Israel as part of an informal truce
brokered by Abbas.
"Hamas has accepted to play
within the rules of the game
said the pollster. "There is no
going back for Hamas
However, others feared a vic-
torious Hamas would eventually
impose Islamic law, despite its
attempt to cloak itself in mod-
eration.
"They gave shown political
pragmatism in many ways, they
will talk to the West and there
will be periods of calm, but
ultimately, Hamas will change
the nature of Palestinian soci-
ety warned outgoing legislator
Hanan Ashrawi, a candidate for
the moderate Third Way Party.
"It might be a serious indica-
tor of what will happen to the
rest of the Arab world
An from page A3
dencies, mental illness and other
things from the students' art.
"Some people think of it as a
modality, an adjunct, something
you use in conjunction with
therapy. It's not Goodwin said.
"When I look at pictures, I can
see where the child is develop-
mentally and their pathology
Students usually see Good-
win one on one at first, then in
small groups. Many are at the
academy because they've gotten
into fights or been kicked out
of their home schools for other
reasons. Most have problems
that run deeper. Some have lost
siblings or parents while others
live in violent environments and
have been injured or seen friends
get hurt, or worse.
Whenever a student comes
into the program, Goodwin has
them draw a picture of what
brought them to the academy.
For most it's fighting, but
the sketches can tell Goodwin a
lot about the student as well as
the incident.
"That's a very good way for
me to see if they know what they
did, where they are and how they
view what they did she said.
The students come in and
choose a project to work on. They
can have several in progress at
once, or they can select supplies
from a well-stocked shelving unit
to make something new.
The class is more self-directed
than most art classes, Goodwin said.
"It's not like your traditional
classroom where the teacher
hands out the white paper and
says 'We're going to do this
project today she said. "While
they're doing this stuff, there's a
lot of cooperative learning and a
lot of etiquette
Goodwin tries to teach the
students some art techniques
while doing the therapy.
"They learn a lot, I try to
teach them she said. "A lot of
them missed out, they were inat-
tentive or in the office
The projects range from sculp-
ture to drawing to more unique
ideas. Goodwin brought in coat
hangers and yarn and had stu-
dents bend the coat hangers to
make sculptures. Then they filled
the projects in with yarn pom-
poms that they made. Goodwin
said that using clay and wire hang-
ers can help students get their
frustrations out because the mate-
rials are difficult to work with.
She got a half-finished wire
and yarn baseball cap down
from a high shelf and handed it
to Carlos Martinez, 13, saying,
"I couldn't believe how strong
you were
A flicker of pride slid across
his face. "I said I want to wear a
hat Carlos said shyly. "Maybe
I'll put it on
The students said that coming
to the class is the best part of
their days.
"I'll be waiting to go to art. It
takes away all the stress Anto-
nio said.
Before giving, I always look
for the Humane Seal
E, Star of NBCa hit show ER
The Humane Charity Seal of Approval
guarantees that a health charity funds
vital patient services or life-saving
medical research, but never animal experiments.
Council on Humans Giving wvtiw.HumaneSeal.org
Washington. D.C. 202-686-2210. ext. 335
PHYSICIANS COMMITTEE FOR RESPONSIBLE MEDICINE
Phone 751-4200
113 East 5th Strot
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Great Books at Great Prices!
Friends of Sheppard Memorial library
USED BOOK SALE
Friday, Feb. 3"d, 9 a.m8p.m.
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NEW LOCATION
Convention C inner. '0' Sl C
Spring Break Ski Trip Special!
yrJyy
(Includes Transportation, Condo, Lift Tickets )
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March 11-18,2006
For more info go to
www.skiouting.com or call 327-8101





