The East Carolinian, July 22, 1998






ast Carolinian
)UND
I - Bathing suit,
)ly sunglasses.
WEDNESDAY
JULY 22.1998
eastcarolinian
EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROUNA
SED HOMES
Delinquent tax.
rea. Toll Free 1-
H-3726 for cur-
MTSI College
s. Medical bills,
se 1-800-218-
ROM $176.
Ihevys. BMWs,
s. 4WDs. Your
218-9000. ext.
your sore ach-
teur masseur
act ice on. Call:
5 (code 2466)
'ille 27836.
$225 a month
g and lessons
3-2536.
N for boarding
ables are 5.5
rge barn. 8
more informa-
I
iiian
IEDS
iel Santos
Miles
)
Adams pleads guilty
to embezzlement
Former medical
foundation president
accepts 16 charges
Christopher Scott
staff writer
In a Farmville courthouse, former med-
ical foundation president, Robert K.
Adams II plead guilty to 16 charges of
embezzlement and financial mismanage-
ment of the ECU Medical Foundation.
The medical foundation is a "non-
profit independent organization that
raises funds for the East Carolina medical
and health-science schools. His sentence
was postponed until Aug. 21. At that time,
he is ordered to pay back $115,000 to the
Medical Foundation or the terms of his
sentencing could revert to a stricter pun-
ishment.
The plea bargain Adams obtained
through his lawyer, Thomas Manning,
frees the defendant from serving the max-
imuml32 year sentence that could have
been given and, instead, permits him to
pay a total of $193,550 to the Medical
Foundation, a $3,608 fine to ECU for
incorrect billing on his travel expenses,
240 hours of community service and
approximately 150 days in jail.
His co-conspirator, Van C. Fleming
plead guilty to charges of aiding and abet-
ting embezzlement and conspiracy to
embezzle.
Acting as president of the organization,
Adams was privy to information concern-
ing the future acquisition of land by the
university and the Department of
Transportation near NC 43 and PCMH.
Mr. Adams then, hired a Fleming to buy
up this land and resell it to the
Foundation at double its price.
John Murphy, prosecutor for the attor-
ney general's office, said the defendant,
along with Fleming, set up a dummy
company in order to buy land around this
area and, in turn, sell the land back to the
Medical Foundation at a inflated price.
While the plan devised by Adams and
Fleming is similar to insider trading on
the stock market, their actions did not go
unnoticed by the eyes of a state audit.
"As soon as the problems became
aware, both ECU and the Foundation
took steps to correct the problems said
John Durham, director of public affairs at
ECU.
Correcting the problem involves, for
the Foundation, a change in the way they
practice their business. Reforms consist of
adding more members to the board of
trustees, increasing the number of audits
during the fiscal year and instituting a
more stringent authorization code on pur-
chases.
Even though Adams worked for a
fund-raising organization solely for the
university, his embezzlement will not
affect students in the medical and health
services schools who are currently receiv-
ing scholarships, according to Tom
Fortner, news and information for the
medical center.
"All the scholarships are funded, and
this funding was already established
before Mr. Adams' actions Fortner said.
Contractors liable for
late construction fees
Contracts may include
Amanda Austin
news editor
Timing is everything when it comes to on-
campus construction projects � or is it?
With Dowdy Ficklen Stadium's upper
deck nearing completion almost, a year
after its deadline date and othe�projects
running late � it took almost an extra
semester for the Student Rec Center to be
completed �extra funding has to go into
the projects. And that extra funding does
not come from the university, nor does it
grow on trees. It comes from the contractor
who missed the deadline.
Construction companies hired for a pro-
ject � and there are many under way on
campus � are never charged a penalty for
projects running late, but are held respon-
sible for expenses that add up due to late
construction.
"Construction companies are never
charged a 'penalty' for late construction,
unless there is also a bonus clause in their
contract for early completion; the state
does not use bonus clauses said Bruce
Flye, director of facilities services. "They
are, however, subject to the costs of actual
expenses incurred by the owner due to
late construction
TODAY
Partly Cloudy
high 95
low 76
Students and staff are inconve-
nienced, but until we are in a situa-
tion where we are renting replace-
ment space or something of that
nature, the actual monetary damages
caused are generally related only to
the additional time of the architect or
other such small figures
Bruce Flye
Director of Facilities Services
The expenses the construction compa-
ny is held reliable for are called liquidated
damages.
"Most contracts contain a clause that
stipulates the maximum amount of dam-
ages that are estimated to be assessable in
the event of late construction Flye said.
All construction projects on campus are
started with the expectation that they will
be completed by a certain time or dead-
line.
After a project is completed, damages
are able to be assessed. The process of
assessing damages involves such factors as
how many contractors were involved and
SEE CONSTRUCTION PAGE 2
flPSJ IS IT
ECU chooses Pepsi's $7.1 million
over. Coke's $3.93 million
T.K.Jonks
assistant sews editor
In an effort to increase revenue, ECU will
reduce its soft drink choice to Pepsi and
join several other schools across the
nation who have already sold their mono-
grams to merchandisers.
The trustees accepted the $7 million
bid by Pepsi, over Coke's $3.93 mil
lion, to monopolize the university's
vending machines, dining halls
and concession stands beginning
Aug. 1 and lasting for the next 10
years.
They concluded that 40 per-
cent of the $7 million will go
toward academics and the remain-
ing 60 percent will be spent on ath-
letics. Pepsi will invest an addition-
al $100,000 in new concession stands at
Dowdy-Ficklen.
"The athletic department was the dri-
ving force behind the request. They needed
a new scoreboard and was looking for ways to
raise the money when they suggested the
negotiation said Betty Speir, trustee mem-
ber. "I would like to have had it (the appro-
priations) considered more equally
Provosts including some trustees and
Chancellor Richard Eakin said after the vote
that they would like to have seen more of
the money be used for academics. But as it
stood, President of Student Government
Association Eric Rivenbark's vote against it
was the only dissenting vote, the negotiation
committee's version of holding Rivenbark's
coat while he did the fighting.
Rivenbark says that not only could the
prices go up in the monopoly but that more
of the money should have been allocated for
the regular student and not the athlete.
Layton Getsinger, associate vice chancel-
lor for finance, said he did not expect to see
Pepsi prices rise within the next year,
but said prices could rise in the
next few years in conjunction
with the economy.
Because rising costs have
out paced incoming tuition
and government's support,
more schools are selling their
names to private businesses for
financial help in return.
In Grapevine, Texas a Dr.
Pepper sign is on a middle
school's roof. At the University of Michigan,
there are Coke vending machines and not
Pepsi. At the University of Chapel Hill, the
Nike swish has found its way on all athletic
uniforms. And according to the Associated
Press, 45 school districts nationwide have
sold space on their school buses to advertis-
ers.
"A lot of major universities are using this
type of business arrangement said Steve
Krouch, vice president of sales and market-
ing for Pepsi. "Frankly, if colleges are going
SEE PEPSI PAGE 3
LOGO COURTESY OF PEPSI CO
In 1898 Pharmacist Caleb Bradham
perfected the blend of syrup, spices
and soda water.
Traditionally named "Brad's Drink
L M A 1 I i , A gti
In 1902 named changed to Pepsi-
Cola and sold exclusively to soda
fountains from back room of
Bradham's pharmacy.
By June 1903 Pepsi Cola officially
registered with U.S. Patent Office.
Sales went from 19,848 gallons in
1904 to 104,029 gallons in 1907.
Experienced setback during sugar
crisis of World War 1.
In 1923 Bradham declared bankrupt-
cy, placed Pepsi-Cola trademark for
sale.
In 1976 Pepsi-Cola became tWsin
gle largest-selling soft drink in
American supermarkets.
Flew into outer space on a shuttle
and opened franchises in China in
the 1980's.
Today, Pepsi-Cola spans the globe
with profits surpassing $1 billion.
SOURCE PIPSI NEWS RELEASE
Med School takes part in sickle cell study
Findings in New England
Journal of Medicine
Debbie Neuwirth
stafp writer
The School of Medicine recently participat-
ed in and proved a study on sickle-cell ane-
mia. The study took place at the Medical
School and was published July 2 in the New
England Journal of Medicine.
Laura Hoye is the nurse coordinator for
the study that described how ECU was one
in 14 centers affiliated with studying sickle-
cell disease. This study proved that if chil-
dren with the sickle-cell disease, have blood
transfusions, they stand a 90 percent less
chance of having a stroke.
"I had 14 kids randomized in the study
Hoye said. "Eight were on standard care,
and seven were on transfusions
After the study took place, all of Hoye's
patients switched to transfusions.
This study gave children ages 2 to 16 the
choice to receive standard care or blood
transfusions.
Because one out of 10 kids with the dis-
ease can have a stroke, this study was aimed
at preventing that from happening.
"We are trying to prevent some of the
things from happening to these kids until
we can find a cure Hoye said.
Dr. Beatrice Files, a pediatric hematol-
ogyoncology specialist, was involved with
the study.
"The patient and family participants
should be proud of the part they have
played in answering the important question
of what children are at risk and how to pre-
vent it Files said.
Because strokes affect 10 percent of
children with sickle-cell disease, these
children, as a result, could have serious
problems being able to move, speak and
learn. Once a child has one stroke, they
have an 80 percent chance of having a sec-
SEE STUDY PAGE 3
Opinion
WEDNESDAY
Lifestyle
Sports
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 93
low 76

ir pepsi '
�(B39!fr-fnsr 1 w,
Academics loses
again to the big bad
athletic department
More beer for the
buck doesn't
mean best
Mascot brings
smiles.
When the cyberdust clears, check
out TEC's new website at
WWW.teC8CU.MRI
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION bldg, GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu





8 Wednesday, Jury IS, 1998
classifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
LOOKING FOR A PLACE to live?!
Free room and board. Physically dis-
abled woman looking for female live-
in companion. Room and board in
exchange for some personal care
and light housekeeping. References
and background check required. Call
356-9161 and leave message.
MEDICAL STUDENT LOOKING
for clean medical, nursing, or gradu-
ate student to share three bedroom
duplex. One mile from hospital. If in-
terested, please call 758-2474.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share four bedroom apartment lo-
cated at Players Club Apartments.
Call 321-7613 for more information.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
for Aug. 1st. Neat, non-smoker, ani-
mal lover to share 2 bdrm. duplex.
$200 deposit. $200 month. 12
bills. Shaded fenced yard. Call 758-
7525 for Lindsey.
1 BEDROOM, ALL UTILITIES in-
cluded, 12 block from campus.
Declawed cats only with pet deposit.
Off street parking. $305. 757-9387.
4 BEDROOM. 3 BATH house near
downtown, washerdryer hookups.
$750. Can be subdivided into 3 bed
2 bath 1 bedbath. Call 757-9387.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share large 2 bedroom house 2
blocks from campus. Must be re-
sponsible and animal loving. $200
per month plus utilities. 910-458-
9039 Christie.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Start 81, share large 3 bedroom
house 1 block from campus.
Washerdryer included. Rent $217
month 13 utilities. Call Lynn at
758-5684.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE
wanted for nice 3 BR duplex. WD,
central air. dishwasher, fenced in
backyard, back deck. Close to cam-
pus and downtownl Ask for Steve
or Beth. 830-6921.
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE im-
mediately, walking distance from
campus and downtown. Large room
(15'x15'). Private phone linecable
in room .Washerdryer included.
$175 per month plus utilities. Call
Mike at 752-2879.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR two
bedroom, two bathroom apt
washer and dryer, walking distance
from campus. Call Kathleen. 752-
2705.
LOOKING FOR FM roommate to
share two bedroom apartment close
to campus. Rent $202.50 12 utili-
ties. If interested please call 758-
3299.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share four bedroom apartment lo-
cated at Players Club Apartments.
Call 321-7613 for more information.
CHRISTIAN FEMALE ROOM-
MATE (nonsmoker) needed for two
bedroom apartment within walking
distance from ECU campus. $218
mo 12 utilities. 9mo. lease be-
ginning Aug. 1. Call 826-3209.
HOUSE FOR RENT. 5 bedroom. 2
bathrooms, large denkitchen with
fireplace, brick patio, on half acre
wooded lot fully fenced in. Pets OK.
2 miles from campus beside Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity house on
Hooker Road. $750 per month. Avail-
able August. Call 321-2030 for ap-
pointment.
Washers and Dryers
FOR RENT
New, X-Large capacity
stop wasting time & money
at the laundromat
call 236-5097
ROOMMATES NEEDED - Two sido-
by-side Player's Club apartments
each need a roommate. Washer
dryer, private bath, pool and friendly
fun. Please call 353-2665.
HOUSE FOR RENT, 302 Lewis St.
3 BR, LR, DR. kitchen, central AC.
garage. 5 mins. walk from campus.
No pets. $750mo. 919-504-2052.
Iv. msg.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share 2 bedroom apartment,
$187.50mo. plus 12 utilities. Call
Jessica, 757-9640. Needed ASAP!
3 BR. APT. AVAILABLE Aug. 1st
above BW3's. $775.00 a month!
Please call 758-2616. ask for Yvonne.
1 FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP: Player's Club Apts. to share
4 bedroom townhouse. Your own
bedroom and bathroom. $210 plus
14 utilities per month, washer
dryer in apt. On bus route. Available
August 4! Please call 328-7798 for
more information.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $275
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
125 Avery St Greenville. 758-6596
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus, $250 per month, 15
utilities. Ask for Tim, 931-9165.
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share four bedroom townhouse at
Player's Club. Contact Kelly at
(919)663-3048. Leave name and
number if not available.
HELP WANTED
PART-TIME HELP needed in ware-
house. Apply in person at the Car-
pet Bargain Center, 1009 Dickinson
Avenue, 758-0057.
NOW ACCEPTING applications for
substituting and part-time teacher
positions. Harmony Childcare, 756-
6229. License Number 1455138,
QUADniPLEGIC NEEDS physical
assistance in AM hours. Bathing, lift-
ing, personal care, domestic chores
and driving. Good experience for the
helping professional. 830-6028.
LOST & FOUND
REWARD OFFERED - Bathing suit.
Phonics book, possibly sunglasses.
Call 328-7796.
OTHER
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax,
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
FREE CASH GRANTS! College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000. ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175.
Porsches. Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
FOR SALE
!��
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$500MONTH. 758-5393
"$100 OFF"
Security Deposit
with puMiimluo of IMs coupon, offer axplrw
7I3VM not valid wtth any ofntr coupon
�WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: 1 or
2 bedrooms, 1 bath, range, refriger-
ator free watersewer, washerdryer
hookups, laundry facilities, 5 blocks
from campus, ECU bus services.
Other properties available.
Pnioenlee ham 24 hr. emergency maintenance-
108-A BROWNLEA DRIVE
758-1921
nopxty I i
RIIMGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Cypress Landing
Now Hiring Marketing
Assistants Sun -Thur, 4pm-
9pm 20-22 hours weekly.
Great hourly wage plus
bonus. Must have strong
communication skills, like
talking to people, customer
service oriented & team
player. Main function will
be telephoning customers.
Call Craig Wheeler
Mon-Fri. to schedule interviews
975-8100
Dapper
Dan's
Big Summer Sale
10-75 OFF
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(9X9)496-2X4
MERCI Clinic, Inc. seeks a full lime director to
manage the facility, volunteer activities, and develop-
mental operations. Good people skills, organizational
ability, and community relations experience required.
Applicants must be familiar with medical clinic opera-
tions and have knowledge of social programs. Bachelor1!
degree necessary. Salary commensurate with experi-
ence. S30K plus income potential. Application deadline
71598. Send resume to MERCI Clinic, Inc PC Box
15254, New Bern, NC 2856
. And shoes! Good ns
DC YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Emkfin Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, irive to back door & ring bttaaccr.
S W A 1' S II ()
FOR SALE: LARGE DORM refrig-
eratorfreezer, almost new, white,
excellent condition, all manuals in-
cluded. $100 OBO. Call 931-0449.
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS Post Script
printer. Laser jet printer. Includes
paper tray and manual feed. $150.
Call 353-7109.
COMPAQ LAPTOP COMPUTER
100 mhz Pentium with 16 mb ram,
color screen, faxrriodem. Ms Of-
fice, Aldus Pagemaker, MS Works,
Norton Utilities. Great school or busi-
ness computer, $800. Call 353-
7109.
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800-484-8546 (code 2466)
or POB 8663, Greenville 27836.
SERVICES
HORSE BOARDING. $225 a month
for full board. Training and lessons
are available. Call 353-2536.
NEW STABLES OPEN for boarding
- Riverfield Farm Stables are 5.5
miles from ECU. Large barn, 8
acres. Please call for more informa-
tion. 551-3200.
li SPORTS WRITERS
.WANTED
Apply at our office on tha 2nd floor
of th� Student Pub Building
ADVERTISE IN
� the i � �
eastcaroiinian
CLASSIFIEDS
comics
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
France
Rafael Santos
X MENER WANT TO
SAY WHAT X t)X
EAjmtRl'MStRRy.
ITS TuiT THAT X
WAHTES For 104 -rp
KNOtMTMl
YoUR REAL GRASWi
Jf FlrSrwtF5WAS
AWlMtfJ OF GREAT
pEAHTfl gut WORKED
rVTF�7�6US"A&A
MWcER.ArftHER
Jame was
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
Wild Thing
N.Miles
YA KNOW, DANNY, Coixf&E
IS A OOOO PL�CF TO
i�ARN HOW SIU.Y SOM?
STEReoTYPes wv
uke Au- Mice cine
OKFSFDO&S H4T� CtTS,
ROS ARE StePPr, SKUNKS
SMEU
OR AU- GlRAFPfS
ctAseHice-BATSAHe
-roevf? Burrs
WEDNESDAY
JULY 22,1998
Ad;
to
Fan
found
accep
C H R I S
In a Farmville
ical foundatio
Adams II pies
embezzlement
ment of the E(
The medic;
profit indepe
raises funds for
and health-sciei
was postponed i
he is ordered to
Medical Found
sentencing coul
ishment.
The plea t
through his lai
frees the defenc
imuml32 year :
been given and
pay a total of
Foundation, a
incorrect billing
240 hours of
approximately 1
His co-consj
plead guilty to c
ting embezzler
embezzle.
Acting as pre:
Coi
late
Contraa
Am at
NE
Timing is cverytl
campus construct
With Dowdy 1
deck nearing co
after its deadline
running late �
semester for the S
completed �exti
the projects. And
not come from tl
grow on trees. Itc
who missed the d
Construction c
ject � and there
campus � are ne
projects running I
sible for expenses
construction.
"Construction
charged a 'penult
unless there is als
contract for Carl
does not use bori
Flye, director of f
are, however, subj
expenses incurrci
late construction
the east c,





