The East Carolinian, May 27, 1998






WIDNE8DAY
eastCarolinian
EASTCABOUHAUIWBBmr
OKENMUiaaNCMIOUMA
Lecturer suspended in light
of account irregularities
$23,400written
Laura Lee Hines
staff writer
A lecturer in the Department of
Theater Arts was suspended
recently in the wake of account
irregularities following a routine
audit of the Theater Arts
Foundation.
Gary Faircloth, a lecturer in
Theatre Arts and theater manager,
was suspended after the audit
turned up irregularities consisting
of checks totaling approximately
$23,400, written over a 15-month
period from October 1996 until
January 1998.
"The funds were
managed by the theater
manager�Mr. Gary
Faircloth said Ben
Irons, university attor-
ney.
The Theatre Arts
Foundation is an inde-
pendent organization
dedicated to supporting
theater arts departmen-
tal operation and auxil-
iaries such as the sum-
mer theater. The foundation
account is subdivided into over a
dozen accounts, some of which
manage scholarship funds, depart-
mental discretionary funds, and
summer theater.
Ban Irons,
University Attorney
FILf PHOTO
Following the internal audit,
remaining funds of the
Theatre Arts Foundation
were transferred to the
East Carolina University
Foundation to assure prop-
er use of the funds.
The ECU Foundation
handles various accounts
for schools within the uni-
versity who have account
for special needs. In the
case of the Theatre Arts
Foundation, that special
need involves assuring
proper use of funds. The ECU
Foundation assures proper use of
funds through a system of checks
and balances in which funds must
SEE SUSPENSION. PAGE 2
Board of Governors names Sheerer
I new School of Education Dean
Interim associate rises
to assume duties
MOHAMED H I'SS E I N
STAFF WRITER
Marilyn A. Sheerer, former interim
associate dean of the School of
Education for two years, has been
named as the school's dean.
Sheerer succeeds Charles Coble,
now a vice president for university-
schools programs at the University
of North Carolina General
Administration.
Sheerer, who came to ECU in
1995 as chair of the
Department of
Elementary and Middle
Grades Education, was
named interim associate
dean in 1996. Her
appointment as dean
was officially approved
on May 15 by the
University of North
Carolina's Board of
Governors.
"Marilyn Sheerer
brings exceptional vision
and leadership skills to
the dean's office said Richard
Ringeisen, vice chancellor of acade-
mic affairs.
As a graduate of Bloomsburg
Marilyn Sheerer
Dean, School of
Education
FILf PM0T0
State College in
Pennsylvania, Sheerer
holds a bachelor's degree.
Sheerer attained a mas-
ter's in educational
administration from
Syracuse University, and a
Ph.D. in curriculum and
supervision from Ohio
State University. She is
the author of a multitude
of academic and profes-
sional journal articles.
Sheerer is also an
active participant in the
School of Education's Bell South
Partnership Grant, which is a
SEE SHEERER PAGE 2
University faculty, alumni receive
distinguished awards for teaching
10 recognized for
outstanding service
TK Jones
STAFF WRITER
Ten university faculty members
were recognized for their outstand-
ing teaching skills during the 1996-
97 academic year.
Awards were distributed in three
divisions: the Alumni Teaching
Excellence Award, the Board of
Governors Distinguished Professor
for Teaching Award and the Board
of Governors Award for Excellence
in Teaching.
Winners of the alumni award arc
Boni Boswell, Frances Eason and
Henry Doskey. The alumni awards
are the oldest campus-wide teach-
ing honors at the university. Six are
recipients of the distinguished pro-
fessor award: Donald Parkerson;
Michael Bassman; Matthew Mahar;
Elizabeth Markowski; Walter
Pories; and Frederick Niswander. A
$1,000 check
accompanies the
alumni and distin-
guished professor
awards.
One award is
given each year
for excellence in
teaching. This
year's recipient is
Richard Marks.
"I knew I had
been nominated
for it and was in
the running, but I
was still surprised
when they called
me and said I had
won said Marks,
a professor of bio-
chcmistry.
Included in his
award is a $7,500
stipend.
Students play a crucial role in
choosing award recipients. Three
letters of reference from students
must append a nominee's portfolio;
also included are summaries of
"None of this happens in
a vacuum. Without the
encouragement of your
dean and your department
chair and students who
are excited about their
profession, none of this
could happen
Elizabeth Markowski
Assistant profBssoi of appsrel. meichandising
and interior design.