CLA
Page A6
THURSDAY January 26,2006
FOR RENT
One two Brs. on-site management
maintenance Central heat air 6,9,12
month leases Water Cable included
ECU bus Wireless Internet pets
dishwasher disposals pool laundry
(252) 758-4015
For Rent: Very nice 4 br, 2.5 bath
house with 2 zone, central heatair;
off street parking; close proximity to
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Call 752-1000, ask for Murrell.
Beat This, No parking fees, No
parking hassle, Walk to class,
downtown or to the rec. center,
2 bed 1.5 bath duplex available
now, short term lease accepted.
Buccaneer Village call 561-7368
One bedroom apartment for rent.
Thru une 2006 with option to
renew. Walking Distance to campus
and on bus route Rent Negotiable!
Call 252-412-4469
2 BD 2 Bath Wyndham Circle
Duplex Avail able June 1 and Aug
1 $625.00 month 321-4802 Newry
decorated Cathedral Ceiljngs
Nice Landlord Great Price!
Room for Rent E. 3rd Street
Duplex 1 Bedroom 1 Bath $250
Month Utilities Included Available
Immediately Call Brendan 410-
608-4732
2 Rooms For Rent Pirates Cove Phase
II - Fully Furnished - WD Available
Now Contact Nicole 919-452-3849
- NLH0320@mail.ecu.edu $387
month utilities included
1 bdrm. Apt. for Rent. 2 blks from
campus near City Mkt. $370mth.
910-232-7884
Sublease Feb 06 thru July 06
$387 a month all Inclusive
vry negotiable. I will pay
application fee. Call 781-254
6031 for more details!
ROOMMATE WANTED
Private furnished bedroom, private
bathroom; washer, dryer, cable,
telephone, internet; walking distance
to campus 325month shared
utilities looking for responsible
student Email santucci2@mail.clis.
com Tel. (252)725-1703
Roommates needed in beautiful 3
BDR house, 2 Bath one block from
campus, females non-smoking;
high speed wireless internet option;
WD, all kitchen appliances, parking.
Please call 347-1231.
SERVICES
Need help with Biology or
Chemistry? Call Alex at 804-
212-4678 for reasonably priced
tutoring.
HELP WANTED
Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting part-
time youth soccer coaches for the
indoor soccer program. Applicants
must possess a good knowledge
of soccer skills and have the ability
and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 12-18 in soccer,
fundamentals. Hours are from 6:45
pm to 9:30 pm, Monday-Thursday
with some weekend coaching.
Flexible hours according to class
schedules. This program will run
from March 7 to mid May. Salaries
start at $6.25 per hour. Apply at the
City of Greenville, Human Resources
Department, 201 Martin L. King
Jr. Dr Greenville NC 27834. For
more information, please contact
the Athletic Office at 329-4550,
Monday through Friday, 10 am
until 7 pm.
Do You Need A Good ob?-The
ECU Telefund is hiring students
to contact alumni and parents for
the ECU Annual Fund. $6.25 hour
plus cash bonuses. Make your own
schedule. If interested, visit our
website at www.ecu.edutelefund
and click on JOBS.
$$$$$ Tutors Needed $$$$$:
Looking for some extra money (-
best opportunity on campus!) and
a way to improve academically?
Are you at least a sophomore with
a 3.0 or better GPA? Become a
tutor or mentor for the Office of
Student Development-Athletics. We
employ tutors in all subject areas and
levels (1000-5999). Undergraduate
students are paid $7hour and
graduate students are paid $10
hour. If this sounds like the job for
you, please contact Jennifer Bonner
at 737-4553 for further information.
Food Delivery Drivers wanted
for Restaurant Runners. Part-time
positions 100-150week. Perfect
for college student Some Lunch
Time (11a-2p) M-F and weekend
availability required. 2-way radios
allow you to be anywhere in
Greenville when not on a delivery.
Reliable transportation a must.
Call 551-3279 between 2-5 only.
Leave message if necessary. Sorry
Greenville residents only.
Bartenders wanted! Up to $250
day. No experience necessary.
Training provided. Call (800) 965-
6520. ext. 202
Servant's Heart Christian Gifts.
Looking for full or part time. Open
8:30am-5:30pm M-F. Hours can
vary Call 321-2451.
GREEK PERSONALS
Delta Zeta would like to thank
Chi Phi for a great social Saturday
night!
Spring Recruitment 2006. Come
meet the sisters of Alpha Phi at
our open house from 6-8 on Jan
3031st. The show begins at 6:30.
Congratulations to all the fraternities
on a successful Spring Rush this year!
-Delta Zeta
Rush Gamma Sigma Sigma Service
Sorority! Meetings will be held this
Tuesday or Thursday in Bate 1032
and this Wednesday in Bate 3006.
All meetings are at 7:30pm.
Thinking about going greek? Come
meet the sisters of Kappa Delta
Thursday January 26th at Cafe
Caribe from 5-7. For more info call
Safa 703-338-6043. Hope to see
you there!
Attention all Greeks: Dollar Night
Every Thursday at Cafe Caribe
$3 Admission. Nicest Restrooms
Downtown. Plenty of Room to
Socialize. Come Check it Out
OTHER
Want To Learn How Hundreds
of ECU Students Are Making
5720 Dally Using Only An
Internet Connection? Visit
www.morethanapartyschool.
com or Email Me
makemoney12daily@yahoo.
com Time Is Money!
Spring Break 2006 with
Student Travel Services to
Jamaica, Mexico, Bahamas
and Florida. Don't get left
behind! Book now, limited
space available. Call for group
discounts. InfoReservations
800-648-4849 www.ststravel.
com http:www.ststravel.
com
Spring Break Panama City From
$199! Beachfront Rooms at
Boardwalk, Holiday Inn! Free Party
Package, Food at MTVu Party Tent!
Bahamas Cruise $299. Daytona
$179, Cancun, Acapulco, Nassau
$599! SpringBreakTravel.com 800-
678-6386
1 Spring Break Website! Low
prices guaranteed. Free Meals &
Free Drinks. Book 11 people, get
12th trip free! Group discounts for
6 www.SpringBreakDiscounts.
com or www.LeisureTours.com or
800-838-8202.
Spring Break Ski Trip - Killington VTfor
only $699! Includes transportation,
condo, lift tickets. March 11-18. For
more info go to www.skiouting.com
or call 327-8101.
Bahamas Spring Break Celebrity
Cruise! 5 Days From $299! Includes
Meals, Taxes, Entry To Exclusive
MTVu Events, Beach Parties With
Celebrities As Seen on Real World,
Road Rules! On Campus Reps
Needed! www.SpringBreakTravel.
com Promo code: 34 1-800-678-
6386
1-26-06
DON'T LET
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Crossword
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4 Havana
populace
10 Female noble
14 Tube top
15 Brunch order
16gobragh!
17 Long distance
commuter
19 Crooked
20 Gist
21 Surprise and
grab
23 Harden ceramics
25 Measure up
29 Floral neckwear
30 Expectant
beneficiaries
31 Metric square
measure
32 Axilla
33 Slangy assent
37 Howdies
38 Salon goo
39 Org. of Flames
41 Before now
42 Solidifies
44 Sonnet section
46 NBC classic
47 Archaeological
fragment
49 Mack or Koppel
50 Those doing a
run-through
53 Tidings
54 Willing to listen
55 Pitcher part
56 Etcher's
substance
57 Noted muckraker
64 Pie a la
65 "Love Boat" co-
star
66 Moogai pan
67 The clink
68 Relaxing
69 Kind of feeling
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2 Jazzy instrument
3 Most spirited
4 Tommy Lee
Jones film
5 Ms. Thurman
6 Golfer Hogan
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10 "La Mer"
composer
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one!
12 Chop into tiny
bits
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18 Road to Rouen
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25 Gorbachev's
reforms
26 Like the Venus
de Milo
27 Use a straw
28 Corner-cutter
30 Crone
34 Faberge item
35 Nixon's V.R
36 Half and full
nelsons
40 Old Ford model
43 "The Still Centre"
poet
45 Ship's pronoun
Solutions
48 Mare's morsel
50 Checks out the
terrain
51 Disney World
attraction
52 Spyri novel
53 Grab
55 Perry's creator
58 Period
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1-26-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A7
Innovations in medical simulation and teaching methods
have enabled medical schools to provide human-based
educational tools to students. Over 80 of medical schools
have eliminated live animal labs in favor of these superior,
clinically-relevant alternatives.
Urge The Brody School of Medicine to replace its physiology
pig lab with one of the many human-based options available
today!
For more inormation on alternatives to the use of live animals in medical school curricula, for help
addressing the issue on your campus, or to invite a physician to speak about the topic at your school,
please contact:
Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine
5100 Wisconsin Ave N.W Suite 400 Washington, DC 20016
Tel: (202) 686-2210, ext. 369 Fax: (202) 686-2216 E-Mail: research@pcrm.org www.pcrm.org
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RHGEA8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
1-26-06
For Leasing Information, Call
752.9995
www.collegeparkweb.com