ast Carolinian
DUND
- Bathing suit,
bly sunglasses.
WEDNESDAY
JULY 22,1998
eastcarolinian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
BED HOMES
Delinquent tax,
rea. Toll Free 1-
H-3726 for cur-
NTSI College
s. Medical bills.
ee 1-800-218-
ROM $175.
;hevys. BMWs,
is, 4WDs. Your
218-9000. ext.
your sore ach-
teur masseur
ractice on. Call:
6 (code 2466)
ille 27835.
$225 a month
ig and lessons
3-2536.
N for boarding
ables are 5.5
irge barn, 8
more informa-
if
inian
IEDS
iel Santos
y
Adams pleads guilty
to embezzlement
Former medical
foundation president
accepts 16 charges
Christopher Scott
staff writer
In a Farmville courthouse, former med-
ical foundation president, Robert K.
Adams II plead guilty to 16 charges of
embezzlement and financial mismanage-
ment of the ECU Medical Foundation.
The medical foundation is a "non-
profit independent organization that
raises funds for the East Carolina medical
and health-science schools. His sentence
was postponed until Aug. 21. At that time,
he is ordered to pay back $115,000 to the
Medical Foundation or the terms of his
sentencing could revert to a stricter pun-
ishment.
The plea bargain Adams obtained
through his lawyer, Thomas Manning,
frees the defendant from serving the max-
imuml32 year sentence that could have
been given and, instead, permits him to
pay a total of $193,550 to the Medical
Foundation, a $3,608 fine to ECU for
incorrect billing on his travel expenses,
240 hours of community service and
approximately 150 days in jail.
His co-conspirator, Van C. Fleming
plead guilty to charges of aiding and abet-
ting embezzlement and conspiracy to
embezzle.
Acting as president of the organization,
Adams was privy to information concern-
ing the future acquisition of land by the
university and the Department of
Transportation near NC 43 and PCMH.
Mr. Adams then, hired a Fleming to buy
up this land and resell it to the
Foundation at double its price.
John Murphy, prosecutor for the attor-
ney general's office, said the defendant,
along with Fleming, set up a dummy
company in order to buy land around this
area and, in turn, sell the land back to the
Medical Foundation at a inflated price.
While the plan devised by Adams and
Fleming is similar to insider trading on
the stock market, their actions did not go
unnoticed by the eyes of a state audit.
"As soon as the problems became
aware, both ECU and the Foundation
took steps to correct the problems said
John Durham, director of public affairs at
ECU.
Correcting the problem involves, for
the Foundation, a change in the way they
practice their business. Reforms consist of
adding more members to the board of
trustees, increasing the number of audits
during the fiscal year and instituting a
more stringent authorization code on pur-
chases.
Even though Adams worked for a
fund-raising organization solely for the
university, his embezzlement will not
affect students in the medical and health
services schools who are currently receiv-
ing scholarships, according to Tom
Former, news and information for the
medical center.
"All the scholarships are funded, and
this funding was already established
before Mr. Adams' actions Former said.
Contractors liable for
late construction fees
Contracts may include
Amanda Austin
news editor
Timing is everything when it comes to on-
campus construction projects � or is it?
With Dowdy Ficklen Stadium's upper
deck nearing completion almost a year
after its deadline date and other projects
running late � it took almost an extra
semester for the Student Rec Center to be
completed �extra funding has to go into
the projects. And that extra funding does
not come from the university, nor does it
grow on trees. It comes from the contractor
who missed the deadline.
Construction companies hired for a pro-
ject � and there are many under way on
campus � are never charged a penalty for
projects running late, but are held respon-
sible for expenses that add up due to late
construction.
"Construction companies are never
charged a 'penalty' for late construction,
unless there is also a bonus clause in their
contract for early completion; the state
does not use bonus clauses said Bruce
Flye, director of facilities services. "They
are, however, subject to the costs of actual
expenses incurred by the owner due to
late construction
TODAY
Partly Cloudy
high 95
low 76
Students and staff are inconve-
nienced, but until we are in a situa-
tion where we are renting replace-
ment space or something of that
nature, the actual monetary damages
caused are generally related only to
the additional time of the architect or
other such small figures
Bruce Flye
Diiecioi of Facilities Services
The expenses the construction compa-
ny is held reliable for are called liquidated
damages.
"Most contracts contain a clause that
stipulates the maximum amount of dam-
ages that are estimated to be assessable in
the event of late construction Flye said.
AH construction projects on campus are
started with the expectation that they will
be completed by a certain time or dead-
line.
After a project is completed, damages
are able to be assessed. The process of
assessing damages involves such factors as
how many contractors were involved and
SEE CONSTRUCTION PAGE 2
ECU chooses Pepsi's $7.1 million
wen Coke's $3.93 million
m.
T.K.Jonks
ASSISTANT NKWS KDITOR
In an effort to increase revenue, ECU will
reduce its soft drink choice to Pepsi and
join several other schools across the
nation who have already sold their mono-
grams to merchandisers.
The trustees accepted the $7 million
bid by Pepsi, over Coke's $3.93 mil-
lion, to monopolize the university's
vending machines, dining halls
and concession stands beginning
Aug. 1 and lasting for the next 10
years.
They concluded that 40 per-
cent of the $7 million will go
toward academics and the remain-
ing 60 percent will be spent on ath-
letics. Pepsi will invest an addition-
al $100,000 in new concession stands at
Dowdy-Ficklen.
"The athletic department was the dri-
ving force behind the request. They needed
a new scoreboard and was looking for ways to
raise the money when they suggested the
negotiation said Betty Speir, trustee mem-
ber. "I would like to have had it (the appro-
priations) considered more equally
Provosts including some trustees and
Chancellor Richard Eakin said after the vote
that they would like to have seen more of
the money be used for academics. But as it
stood, President of Student Government
Association Eric Rivenbark's vote against it
was the only dissenting vote, the negotiation
committee's version of holding Rivenbark's
coat while he did the fighting.
Rivenbark says that not only could the
prices go up in the monopoly but that more
of the money should have been allocated for
the regular student and not the athlete.
Layton Getsinger, associate vice chancel-
lor for finance, said he did not expect to see
Pepsi prices rise within the next year,
but said prices could rise in the
next few years in conjunction
with the economy.
Because rising costs have
out paced incoming tuition
and government's support,
more schools are selling their
names to private businesses for
financial help in return.
In Grapevine, Texas a Dr.
Pepper sign is on a middle
school's roof. At the University of Michigan,
there are Coke vending machines and not
Pepsi. At the University of Chapel Hill, the
Nike swish has found its way on all athletic
uniforms. And according to the Associated
Press, 45 school districts nationwide have
sold space on their school buses to advertis-
ers.
"A lot of major universities are using this
type of business arrangement said Steve
Krouch, vice president of sales and market-
ing for Pepsi. "Frankly, if colleges are going
SEE PEPSI PAGE 3
LOGO COURTESY OF PEFSI CO
istory o
In 1898 Pharmacist Caleb Bradham
perfected tjwotend of syrup, spices
and soda water.
Traditionally named "Brad's Drink
kHf . j 1 T"l i- jhk
In 1902 rimed changed to Pepsi-
Cola and sold exclusively to soda
fountains from back room of
Bradham's pharmacy.
By June 1903 Pepsi Cola officially
registered with U.S. Patent Office.
Sales went from 19,848 gallons in
1904 to 104,029 gallons in 1907.
Experienced setback during sugar
crisis of World War I.
In 1923 Bradham declared bankrupt-
cy, placed Pepsi-Cola trademark for
sale. � "
In 1978 Pepsi-Cola became
glelargest-selling soft drinl
American supermarkets.
Hew into outer space on a shuttle
and opened franchises in China in
the WHO'S.
Today, Pepsi-Cola spans the globe
with profits surpassing $1 billion.
SOURCE MFSI NEWS RELEASE
Med School takes part in sickle cell study
Findings in New England
Journal of Medicine
Debbie Neuwirth
staff writer
The School of Medicine recently participat-
ed in and proved a study on sickle-cell ane-
mia. The study took place at the Medical
School and was published July 2 in the New
England Journal of Medicine.
Laura Hoye is the nurse coordinator for
the study that described how ECU was one
in 14 centers affiliated with studying sickle-
cell disease. This study proved that if chil-
dren with the sickle-cell disease, have blood
transfusions, they stand a 90 percent less
chance of having a stroke.
"I had 14 kids randomized in the study
Hoye said. "Eight were on standard care,
and seven were on transfusions
After the study took place, all of Hoye's
patients switched to transfusions.
This study gave children ages 2 to 16 the
choice to receive standard care or blood
transfusions.
Because one out of 10 kids with the dis-
ease can have a stroke, this study was aimed
at preventing that from happening.
"We are trying to prevent some of the
things from happening to these kids until
we can find a cure Hoye said.
Dr. Beatrice Files, a pediatric hematol-
ogyoncology specialist, was involved with
the study.
"The patient and family participants
should be proud of the part they have
played in answering the important question
of what children are at risk and how to pre-
vent it Files said.
Because strokes affect 10 percent of
children with sickle-cell disease, these
children, as a result, could have serious
problems being able to move, speak and
learn. Once a child has one stroke, they
have an 80 percent chance of having a sec-
SEE STUDY PAGE 3
Opinion
WEDNESDAY
Lifestyle
Sports
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 93
low 76

ir pepsi wi
8f& 3531
Academics loses
again to the big bad
athletic department
More beer for the
buck doesn't
mean best
Mascot brings
smiles.
1
When the cyberdust dears, check
out TEC's new website at
www.tececu.edu
the east Carolinian STUDENT PUBLICATION BLOG, GREENVILLE, NC 27858 across from Joyner library � newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu
U