Student Opinion of Instruction
Surveys (SOIS).
"None of this
happens in a vacu-
um. Without the
encouragement of
your dean and your
department chair
and students who
are excited about
their profession,
none of this could
happen said
Markowski, an
assistant professor
of apparel, mer-
chandising and
interior design.
Distinguished
professor and
alumni portfolios
are limited to 50
pages in length,
unlike the excel-
lence in teaching portfolio where
the length is not stipulated.
Required in each of the three is a
statement from the professor detail-
SEE AWARD! PACE 2
Cola war comes to campus
Both Pepsi and Coce-Coli are hoping to bo the exclusive drink of ECU. Campus officials say a deal is beneficial to both the soft drink
company and to the university.
PHOTO IT MARC CRIFPf N
Coke, Pepsi vie for pouring rights
Local patrons' Pepsi
ties complicate issue
William LeLiever
staff writer
The Board of Trustees recently
voted to prepare a request for pro-
posal (RFP) to provide exclusive
pouring rights to certain companies.
This RFP is being used to solicit
bids from Coca-Cola USA and
Pepsi USA to see what ECU stands
to gain.
Pouring rights are exclusive
rights for a company to sell its prod-
uct at a certain location, indepen-
dent from its competitor.
According to Layton Getsinger,
associate vice chancellor for admin-
istration and finance and executive
director of busi-
ness services, the
RFP is a com-
mon proposal
that benefits
both parties
involved finan-
cially. This is for
the students,
who spend digit
money on drinks
to help bring the
money back to
the school.
"The poten-
tial exists for
there to be a cash
incentive, an improvement in prod-
uct prices, increase in vending
machine commissions Getsinger
said. "This money might allow for
increase merit scholarships, to meet
some of the athletic needs, and to
support the residence hall associa-
"The potential exists for
there to be a cash incentive,
an improvement in product
fft
prices, increase in vending
machine commissions
Layton Getsinger
Associate vice chancellor for administration
and finance
This will take the pressure of
the tax payers in
helping the uni-
versity in doing
so
These compa-
nies have provid-
ed financial gains
for universities
that have given
such pouring
rights around the
nation in the past
The
University of
Massachusetts
has a contract
with Coca-Cola
worth $5.4 million for five years.
Pepsi is paying Virginia
Commonwealth University $8.5
million over ten years for their
exclusive pouring rights.
The contract the university is
SEE COLA PAGE 2
Graduates receive government internships
8 students chosen from
10 UNC schools
TK Jones
STAFF WRITER
Three ECU graduate students
were selected among eight for
intern positions with the state and
federal governments through the
N.C. Governor's Public
Management Internship program.
The internship is designed to
join eight students with masters
degrees in
public
administra-
tion with
state and fed-
eral agencies.
Of the 10
schools in the
UNC school
system, eight
students are
chosen for
the � intern-
ship. Two
were ECU
students.
" didn 't think I had a chanceof
getting either one of them. There
were about 3,000 people (eligible
to compete for) the PMI and 30
for the governors internship
Edward Birr
positions having
The Presidential Management
Internship is
given by the
Office of
Personnel
Management,
Finalists for
the presiden-
tial internship
can work for
virtually any
federal
agency and
are likely to
be offered
permanent
completed their
SEE IOTEMSMIW, PAGE 1
TODAY
Thunderstorms
high 84
low 65
TOMORROW
Thunderstorms
high 86 .
low 64
Opinion
Should Pepsi or
Coca-Cola take
the cake?
EDNESDAV
Lifestyle
Jackie Brown
and Booty
coma calling
Sports
FflQnline Survey
www.tec.ecu.edu
'Do you prefer Pep�i over Coke?"
Baseball team falls
in CAA Tournament
Answer posted next week
the east Carolinian STUDENT publication BLDG. Greenville, NC 27858 across from Joyner library - newsroom 328-6366 advertising 328-2000 fax 328-6558 website www.tec.ecu.edu
f f





2 WHMtStr, May �, H8I
-�
vty.umw'MWft yw
i nil ,�i-�a i ii'r i i
�VlmmlA
asss
III II
news
.news
brier
Memorial Day
flap-burning rally
divides Senatorial
Candidates
CHICAGO (AP) � To mark
fylemorial Day, several hundred
flag-waving veterans gathered
downtown to protest flag-burning,
including a would-be U.S. senator
whose view clashed with incum-
bent Sen. Carol Moseley-Braun.