1-26-06

I
Arts & Entertainment
Page B1 features@theeastcarolinlan.com 252.328.6366 CAROLYN SCANDURA Features Editor KRISTIN MURNANE Assistant Features Editor
THURSDAY January 26, 2006
Campus Confessions:
I tripped in the dining hall and my
food flew everywhere, including on
a cute guy's lap.
I forced my roommates to move out
becausethey smelted so bad allthetime.
I am playing five guys.
I always wear a bra, and I'm a guy
This weekend I accidentally sprayed
mace in my boyfriend's face.
I'm already down 100 Pirate Bucks
because I've been avoiding Todd
food as much as possible.
My roommate has a naked picture of
her boyfriend on her computer and I
enjoy looking at it.
I hate thong underwear. I'd rather go
commando.
I'm a girl, and I rarely wear a bra.
My roommate is a disgusting slob,
and I want to slap her every time she
leaves food on the counter.
I have a thing for guys with long hair,
and I saw a guy in Chlck-fil-a at about
5:30 Monday night with beautiful, long,
dreadlocked hair. I want to marry him
and have his babies because his hair
was the greatest.
As I was crossing Fifth Street this
afternoon, my bra came undone.
I go home every now and again, but
not too long ago, I went back and a
neighbor was teaching his kid how
to play baseball. My friends and I
grabbed a couple beers and watched
intently until the father beamed his
son in the eye.
I want to get freaky in a study room
in the library just once.
The next time I see someone with
their collar popped like it's cool, I want
to staple it to their neck. Watch out
for the guy with the staple gun and
the gleam in his eye, frat boys.
I have been really good friends with
my ex-boyfriend for about six years,
even though my fiance doesn't know
about It
I use Lysol on my desk after anyone
else uses it.
I saw someone get busted for drugs
today and thought it was funny.
Shoo-Ry Pie
Pastry:
1 14 cups all-purpose flour, plus
more for dusting
1 tablespoon sugar
Pinch salt
12 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cold
and cut into small chunks
2 tablespoons ice water, plus more
if needed
Riling:
1 cup unsulphured molasses or
Pennsylvania Dutch Table Syrup
34 cup hot water
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
12 teaspoon ground cloves
Crumb Topping:
1 cup all-purpose flour
12 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
Whipped cream, for serving
To make the pastry:
Combine the flour, sugar, and salt in
a large mixing bowl. Add the butter
and mix with a pastry blender or your
hands until the mixture resembles
coarse crumbs. Pour in the ice water
and work it in to bind the dough until it
holds together without being too wet
or sticky. Squeeze a small amount
together, if it is crumbly, add more
ice water, one tablespoon at a time.
Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and
refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.
Sprinkle the counter and a rolling pin
lightly with flour. Roll the dough out
into a 10-inch circle; to check the size,
put the 9-inch pie pan upside down
over the dough. Carefully roll the
dough up onto the pin (this may take
a little practice) and lay it inside the
pie pan. Press the dough firmly into
the bottom and sides so it fits tightly.
Trim the excess dough around the rim.
Place the pie pan on a sturdy cookie
sheet so it can prevent spills from
burning in the bottom of the oven.
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
To make the filling: In medium-size
mixing bowl, combine the molasses
and water; stir in baking soda, eggs,
and spices. To make the crumb
topping: With a pastry blender, mix
together the flour, brown sugar, and
butter, until it is the texture of coarse
crumbs. Take 12 cup of the crumb
mixture and put it in the bottom of
the pie shell, pour in the molasses
filling, and scatter the remaining
crumbs on top.
Bake for 30 minutes, until the filling
jiggles slightly and the top is firm.
Let cool to room temperature before
cutting. Serve with whipped cream.
Underworld: Evolved
for your enjoyment
Distracted judges Simon Cowell, Paula Abdul and Randy Jackson.
Fox's 'American Idol'
returns for fifth season
The judges are back to
determine who will be
the next American Idol
SHANNON DAVIS
STAFF WRITER
Kate Beckinsale, making guns look both scary and attractive in her movie, Underworld: Evolution.
'Underworld' is back
with teeth
SCOTTY WILLIAMS
SENIOR WRITER
When Underworld debuted
in September of 2003, it raked
in a domestic gross of $51 mil-
lion. Gothic men and women
everywhere flocked to theaters
to see Kate Beckinsale, with
those pale blue eyes, kicking
a lot of supernatural booty
in tight black leather. The
original movie was billed as
a Romeo and Juliet story but
with vampires and werewolves
(or death-dealers and lycans,
if we're following along).
The story followed Selene
(played by Beckinsale) as
she hunted lycans but fell in
love with a human being in
the middle of unlocking a
hidden family secret about
the death-dealers. Eventually,
the human being becomes
a hybrid beast with both
lycan and death-dealer traits.
Underworld: Evolution
begins with a little background
story about the history of the
lycanvampire struggles, but
then gets right back where
the first movie left off. Selene
and Michael, the hybrid (Scott
Speedman), are running and
trying to get some answers
about what has happened.
Meanwhile, the last vam-
pire elder awakens as a nasty
killer bat-thing named Markus.
Without giving away too much
of the story, the action basically
follows Markus while trying to
fulfill a mission with Michael
and Selene as key players.
The first thing you need
to know about this movie
is, like the first, it will make
the goriest movie you've ever
seen look like an episode of
"Barney and Friends The battle
scenes are a myriad of slashing,
impaling, biting, blood and
entrails. Director Len Wise-
man actually gets away with it,
though. Wiseman's film has a
lot.of dull colors, and no one
color comes out very bright or
vibrant, especially that of blood.
You'll know it's there, but it
won't set off your gag reflexes.
If it's possible to be tastefully
gory, Wiseman makes it happen.
It's definitely possible to be dis-
tastefully gory - if you've ever
seen Freddy vs. jason - by the way.
Evolution avoids the major
pitfall of sequels. That is, a lot
of movie makers just bring out a
sequel to introduce the same char-
acters and put them up against
a different antagonist and hope
the cash cow still gives milk.
This sequel actually expands
upon the storyline of the first
and gives you the sense that
you're seeing another leg in their
journey, which honestly garners
more interest than putting the
same people up against differ-
ent bad guys. For an example,
see Ghostbusters II. It's the same
dudes with atomic ghost-weap-
ons, but they're aiming at dif-
ferent bad guys.
Wiseman's care to make
see UNDER page B2
It was Tuesday, Jan. 17 at
8 p.m. and time for the show
to begin. The theme song was
cued, the opening insignia of
"American Idol" appeared, the
song faded out and the host
Ryan Seacrest welcomed the
audience for tuning into the
number one show on television.
Their first stop was Chicago,
111 the "Windy City" of America.
The judges began by insulting
contestant after contestant. They
found very few people who they
considered to be Grrreat, as
Tony the Tiger would say, but
they passed a handful of people
whom they considered good.
Chicago proved to have a unique
following of super-fans when
people came dressed as cowboys
and medieval honor guards.
"American Idol" began five
years ago as a search for the
most talented singer in America.
Throughout the seasons, it seems
that people audition to see who
can shock the viewers and judges
the most, rather than who has
the best singing abilities. After
two days in Chicago, the crew
ventured to the "Mile High City
In hopes of finding talent,
they moved on to Denver, Colo.
Here, the judges, Paula Abdul,
Simon Cowell and Randy Jack-
son encountered a homeless
woman named Rochelle Elaine.
Elaine belted out, "Chain, chain,
chain! Chain of fools which
wooed the udges and allowed
her advancement to the next
level in Los Angeles, Calif.
The second day in Colorado
aired Wednesday, Jan. 18 at 8 p.m.
The episode was entertaining, but
far from a triumphant discovery
for the next American Idol.
Nick McCord, a 25-year-old
"entrepreneur" who wears out-
landish matching pajama sets
as his daily attire and is start-
ing his own home cleaning
business, began to sing, but his
voice cracked as if he were a 13-
year-old boy entering puberty.
Nervously, he continued through
his song and ended on a high
note, high enough that his voice
cracked again. All three judges
agreed that he could not sing
and suggested that he stop being
around household cleaning
products.
The next victim was 24-year-
old Ben Hausbach, a self-pro-
claimed inventor. He has a patent
for his invention, the Cosmic
Coaster, which suspends a cup
see IDOL page B3
Seattle: Birthplace of 'grunge music' revolution
Grunge earns its place in
American music history
MARK ROMANO
STAFF WRITER
This semester, we are going
to spotlight cities all over the
country that have influenced
American music. Grunge, the
music many of us grew up with
in the early 1990s, originated
in Seattle and its surrounding
areas as a form of rock that was
influenced by punk and indie
rock. It was synonymous with
the term "alternative rock" for
the better part of the 1990s.
Grunge, in retrospect, has greatly
influenced today's music and is a
part of America's musical history.
Most people are familiar with
the band Nirvana, the group of
scraggly guys from Aberdeen,
Wash or are at least familiar
with their album cover featur-
ing a naked baby boy swimming,
after a dollar bill on a fishing line.
On Sept. 6, 2005, that album,
Nevermind (1991), was inducted
into the Library of Congress for
being "culturally, historically or
aesthetically significant join-
ing the likes of the Allman
Brothers, Muddy Waters and the
King James version of the Bible.
Nirvana, albeit the most
popular of the grunge bands, was
anti-establishment and against
the idea of making music to be
commercially successful, which
is ironic considering Nevermind
sold more than 10 million copies
and is now revered by Congress.
Anti-establishment themes inter-
mingle with teen-angst and a
purely artistic vision to create
the essence of grunge. Bands
like Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and
Alice In Chains prescribed to this
doctrine as well and became the
gloomy and sadistic poster boys
for grunge by spreading their
sound and influence all over the
country from a strong Seattle base.
The beginnings of grunge
started in the mid 1980s when
bands such as Mudhoney
brought the sound to Seattle's
detached underground. Seattle,
being rainy and gloomy for
most of the year, was a natu-
ral place for this introspective,
self-depreciating (see Alice In
Chains' Dirt) music to brew.
The first label to introduce
grunge to the rest of the nation
was Sub Pop Records, whose cur-
rent roster includes Hot Hot Heat,
Postal Service and Sleater-Kinney.
The label, founded by Jona-
than Poneman and Bruce Pav-
itof, was catapulted by then
unknown Soundgarden, who
was playing at clubs around
Seattle. The style exploded onto
radios and MTV, becoming over-
played and ingrained into the
minds of young listeners as the
mainstream media took hold of
grunge's fate.
Grunge's sense of indepen-
dence eventually led to its down-
fall. Commercialism, being one
of grunge's greatest adversaries,
eventually overtook the style,
immersing it into modern cul-
ture against the wishes of its
creators and true fans.
Grunge was not supposed to
be mainstream, but its intense
power and raw emotion con-
nected with so much of America's
youth that it was impossible for it
not to become a major part of the
development of American music.
The influence of grunge can
been seen in the independent
music world of today - bands are
creating music without the goal
of commercial success and are
creating new, original, meaning-
ful and personal sounds for lis-
teners to find without the aid of g
money hungry record companies, jj
o
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Seattle and the genre of grunge music are often synonymous.
People Poll: What was your favorite movie of 2005?
IAN GLANCY
JUNIOR - MEDIA STUDIES
'OCEANS 12 WAS GOOD. I THOUGHT
IT WAS A GREAT FOliOW-UP STORY
BRANDON RUSSELL
SENIOR - MARKETING
"I WOULD HAVE TO SAY HITCH AND
FANTASTIC FOUR WERE GOOD
CAROLINE DAVANI
FRESHMAN - COMMUNICATION
"KING KONG AND MEET THE
FOCKERS-
MAGGIE ROMAN
FRESHMAN - ELEM. EDUCATION
"WEDDING CRASHERS, JUST
HEAVEN. AND RENT-
ERIC DIXON
SENIOR - COMMUNICATION
"STAR WARS EPISODE III WAS THE
HOTTEST





PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FATURES
1-26-06
Review: New Fort Minor CD 5E
from page B1
The Rising Tied: Different
Linkin Park?
AARON BORREGO
STAFF WRITER
It seems as though we
couldn't get enough of Linkin
Park and the rap-influenced cho-
ruses from Mike Shinoda playing
on MTV. Nor could we lose the
pop-laced, mindless, disposable,
watered-down, trendy, unim-
portant, self-absorbed, preten-
tious and intellectually stunting
verses from just about anyone
in the entire music industry.
Just think, some of the rap-
pers in the world actually have
talent such as producing records,
writing hooks and even steal-
ing samples from rocks bands.
Baring of course ICP, the worst
band in the history of music.
This lack of talent isn't
found in rap exclusively, it is
just readily available there and
more noticeable since MTV
and radio don't know how to
play anything other than crap.
All this negativity went
into the brainstorming for this
review and showed no signs
of ceasing before the article
was over, but yet found a way
to subside and be assuaged.
Shinoda has found a way to
continue the success of Linkin
Park and turn that into a very
decent rap album that stays
somewhat in line with his Linkin
Park sound. This album, how-
ever, displays music I believe to
be more indicative of Shinoda's
future creative direction.
This album'seems to be more
reflective and subtle in its arrange-
ments of personal thoughts and
observations rather than what we
have seen as "words seemingly
put together" from his Linkin
Park efforts. I, for one, am thank-
ful that some passion from the
artist comes through the sound
and into our stereo systems.
You may have seen the single
from this album, "Remember the
Name" played either on the radio
or the NBA games during com-
mercial breaks. Either way. the
song, along with the entire album,
is fronted by great beats and
backed by powerful lyrics. 1 will
admit that the lyrics at times can
be a little too direct and honest
for rap, but the delivery of his
normal everyday accounts is key.
His style is pretty much the
same as in the Linkin Park deliv-
ery, but with a few added ele-
ments of his own which allow
this album to be truly some-
thing different from what he
sounds like in his day job. I
really enjoy this album and its
introverted look at life and the
way the beats sem to make you
want to listen in the first place.
Indeed, I am not a fan of rap,
nor do I hate it, but this wouldn't
be called rap to me. I guess it is
best compared to Linkin Park,
just slightly different and with
fewer real instruments.
This album has infectious
beats and is overall good listen-
ing. I do state that this could
be only for light rap listeners or
possibly people trying to find
alternatives to the disposable
garbage found on almost all
the airways apart from our own
radio station. So, give it a try,
you might like what you hear.
Grade: 11
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeas tcarolinian. com.
1-26-06
1
T(
We
T
Scott Speedman and Kate Beckinsale not only fight personal battles but get up close and personal, too.
this a tasteful story is evident
in the scenes where Michael
and Selene interact. In one
scene in particular, you see
Michael (who can walk in the
daylight) trying feverishly to
splash paint on the windows so
that the sunlight won't touch
Selene. It's writing like this that
makes this love story really sizzle.
Far too often in movies you
get the impression that the two
lovers in a movie are acting when
they're supposed to be making
you believe they love the other
person. If you've ever seen The
Matrix Revolutions, you get it.
The movie's action scenes are
very engaging, and one thing
Wiseman does well is to show
enough hand-to-hand fighting
that you don't scoff at all the CGI
(computer-generated graphics)
reality-bending that also goes on.
CGI does get overused in movies,
but not here.
It's just enough to compli-
ment the real-time action and
really make characters superhu-
man instead of making you think
you're watching a computer.
There's still enough raw, personal
struggle to make you tingle and it
will bring you to the edge of your
seat in the end.
A warning to all moviegoers,
however, do not see this movie
until you have seen the first one.
The movie's storyline does build
and rely on the first one, at least
for the first 45 minutes or so,
and if you've not seen the first
Underworld, you'll be in the dark
(no pun intended).
It's not terribly long before
the second movie's plot stands
on its own and you're not having
to think "now, didn't this guy do
this and that in the first one?"
Overallfor those with a
strong stomach and a fixation
on the supernatural, Evolution
will look like an evolved prod-
uct that deserves your money. It
could very well out-gain the first
movie's domestic gain, but that
still remains to be seen. At the
least, it led last weekend's gross.
Wiseman's directing achieves
a nice balance and manages to
marginalize the parts that you
sense are getting out of hand.
Now, for all of you guys who
got some kicks out of watching
Kate Beckinsale in black leather,
you'll get your money's worth.
Just don't expect much luck
talking your girlfriend into
suiting up for you - apparently not
too many girls like being compared.
Grade: B
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
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1-26-06
1-26-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEATURES
PAGE B3
It's not too late, but please don't wait,
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We offer 4 different sizes for you and your peers,
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IdOl from page B1
from the table. He hopes that it will
be popular amongst bars and clubs.
Abdul tried it by placing her Coca-
Cola cup on the coaster, which
nearly spilled over because of the
unsteady nature of the coaster.
It did not take long for the judges
to realize Hausbach had just as little
talent in the singing department as
he does with his invention. Cowell's
response to the confident singer was,
"You're hopeless, nonsense, entirely
useless. I'm bored
Fortunately, Abdul tried to be
the positive judge by telling Haus-
bach, "You're engaging All
three judges decided he was not
equipped for the competition. His
response to their decision was, "Kiss
my butt, you guys, because I don't
care. Yeah
At 24, he still has time to work
on his inventions, singing and
maturity.
The entire episode did not
consist of similar disappoint-
ment. April Walsh, a 27-year-old
from Laguna Niguel, Calif, sang
"It's So Quiet" by Bjork. Jackson
and Abdul adored her singing.
Thankfully, she only needed
two votes to continue because
Cowell's opinion was not of the
same admiration.
He stated, "If you were sitting
at a restaurant and someone got
up to do that you would say, 'shut
up and give me my dessert
Eighteen hopefuls were
chosen from Denver to go to Los
Angeles. Tune in Tuesday nights
at 8 p.m. on Fox for other action
packed, two-hour episodes of
"American Idol" as they travel all
over the country shattering the
hopes and dreams of thousands
of hopeful singers.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.