2 W�dimd�y, July 22, 1998
news
The East Carolinian
3 Wedneiday
Construction
continued from page t
across
) state
Unemployment rate
lowest in 20 years
RALEIGH CAP) North
Carolina's seasonally adjusted
unemployment rate fell to 3.0 per-
cent in June, the lowest jobless
rate in the state since 1978, when
officials began using current
methods to calculate it, the
Kmployment Security
Commission said.
The June rate is lower than the
3.3 percent rate in May, the ESC
said Friday.
Fayetteville center
receives grant to help
women entrepreneurs
FAYETTEVILLE (AP) The
Women's Center of Fayetteville
has been awarded a $150,000 fed-
eral grant to offer help to women
entrepreneurs.
The Women's Business
Resource Center will be the first-
such program in the state. There
arc 60 elsewhere in the country.
"I'm just thrilled said Sylvia
Ray, director of the Women's
Center.
"Part of me is really proud for
Fayetteville to be first in the
state
The grant was awarded by the
Small Business Administration. It
is being supplemented by $37,500
from the City of Fayetteville and
$7,500 from the Florence Rogers
Charitable Trust.
MA sentencing
postponed for repeat
drunken driver
GREAT BARRINGTON, Mass.
(AP) The logistics of transport-
ing a repeat drunken driver from a
Connecticut prison to a
Massachusetts courthouse forced
the postponement of her sentenc-
ing.
Linda Spellacy, 49, of
Salisbury, Conn began serving a
2 12-ycar sentence in
Connecticut earlier this month
after pleading guilty to five drunk-
en driving charges.
She had been scheduled for
sentencing Monday in Southern
Berkshire District Court for violat-
ing her probation in Massachusetts.
Winona State student
apparently frowns in
Mississippi River
WINONA Minn. (AP) Winona
County officials found the body of
a 21-year-old Winona State-
University student Monday morn-
ing in the Mississippi River.
Divers were sent out when a
group of swimmers called just
after 2:30 a.m. to report that a per-
son was missing from their group.
About four hours later, the
body of Colleen Kelly of
Fitcnburg, Wis was pulled from
the river in front of a beach where
she and four others had gone
swimming, said Andrea Foss,
Winona deputy police chief.
Compulsory drug testing
to be introduced Royal
Air Force
LONDON (AP) Britain will
introduce compulsory drug testing
in the Royal Air Force, bringing
the service into line with the army
and navy.
Random urine tests on a quar-
ter of Royal Air Force personnel
each year will screen for cannabis,
cocaine, amphetamines, opiates,
barbiturates and LSD,
Armed Forces Minister Dr.
John Rcid said Monday.
Compulsory testing will begin
Nov. 1. An individual who tests
positive is likely to be discharged,
Rcid said.
German convicted of
supplying Pakistani
nuclear program
STUTTGART, Germany (AP)
A German businessman was con-
victed Monday of illegally export-
ing nuclear weapons equipment to
Pakistan, which declared itself a
nuclear power in May.
A state court sentenced Ernst
Piffl to three years and nine
months in prison and fined him
$24(),(MX), saying he seriously hurt
Germany's standing in the world.
Pakistan exploded its first six
nuclear devices in May in a tit-for-
tat response to rival India, which
exploded five nuclear devices ear-
lier that month.
were there any changes made by
the owner that may have caused
problems.
"Successfully assessing dam-
ages is often difficult because of
the number of factors that would
have caused the delay Flye said.
"This often makes it very compli-
cated to reach a final and justifiable
conclusion. Students and staff are
inconvenienced, but until we arc in
a situation where we are renting
replacement space or something of
that nature, the actual monetary
damages caused are generally relat-
ed only to the additional time of
the architect or other such small
figures
One long anticipated construc-
tion project nearing final complc-
The upper deck is the one of the many projects that has been continually delayed.
PHOTO BY MARC CRIPPEN
tion is the addition of the upper
deck to the stadium.
"The upper deck has been
accepted by the university and is
being seen by various tour groups
and actually will be available for an
open house during the first week in
August Flye said. "The general
contractor is continuing to com-
plete various items of work which
have not been found acceptable
or are otherwise incomplete;
this is typical most projects
everywhere and is often referred to
Survey shows academics most
important issue for students
Finances, drugs also
toppriority
Debbie Neuwj-Rth
STAFF WRITER
The Office of Research,
Assessment and Testing conduct-
ed a survey to examine many
important issues facing college stu-
dents. This phone survey looked at
issues that nationwide college stu-
dents as well as ECU students
must face day to day.
The three most important
issues facing U.S. college students
were finances, academics and
future plans. For ECU students,
the order was academics, finances
and alcoholdrugs.
Kris Smith, director for research,
assessment and testing, as well as
assistant vice chancellor for student
life took part in the survey.
"The survey helped us identify
important issues for students at
ECU Smith said.
After the survey, students were
individually asked how they felt
about concerns and issues. Here
on campus, the majority of stu-
dents answered that academics
were most important to them.
"This shows our students are
concerned about getting an educa-
tion, and that they feel this is their
greatest accomplishment while
they are here Smith said.
In the past ECU has been rated
by top magazines as a party school
in. The new survey contradicts
past articles and shows not all stu-
dents are here for the reputation of
the school. Most students ques-
tioned in the survey were genuine-
ly concerned with getting a solid
SEE SURVEY PAGE 3
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Ea�l Carolinian
Wednesday, July 22, 1998
news
Tha Eatr Carolinian
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Study
continued liom page 1
ond one.
"Our
effortsvyi
conic
patient participants
affect lives for years to
iles said.
After the study, the children in
standard care decided instead of
taking a risk, they would go ahead
and receive transfusions. Sickle-
cell disease is the most common
genetic blood disorder in the
United States, and with this
study's help, there is a way to help
children live longer,
healthier lives.
Lawmakers vote on
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standardized testing
RALEIGH (AP) Some of North
Carolina's youngest children could
be subjected to standardized test-
ing if state legislators approve a bill
to lift a 12-year ban on such testing
in lower grades.
Last week the House
Education Committee approved a
bill to include second-graders in
standardized testing.
Education officials' proposals
would repeal the current law that
forbids schools to use the multiple-
choice tests and "bubble-sheet"
answer grids that are a staple of the
state's accountability program for
older children.
"We have been very careful to
make sure the testing we allow at
the youngest level is appropriate
and avoids the problems we have
had in the past said Henry
Johnson, the associate state super-
intendent who oversees instruc-
tion and accountability for North
Carolina's 1.2 million public school
students.
In North Carolina, students do
not take state-mandated exams
until third grade. By using stan-
dardized tests in second grade,
schools can have a better idea how
their children will fare when the
test scores count.
July 12
Damage to Real Property �
An officer discovered that per-
son(s) unknown had defaced a
wall on the seventh floor of the
Brody Medical Complex.
July 9
van was parked north of the
Student Rec. Center.
Larceny � A student reported
the larceny of his temporary
license tag from his vehicle
parked north of the Student Rec.
Center.
July 1
Damage to Property � A stu- Worthless Check � Edward
dent reported the antenna and L. Rinehart, DOB 31567, of 200
windshield wipers on the SGA West 8th Street was served a crim-
Transit Van had been bent. The inal summons for worthless check.
Pepsi
continued iram
to be competitive with each other,
they have to market themselves in
a way that best benefits their
school
Not all schools approve of this
tactic to gain the additional funds.
Seattle, Milwaukee and Berkeley,
Calif, are a few the AP said who
questioned the ethicality of
"exposing kids to advertising in
school, where attendance is
required and they cannot walk
away
Survey
continued from page 2
education.
The sample was done using
undergraduates and was conduct-
ed by hired students. The phone
interviews were also given by grad-
uate students who assist in the
Office of Research, Assessment
and Testing.
"I hope students know they are-
not alone Smith said. "Everyone
feels the same way. Students arc
here to do well academically
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4 Wtdrmdiy, July 22. 1998
opinion
The East Carolinian!
eastcarolinian
Amy L.Rosi ik Editor
HeaTHKR Bi'H(;i;ss ManaQifigEditor
Amanda Ai srirt Newfdiior
TK Jones Assistant News Editor
A.sm Ti rnkr LffestyleEditor
MlCCAH SMITH Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Matt IIfci
KilUin Til
Travis Barklf.y Spons Editor
Tracy Hairr Assistant Sports Editor
Carole Mehi.f; Head Copy Editor
Chris Knotts Staft Illustrator
Advertising Manager
oi.E Webmaster
Semrtg the ECU njflimuony smci 1975. the E�l Cwoimiw putHshes 11.000 copies every tuestey and Itiunutsy The if ad editorial m each etJmon is the
opinion of The i rhtotnl Bawd, the Eni Cc4miar wctomis letters to the ertror limned id 760 words, which may be edited fm decency oi bievity Ihe East
Caiohrwan reserves the 'ighi 10 ei cr �i�ct tenets lot publication All tenets muji be signed, tenets should tie addtewed 10. Opinion ednot .the fast
Carolinian Sludem Pubkaitons Buildmg. fCU. GteenvtHe, 2'8684353. tot intorniatton. call 919.37S.6366.
oilnew
Score! Score! Score! It's the sound of ECU athletics rejoicing over the
Board of Trustees deal with Pepsi. Listen harder, somewhere in the
background "everyone else" is celebrating too, just not quit as enthu-
siastically.
The Board of Trustees closed the pouring rights deal with Pepsi for
a sweet $7.1 million. Sixty percent of the money has been allotted by
the ECU Board of Trustees to ECU athletics, leaving 40 percent for
"everything else including the academic programs that make our
school what it is: a school.
While it's true that representatives of ECU's athletic department
suggested the deal in the first place as a means of raising revenue for
sports, we believe the money from this deal should at least be split
Jown the middle. The issue is fair distribution. What kind of message
does this decision send to the biology major working nights in the lab
on her research project or the social work professor whose pilot pro-
gram is sorely underfunded?
It's petty and silly for the Board of Trustees to pander to athletics by
awarding them a sort of "finder's fee" for all this money and skimming
from the pile we feel ought to belong to academics.
The academic departments on campus have fewer resources for rais-
ing money than the athletic department does. They rely on revenues
from tax dollars, tuition and grants that are further divided among
heavy construction projects, maintenance, and salaries. We can't even
afford to get the air-conditioning in the classrooms working properly.
Comparatively, merchandise sales, television broadcasting rights, con-
cession proceeds, ticket sales and brand-name sponsorships are limit-
ed for say, the ECU Debate Team.
We heard someone say that athletics made our degree worth more,
but is that as high as we want to set our standards? Consider the won-
ders MIT's football team has done for their reputation.
August 20, when you're sitting in a hot classroom in the Austin
Building, try not to mutter between clenched teeth � "Go Pirates
OPINION
Columnist
Britt
HONEYCUTT
Trucks not redneck toys anymore
like driving a truck.
I like it a lot. I like it more
than having strawberry jam
sucked off of my toes by
a tall dark latino
named Diego.
I feel like such a dork saying this,
but I believe in truth in journalism,
and I can't keep living this lie. I
like driving a truck. I like it a lot. I
like it more than having strawberry
jam sucked off of my toes by a tall
dark latino named Diego. Almost.
I have recently come to this con-
clusion after being stuck with my
dad's big ol' Chevy this week
because my car � god bless it � is
a P.O.S. I've never had much expe-
rience with trucks �surprising,
considering where I come from.
But there's nothing in the world
like riding high above everyone
else in a large loud vehicle that
moves with a quickness when the
gas is tapped.
As my few faithful readers out
there may have gathered (I'm talk-
ing about you, Mom and Dad), 1
don't normally have a favorable
opinion of rednecks. Normally, I
can't bring myself to see through
their contorted and strangely
altered eyes. But this is one place
where I feel that they may actually
be smarter than we think.
Now, I don't exactly believe
that tractor tires, mud flaps with sil-
houettes of naked women, Calvin
whizzing on a racing symbol and
gun racks lining the back window
are a mark of certain genius. But
rednecks seem to have known the
merits of pickup trucks for years,
and the rest of us are just beginning
to come around � and slowly.
Most of us can't make ourselves
jump all the way from tiny road-
sters to all-out trucks.We have to
work our way up, starting with
sport-utility vehicles. These are
just watered down trucks for those
too chicken to admit that their
necks are slightly pink.
I do love my little Toyota car,
but where's the get-up-and-go? I
want a vehicle that will stand up
and kick somebody's butt if they're
tailgating me. In the truck, I can do
anything. Yellow light? I can make
it. Pot hole? No problem. Leap tall
buildings in a single bound? All
over it like a Spice Girl on the
crotch of a professional basketball
player. You don't mess with a
woman in a truck. Mainly because
chances are it's her boyfriend's and
he just got out on parole and will be
highly upset. There are so many
more things to consider before
harassing a truck owner. Is there a
shotgun in there somewhere?
Nobody knows, baby, nobody
knows.
Maybe it's the country upbring-
ing that I've been trying so hard to
suppress for the past 10 years com-
ing out with a vengeance not to be
reckoned with that makes me love
the roar of that big loud engine �
I'm not sure. But I'm ready to
move past all the stereotypes and
embrace the lifestyle that I was
born to follow. I should forget
about all hat "human rights" crap
and and I should start eating steak
and beer with every meal and learn
to make that "wooo" sound really
loudly.
Or I could just get a truck.
OPINION
Columnist
Jeff
BERGMAN
Burn, baby, burn
Banning someone's right to
burn desecrates those who
have died more than the
actual burning. Many gave
their lives defending our free-
doms. One of those is the
freedom of expression.
The Stars and Stripes is consid-
ered one of the sacred symbols of
our society. An amendment to the
Constitution is being considered to
ban the burning of this icon. Many
wasteful hours are spent debating
this amendment by our honorable
members of congress.
The freedom of expression is
one of the top beliefs held by our
forefathers and by us, American
Citizens The flag burning amend-
ment would take away our right to
burn the flag.
I have not burned a flag, and
only a few people have. If people
do burn the flag, what is the big
deal? The proud Americans say
that it dishonors those who have
died for this great country. These
people rarely do as they say.
Americans rarely vote, say the
pledge of allegiance, stand for �
much less sing � the national
anthem at sporting events or even
salute the flag.
Ban flag burning and the novel
few will come up with more intel-
ligent ways to grab media attention
� blowing their nose on the flag,
using the flag for toilet paper. Will
amendments ban these also?
Banning someone's right to
burn desecrates those who have
died more than the actual burning.
Many gave their lives defending
our freedoms. One of those is the
freedom of expression.
Consider what would happen if
the population of this great nation
did ban the burning of the flag.
Can I still burn jeans that has a
patch of the American Flag? What
about people with the flag tattooed
upon them? Can they legally have
it removed without being in Viola-
tion of the amendment to the
Constitution?
When people yell at me about
this country being a democracy
and if the people want it they
should get it, I pause to give these
pea brains time to calm down.
Then I politely reply that this
country is not about protecting the
rights of the majority, rather it is
the minority's rights that need to
be protected (as Webster says; See:
Tyranny). Included in those rights
is the right to be un-American.
Yes, the majority can change the
Constitution but do we really want
to enter that quagmire?
OPINIOI
iColumnist
Stephen
KLEINSCHMIT
Commercialism takes its toll
If l hear Natalie Imbruglia's
one-hit-wonder song "Torn"
one more time, 1 miglit feel com-
pelled to jump in front of a bus.
Well, Titanic was a major hit thanks
to idiotic 13-year-old girls with
subscriptions to Big Bopper and 16
magazine. Everybody rushes out
to see Lethal Weapon 4, which did
nothing but beat the proverbial
dead horse. The Backstreet Boys
are a sickening reincarnation of
NKOTB. Everywhere we look, we
are bombarded with crass commer-
cialism. In short, we are turning
into a nation of mindless tool bags
who let industry dictate our enter-
tainment.
First, let's look at music. Mase
and Puffy are as much hype as Milli
Vanilli. Do you think that girl in the
Notorious B.I.Gs "Big Poppa "
video found him attractive? She
can't even fit her arms around him
to give him a hug! If 1 hear Natalie
Imbruglia's one-hit-wonder song
"Torn" one more time, I might feel
compelled to jump in front of a bus.
It's time wc get off their boat and
discover smaller bands who make a
lot better music. Phish and The
Dave Matthews Band are examples
of bands that grew to gigantic pro-
portions due to merit, and not clue
to hype. They will be here a long
time after those MTV sweethearts
are sent packing.
Then there is TV. I have never
watched Baywatch, which is as bla-
tantly sexual as The Booty Mix '98
soundtrack. Comedy Central is
probably the only good cable net-
work, and has won high marks for
The Daily Show, which is probably
the funniest thing I have seen since
Chris Rock's HBO special. South
Path fills the college need for crude
toilet humor and foul language.
And I call for a boycott on channel
59. If you have cable, flip it there
and you will understand.
And we have a lot better ways to
spend $6 than on mega-budget star-
studded crap such as Godzilla. Good
Will Hunting was an excellent
movie. And it was cheap at
Blockbuster. Trainspotting was good
alsi). And if you want to laugh alot,
check out Clerks, a good low budget
independent film with no big-name
stars. The last movie I saw at the
theater was Ar Good As It Gets with
I leleii 1 lunt and Jack Nicholson.
This waste of money reaffirmed my
belief that the movies are still and
always will be a place for middle
school kids to take their dates and
make out.
And finally, there is fashion.
Feryone likes to feel attractive.
But if you ladies think that guys are
driven wild by Kate Moss, whose
anorexic, heroin addict look has
high school girls purging their din-
ner across the country, you're
wrong. Don't let snooty so-called
fashion mags fool you, there are
some of you ladies out there who
should be telling them what to do.
But to the guys I saw at CD Alley
the other day, I don't think
Whitesnake or Def Leppard
will be coming to town soon. This is
the 90's man � what's
wrong with you?
"The function of art has always been to break through
the crust of conventionalized and routine conscienceness
John Dewey, philosopher, educator, 1934
mm
5 Wednesday.
CD
re
BR5-49
Big Back
Show
8 OU
A N I)
1.IFEST1
Redneck mov
Briggs has to
twangers BR5
artists behind
album, Big Bn
But more about
second. First, I
Bob one more I
ning with a tots
and then gettin
ting to. Get it?
I was down
today, enjoyir
greasy goodne
Cheesesteak. A
pepper off my c
ing of down rig!
person. I looki
dow and across
him staring at m
Alan Thicke w
the front windo'
shop at the Ev
jumped, causin
cheesesteak to
landing square
unknown soldk
pain.
And speaki
that will get yd
pants, you shou
49's Big Backya
should know tb
49 by now. 1
themselves afte
skit, featuring
Junior Samples
ning gig at a
shophonky
Western World
for tips. Their
record contract
released their
album in 1996.
Big Backyard
that BR5-49 ar
guys able to kei
with reved-up
country songs. I
band capable of
ing original ma
tracks on the alt
inals and damn
That doesn'l
aren't fun. I
could challenge
box in the Unit
comes to the n
songs they are c
On Big Backyan
tackle songs ma
likes of Buck (
Lewis and Moo
they can't turn
into a simmerin
the way the Kill
an inspired reat
SEE BACK!






le East Carolinian

SlVir.
1
ictual burning,
.es defending
)f those is the
)n.
)uld happen if
is great nation
g of the flag,
ins that has a
�n Flag? What
e flag tattooed
:y legally have
being in viola-
Iment to the
1 at me about
a democracy
want it they
; to give these
i calm down.
:ply that this
protecting the
ty, rather it is
; that need to
ster says; See:
in those rights
un-American.
in change the
A'c really want
toll
a-budget star-
Godzilla. Good
an excellent
is cheap at
ting was good
to laugh alot,
)d low budget
1 no big-name
I saw at the
s It Gets with
:k Nicholson.
reaffirmed my
s are still and
:e for middle
ieir dates and
e is fashion.
:el attractive,
that guys arc-
Moss, whose
lict look has
;ing their din-
intry, you're
oty so-called
du, there are
ut there who
n what to do.
i at CD Alley
don't think
ef Leppard
l soon. This is
� what's
5 Wednesday. July 22, 1
998
CD
review
BR549
Big Backyard Beat
Show
8 OUT OF 10
Andy Tirner
lifestyle editor
Redneck movie critic Joe Bob
Briggs has to be a fan of retro-
twangers BR5-49, the hillbilly
artists behind the spiffy new
album, Big Backyard Beat Show.
But more about them and that in a
second. First, I want to rip off Joe
Bob one more last time by begin-
ning with a totally irrelevant story
and then getting to what I'm get-
ting to. Get it?
I was down at Cubbies' earlier
today, enjoying the dynamite
greasy goodness of a Cubbie's
Cheesesteak. As I wiped a green
pepperoff my chin, a strange feel-
ing of down right evil overtook my
person. I looked out of the win-
dow and across the street. I saw
him staring at me. The big head of
Alan Thieke was eyeballing from
the front window of a photography
shop at the Evans Street Mall. I
jumped, causing grease from the
cheesesteak to drip on my pants,
landing square at the tomb of my
unknown soldier. 1 felt a growing
pain.
And speaking of something
that will get you shaking in your
pants, you should check out BR5-
49's Big Backyard Beat Show. You
should know the story about BR5-
49 by now. The boys named
themselves after an old Hee-Haw
skit, featuring the legendary
Junior Samples. They got a run-
ning gig at a Nashville boot
shophonky tonk, Robert's
Western World, playing requests
for tips. Their popularity led to a
record contract with Arista, who
released their self-titled debut
album in 1996.
Big Backyard Beat Show proves
that BR5-49 are more than just
guys able to keep the party going
with reved-up covers of classic
country songs. It shows they are a
band capable of producing engag-
ing original material Of the 14
tracks on the album, nine are orig-
inals and damn fines ones at that.
That doesn't mean the covers
aren't fun. I imagine BR5-49
could challenge any country juke-
box in the United States when it
comes to the number of country
songs they are capable of playing.
On Big Backyard Beat Show, they
tackle songs made famous by the
likes of Buck Owens, Jerry Lee
Lewis and Moon Mullican. While
they can't turn "The Wild One"
into a simmering, sexual stomper
the way the Killer could, they give
an inspired reading of the rocka-
SEE BACKYARD. PAGE 7
lifestyle
Tht East Carolinian
Who's gonna complain, as long as it's good and cold?
More Drunk for
the Dollar
College is the time to find the brew that's right
foryou
J K S N I f E R L E 0 i E I T
SENIOR WRITER
There's a time and a place for
everything. It's called college.
And as much as administrators
don't want to admit it, college is
a time of gratuitous and plentiful
beer drinking. Most college peo-
ple don't drink beer because it
tastes good. They drink it
because it's beer. But it doesn't
have to be that way. There is
plenty of beer out there that is
cheap and tastes good enough to
drink lots of without having to
choke down the first three or
four.
Admittedly, most cheap beer
all tastes alike. It's just that some
are way less embarrassing than
others. Certain beers come with a
certain attitude. For example,
the stereotype of someone drink-
ing a Heineken is a yuppie.
Southpaw Light drinkers are frat
RATING GUIDE:
Five Stars!
Prettvtastv
mmm yeltowDeer
vile
let fuel might taste beftt
boys. PBR drinkers want that
piece of Americana in a can, just
as Natural Light drinkers are all
rednecks and love Nascar. And
Milwaukee's Best drinkers are,
well, just plain old cheap. This
sounds absurd, right? We all
know that not every 40 ounce
and Schliz Malt liquor drinker
lives in the hood.
There's nothing embarrassing
about drinking a 40. It just so
happens that 40's have a very
practical function of having a
screw on cap so if need be, the
unfinished portion can always be
saved for breakfast. However,
there is no good reason for any-
one to drink the Beast. Though
they market Milwaukee's Best,
Milwaukee's Best Light, and
Milwaukee's Best Ice, and it's all
$4.99 a case, that is still no
excuse. It's watery, takes two of
these to one of anything else, and
ends up tasting like the can. It's
is not even the color of real beer,
being practically clear to other
canned beers' pale yellow.
If you desire good beer for
cheap beer prices, you might try
Michelob Amber Boek.
Dundee's Honey Brown,
Pabst Blue Ribbon Miller
High Life, Miller Lite, and
Miller High Life.
With their Amber Bock,
Michelob seems to be trying
to capture the microbrew mar-
Cheap Beer

6 pack bottles unless otherwise notedM
PBR2.79m
Miller Lite5.99m
Bud Light3.89 '
Milwaukee Best4.99 case
MB Light4.99 case
MB Ice4.99 case
Busch Light3.49�
Schlitz2.49 � .
(extra point for retro can design)
Southpaw4.05 A
Bud3.99m
Natural Light2.69m
Miller Lite3.99
(extra point for effective ad campaignancI .
hypnotic par)
Michelob Light4.39
Coors Light3.99
Red Dog3.49t
Red Wolf4.49
Icehouse4.49 M
Bud Ice3.99&Z
High Life2.990
Rolling Rock4.65
Bud3.99
ket. At $4.29 a six pack the
Amber Bock was great and the
best of their microbrew series. It
was a good amber beer, smooth
and rich without being bitter and
free of any funky after taste.
Unfortunately, the rest of the
microbrew recipes don't add up
to this one. Michelob makes pil-
sners, ambers, bocks, and darks,
but the recipes don't have the
variety that most Microbrews are
noted for. Maybe they need to
narrow their production.
Another good one was the
I loriey Brown. It's flavor is simi-
lar to Newcastle Brown Ale but
not quits as bitter and at $4.49 a
six pack, it's half the price of the
English ale. Dundee's now also
makes Honey Brown Light.
Pabst Blue Ribbon is only
drinkable for one reason. It's
cool. It's not much better than
keg beer but at $2.79 for six pack
of cans, some watered down beer
can be handled for that "Happy
Days" feeling of Americana.
Miller seems to be buying
into this retroAmericana thing as
well. Their beer is not bad at all
and they get bonus points for
effective advertising and being
the high gurus of marketing.
Of all Miller products and of
all beer in general, Miller High
Life is the only choice for inex-
pensive beer. It's cheap at $2.99
for a six pack of bottles. It's even
tasty, and it does not have any
special flavors or a fancy bottle or
SEE BEER. PAGE 7
22 Wednesday
Lilith Fair at the Walnut Creek
Amphitheater in Raleigh
The Harmony Four at The Cave
in Chapel Hill
Clare Quilty at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
The Loud Family, Nielson
Hubbard, Mayflies USA at Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro
23 Thursday
As Good s It Gets at the Student
Rec Center pool
Aftertax at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
The Hail Marys at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
Andrew Byrd's "Bowl of Fire
The Knockdown Society, Katherine
Whelan at Cat's Cradle in Carrboro
24 Friday
The Breakfast Club at The Attic-
Culture Club, Howard Jones
Human League at the Walnut Creek
Amphitheater in Raleigh
TBA at The Cave in Chapel Hill
Jennyanykind, The Lonesome
Trailers at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
No Knife at The Lizard & Snake
in Chapel Hill
Jason and The Scorchers at Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro
25 Saturday
LeAnn Rimes, Bryan White at the
Walnut Creek Amphitheater in
Raleigh
TBA at The Cave in Chapel Hill
Cheri Knight, Bap Kennedy at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Big Fish Ensemble at The Lizard
& Snake in Chapel Hill
Modern English at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
Jason and the Scorchers
PHOTO FROM JASON AND THE SCORCHERS WEB SITE
26 Sunday
The Urge, Too Skinee J's, Sprung
Monkey, Cottonmouth Kings at The
Attic
Jennyanykind at The Cave in.
Chapel Hill
Aftertax, The Rusty Nails at The'
Lizard & Snake in Chapel Hill
The Magnetic Fields, Damon &-
Naomi, The Kletters at Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
Culrure Club, Human League,
Howard Jones at the Virginia Beach
SEE SHOWTIME PAGE I
Incredibly mixed-up movie stopped
being amusing after credits
This is the column where wefocus on the stuff we miss
and the stuff you missed. We will examine the hoots,
movies, mid albums we feel deserve further exploration.
The stuff we dug bad in the day
The title was far more
Miccah Smith
assistant lifestyle editor
3 OUT OF 10 FOR EFFORT
It was a dark and stormy night. Actually, it
was in the middle of the afternoon, but just
pretend, OK? Do it for me
I gingerly slid the tape into the VCR with
not a little trepidation, for this was no ordi-
)
nary movie. This was the world's premier
monster musical, known as The Incredibly
Strange Creatures Who Stopped Living and
Became Mixed- Up Zombies.
Whoa! With a name like that, it's got to be
good! Or so I thought. This 1963 flick, direct-
ed by Ray Dennis Stcckler, turned out to be
one of those "hey let's go check out a creepy
old amusement park and get ourselves
killed" movies made popular by theaters full
of screaming teens in days of yore.
Well, we can go ahead and get the vital
stats out of the way: the body count was 12,
but only if you count the zombies who had
already died once and were latet killed again.
Music by Perry Cuomo, F'ats Domino and
the Doobie Brothers on crack, apparently
recorded in a bathroom stall in Carlsbad
Caverns, gave the film that certain some-
thing.
Let's see we had some kung-fu, dancc-
fu, eyelash-fu, Speening Hypno-Wheel-fu,
extreme close-ups and a kidnev-shaped pool,
just for starters.
And you diought B-movies were low-budget!
The "love interest resplendent in a blue
hooded sweatshirt for most of the film, is a
rebel kinda guy who looks like a young
Nicolas Cage minus all the sex appeal. His
girl is the wholesome type who wears cardi-
gan sweaters with her teased-up hair. They
hang out with another dude who has a serious
case of James Dean Hair Syndrome, which
appears ro be incurable in such an advanced
state.
Anyways, these crazy kids go to get their
fortunes read at the amusement park by
some used-up looking Spanish broad who
looks like Anita fromWest Side Story.
I kept waiting for her to burst into song
with something like, "Puerto Rico, you ugly
island, island of tropic diseases But, you
know, she didn't, much to the movie's detri-
ment.
The next few scenes alternate between an
alcoholic dancing girl's pathetic attempts to
tegain her footing onstage and equally dizzy-
ing flashes of our teenage protagonists on the
rides at night, filmed without the benefit of
lighting.
Things pick up when the girl refuses to
check out a strip show which features the
hag's beautiful sister, Carmelita, and assorted
dancing girls in several smash-hit musical
numbers including the non-MGM-quality,
"Chew gum and shake yet bootie in a zebra-
striped dress boogie
The hooded sweatshirt guy gets suckered
backstage by a forged invitation from
Carmelita. What a dummy! The hag then
hypnotizes him with her hi-tech methods,
including a swirly black and white Speening
Hypno-Wheel and the subtle nuances of her
cultured voice. Yeah.
So then she, like, makes him kill all these
random people and stuff. Then he has this
dream. Strangely inappropriate doo-wop
SEE MOVIE. PAGE I





4 Widmsday, July 22. 1998
opinion
i the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
AMY L.Rovsi i-r Editor
Heather Bi rcjess Managing Editor
Amanda Ai si in NewsEditof
TR JONES Assistant Kows Editor
Andy Tirnkk lifesiyte Editor
Miccah Smith Assistant lifestyle Editor
Travis Barkley Sports Editor
Tracy li wrr Assistant Sports Editor
Carole M i: 111. f. Head Copy Editor
Chris KNOTTS Staff Illustrator
Matt HeqB Advertising Manager
Hobby TUCOLB Webmaster
Senrnnj the KM community since !9?&. he East Carolinian publishes 11.000 copies twy tuesrjay and Itiuisday the lead ednonal m each edition is the
opinion ef the ftiitonai Hoard the East Cwolman welcome letters to the editor limited to ?M wtjirJi which may be edited tot decency or brevity, the East
Carolinian reserves the tight to edit m rgjeci letters tor publication. All letters must be signed tenets should be addressed to. Opinion editor .The Easi
Carobman. Student Puokaiioris Budding. ECO. Greenville. 285843b3. For information, tail 919.3?8.8.166
oumsw
I