Idol Info
Who: The numerous contestants,
Ryan Seacrest, Paula Abdul, Simon
Cowell and Randy Jackson.
What: "American Idol" a television
show on Fox
When: 8 p.m. Tuesdays and
Wednesdays
Where: Fox
Why: To search (or the next
American Idol who will win an
opportunity to launch his or her
singing career.
For more Information about "American
Idol go to ldolonfox.com.
Movie picks
k Outstanding
Worthy
effort
T So-so
O
8
CO
D CD
8I 11 li
Oh Q5 QQ.
Glory Road (PG)
Hoodwinked (PG)
Last Holiday (PG-13)
? Looking (PG-13)
T ii ?
? T
Match Point (R)
Mrs. Henderson (R)



? The New World (PG-13)

? Underworld (R)
1

G All ages admitted
PG All ages admitted,
parental guidance
suggested
PG-13 Parents strongly
cautioned, some material
may be inappropriate for
children under 13
R Restricted, under 17
requires accompanying
parent or guardian
2006 KRT
Professional, Comprehensive
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MFDV





1-26-C
Page B4 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY ZOPPO Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
THURSDAY January 26, 2006
In hockey, losing
teeth is cost of
doing business
Josh King takes one off of his head as the Pirates take another one on the chin, losing their fifth straight Conference USA game.
Pirates can't find basket
in second half, fall 64-59
ECU continues winless
streak, 0-5 in C-USA
ERIC GILMORE
SENIOR WRITER
Priority number one upon
Ricky Stokes' arrival was to
improve shooting, hive games
into Conference USA play- ECU's
frustration is mounting in trying
to solve the problem.
UCF gritted out a 64-59 con-
ference road win flushing ECU
further down the conference
standings. Kirk Speraw's club
knocked through 14-of-19 free
throws in the second half to steal
their third conference win in
their inaugural season in C-USA.
ECU cut the lead to five
during four different intervals
over the last two minutes, but
never managed to get within
striking distance. Following two
Jonathon Hart free throws with
1:43 remaining, ECU's Jeremy
Ingram grabbed a steal in UCF's
hackcourt. Seconds later, Ingram
committed a critical turnover
fumbling the ball while trying
to pass to the wing.
"We had some ill advised
turnovers, passes and mishan-
dling of plays said a frustrated
Ricky Stokes following the game.
"As hard as we were fighting to
retake the lead, we just did not play
as smart and take care of the bas-
ketball as much as we needed to
However, turnovers weren't
the Pirates' main Achilles heel. As
had been the case in the C-USA
play, ECU simply couldn't put the
ball in the basket. The shooting
woes worsened in the second half
as ECU managed only seven field
goals. UCF held ECU to just two
field goals over a 16-minute, 48-
second stretch.
Thedrought started with 17:34
remaining when Rouse notched a
layup capping an 8-1 ECU spurt.
UCF responded with an 8-0
run of their own to extend to a
more comfortable 10-point lead.
UCF senior guard Justin Rose
scored 18 points total, including
14 in the second frame. Rose's
six rebounds also led the Golden
Knights' rebounding. Fellow
senior andJUCO product Anthony
Williams added 14 points.
Defensively, the Pirates had
no answers allowing UCF to
shoot a torrid 61 percent (14-of-
23) in the first frame.
"We're not a physical team
Stokes said.
"But we were not as physical as
we needed to be in the first half
Senior forward Corey Rouse
paced ECU with a game-high 22
points and added 12 rebounds.
Outside of the frontcourt leader,
few Pirates managed to find the
bucket. Exclude Rouse and ECU's
starters were outscored by their
bench 20-17.
"We've got to shoot
the ball better Stokes said.
"I don't think there's any
secret to that. Our perimeter guys
will have to shoot the ball better
for us to have a chance to win
see ECU page B5
(KRT) Jonathan Cheechoo
has been playing hockey since he
was three, and he has the scars
to prove it. So he knew the day
would come and it arrived with
a vengeance in late December
when he caught a puck square in
the mouth.
"My lips pretty much
exploded, and 1 felt teeth swim-
ming around in there right away
Cheechoo said.
Four-and-a-half teeth, to be
exact.
"You're not surprised when
you lose them, but this was my
first time said Cheechoo, 25.
"I guess it's nice to have kept
them as long as I did
Missing incisors are as much
a part of hockey as the Zamboni.
But the San Jose Sharks are in the
midst of an odd losing streak.
Three players - Cheechoo, Joe
Thornton and Scott Hannan
- have suffered fractures in a
combined nine teeth since mid-
November.
"Nobody goes through a life-
time of hockey without losing a
few Chiclets said defenseman
Kyle McLaren.
"But this has been worse than
I've ever seen it. It's been kind of
freaky
When sticks, pucks and some-
times even punches fly around
the ice, things happen often to
the pearly whites. Yet there's
a reason hockey players often
are lauded as the toughest of
all athletes: They discuss losing
teeth with an almost disturbing
nonchalance.
After all, they say, it's not
like busted choppers are a seri-
ous injury.
"The interesting thing is we
had three guys lose teeth and we
might have only lost a couple of
shifts Sharks Coach Ron Wilson
said.
"I'm sure they didn't wish they
lost them, but they sure didn't let
it bother them, either
Frontal assault - the outbreak
of damaged Shark teeth - started
two months ago. During a game
against Dallas, a puck ricocheted
up Hannan's stick and sheared off
half a front tooth.
"They did a root canal
i between periods so it wouldn't
kill me Hannan said.
Not only did he return and
take two more blows to the
o same spot that night, but his
mother was on hand to witness
the bloody scene, not that she
seemed too unnerved.
"She's a Canadian mom
Hannan explained.
Then Cheechoo took a shot to
the face in Phoenix on Dec. 22,
damaging two upper incisors and
three lower.
"I had a mouth guard on, so
it probably saved a few teeth
he said.
"But I missed the end of the
period as they tried to pull out all
the little pieces that were stuck
in there
A week later, an accidental
high stick from Colorado right
wing Milan Hejduk separated
Thornton from three of his teeth.
Thornton joked that it could
have been worse - he might have
lost five. And Cheechoo cracked
that Thornton wanted to look
like him.
Are these guys nuts?
As Thornton said, shrugging
his shoulders, there's not much
you can do when it happens
except "go back to the bench and
spit them all out
After he took the stick to the
mouth, Thornton seemed more
intent on complaining about the
lack of a penalty call than assess-
ing the damage.
"It's not something where
you phone your parents and say,
"Hey, I lost my tooth and then
put it under your pillow for the
tooth fairy Thornton said.
"It's more like, Damn, I lost
some teeth and now I've got to
go sit in the dentist chair for an
hour
You know, a minor inconve-
nience.
But the Sharks say if you play
hockey, you're just as familiar
with shots of Novocaine as slap
shots. The gap-toothed smile
from Hall of Famer Bobby Clarke
years ago to current star Dany
Heatley is part of hockey's lore,
and its stereotype.
Former Shark Mike Ricci even
managed to make his toothless
appearance very cool. In 1997, a
Denver columnist described a bar
encounter where a woman was
hitting on the hockey player.
"Ricci dropped his false teeth
into her glass of beer, grinned like
a jack-olantern and said, 'what
do you think of me now?" the
columnist wrote.
In an informal survey con-
ducted by the Sharks' public rela-
tions staff last week found that
of the 22 players on the active
roster, 13 have lost teeth playing
hockey. Of the nine who haven't,
two are goalies that wear masks.
"I've lost about six and dou-
bles on some McLaren said.
He means he has lost artificial
teeth, too.
"We've got good benefits
and they can make your smile
look unbelievable these days
Thornton said.
"You end up with a newer,
better, whiter set of teeth
Dr. Robert Bonahoom, the
Sharks' dentist since 1991, works
in a small room at HP Pavil-
ion complete with dental chair
during games. The team has kept
him busy.
"I've been with the Sharks
since 1991 and I've replaced a lot
of teeth over the years, but this is
a rash Bonahoom said.
In addition to Hannan,
Cheechoo and Thornton,
Bonahoom has been treatingjim
Fahey. Last March while playing
for minor league affiliate Cleve-
land Fahey lost two teeth and two
others were sawed in half. (Fahey
said he has made about 10 visits
to dentists so far.)
Bonahoom said Wilson's
theory about the rule changes
playing a role is worth consider-
ing.
"The game is faster and more
entertaining, but we're also
having a lot more dental inju-
ries than we can remember
Bonahoom said.
"Whether it's coincidental or
something else, it's too early to
tell. But the way things are going,
we might make a case for players
wearing full cages
It's hard enough to persuade
them to wear mouth guards. (And
Cheechoo's case shows they are
no guarantee of protecting teeth.)
Some complain they are uncom-
fortable and impair breathing.
"Should I wear one?" McLaren
asked.
"Yes. But I just choose not to,
and I know the consequences
While hockey players are
tough, they are not impervious
to pain. Cheechoo said it was no
fun when the roots of his teeth
were exposed to air, "but then
they froze me up so I couldn't
feel anything
His mother encouraged him to
get top-of-the-line replacements.
But Cheechoo, who already has
had new ones put in, said he is like
see TEETH page B8
Diamond Bucs preparing for trek to Omaha in 2006
ECU returns 15 lettermen
from 2005 season
BRENT WYNNE
SENIOR WRITER
After a tumultuous off-season
that saw former Head Coach
Randy Mazey forced into resig-
nation, the ECU Pirate baseball
team fires up the 2006 season
with a new face but the same
recurring goal.
New Head Coach Billy
Godwin will guide the Diamond
Bucs in their annual quest for
Omaha and the College World
Series.
ECU concluded its first week
of practice last week, and Godwin
was encouraged with what he
saw.
"This has been a great week
of practice for us said Godwin
in an interview with ecupirates.
com.
"The kids worked hard during
the off season and over Christmas
break and it really shows
"We came out ready to prac-
tice, and I'm happy with where
we are at. We still have a lot of
work to do, but we'll get it done
and be ready for Feb. 10
The Pirates open up the 2006
campaign with a weekend series
against ACC foe Maryland Feb.
10-12. The Terrapins will make
the dreaded trip to Clark-LeCIair
Stadium and "The Jungle one
of the most renowned student
baseball sections in all of college
baseball.
Although the Bucs lost key
players such as Brian Cavanaugh,
Mark Minicozzi, Drew Costanzo,
Billy Richardson, P.J. Connelly
and Ricky Brooks to eligibility
and the Major League Draft,
ECU still returns 15 lettermen
from last year's squad. That team
went 35-26 and appeared in the
school's seventh straight NCAA
tournament.
Senior Adam Witter and
sophomore T.J. Hose were named
to Conference USA's "Players to
Watch" list. Witter batted .328
last season, with seven home
runs, 33 RBI and 11 doubles.
Hose, as a freshman hurler, was
7-4 with a 4.26 ERA in 69.2 IP.
Godwin and his staff are also
very excited to return five red
shirt pitchers from a year ago
Ash
N
Clei
Call
0
Nort
Ma
Mot
Han
Br
SP
SUI
Mo
We
see BUCS page S6 The Bucs will open their season on Friday, Feb
I