PINION
Columnist
Britt
HONEYCUH
Trucks not redneck toys anymore
like driving a truck.
I like it a lot. I like it more
than having strawberry jam
sucked off of my toes by
a tall dark latino
named Diego.
I feel like such a dork saying this,
but I believe in truth in journalism,
and I can't keep living this lie. I
like driving a truck. I like it a lot. I
tike it more than having strawberry
jam sucked off of my toes by a tall
dark latino named Diego. Almost.
I have recently come to this con-
clusion after being stuck with my
dad's big o' Chevy this week
because my car � god bless it � is
a P.O.S. I've never had much expe-
rience with trucks �surprising,
considering where I come from.
But there's nothing in the world
like riding high above everyone
else in a large loud vehicle that
moves with a quickness when the
gas is tapped.
As my few faithful readers out
there may have gathered (I'm talk-
ing about you, Mom and Dad), 1
don't normally have a favorable
opinion of rednecks. Normally, I
can't bring myself to see through
their contorted and strangely
altered eyes. But this is one place
where I feel that they may actually
be smarter than we think.
Now, I don't exactly believe
that tractor tires, mud flaps with sil-
houettes of naked women, Calvin
whizzing on a racing symbol and
gun racks lining the back window
are a mark of certain genius. But
rednecks seem to have known the
merits of pickup trucks for years,
and the rest of us are just beginning
to come around � and slowly.
Most of us can't make ourselves
jump all the way from tiny road-
sters to all-out trucks.We have to
work our way up, starting with
sport-utility vehicles. These are
just watered down trucks for those
too chicken to admit that their
necks are slightly pink.
I do love my little Toyota car,
but where's the get-up-and-go? I
want a vehicle that will stand up
and kick somebody's butt if they're
tailgating me. In the truck, I can do
anything. Yellow light? I can make
it. Pot hole? No problem. Leap tall
buildings in a single bound? All
over it like a Spice Girl on the
crotch of a professional basketball
player. You don't mess with a
woman in a truck. Mainly because
chances are it's her boyfriend's and
he just got out on parole and will be
highly upset. There are so many
more things to consider before
harassing a truck owner. Is there a
shotgun in there somewhere?
Nobody knows, baby, nobody
knows.
Maybe it's the country upbring-
ing that I've been trying so hard to
suppress for the past 10 years com-
ing out with a vengeance not to be
reckoned with that makes me love
the roar of that big loud engine �
I'm not sure. But I'm ready to
move past all the stereotypes and
embrace the lifestyle that I was
born to follow. I should forget
about all hat "human rights" crap
and and I should start eating steak
and beer with every meal and learn
to make that "wooo" sound really
loudly.
Or I could just get a truck.
Score! Score! Score! It's the sound of ECU athletics rejoicing over the
Board of Trustees deal with Pepsi. Listen harder, somewhere in the
background "everyone else" is celebrating too, just not quit as enthu-
siastically.
The Board of Trustees closed the pouring rights deal with Pepsi for
a sweet $7.1 million. Sixty percent of the money has been allotted by
the ECU Board of Trustees to ECU athletics, leaving 40 percent for
"everything else including the academic programs that make our
school what it is: a school.
While it's true that representatives of ECU's athletic department
suggested the deal in the first place as a means of raising revenue for
sports, we believe the money from this deal should at least be split
tlown the middle. The issue is fair distribution. What kind of message
does this decision send to the biology major working nights in the lab
on her research project or the social work professor whose pilot pro-
gram is sorely underfunded?
It's petty and silly for the Board of Trustees to pander to athletics by
awarding them a sort of "finder's fee" for all this money and skimming
from the pile we feel ought to belong to academics.
The academic departments on campus have fewer resources for rais-
ing money than the athletic department does. They rely on revenues
from tax dollars, tuition and grants that are further divided among
heavy construction projects, maintenance, and salaries. We can't even
afford to get the air-conditioning in the classrooms working properly.
Comparatively, merchandise sales, television broadcasting rights, con-
cession proceeds, ticket sales and brand-name sponsorships are limit-
ed for say, the ECU Debate Team.
We heard someone say that athletics made our degree worth more,
but is that as high as we want to set our standards? Consider the won-
ders MIT's football team has done for their reputation.
August 20, when you're sitting in a hot classroom in the Austin
Building, try not to mutter between clenched teeth � "Go Pirates
OPINION
Columnist
Jeff
BERGMAN
Burn, baby, burn
Banning someone's right to
burn desecrates those who
have died more than the
actual burning. Many gave
their lives defending our free-
doms. One of those is the
freedom of expression.
The Stars and Stripes is consid-
ered one of the sacred symbols of
our society. An amendment to the
Constitution is being considered to
ban the burning of this icon. Many
wasteful hours arc spent debating
this amendment by our honorable
members of congress.
The freedom of expression is
one of the top beliefs held by our
forefathers and by us, American
citizens. The Hag burning amend-
ment would take away our right to
burn the flag.
I have not burned a Hag, and
only a few people have. If people
do burn the Hag, what is the big
deal? The proud Americans say
that it dishonors those who have
died for this great country. These
people rarely do as they say.
Americans rarely vote, say the
pledge of allegiance, stand for �
much less sing � the national
anthem at sporting events or even
salute the flag.
Ban flag burning and the novel
few will come up with more intel-
ligent ways to grab media attention
� blowing their nose on the Hag,
using the Hag lor toilet paper. Will
amendments ban these also?
Banning someone's right to
burn desecrates those who have
died more than the actual burning.
Many gave their lives defending
our freedoms. One of those is the
freedom of expression.
Consider what would happen if
the population of this great nation
did ban the burning of the flag.
Can I still burn jeans that has a
patch of the American Flag? What
about people with the flag tattooed
upon them? Can they legally have
it removed without being in viola-
tion of the amendment to the
Constitution?
When people yell at me about
this country being a democracy
and if the people want it they
should get it. I pause to give these
pea brains time to calm down.
Then I politely reply that this
CoUfltry is not about protecting the
rights of the majority, rather it is
the minority's rights that need to
be protected (as Webster says; See:
Tyranny). Included in those rights
is the right to be un-American.
Yes, the majority can change the
Constitution but do we really want
to enter that quagmire?
OPINIOI
iColumnist
Stephen
KLEINSCHMIT
Commercialism takes its toll
If I hear Natalie Imbruglia s
one-hit-wonder song "Torn"
one more time, I might feel com-
pelled to jump in front of a bus.
Well, Titanic was a major hit thanks
to idiotic 13-year-old girls with
subscriptions to Big Bopper and 16
"magazine. Everybody rushes out
to see Lethal Weapon 4, which did
nothing but beat the proverbial
dead horse. The Backstreet Boys
are a sickening reincarnation of
NKOTB. Everywhere we look, wc
are bombarded with crass commer-
cialism. In short, we are turning
into a nation of mindless tool bags
who let industry dictate our enter-
tainment.
First, let's look at music. Mase
and Puffy are as much hype as Milli
Yanilli. Do you think that girl in the
Notorious B.I.Gs "Big Poppa "
video found him attractive? She
can't even fit her arms around him
to give him a hug! If I hear Natalie
Imbruglia s one-hit-wonder song
"Torn" one more time, I might feel
compelled to jump in front of a bus.
It's time wc get off their boat and
discover smaller bands who make a
lot better music. Phish and The
Dave Matthews Band are examples
of bands that grew to gigantic pro-
portions due to merit, and not due
to hype. They will be here a long
time after those MTV sweethearts
are sent packing.
Then there is TV I have never
watched Baywatch, which is as bla-
tantly sexual as The Booty Mix '98
soundtrack. Comedy Central is
probably the only good cable net-
work, and has won high marks for
The Daily Show, which is probably
the funniest thing I have seen since
Chris Rock's HBO special. South
Park fills the college need for crude
toilet humor and foul language.
And I call for a boycott on channel
59. If you have cable, flip it there
and you will understand.
And we have a lot better ways to
spend $6 than on mega-budget star-
studded crap such as Godzilla. Good
Will Hunting was an excellent
movie. And it was cheap at
Blockbuster. Trainspotting was good
also. And if you want to laugh alot,
check out Clerks, a good low budget
independent film with no big-name
stars. The last movie I saw at the
theater was As Good As It Gets with
Helen Hunt and Jack Nicholson.
1 his waste of money reaffirmed my
belief that the movies are still and
always will be a place for middle
school kids to take their dates and
make out.
And finally, there is fashion.
Everyone likes to feel attractive.
But if you ladies think that guys are
driven wild by Kate Moss, whose
anorexic, heroin addict look has
high school girls purging their din-
ner across the country, you're
wrong. Don't let snooty so-called
fashion mags fool you, there arc
some of you ladies out there who
should be telling them what to do.
But to the guys I saw at CD Alley
the other day, I don't think
Whitesnake or Def Leppard
will be coming to town soon. This is
the 90's man � what's
wrong with you?
"The function of art has always been to break through
the crust of conventionalized and routine conscienceness
John Dewey, philosopher, educator, 1934
BR5-49
Big Back
Show
8 OUt
A N 1) V
Litest
Redneck movii
Briggs has to h
twangers BR5-
artists behind
album, Big Bat
But more about
second. First, I i
Bob one more l
ning with a total
and then gettinj
ting to. Get it?
I was down a
today, enjoyin,
greasy goodnes
Cheesesteak. A)
pepper off my el
ing of down righ
person. I looke
dow and across
him staring at mt
Alan Thicke wa
the front windov
shop at the Evs
jumped, causing
cheesesteak to (
landing square a
unknown soldie
pain.
And speakir
that will get yoi
pants, you shoul
49's Big Bathat
should know the
49 by now. T
themselves aftei
skit, featuring
Junior Samples,
ning gig at a
shophonky I
Western World,
for tips. Their p
record contract
released their
album in 19.
Big Backyard
that BR5-49 arc
guys able to kee
with reved-up
country songs. Il
band capable of
ing original mat
tracks on the alb
inals and damn f
That doesn't
aren't fun. I i
could challenge
box in the Unit
comes to the m
songs they are ci
On Big Backyam
tackle songs mai
likes of Buck C
Lewis and Moor
they can't turn
into a simmerini
the way the Killc
an inspired read
SEE BACKY
Keti
Texas





tie East Caroliniaj
w
ifcri.
1
ictual burning.
,es defending
)f those is the
n.
mid happen if
is great nation
g of the flag.
ns that has a
in Flag? What
e Hag tattooed
y legally have
icing in viola-
ment to the
I at me about
a democracy
want it they
: to give these
calm down.
ply that this
protecting the
y, rather it is
that need to
ster says; See:
n those rights
un-American,
n change the
ve reallv want
; toll
l-budget star-
lodzilla. Goo
in excellent
s cheap at
'ting was gooil
to laugh alot,
d low budget
i no big-name
I saw at the
s Gets with
k Nicholson,
eaffirmed my
; are still and
e for middle
eir dates and
: is fashion,
el attractive,
that guys are
Moss, whose
let look has
ng their din-
ntry, you're
oty so-called
u, there are
it there who
1 what to do.
at CD Alley
don't think
:f Leppard
soon. This is
� what's
5 Wednesday. July 22, 1998
CD
review
BR549
Big Backyard Beat
Show
8 OUT OF 1 O
A N I) V T I R N F. R
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Redneck movie critic Joe Bob
Briggs has to be a fan of retro-
twangers BR5-49, the hillbilly-
artists behind the spiffy new
album, Big Backyard Beat Show.
But more about them and that in a
second. First, I want to rip off Joe
Bob one more last time by begin-
ning with a totally irrelevant story
and then getting to what I'm get-
ting to. Get it?
I was down at Cubbies' earlier
today, enjoying the dynamite
greasy goodness of a Cubbie's
Cheescsteak. As I wiped a green
pepper off my chin, a strange feel-
ing of down right evil overtook my
person. I looked out of the win-
dow and across the street. I saw
him staring at me. The big head of
Alan Thicke was eyeballing from
the front window of a photography
shop at the Evans Street Mall. I
jumped, causing grease from the
cheesesteak to drip on my pants,
landing square at the tomb of my
unknown soldier. I felt a growing
pain.
And speaking of something
that will get you shaking in your
pants, you should check out BR5-
49's Big Backyard Beat Show. You
should know the story about BR5-
49 by now. The boys named
themselves after an old Hee-Haw
skit, featuring the legendary
Junior Samples. They got a run-
ning gig at a Nashville boot
shophonky tonk, Robert's
Western World, playing requests
for tips. Their popularity led to a
record contract with Arista, who
released their self-titled debut
album in 19.
Big Backyard Beat Show proves
that BR5-49 are more than just
guys able to keep the party going
with reved-up covers of classic
country songs. It shows they are a
band capable of producing engag-
ing original material; Of the 14
tracks on the album, nine are orig-
inals and damn fines ones at that.
That doesn't mean the covers
aren't fun. I imagine BR5-49
could challenge any country juke-
box in the United States when it
comes to the number of country
songs they are capable of playing.
On Big Backyard Beat Show, they
tackle songs made famous by the
likes of Buck Owens, Jerry Lee
Lewis and Moon Mullican. While
they can't turn "The Wild One"
into a simmering, sexual stomper
the way the Killer could, they give
an inspired reading of the rocka-
SEE BACKYARD. PAGE 7
lifestyle
The Eait Carolinian
Who's gonna complain, as long as it's good and cold?
More Drunk for
the Dollar
College is the time to find the brew that's right
foryou
I E N MFF,� L F. 0 O E T T
SENIOR WRITER
There's a time and a place for
everything. It's called college.
And as much as administrators
don't want to admit it, college is
a time of gratuitous and plentiful
beer drinking. Most college peo-
ple don't drink beer because it
tastes good. They drink it
because it's beer. But it doesn't
have to be that way. There is
plenty of beer out there that is
cheap and tastes good enough to
drink lots of without having to
choke down the first three or
four.
Admittedly, most cheap beer
all tastes alike. It's just that some
are way less embarrassing than
others. Certain beers come with a
certain attitude. For example,
the stereotype of someone drink-
ing a Heineken is a yuppie.
Southpaw Light drinkers are frat
RATING GUIDE:



Five Stars!
pretty tastv
tnmm yeNowoeer
vile
jet fuel misht taste
boys. PBR drinkers want that
piece of Americana in a can, just
as Natural Light drinkers are all
rednecks and love Nascar. And
Milwaukee's Best drinkers are,
well, just plain old cheap. This
sounds absurd, right? We all
know that not every 40 ounce
and Schliz Malt liquor drinker
lives in the hood.
There's nothing embarrassing
about drinking a 40. It just so
happens that 40's have a very
practical function of having a
screw on cap so if need be, the
unfinished portion can always be
saved for breakfast. However,
there is no good reason for any-
one to drink the Beast. Though
they market Milwaukee's Best,
Milwaukee's Best Light, and
Milwaukee's Best Ice, and it's all
$4.99 a case, that is still no
excuse. It's watery, takes two of
these to one of anything else, and
ends up tasting like the can. It's
is not even the color of real beer,
being practically clear to other
canned beers' pale yellow.
If you desire good beer for
cheap beer prices, you might try
Michelob Amber Bock,
Dundee's Honey Brown.
Pabst Blue Ribbon Miller
High Life, Miller Lite, and
Miller High Life.
With their Amber Bock,
Michelob seems to be trying
to capture the microbrew mar-
�-�
eap Beer
ft pack battles unless otherwise noted
PBR2.79
Miller Lite3.99:
Bud Light3.89
Milwaukee Best4.99 case
MB Light4.99 case
MB Ice4.99 case
Busch Light3.49
Schlitz2.49
I
(extra point for retro can design)
Southpaw 4.05
Bud 3.99
Natural Light 2.69
Miller Lite 3.99
(extra point for effective ad campaign and
hypnotic pac)
Michelob Light
Coors Light
Red Dog
Red Wolf
Icehouse
Bud Ice
High Life
Rolling Rock
Bud
4.39
3.99
3.49
4.49
4-49
3.99
2.99
4.65
3.99
ket. At $4.29 a six pack the
Amber Bock was great and the
best of their microbrew series. It
was a good amber beer, smooth
and rich without being bitter and
free of any funky after taste.
Unfortunately, the rest of the
microbrew recipes don't add up
to this one. Michclob makes pil-
sners, ambers, bocks, and darks,
but the recipes don't have the
variety that most Microbrews are
noted for. Maybe they need to
narrow their production.
Another good one was the
I loney Brown. It's flavor is simi-
lar to Newcastle Brown Ale but
not quite as bitter and at $4.49 a
six pack, it's half the price of the
English ale. Dundee's now also
makes Honey Brown Light.
Pabst Blue Ribbon is only
drinkable for one reason. It's
cool. It's not much better than
keg beer but at $2.79 for six pack
of cans, some watered down beer
can be handled for that "Happy
Days" feeling of Americana.
Miller seems to be buying
into this retroAmericana thing as
well. Their beer is not bad at all
and they get bonus points for
effective advertising and being
the high gurus of marketing.
Of all Miller products and of
all beer in general. Miller High
Life is the only choice for inex-
pensive beer. It's cheap at $2.99
for a six pack of bottles. It's even
tasty, and it does not have any
special flavors or a fancy bottle or
SEE BEER. PAGE 7
22 Wednesday
Lilith Fair at the Walnut Creek
Amphitheater in Raleigh
The Harmony Four at The Cave
in Chapel Hill
Clare Quilty at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
The Loud Family, Nielson
Hubbard, Mayflies USA at Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro
23 Thursday
Af Good As It Gets at the Student
Rec Center pool
Aftertax at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
The Hail Marys at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill
Andrew Byrd's "Bowl of Fire
The Knockdown Society, Katherine
Whelan at Cat's Cradle in Carrboro
24 Friday
The Breakfast Club at The Attic
Culture Club, Howard Jones
Human League at the Walnut Creek �
Amphitheater in Raleigh
TBA at The Cave in Chapel Hill
Jennyanykind, The Lonesome
Trailers at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
No Knife at The Lizard & Snake
in Chapel Hill
Jason and The Scorchers at Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro
25 Saturday
LeAnn Rimes, Bryan White at the
Walnut Creek Amphitheater in
Raleigh
TBA at The Cave in Chapel Hill
Cheri Knight, Bap Kennedy at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
Big Fish Ensemble at The Lizard
& Snake in Chapel Hill
Modern English at Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro
Jason and the Scorchets
PH0T0 FROM JASON AND THE SCORCHERS WEB SITE
26 Sunday
The Urge, Too Skinee J's, Sprung
Monkey, Cottonmouth Kings at The
Attic
Jennyanykind at The Cave in.
Chapel Hill
Aftertax, The Rusty Nails at The'
Lizard & Snake in Chapel Hill
The Magnetic Fields, Damon &�-
Naomi, The Kletters at Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
Culture Club, Human League,
Howard Jones at the Virginia Beach
SEE showtime PAGE I
Incredibly mixed-up movie stopped
being amusing after credits
This is tie column where we focus on the stuff we miss
and the stuff you missed. We will examine the books,
movies, and albums we feel deserve further exploration.
The stuff we dug back in the day
The title was far mote
inteesting
Miccah Smith
assistant lifestyle editor
3 OUT OF 10 FOR EFFORT
It was a dark and stormy night Actually, it
was in the middle of the afternoon, but just
pretend, OK? Do it for me
I gingerly slid the tape into the VCR with
not a little trepidation, for this was no ordi-
nary movie. This was the world's premier
monster musical, known as The Incredibly
Strange Creatures Who Stopped Living and
Became Mixed-1 'p Zombies.
Whoa! With a name like that, it's got to be
good! Or so I thought. This 1963 flick, direct-
ed by Ray Dennis Steckler, turned out to be
one of those "hey let's go check out a creepy
old amusement park and get ourselves
killed" movies made popular by theaters full
of screaming teens in days of yore.
Well, we can go ahead and get the vital
stats out of the way: the body count was 12,
but only if you count the zombies who had
already died once and were later killed again.
Music by Perry Cuomo, Fats Domino and
the Doobie Brothers on crack, apparently
recorded in a bathroom stall in Carlsbad
Caverns, gave the film that certain some-
thing.
Let's see we had some kung-fu. dance -
fu, eyelash-fu, Speening Hypno-Whcel-fu,
extreme close-ups and a kidnev-shaped pool.
jusr for starters.
And you thought B-movies were low-budget!
The "love interest resplendent in a blue
hooded sweatshirt for most of the film, is a
rebel kinda guy who looks like a young
Nicolas Cage minus all the sex appeal. His
girl is the wholesome type who wears cardi-
gan sweaters with her teased-up hair. They
hang out with another dude who has a serious
case of James Dean Hair Syndrome, which
appears to be incurable in such an advanced
state.
Anyways, these crazy kids go to get their
fortunes read at the amusement park by
some used-up looking Spanish broad who
looks like Anita fxomW'est Side Story,
I kept waiting for her to burst into song
with something like, "Puerto Rico, you ugly
island, island of tropic diseases But, you
know, she didn't, much to the movie's detri-
ment.
The next few scenes alternate between an
alcoholic dancing girl's pathetic attempts to
regain her footing onstage and equally dizzy-
ing flashes of our teenage protagonists on the
rides at night, filmed without the benefit of
lighting.
Things pick up when the girl refuses to
check out a strip show which features the
hag's beautiful sister, Carmelita, and assorted
dancing girls in several smash-hit musical
numbers including the non-MGM-quality,
"Chew gum and shake yer bootie in a zebra-
striped dress boogie
The hooded sweatshirt guy gets suckered
backstage by a forged invitation from
Carmelita. What a dummy! The hag then
hypnotizes him with her hi-tech methods,
including a swirly black and white Speening
Hypno-Wheel and the subtle nuances of her
cultured voice. Yeah.
So then she, like, makes him kill all these
random people and stuff. Then he has this
dream. Strangely inappropriate doo-wop
SEE MOVIE. PAGE I
1





6 Wtdnttdty. July 22. 1998
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
raqflfeli
This is not a rant. The goal: to write
complete sentences and hopefully to make some sort
of point. Just another ass vifh an opinion
Yee-ha! It's an
anime roundup!
!
Yeee-ha! Anime
roundup!
Wrangler TEC
CARTOON RODEO EXPERT
All right, li'l buckaroos, it's time
for Wrangler TECs Big Anime
Roundup! The world of Japanese
animation is a wild and wooly
place, and a cowboy's gotta be
mighty careful about which
videos he decides to rope.
Sometimes a man thinks he's a-
gettin' a light-hearted romp for
him and his filly, and winds up
starin' a bunch of twenty-foot-long
penile tentacles right in the eye.
But that's why I'm here. So all
you Japanese cowboys out there
settle down and listen up, and ol'
Wranglet TECW give you the low-
down on the latest videos from the
Land of the Rising Sun
First up is Sword for Truth, a new
samurai tape from the nice folks at
Manga Video. Now, on the box,
they're makin' all sorts of compar-
isons to Ninja Scroll, but don't you
believe it. Ninja Scroll is what we
here at the Saucer Eye Ranch like
to call a classic of the Breasts and
Blood genre. If you like your anime
with lots of decapitations and nudi-
ty (but nothin' too pornographic),
Ninja Scroll is the movie to see.
Sword for Truth ain't nothin' but
a bad imitation. Sure, there's lots of
sword fightin and the animation
ain't too bad, but somethin' just
ain't workin' right here. There're
too many breasts and too much
blood, like they was tryin' to prove
somethin' with it. The sword fights
are okay, but too many of 'em end
up with a feller gettin' his head
chopped off. And the sex scenes go
on too long; if I wanted a stroke
movie, I'd rent one.
Now, there is some right inter-
estin' stuff goin' on here with the
plot and a buncha politics between
the different clans. And if you're
into Japanese history, I hear tell
that Sword for Truth is pretty accu-
rate in the costumes and political
taffy-pulls. But it's still just yer
average samurai anime. I couldn't
help but feel like I'd seen it all
before, so I'm gonna give it five
outta ten spurs.
Satanika: Stay away from this
one, li'l buckaroos. It might say it's
anime on the box. The big eyes
I see, but could you tell me exactly what i'm looking at?
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WORLDWIDE WEB
might make it look like anime to
the tenderfoots. And the Korean
animators might even give it a little
bit o' anime shine. But Salonika'
about as much anime as that HBO
Spawn cartoon.
Salonika, behind the mask, is
really just the animated version of a
comic book by Glen Danzig (that
steroid heavy metal fella who sings
about the devil an' such?). It's right
stupid, and not very good to tell you
the truth. It's pretty much a rip-off
of Go Nagai's Devilman, a real
anime series that's also kinda
dumb, but still lots better than this
piece of horse crap.
I'd be ashamed to show my face
to my mama if I gave Sataniko any
more than one spur.
Dirty Pair Flash: They're pretty
fillies in skimpy suits, and they
blow a lotta stuff up. I don't rightly
understand why folks like the Dirty-
Pair so much, 'ccpt for the attribut-
es I mentioned above, so mcbbe
I'm not the best fella to be talkin'
'bout their latest scries. But here
goes:
They give the girls new outfits
in this one, and the guns are just as
big as ever. Stuff blows up real
good, and the boys in the buck-
house laugh a lot when they watch
it. There's two volumes of this out
right now, so if you like this sorta
thing, check it out I guess. As for
me, though, I gotta give it three
outta ten spurs, 'cause, like I said, I
just don't get it.
Fin Emblem: Now, this one's an
intercstin' case. I pretty much
ignored this when it came out, on
account of it's based on a video
game. But then I was bored one
night (sometimes the ol' Saucer
live gets mighty lonesome), and I
decided to give it a look-see.
What 1 found was a fun little
heroic fantasy story about this li'l
prince fella who's gotta become
king real quick-like when his
daddy gets killed by some rotten
sidewinders. He puts together a
posse of hero-types to go out and
clean up the land and generally
play Lone Ranger.
The animation's pretty good, and
there's plenty of sword fights to
keep it intercstin And, believe it or
not, it's clean enough to show to the
young'uns. It's not gonna be
changin' the anime world, but I'm
still gonna give it seven outta ten
spurs, just 'cause it was so much bet-
ter than I thought it would be.
There's not a lotta real excitin'
stuff out there right now, but gear up
for the fall. Comin' up real soon,
we're finally gonna get the last chap-
ter of Giant Rolm. I saw it subtitled a
couple of months ago, and lemme
tell ya, the two-year wait was worth
it. Plus, Disney's finally gonna
release English-language versions of
the Miyazaki films. Kiki's Delivery
Service is gonna be first, and rumor
has it that we'll get PrincessMononoke
(Miyazaki's latest) in theaters within
a year.
Well, that about wraps it up,
buckaroos. Ol' Wrangler TECs gotta
get out on the range and rustle up
some more tapes for the boys. So 'til
next time, otaku, remember, prac-
tice your 40-foot leaps and don't let
the sand get under your chaps. So
long, saddle pals
Movie
continued from page 5
music accompanies the ravings of
his poor, fevered brain as he is
caught in a game of human foozball
by nice-looking girls in debutante
gowns and surrounded by images
of his laughing girlfriend, who also
looks like she's at the prom. Heck,
maybe it is the prom!
All I know is that it was badly
choreographed.
Uh, more slayings. More musi-
cal numbers like that crazy twist hit
"Shook Outta Shape" and another
one where all the dancers are
dressed?in "tribal" costumes, but
the music is from a Frankie and
Annette movie.
Finally, we get a gander at those
mixed-up zombies, but they all get
killed after about five minutes.
C'est la vie.
Well, they all chase the hypno-
tized dude down the beach and
over rocks for what seem to me like
hours, but it's probably just 20 min-
utes or so. Then he dies.
Oh, man! Did I just give away
the ending? I'm sorry.
continued from page 5
Amphitheater
27 Monday
Mark Ivanitch at The Cave in
Chapel Hill
Jack Logan at The Lizard &
Snake in Chapel Hill
i
in
28 Tuesday
Festus at The Cave in Chapel
Hill
Crail Park, Basement at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
Busta Rhymes, Cypress Hill,
Public Enemy at the Virginia
Beach Amphitheater
Writer letter to tht Editor
Got something to say? Need somewhere to say it? Bring your letter to the
lasiorolinian, located on the 2nd floor of The Student Publications Building
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"The Undefeated Best
Place to Hear Live Music
in Greenville
-Greenville Times
209 E. 5th St.
NC's Legendary Nightclub,
Voted 1 at ECU and
Top 100 College Ban in the
Nation by Playboy magazine
October 1997
752-7303
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East Carolinian
7 Wednesday. July 22, 1998
lifestyle'
The East Carolinian
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Cast Chance for Live
Theatre this Summer
&syMFTheatre 1998
presents
A Streetcar
Mamed Desire
by Tennessee Williams
July 21-25, 8pm
July 25, 2pm
252328-6829
for reservations
and more information
Backyard
continued from page 5
Beer
billy classic by turning it into a hip-
shakin' boogie woogie.
This time around, however, the
originals outdo the cover songs.
"You Are Never Nice to Me
"Out of Habit" and "My Name is
Mudd" show main songwriters and
lead vocalists, Gary Bennett and
Chuck Mead, have learned a lot
from the honky tonk heroes
they've seen fit to cover.
Other standouts include
"Goodbye, Maria a Tex-Mex
hoedown, featuring Santiago
Jimenez Jr. on accordion, and the
hilarious "You Flew the Coup
Get this album. It's a lot more
fun (and a lot less evil) than Alan
Thicke.
continued from page 5
label. It's just a good plain beer.
Yum!
A few beers to stay away
from are Bud Ice and any Red beer.
Ice beers and Red beers may have
a higher alcohol content than regu-
lar beer but it is not worth it. Bud
Ice is a complete waste of money
and the only thing even remotely
interesting about this beer is its'
tacky bottle. As far as red beer
goes, it's rumored to do vile things
to your body. Even if these beers
were free, don't drink them. Yes
they are just that bad.
Let's be honest. As soon
as college students turn 21 their
primary (ok maybe secondary) goal
is getting drunk for cheap. That
$2.79 six pack is sometimes all you
need to curb a craving for beer. But
it's important that once a person is
of drinking age they don't let cost
be the only factor in their beer
choice. Chances are you have had
your fair share of Milwaukee's
Best, Natural Lite, Bud and other
such stale beers usually found at
college keggers. But when the
time comes that keg beer just
won't do the trick, you may realize
that you have developed standards.
One day Beast is just fine and the
next day nothing but Heineken
will suffice.
This is the kiss of death for the
college student who is constandy
broke, and unfortunately, once you
have had a taste of the good stuff
it's hard to go back-to the schwagg.
Save yourself some agony and
don't drink any good beer until you
know you can afford to keep up the
habit. In the mean time drink High
Life or PBR because it's cool,
cheap, and tastes pretty good when
it's really cold.
Hoboken honors blue-eyed
son over respected teacher
HOBOKEN, N.J. (AP) The
city dedicated a park to favorite son
Frank Sinatra on Tuesday with
swing music, tears, and a plaque
proclaiming him "Hoboken's gift
to the world
About 700 people lounged on
benches and listened to Sinatra
music at the Frank Sinatra
Memorial Park, a semicircular land-
ing facing the singer's beloved
New York.
The park in the entertainer's
birthplace includes a bust of
Sinatra, a large plaque, rows of
benches, a soccer field and a water-
front promenade.
"I'm sure when he was a child,
Frank Sinatra came to this water-
front, looked at New York and
dreamed of singing to the world
Mayor Anthony Russo said.
Russo said a lifelike statue will
eventually be placed in the park.
Russo also quelled a controversy
about a broken promise to name
the park after a high school teacher
murdered earlier this year.
The brother of John Sacci,
David Sacci, spoke on the mayor's
behalf, saying Russo "instinctively
took action as any elected official
should" when Sacci's widow
Kathleen filed a worker's compen-
sation claim with the city.
A tearful Nancy Sinatra,
Sinatra's daughter, said that per-
haps the park could also memorial-
ize Sacci in some way.
"I wasn't going to cry today.
We've been in-mourning for so
long she said.
Nancy Sinatra also introduced
her daughter, A.J. Lambert, and
said Lambert is getting married
and wants to move to Hoboken,
which prompted a standing ovation
from the crowd.
Thousands in the city idolize
the entertainer, although he hadn't
set foot in the city for at least a
decade before he died in May of a
heart attack.
Several fans think Sinatra
deserves more
than a park. A
recent,
$100,000 grant
to the
Hoboken
Historical
Museum
prompted
cries of a
museum for
Sinatra alone.
The museum
said it would
include an
"appropriate"
commemora-
tion.
The park
naming has
generated
controversy
because it was
first to be
named for
Sacci, a
beloved
Hoboken
High School
teacher who
was shot to
death in front
of his students
in February.
Sacci, a former Teacher of the
Year, was killed by a man who mis-
takenly believed he was having an
affair with his wife. Jerry Metaxas
killed himself after shooting Sacci.
The City Council issued a reso-
lution to name the park after Sacci,
but changed its mind about the
park after his widow filed a notice
of claim, indicating an intention to
sue. She is seeking workers' com-
pensation benefits for her husband
because he was killed on the job.
"I don't understand any of the
motivation behind it Mrs. Sacci
said Tuesday. "This was dedicated
to my husband because he was an
outstanding individual who
touched the lives of many chil-
dren
Hello, my name is Frank and I'm an alcoholic - NOT!
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FHANK SINATHA PHOTO GALLERY
Sinatra, she said, is a "tremen-
dous entertainer" with many sites
dedicated to him throughout the
city, including plaques on restau-
rant walls and a star at his birth-
place.
She said Russo "is just using
Frank Sinatra's name to get back at
this whole issue here
"I think it's a disgrace to Frank
Sinatra, as well she said.
Hoboken High School's vale-
dictorian recently asked the mayor
to change his mind in a speech at
graduation, she said.
Russo has said he couldn't name
the park after the Hoboken High
School teacher because Mrs. Sacci
was threatening to take taxpayers'
money in a lawsuit.
entertainment
niDDTets
WARSAW, Poland (AP) Warsaw
authorities are offering four new
locations to Michael Jackson for
consideration as sites for his
planned amusement park, a
Jackson lawyer said Thursday.
" We believe that all the options
are very interesting and we are
going to look into them in a very,
very serious fashion said Amnon
Shiboleth, who discussed the pro-
ject with city authorities during a
visit this week.
Last year, the King of Pop
signed a letter of intent with
Warsaw Mayor Marcin Swiecicki to
develop a dlrs 500 million theme
park in Warsaw. However, the
Interior Ministry refused to let go
of his favored site, a military airport
where Jackson performed two
years ago.
The mayor refused to identify
the sites, saying city authorities had
to check their ownership first.
Swiecicki said he hoped all
problems could be solved before
May 1999, when the current letter
of intent expires.
NEW YORK (AP) Antonio
Banderas has pulled out of a film
about Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the
founder of modem Turkey, amid
protests by Greek-Americans.
Robin Baum, publicist for the
star of The Mast of Zorro, didn't
mention the movie's critics in
explaining his departure, saying
Banderas wants to devote his time
to the movie adaptation of The
Phantom of the Opera.
The project's producer,
Laurence Olivier's son Tarquin
Olivier, said he hadn't been told
Banderas was leaving and planned
to meet with him Friday.
The protesters fear a favorable
portrayal of Ataturk might lead to a
warming of popular feeling toward
Turkey, a historical rival of Greece.
"It isn't honorable for a minority
to block artistic expression
Olivier said, attributing the protests
to "a few disenchanted Greeks, a
few disenchanted Armenians