1-26-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE B5
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Yow adapts to new lifestyle
Yow celebrates with Mr Wuf after coaching her 1000th college basketball game, played against
Dartmouth, Sunday, Jan 22, 2006, at the Reynolds Coliseum in Raleigh, NC.
(AP) Kay Yow has won an
Olympic gold medal, coached in
the Final Four and earned a place
in the Basketball Hall of Fame.
Yet to many, it was the graceful
way the North Carolina State
coach handled her fight against
breast cancer nearly 20 years ago
that best defined her.
She's done nothing to change
that assessment since the cancer
returned last year even though
the disease has forced her to
change just about everything in
her life.
Yow brought her meals to
restaurants for team outings,
shunning the home-style cookin'
of her beloved North Carolina
upbringing in favor of salads, car-
rots and walnuts. She's still going
to bed early, even on nights when
she would rather stay up late and
watch ACC basketball on televi-
sion. She's crammed radiation
and hormone treatments into a
life filled with practices, games
and recruiting.
But Yow still walks the side-
lines at Reynolds Coliseum with-
out a hint of frailty or hesitation,
and her team is still winning.
In and out of the Top 25 this
season with two wins against
ranked opponents, NC State
(12-6) appears likely to reach the
NCAA tournament for the 19th
time in 25 seasons. Nothing is
different at practice, where Yow
emphatically shouts instructions
from the baseline and paces the
court during drills.
"She's always upbeat and
inspirational senior Rachel
Stockdale said.
"She doesn't want us to worry
with everything going on for
her
And after coaching her
1,000th game over the weekend,
Yow's not going to complain
about anything.
"Almost everybody is dealing
with something she said with
a smile.
"I know every day is a gift
she said.
"1 want to make the most out
of every day I have
There have been more than
three decades worth of days at
NC State, where Yow has posted
629 of her 686 career victories.
That includes Sunday's 78-43
win against Dartmouth, which
was the 1,000th game of Yow's
35-year career - 31 spent in
Raleigh - and put her alongside
Tennessee's Pat Summitt and
Texas' Jody Conradt as the only
active Division 1 coaches to reach
the mark.
The 63-year-old Yow has no
plans to retire but acknowledges
the uncertainty regarding her
health and is quick to point
out that no one - coach or not
- is guaranteed another day. She
hopes to learn soon if the recent
treatment and lifestyle changes
have made a difference.
"I don't feel like I can say I'm
cancer-free Yow said.
"I have to have a scan and
nothing showing up that gives
any indication that it's there.
That's what I would need to say
I'm cancer-free
Yow was first diagnosed with
breast cancer in 1987, the year
before she coached the United
States to a gold medal in the
Seoul Olympics. She had a mas-
tectomy as part of her treatment,
but says now she didn't make as
many lifestyle changes then as
she should have.
Then, in November 2004,
she discovered a lump close to
where cancer was first discovered
17 years earlier. She had surgery
that December and started on a
regimen of radiation and daily
hormone therapy.
She missed two games the
next month while attending an
see YOW page B6
ECU
from page B4
During the last five games, all losses, ECU
is averaging 33.7 percent from the field. From
the field, ECU shot 26.9 percent (7-of-26) in the
second half. Neither Captain nor Ingram notched
a 3-pointer for the first time in 17 and 11 games
respectively en route to team 4-of-18 from behind-
the-arc.
"Someone's got to step up and hit shots said
sophomore guard Josh King, who tallied a season-
high 10 points.
"That's what coach stresses in practice. We're
shooting the ball in practice. We've just got to step
up and make shots during game time
The Pirates played without starting point guard
Japhet McNeil who pulled a hamstring on Monday.
The junior point guard's absence forced ECU to
used their seventh different lineup of the season.
We're going through a tough time right now
said sophomore walk-on Taylor Gagnon.
"We've got some people banged up. We're not
playing the best ball we can play, but I think we're
still staying together all right
The Pirates will try for their first C-USA win
against Tulsa inside Williams Arena in Minges
Coliseum on Saturday at 7 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeas tcarolinian.com.
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I
PAGE B6
THE EAST CAROUNIAN SPORTS
1-26-06
Yow
from page 85
eight-day nutritional modifica-
tion program, which called on
her to eat an organic-food diet
free of meat, dairy products and
sugar. She stayed on the diet for
eight months, losing 40 pounds
by keeping junk food and South-
ern favorites like biscuits and
gravy off her menu.
She also started going to bed
earlier and sleeping later, a stark
change from her past practice of
sleeping only five or six hours
a night.
Despite those steps, Yow
discovered two more lumps that
led to a second surgery in July,
followed by two months of radia-
tion treatments Monday through
Friday, running from 15 to 30
minutes at a time that ended in
November.
But she's not about to let her
illness interfere with her love
of basketball and coaching, a
profession she first took up to
secure a job teaching high school
English.
She cheated on her diet
during home recruiting visits
this past fall because she didn't
want to offend anyone, and now
is more focused on general nutri-
tion. She also stayed up later than
usual to watch the NC State men's
team win at Boston College in a
game that started at 9 p.m. earlier
this month. She spends less time
worrying about herself than she
does about senior Monica Pope,
whose father is fighting colon
cancer.
"We know she's battling
cancer associate head coach
Stephanie Glance said.
"If we didn't know, we
couldn't tell by her actions or her
energy level or anything
Yow quickly found ways to
make her treatments and lifestyle
changes fit with her job.
She met her assistant coaches
for lunch following her radiation
treatments to plan practices. She
also brought along someone on
road trips to prepare meals that
conformed to her organic diet,
going so far as to bring her own
salads or a banana sandwich to
restaurants on team outings.
Nora Lynn Finch, a senior
associate athletics director and
senior women's administrator at
NC State, remembered the team
stopping at an Italian restau-
rant for a meal the night before
last season's game at Maryland.
Yow took her organic pasta and
marinara sauce to the cook, who
prepared her food and served it
alongside everyone else's meals.
"She is every bit as passionate
and energized for coaching as
she's ever been Finch said.
"She's going to stay in as long
as she's physically and emotion-
ally energized to coach. It's a
demanding profession, and Kay's
not going to cheat anybody
Yow has also been active in
raising awareness and money
for breast cancer research, earn-
ing an outstanding volunteer
award from the University of
North Carolina Lineberger Com-