8 Wedntsdey, July 22. 1998
sports
The East Carolinian
ECU constructs new intramural fields
9 Wedneidey,
State-of-the-art complex,
opens this fall
Chris Farnsworth
staff writer
Everyone who has ever played an outdoor
intramural sport here at ECU knows the
feeling: dread, fear and, finally, resignation.
Dread at having to play the game on the
tortured intramural fields behind Dowdy-
Ficklen stadium, with their mounds of dirt
SWA allows
training for
wrestlers
Student able to follow his
dream close by
I
Tracy Hairr
assistant sports editor
Big, muscular guys walking around in span-
dex pants and participating in a sporting
event consumed with falsehood often
embody the various assumptions connected
with wrestling. For senior Dustin Massey,
however, this action invites more meaning
and especially through the SWA (Southern
Wrestling Alliance), a minor wrestling
league based out of Mount Airy. Just as in
baseball, there are often separate divisions
to endure or be submitted to before accep-
tance on to professional teams, the SWA
offers a rudimentary means for its members
to develop their skills.
"It's really a way to get noticed Massey
said. "Promoters come and watch and may
�invite you to work with them
Prior to Lazurus' (Massey) wrestling
career, he attended SWATS (SWA Training
School) where he learned the fundamentals
and discovered some facts he'd not imag-
ined before. Something as simple as learn-
ing how to fall became one of the first
lessons Massey absorbed, and during the
process, acquired bruises were obvious after
ceaseless strikes against the surrounding
ropes, made of steel cables or garden hose
wrapped in PVC piping.
"It's tough stuff, very demanding said
Massey. 'Then once you're involved, you're
shaving your armpits and chest and watch-
ing your figure. So I'm real sympathetic
toward women now
On December 14 of last year, Massey had
his first match, which consisted of IS men,
and he was eliminated by Lodi (ECU alum
Brad Kane) who's now wrestling with WCW
(World Championship Wrestling) as a mem-
ber of The Flock. Since then, Massey has
overcome his initial nervousness and con-
centrated more on the fun he has when he's
in the ring.
"A lot of us get real offended if you call it
fake Massey said. "It's a show, and I'm out
there doing a job. But the difference
between us and the NFL, for example, is
that they're competitors, we're entertain-
ers
Massey admits that regardless of its
superficial appearance, wrestlers' attempts
should not be undermined since they, too,
are athletes whose responsibilities in a
match extend to interacting with the fans.
"It requires a lot of athleticism, but we're
out there mostly to give people what they
can't get from normal life Massey said.
"How many times do you see back flips off
ropes in a fight?"
All throughout North Carolina and parts
of Virginia, SWA wrestlers travel and exhib-
it their crowd-pleasing abilities, sometimes
to locations as close as Kinston, just a few
miles outside of Greenville. And the entire
illusion associated creates distinguishable
images that causes the wrestlers to assume
their good or bad persona before, during and
after a match.
"I've turned out to be the bad guy most
of the time, so when I'm just walking
around and little kids want my autograph, I
have to tell them no Massey said.
The guys range in age and also in their
purpose in being involved.
"Some of the guys are older than me,

SEE WRESTLING PAGE 9
and rock, occasionally sprinkled with a
touch of dead, brown grass; fear of sprain-
ing an ankle, twisting a knee or something
even more painful as stray bits of construc-
tion concrete hide in the dirt, waiting to
maim any who dare to even jog by. And
finally, resignation sets in as one realizes
that in order to play, they must brave the
dire conditions with no regard for personal
safety, other than momentarily glancing
down at the jagged ground. That is what
intramurals were all about.
Fear no longer, would-be-athletes, for
construction is finished on a 21 field, fine-
ly-grown Bermuda grass intramural sports
"With this many fields, as opposed to
the four lighted fields before, we have
greater flexibility
David Gaskins
Assistant Director of Intramural Spoils
complex. The brand-spanking new Blount
Recreational Sports Complex, located
behind the Belk building on Charles
Boulevard, will provide 10 football fields,
six soccer fields, five Softball fields, a ropes
challenge course and a fieldhouse. The
complex will also service club sports, like
the Irates and Helios ultimate frisbee
teams, rugby and lacrosse. The official
opening for the Blount Complex has not
been yet determined, though its first intra-
mural use will be for flag football in early
September.
"The complex has been in planning for
about two or three years said David
Gaskins, assistant director of intramural
sports. "Initially, we had planned for them
to open this past fall
Construction on the fields began late
last spring, with final touches being applied
early this summer. Of the football and soc- �
cer fields, eight of them are lighted, and
four of the softball fields are available for
night use. This gives the intramural sports
department much more freedom in sched-
uling games.
"With this many fields, as opposed to
the four lighted fields before, we have
greater flexibility Gaskins points out.
"Especially for the later games, like 8:00
p.m. to 10:00 p.m. ones, we can be more
liberal with the scheduling
Though the Blount complex will be
SEE FIELD CAGE 9
Pirate linebackers earn
national recognition
Sporting News ranks current oup ofLBs 10th in the country
Patrick Giovinazzo
staff writer
The ECU linebacker squad was named
to the top ten in the nation by the
Sporting News recently. Every year
Sporting News releases its College Preview
issue that examines and rates all the best teams
in the U.S. This year, ECU was commended
for its outstanding linebackers.
The article cited the talents of Roderick
Coleman and Jeff Kerr among others. Coleman
posted a team-high 15 sacks last season. He
also contributed a second-best 73 unassisted
tackles. Kerr finished the season with a stellar
record as well. He led the team with 167 tack-
les. This number more than doubled that of his
nearest teammate.
This national ranking is apparently no mis-
take. The linebackers are expected to con-
tribute to ECU's success this season.
Defensive Coordinator Paul Jette is counting
on his linebacker squad for big plays. "Those
are the guys that have to make plays for us in
order to be successful Jette said. He went on
to describe some of last years problems. "The
thing that hurt us defensively last year was
some guys who were more concerned with
making plays than doing their jobs This
problem is expected to be avoided this season.
Pernell Griffin, a red-shirt freshman, and
Marc Yellock will probably fill the other two
starting linebacker positions. Griffin, out of
Williamston High School, recorded 166 tackles
in 19 and helped his team to the 1995 Class
I-A state championship. He is expected to see
his first playing time as a Pirate this year.
SEE LINEBACKER PAGE 9
HAV
The ECU
assistan
1998-9'
apply. I
Roderick Coleman has become one of college football's most feared pass rushers.
�CK
Unassisted Tackles
ACKERS
RODERICK COLEMAN
Assisted Tackles: 17
Sacks: 0
Unassisted Tackles
73
Assisted Tackles:?
Sacks: 15
m
RECREATI
SERVICES
328-644
Grad student produces smiles as Indians' mascot
Kinston s Tom E. Hawk got his start
as Pee Dee the Pirate