prehensive Cancer Center and
having a research laboratory
named in her honor. Her players
wear pink shoelaces, the color of
breast-cancer awareness, during
games.
It's clear that while Yow
doesn't dwell on her health
concerns her illness, recovery
and relapse colors everything
she does.
Almost as much as basket-
ball.
"We're all faced with a lot of
tough issues that we're dealing
with Yow said.
"We know we need to just
come to the court and let that
be our catharsis in a way. You
can't bring it on the court with
you, but we can all just think of
basketball as an escape for a few
hours
BUCS from page B4
2004 Freshman All-American Shane Matthews
highlights the list of names that includes Brody
Taylor, Dustin Sasser, Carter Harrell and Chad
Jennings.
Taylor, along with Greg Bunn, keyed the Pirates
in their run to the super regionals two seasons ago,
while Sasser anchored the squad in innings pitched.
The liveliest arm of the group, however, could be
Harrell's, who showed flashes of brilliance as well
as inconsistency during the 2004 season.
Along with five red-shirt hurlers, the Pirates
return eight pitchers from last season's team. Hose,
Mike Flye (6-5, 6.48 ERA), Jeff Ostrander (2-1, 3.67
ERA), Kevin Rhodes (3-1,4.76 ERA), Scott Andrews
(5-3, 4.80 ERA), Cody Leggett (50.2 IP, 36K), Chris
Powell (28.1 IP)andJasonNeitz(18.1 IP) will all play
enormous roles throughout the 2006 schedule.
Along with Witter, Dale Mollenhauer (.327, 38
RBI), Harrison Eldridge (.313, 34 RBI), Jake Smith
(.259, 31 RBI), Jamie Ray (.359, 10 RBI), Jay Mattox
(.286) and Adam Hodges (.250) are the returning
position players.
ECU also welcomes 11 new players to the pro-
gram. It's hard to tell at this point which of the
group will be impact players, but come late Febru-
ary expect a group of five or six players to begin
playing key roles.
C-USA has picked the Pirates preseason sixth
out of nine teams. While some may consider this
a slap in the face, this ranking is likely due to the
uncertainty of the pitchers coming back from a red-
shirt season, as well as the loss of some outstanding
offensive players in Minicozzi and Cavanaugh.
New conference opponent Rice was the unanimous
number one selection.
The Diamond Bucs played every game on the
road during February of last season due to the con-
struction of Clark-LeClair Stadium. They will now
reap the rewards of the new facility as they open
the 2006 campaign with 15 straight home games
before hitting the road for one of the biggest series
in the history of the program. The Diamond Bucs
travel to 2004 champ Cal State Fullerton for a three
game series.
Let the games begin.
This writer can be contacted at
sp0rts@theea5tcarolinian.com.
Despite no TV, Chamberlain's
100-point feat is no tall tale
(KRT) Wilt Chamberlain
is gone and unable to defend
himself, though it's not out of
the question that he will return
from the hereafter, give his crit-
ics a beat-down and, just for old
time's sake, seduce a few of their
wives.
I never thought I would live
to see the day when 100 points
in a game by one player would be
devalued. But by Monday, what
Chamberlain did on March 2,
1962, might as well have been
the peso.
The Lakers' Kobe Bryant
scored 81 points Sunday night
against the Raptors, and it wasn't
long before it was being heralded
as the greatest individual accom-
plishment in NBA history. One
of the reasons, the heralds said,
was because Chamberlain's 100-
point game for the Philadelphia
Warriors was a result of his being
7-feet 1-inch.
Bryant's feat is far more
impressive, they said, because
he's a 6-6 shooting guard and
therefore had to do a lot more to
score 81 points than Chamber-
lain did to get his 100.
That's weird, heralds.
It's a thin argument because it
assumes that being 7-1 is more of
an advantage in basketball than
having tremendous quickness
and leaping ability, which Bryant
has. If the logic were sound, it
would follow that most of the
great players in NBA history
would have been 7-footers. Some-
body tell Will Perdue that.
The Kobe-is-God crowd scoffs
because, on that March night in
Hersey, Pa Chamberlain went
against 6-10 Knicks center Darrell
Imhoff. If your name is "Darrell
Imhoff people assume you're
from Hooterville, but the truth is,
Imhoff was a good defender.
"His reputation as a defensive
player was very, very high Joe
Ruklick, Chamberlain's backup
on the Warriors that night, said
Tuesday. "People would say, 'He
can't shoot, but, man, can he play
defense
Kobe scored his 81 against
the Raptors, probably the worst
defensive team in the league.
This is what Toronto's Mike James
told Sirius Satellite Radio about
the way the Raptors "defended"
Bryant on Sunday night:
"You can't point fingers at
anyone, but when a person's
that hot, you can't allow some-
body to be on a deserted island.
And we kept our players on an
island the whole night trying to
play him one-on-one, and now
he's so aggressive and the referees
are giving him every call. I felt
like we should have been double-
teaming
see WILT page B8
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1-26-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE B7
Student Union Events
cultural
The Romantic Comedy
Broadway Play:
Platanos and Collard Greens
Thursday, Jan 26th @ 7:00pm
In Mendenhall's HendrixTheatre
Haireoke (80's metal Karaoke Contest)
Thursday,Jan 26th @ 8pm nnnnlai
In Mendenhall's Pirate Underground pnFprlainionfr
$200 in cash and Prizes
Jazz at Night
Friday, Jan 27th @ 8pm
In Mendenhall's Great Rooms
Light and Shadow:
January 6th-31st Artwork from
Tripp Jarvis and Anne Partne-Jarvis
In Mendenhall's 2nd floor gallery
spectrum (j
Is Georgia on your mind?
Atlanta Tri
Tuesday, March 14thSunday, March 19th, 2005"
Tickets start at150
Purchase a ticket at Mendenhall's Central Ticket Office
or for more information call 328-4715.
Iittle Shop of Hobbobs
Sat Jan 28th Midnight
All movies are shown in
Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre.
Upcoming Films
Saw if
Stay
MwCoumm
Proof
Mm the Lm
Jar Head
Questions? CaJI 328-4715
Visit www.ecu.edustudentunion
Email STUDENTUNION@MAIL.ECU.EDU
Call for Applications:
ECUs Undergraduate Research and
Creative Activities GrantsAwards
Fund your original research or inquiry-based learning project, earn recognition for your efforts
and secure a spot at the ECU Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities Symposium.
To be considered for an award, an individual must:
Be a full-time degree seeking undergraduate student at ECU;
Have completed a minimum of 12 credits at ECU by time of application;
Have an acceptable record of academic achievement and a minimum GPA of 2.5;
Provide details of any extraordinary circumstances that might outweigh any
of the above factors;
Submit a signed complete application.
For more details and a downloadable application, visit:
http:www.ecu.educs-acadhonorsUngradResearch.cfm
Application Deadline: February I, 2006.
Return all application materials to:
Undergraduate ResearchCreative Activities Committee,
Office of the University Honors Program, EC Scholars, & Undergraduate Research, Brewster D 107
honors@mail.ecu.edu