Jim Phei.ps
staff writf.r
Anthony Bailey, a graduate student at ECU has been in
the team mascot business for a couple of years now. j
He got his start here at ECU as Pee Dee the Pirate from
1996-98j Last year he got his first professional job as
Muddy, the Carolina Mudcats mascot, and he is currently
Tom E. Hawk, the mascot for the Kinston Indians. He has
been a professional since July 4,1997. The only mascot job
that required tryouts was the ECU job.
"I had to do a skit and a reaction to certain game situa-
tions like for an interception Bailey said. "You have to
know where the character's body parts areThe nose
might be where your chin is
Being a mascot is a paying job, but there is a big differ-
ence in the pay, depending on where you mascot.
"Professional mascots get paid. On the collegiate level
you get scholarships- book money Bailey said. "We get to
letter as a mascot
Like any other job, there are pros and cons to being a
mascot
"The good aspects of the job are that I get to meet a lot
of the fans, supporters who finance the program, players
and special guests Bailey said. "The best part of the job
would be the kids. You are a role model to them; I enjoy
Bailey said that wearing
a heavy costume during
the hottest part of the
summer can be tough.
"The physical aspect
can be a drawback. The
costume is real hot and it's
hard to breathe Bailey
said. "It's also a drawback
when there are no body-
guards because kids will
be pulling on the costume
and you can't do anything
about it. But the biggest
fear of the job is heat and
dehydration
Before a game, Bailey
has a few things to do
before becoming Tom E.
Hawk. He gets an ice pack
out of the freezer to cool
him off during his perfor-
mance. He lays out his
costume in order to put it
on. He readies the four
wheeler that he rides onto
the field and makes sure
all the t-shirts to be given away are taped so they can be
flung into the crowd.
He begins his act by waving to the fans. Around the sec-
ond inning he signs autographs. At the end of the fourth
inning he races a child around the bases. During the fifth
ECU student Anthony Bailey has performed for fans as both Pee Dee (left) and Muddy the Mudcat (right).
PHOTO COURTESY OF ANTHONY BAILEY
inning he flings t-shirts into the stands with a slingshot.
Being a mascot is not just performing at games; it also
has other duties.
"I do birthday party visits; I make deliveries sometimes
SEE MASCOT. PAGE 9
I
Oui
Mond
Satur
Weath
Fiti
Final
Tuesc
Hostec
Adi
First
July 2
MV VMH mmm
BAIT ET
jCA�OUHA "
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ast Carolinian
is
i-s being applied
Football and soc- �
ire lighted, and
ire available for
itramural sports
:edom in sched-
, as opposed to
;fore, we have
ins points out.
ames, like 8:00
e can be more
implex will be
9 Wedneaday, July 22, 1998
sports
Tht East Carolinian
Save $3.78:
Value Meal for Two
II ���! tin Stum Okkn(li4)w j
CHINESE FOOD "�����'fcs�i (����� '
,1 Star. Mh or Cm Drop soup). I
Wlnn-D1�tt Markttplan fj'�"�W
310-F E. Artlngton Blvd. 1 FffiVSPIr ,r mY"
OP�N 7 DAYS A WEEK �������
12:00 noon-10:30 PM Coupon for Party
J i Largw Piatts Sesamt akkm(tU) w
2 Sttamtd Kkt, I Soup (dm from
Hot i Sour, mutton, or Egg Drop soup)
2 Uter of Coid Kpsf,(8) Swttt AppU
Cmmommtoa.
PICK-UP OR FREE DELIVERY
321-8300
iHBBBBM
Hove on Escape
BE FIRE-SAFE
Prepare and practice fire escape
plans with your family.
HAVE AN EYE FOR SPORTS?
The ECU Athletic Video Office is seeking to hire student
assistants to film football and basketball events for the
1998-99 academic year. All majors are encouraged to
apply. Internship opportunities are also" available for
communications majors.
If interested, call the Athletic Video Office
at 328-0059 to set up an appointment.
A PREFERRED
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CENTER
Abortions to 20 weeks
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Confidential & Experienced
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Call ToU Free
1-888-562-7415
Mon - Sat 8 am - 8 pm
mt
rushers.
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Student Rec Center Outdoor Pool
Wear your swim suit bring your lawn chairs and blankets!
(Rain Site - REC Indoor Pool)
As Good as itokts
Thursday
July 23
mr
328-64436387
Free admission with valid ECU One Card or valid
SRC membership card. One guest per ID.
Coolers Welcome - NO ALCOHOL ALLOWED!
328-60044715
scot
ui
iludcat (right).
i slingshot.
james; it also
:s sometimes
I
Outdoor Pool Hours
Monday- Friday 10:00am- 6:00pm
Saturday- Sunday 11:00am- 6:00pm
Weather permitting � may be subject to change
itness flH
Final Daze Aerobics House Party
Tuesday, July 28 5:30
Hosted by guest instructor from Research Triangle Park
overtures
First Year Wilderness Camp I
July 26-31 ECU only $225
August 2-9 � Closed For Maintainance
m
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
I For More Information Contact
ss2 Recreational Services At 328-638
Seminoles picked to win
ACC for seventh straight year
BUFORD, Ga. (AP) � The great
chase is about to enter its seventh
season in the Atlantic Coast
Conference.
And while few argue the physi-
cal gap between Florida State and
the rest of the league has narrowed,
the mental war remains an uphill
battle.
"As a coach you tell (your team)
you can't make mistakes and beat
them and then the first mistake
you make it's like, "Oh no
Clemson coach Tommy West said
of Florida State's ACC dominance.
"Maybe that's the worst thing you
can tell your team because the first
mistake you make and they convert
it the air goes out of your sails
"Out of conference I wish them
luck, in the conference I hope
everybody beats them because you
need to do that to have a confer-
ence added Georgia Tech's
George O'Leary. "You want to have
people in the conference competi-
tive with everyone
Maybe next year.
But this year, the six-time ACC
football champions were tabbed
Monday as the unanimous selec-
tion to win the conference yet
again. The Seminoles, who are 47-
1 in ACC play since joining the
league in 1992, received all 66 top
preseason votes cast by media
members at the ACC's annual foot-
ball outing.
"Everybody says (the ACC) is
closing the gap, I don't get into
that O'Leary said of the
Seminoles, who have won at least
10 games an NCAA record 11
straight years. "I've been in a
bunch of big games in the NFL
and college and when you're in big
games it's an attitude.
"It has nothing to do with clos-
ing the (talent) gap, it has to do
with, "Do you really believe you
can beat them?' You can talk and
talk and talk and say you are closing
the gap speed-wise but to be in big
games and know how to play them
you have to play in them
The Seminoles have posted five
8-0 league marks in six seasons
1995's loss at Virginia their only
league blemish. And coach Bobby
Bowden believes this year's team
could be one of his fastest and best
ever.
The other coaches tell me they
want us to win a national champi-
onship, they want us to be the best,
but they want to be there with us
said Bowden, beginning his 23rd
season in Tallahassee, Fla. We
beat North Carolina last year, but I
thought they were the best team
we played. Had we played them
again they might have beat us
The Tar Heels, coming off an
11-1 season, were picked to finish
second, just three points ahead of
Virginia. North Carolina had 13
players from last year's team sign
NFL contracts, but new coach Carl
Torbush said the team still has
enough talent to fill the voids.
The Cavaliers return nine,
starters on defense, but open the
season at Auburn before closing the
slate with games against Florida
State, North Carolina and Virginia
Tech.
"Coach expects us to be a better
team. He also expects people we
play to be better said Virginia
offensive coordinator Sparky
Woods, subbing for George Welsh,
who is still on the mend from
recent back surgery.
"Everybody else is working too
and getting better. I know we have
to start awful good. We also have
only five home games and an ugly
November
Georgia Tech was picked fourth
by the media, followed by
Clemson, Wake Forest, N.C. State,
Duke and Maryland.
Manning hopes to sign before
Colts training camp starts
KNOXVILLE, Tcnn. (AP) �
Peyton Manning said Monday he
doesn't know yet when he will be
playing for the Indianapolis Colts
since there is a chance he won't
reach a deal before training camp
opens Thursday.
"Obviously I would like to
(have a contract by then)
Manning said after announcing an
endorsement deal with
Tennessee's largest bank. "But
there is a chance (there won't be).
No question about it
He said the Colts have made an
offer and he and his agent Tom
Conlon have made a counteroffer.
He wouldn't reveal details.
"Like I said all along, I hope it
gets done. But it is an important
decision and it is one that needs to
be done right the former
Fields
continued from page 8
extremely busy with scheduled
events, it is possible to reserve
fields, as long as the reservations
are made at least two weeks in
advance. In order to keep the
fields in prime condition, there will
be no pets, smoking, alcohol, glass
containers, golf or parking allowed
on the fields. Students should be
University of Tennessee quarter-
back said.
"People don't understand. It is
not a one-year deal. It is a long-
term deal I have waited 22 years
to get to this point
Delays raise the specter of a
holdout and possible repercussions
for a rookie quarterback pegged as
the next starter.
That is something that you just
can't worry about he said. Once
the deal is completed, you go in
there and you pick up where you
left off and work really hard. And I
think I will be ready when the time
comes.
Manning said he has absorbed
as much as the Colts have thrown
at him. Everything they have
taught me I feel like I know it
well
advised that the parking outside
the Belk building is university reg-
istered vehicles only, with others
being ticketed or towed. Parking
for any vehicle is available across
the street, next to the Harrington
baseball stadium.
"We're very proud of the the
new complex said Patrick Daniel,
new intramural sports coordinator.
"It seems to be getting quite a bit
of attention
That attention is most likely
coming from those same people
who would fear for their lives
Mascot
continued from page 8
of flowers or other things to
people's wives or sweet-
hearts; I do promotions,
etc Bailey said.
When asked if he would
like to make a career of
being a mascot. Bailey said
that it would have to wait.
"I'm a North Carolina
Teaching Fellow and have
to fulfill my teaching con-
tract but I wouldn't mind
doing it a couple of years
later Bailey said.
Bailey really enjoys his
job and knows he has done
his job when people are
smiling.
"The main reason is to
make people smile and
laugh Bailey said. "I
know I'm doing my job if
people smile
Being a mascot is all
about making people smile.
What he does know is where
he'll be in the offseason.
Manning said he will live in
Tennessee when he's not playing
football, and he will be a commer-
cial spokesman for First Tennessee
Bank, Tennessee's largest bank.
The New Orleans native said
he will make Tennessee his "prin-
cipal residence" in the off-season.
Specifically, he has a lot picked out
in the planned "Thunder Farms"
development in Ooltewah near
Chattanooga.
Chattanooga businessman John
"Thunder" Thornton is behind
the venture. A big Tennessee
booster, Thornton once paid $1
million to run with the players
through the "T" formed by the
marching band in Neyland
Stadium.
whenever they set foot on the old,
hostile fields, as they are now
breathing a collective sigh of relief.
Linebackers
continued from page 8
Yellock finished fourth among all
linebackers last year, and he may
be used to fill the hole left by a dis-
missed Raymond Massey.
This national ranking has
brought plenty of attention to the
linebacker unit "I think its pretty
safe to say that this area, inside or
outside linebacker, is our deepest
area of the team Sports
Information Director Norm Reilly
said. "The most solid part of our
defense is at linebacker As sum-
mer ends and the season begins,
these claims will surely be tested.
Wrestling
continued from page 8
Tom E. Hawk signs autographs for a fan in Kinston
PM0T0 C0URTEST OF MTHOnAmIET
around 25-26, but there's some still
in high school Massey said. "And
most of us have plans on going pro,
but there are some guys who just
love to do it"
To Massey, the fun is para-
mount the capacity for entertain-
ment is essential, and with little
consideration paid to the perpetual
risks, wrestling is, to many, a way to
rejuvenate andor enact the child-
hood fantasies that combine both
excitement and stress-relieving
physical contact �
I
1
I





10 Wednesday, July 22, 1998
classifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
nice 2 BR2BA duplex in Heritage
Village. $247month 12 utilities.
Grad student or mature individual
preferred. Call Mike at 329-4116 or
353-6799.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 4
bdrm. apartment. Security dep. and
1st months rent already pd. $240.00
per month. Call 1-800-216-7923 ext.
2407.
ROOMMATES NEEDED, $226 in-
cludes utilities, very nice house at
1607 Cedar Lane, across from bus
stop. Call 919557-0445.
ROOMMATE NEEDED AUGUST 1,
share 3 bedroom house 3 blocks
from school. $200 13 utilities.
Contact Greg. 758-1686.
FOR RENT: 2 BEDROOM. 1 bath
apt. on 10th Street in Forest Manor
Apartments. Free watersewer.
$355 per month. Call 758-1921.
FOR RENT: 2 BEDROOM. 1 bath
apt. range, refrigerator, free water
sewer, washerdryer hook-ups. laun-
dry facilities, 5 blocks from campus,
ECU bus service. 758-1921.
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM. 1 bath
apartment, $275.00 per month. Free
watersewer, range, refrigerator,
pets O.K. Call 758-1921.
MEDICAL STUDENT LOOKING
for clean medical, nursing, or gradu-
ate student to share three bedroom
duplex. One mile from hospital. If in-
terested, please call 758-2474.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE
wanted for nice 3 BR duplex. WD.
central air. dishwasher, fenced in
backyard, back deck. Close to cam-
pus and downtown! Ask for Steve
or Beth. 830-6921.
1 BEDROOM, ALL utilities included.
12 block from campus. Declawed
cats only with pet deposit. Off street
parking. $305. 757-9387.
4 BEDROOM. 3 BATH house near
downtown, washerdryer hookups.
$750. Can be subdivided into 3 bed
2 bath 1 bedbath. Call 767-9387.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share large 2 bedroom house 2
blocks from campus. Must be re-
sponsible and animal loving. $200
per month plus utilities. 910-458-
9039 Christie.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR two
bedroom, two bathroom apt
washer and dryer, walking distance
from campus Call Kathleen, 752-
2705.
LOOKING FOR FM roommate to
share two bedroom apartment close
to campus. Rent $202.50 12 utili-
ties. If interested please call 758-
3299.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share four bedroom apartment lo-
cated at Players Club Apartments.
Call 321-7613 for more information.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)496-114
ROOMMATES NEEDED - Two side-
by-side Player's Club apartments
each need a roommate. Washer
dryer, private bath, pool and friendly
fun. Please call 353-2665.
HOUSE FOR RENT. 5 bedroom, 2
bathrooms, large denkitchen with
fireplace, brick patio, on half acre
wooded lot fully fenced in. Pets OK.
2 miles from campus beside Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity house on
Hooker Road. $750 per month. Avail-
able August. Call 321-2030 for ap-
pointment.
HOUSE FOR RENT, 302 Lewis St.
3 BR. LR, DR, kitchen, central AC,
garage, 5 mins. walk from campus.
No pets. $750mo. 919-504-2052,
Iv. msg.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share 2 bedroom apartment,
$187.50mo. plus 12 utilities. Call
Jessica, 757-9640. Needed ASAPI
3 BR. APT. AVAILABLE Aug. 1st
above BW3's. $776.00 a monthl
Please call 758-2616, ask for Yvonne.
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share four bedroom townhouse at
Player's Club. Contact Kelly at
(919)663-3048. Leave name and
number if not available.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $275
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts ,
125 Avery St Greenville. 758-6596
1 FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
ASAP: Player's Club Apts. to share
4 bedroom townhouse. Your own
bedroom and bathroom. $210 plus
14 utilities per month, washer
dryer in apt. On bus route. Available
August 41 Please call 328-7798 for
more information.
HELP WANTED
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$500MONTH. 758-5393
Washers and Dryers
FOR RENT
New, X-Large capacity
stop wasting time & money
at the laundromat
call 236-5097
QUADRIPLEGIC NEEDS physical as-
sistance in AM hours. Bathing, lift-
ing, personal care, domestic chores
and driving. Good experience for the
helping professional. 830-6028.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for substituting and part-time
teacher positions. Harmony Child
care. 756-6229. License Number
1455138.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS Department Fall Adult Soc-
cer Officials' Meeting. The Greenville
Recreation and Parks Department
will be holding an organizational
meeting for all those interested in
officiating in the Fall Adult Soccer
Leagues. Position pays $12-$ 16 a
game. Clinics will be held to train
new and experienced officials. How-
ever, a basic knowledge and under-
standing of the game is necessary.
The meeting will be held Tuesday,
August 11, 1998 at 6:30 PM at Elm
Street Gym. Experience require-
ments, clinic schedule, and game
fees will be discussed. For more in-
formation, please call the Athletic
Office at 329-4550 between the
hours of 2PM-7PM. Monday thru
Friday.
AFTER SCHOOL SITTER NEEDED
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays
only. Pick-up my child at 3:15PM.
Must be energetic, flexible, great
with kidsl Great references, excellent
driving record. Must start August 26.
Call 353-5623 after 7PM any day.
SERVER8 NEEDED DAY OR night.
Apply in person at Charlie Tom's.
466 Grimes Rd. in Washington. 252-
946-8895.
HELP WANTED: RESPONSIBLE
female with dependable transporta-
tion wanted to pick up two children
from school at 2:50 and take to our
home to care for and help with
homework until 6PM beginning Au-
gust 24. Call 758-3111 after 5:30.
PART-TIME JOB POSITIONS avail-
able. Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department
Fall Youth Soccer Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation 8- Parks De-
partment is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the soccer skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-15. in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from
3PM until 7 PM with some night and
weekend coaching. Flexible with
hours according to class schedules.
This program will run from Septem-
ber to mid November. Salary rates
start at $5.15 per hour. For more in-
formation, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after 2PM.
DRESSER WITH LARGE mirror
and matching nightstand, four years
old. must sell ASAP. $100. Please
call Tracey, 756-6818, leave mes-
sage.
FOR SALE: LARGE DORM refrig-
eratorfreezer, almost new, white,
excellent condition, all manuals in-
cluded. $100 OBO. Call 931-0449.
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS POST
Script printer. Laser jet printer. In-
cludes paper tray and manual feed.
$150. Call 353-7109.
OTHER
GOV'T. FORECLOSED HOMES
from pennies on $1. Delinquent tax.
repo's. REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H-3726 for cur-
rent listings.
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000. ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175
Porsches, Cadillacs, Cfievys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
PERSONALS
LADIES: LEND ME your sore ach-
ing muscles. Amateur masseur
needs your back to practice on. Call:
Kyle 1-800-484-8546 (code 2465)
or POB 8663, Greenville 27835.
FOR SALE
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom 8t
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Dapper
f Dan's
Big Summer Sale
10-75 OFF
� TlmbWtonii hoofs
sho4$fG�Kijwws.
DC YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry 4 Coins � Also Blfiken Cold Pieces
Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door 4 ring buzzir.
COMPAQ LAPTOP COMPUTER
100 mhz Pentium with 16 mb ram,
color screen. faxmodem. MS Of-
fice, Aldus Pagemaker, MS Works,
Norton Utilities. Great school or busi-
ness computer, $800. Call 353-
7109.
MISSION STYLE FUTON, like
new $75 or best offer, must go
Call 754-0719.
SERVICES
WORD PROCESSING and desktop
publishing. 24 hour service with
pickup and delivery available. Call
830-5559 for quotes on papers, re-
sumes, cover letters, fliers and more!
RIVERFIELD FARM STABLES
open for boarding 5.5 miles from
ECU. Full board $200 a month. Train-
ing and lessons available. For more
information call 551-3200.
Life on Tuesday
comics
Chris Knotts Wild Thing
N.Miles
S H9t AfUeC- -tHvTmJ-
WEDNESDAY
JULY 29.1998
Boa
elec
Firs
Amerii
Benjamin S.
Salem execut
the chairman
of Governors,
will serve a tw
"This set
, chance to pay
J state has giv
" said. "If tuitic
in North Ca
would not ha
now because
afforded it. "
Ruffin is a
Carolina Cen
has his maste
work from Uf
has earned r
;from three u
"formerly a spe
Jim Hunt. Ir
duties, Ruffin
corporate tab
Black Cat
Legislatures.
"This is ar
history said 1
utive assistan
"In the past,
accused of sh
certain camp
with a smalle
One of Ruffii
treat those cat
Tit
rank
Student
monewii
D I: B ii I K
STAf
�While a recem
dents were
about academi
dents reported
cerns about pe
and time mana
The Offic
Assessment an
ed a telepho
through Apri
undergraduate!
vey examined
students on ci
wide.
Also condui
� were individu
students to de
they were on ir
The top thn
dents nationw
academics and
ECU students
demies,
alcoholdrugs,
their main com
Kris Smith,
vey, said the :
point importani
the east


Title
The East Carolinian, July 22, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 22, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1281
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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