If
RAGEB8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
1-26-06
Teeth
from page B4
Come and join us for an afternoon of IM tCiaC U VC
and MCQltstlVC activities focusing on
The Dances of Universal Peace are simple
Circle dances set to live music and oBCVCd
Phrases from many different spiritual traditions j
throughout the world. No previous dance or musical experience isj
necessary. The MOVejTientS & SOHgS
are drawn from over'
i
i
Heatly is one of many NHL players who isn't playing with a full set of chops every night.
many players who prefer to wait
until retirement before springing
for expensive versions that might
just get dislodged again.
Meanwhile, Cheechoo said
he is hoping to have a little more
luck in the teeth department than
Ricci.
"Reech made it a real look
he said.
"But I'd like to keep more of
mine
Cost of business - Any hockey
player will say that he would give
his teeth just to play in the NHL.
And dealing with pain is part of
the sport's culture.
But anyone who has ever had a
root canal can relate to the agony
players endure when they take it
in the teeth.
Wilt
from page B6
Chamberlain wore nice threads during the day
and two or three defenders on every possession at
night. He got hacked and held perhaps more than
any player in NBA history.
"I don't suppose Bryant had anything like the
physical punishment that Wilt took said Ruklick,
who starred at Northwestern.
"Wilt's achievement was a feat of unbelievable
endurance. He really had to work to get open, to
get those guys off of him. Everybody in the league
was tired of him scoring 50 points a game against
them. They roughed him up in that game
Chamberlain was blessed with height, strength
and skill.
Bryant is blessed with athleticism, speed and
shooting ability.
Why is one set of attributes considered so much
nobler than the other? OK, Chamberlain took most
of his shots close to the basket. Bryant hit seven
three-pointers Sunday night. But this isn't David vs.
Goliath. You can count on two hands the number of
athletes on the planet who are physically superior
to Bryant. Chamberlain was a man among boys?
So is Bryant.
The reaction to Bryant's sensational night was
predictable. We live in an age in which whatever
happens now is always more important, more
meaningful and more profound than whatever
came before. It's why anything by the White
Stripes has to be deeper than anything written by
The Who.
We're into immediacy, and what's more imme-
diate than someone scoring 81 points and, within
seconds, the highlights showing up on ESPN? One
of the few physical reminders of Chamberlain's
100-point night is a photo of the Stilt holding up
a piece of paper, on which someone had scribbled
the number 100.
It's a quaint reminder that not everything
was televised. But just because you can't watch
Chamberlain's big night through thousands of
pixels on a TV screen shouldn't lessen the accom-
plishment.
What Bryant did Sunday was extraordinary. But
it's a pity it automatically should take away from
what Chamberlain did almost 44 years ago.
GET CAUGHT
READING.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
tec
The ECU Media Board
welcomes applications for
my CTUDunr
iiraiiiinr it i
The board is seeking fulltime students interested in serving as the day student repre-
sentative on the Media Board, the 11-person board which governs student media at
ECU, WZMB. The Rebel, The East Carolinian, Expressions, and Buccaneer.
To qualify, you must be a student living off campus who is not a member of a sorority
or fraternity and you will be expected to attend a late afternoon meeting monthly.
For information, contact: ECU Media Board Office
205 A Self Help Center
301 S. Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27858
328-9200
Applications due Friday, February 10th at 5p.m.
0
y
O

IING'S ROW RPARTM6NTS
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
200 GO Verdant Dr. Greenville, NC
252-752-3519
' ;
i mWiII

400 dances that include themes of
Peace, Healing & Celebration of Life. t
Sunday, January 2?
Mcndenhall Student Center
Multipurpose Room
fcOO-OOpm PREfi


the ECU Student Experiences, for more information call 525
WATCH THE BIG GAME
SUNDAY Feb. 5th, 2006
No cover charge
You can't miss any of the action
on one of our 14 TV's!
92" HD Projection Screen
2 60" HDTV s
3,6" TV's throughout the bar
Try out our new grill with our
nightly drink specials
1920 B Smythewyck Drive Greenville 252 439 0555
Call for more information


Title
The East Carolinian, January 26, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 26, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1873
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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