Police investigating
body found at
apartment complex
NEW BRITAIN, Conn. (AP) -
Local and sate police were inves-
tigating the death of a 35-year-old
jjian whose body was found out-
Zde an apartment building
Sunday.
Elephant stampede
injures 30 in
Bangladesh Village
CHITTAGONG, Bangladesh
(AP) - Hungry wild elephants
went on a rampage through a
Bangladesh village, injuring 30
people and destroying homes and
crops, a forestry official said
Monday.
Thirteen elephants, apparently
forced out of the forest by a short-
age of fodder, stampeded Sunday
flight in a village near the town of
Khagrachari, 325 miles southeast
of Dhaka, said Muullib, chief con-
servator for the region.
Italians shooting for
world record turn out
6,940
ii
940 pizzas
in 12 hours
FORLI, Italy (AP) - It worked out
to one pizza every six seconds: a
bid by four Italian bakers to set a
new world record that produced
6,940 pies in 12 hours. Italian tele-
vision said Friday night's feat
"ihight even secure Dovilio Nardi,
'Michele Accetta, Nicola and
Franco Grittani a place in the
Guinness Book of World Records,
although the latest edition doesn't
"list a pizza-making speed record.
" The four put on a ahow, joking
and clowning as they transformed
a ton of flour, 300 quarts of water,
1,540 pounds of tomatoes and a
ton of mozzarella cheese into
steaming pizzas from noon to mid-
njght
ECU Med School holds
national teleconference
Ervin nominated to
State Utilities
Commission
RALEIGH (AP) � Morganton
attorney Samuel "Jimmy" Ervin
IV has been nominated to the
state Utilities Commission by
Gov. Jim Hunt Ervin, the son of
4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
Judge Sam Ervin III and grandson
of U.S. Sen. Sam Ervin Jr has per-
formed extensive regulation work
before the commission.
5-year-old kills twin
brother with
pistol found in
father's car
mm
"hENDERSONVILLE (AP) A
5-year-old boy was accidentally
' shot to death by his twin brother
with a pistol found while riding in
their father's car, police said.
Patrick Watkins died at a hospital
after being shot in the head
Thursday.
The boys, their father, Billy
Watkins, and his girlfriend were
driving in Hendersonville when
the shot was fired.
Topicsincluded
Mohamed Hussein
STAFr WHITJH
Technology is sweeping the nation
like a hurricane and ECU's Medical
School is joining in on the fervor.
On May 14 and 15, ECU'S
Medical School held a conference
on telehealth programs at the
Edwin W. Monroe Area Health
Education Center (AHEC)
Conference Center at 2000 Venture
Towers Drive.
Teleconferencing is a system
that links area schools so that they
can communicate over television
screens via satellites. The system
has been in use for years in the
business world, but hi recently
being applied toward the academic
world. The benefit of the system is
that it allows "face to face" interac-
tion, and more personal communi-
cation. Telehealth takes a new
approach to medical education in
that it makes medical education
and diagnosis boundless.
Cola
continued from pag� 1
proposing allows one beverage
company to serve its beverages
exclusive of its competitors. The
companies would have exclusive
control of cafeterias, vending
machines, and sports games.
According to Ben Irons, univer-
sity attorney, when the RFP is fin-
ished it will be sent to the competi-
tors to bid on. The bids will then be
taken and voted orT in the July 17
Board of Trustees meeting. '�
The university has riot made a
decision to enter into any contract
with any soft drink company at this
time said Irons.
Once bids come back the deci-
sion of which company will be cho-
sen may be intensified by the fact
Award
continued from page 1
ing hisher teaching philosophy.
Bassman, a foreign language and
literature professor, said it took him
over two months of working non-
stop on weekends to compile the
material and write his philosophy.
"I've worked very hard at
putting together my course (The
Holocaust) to make it a worthwhile
endeavor for students, and! one of
the things that makes this award
worth it to me is that I must have
really affected the lives of some
them Bassman said.
Sheerer
continued from page I
$200,000 project. Before joining
ECU, Sheerer was a faculty mem-
ber and administrator at Edinboro
University of Pennsylvania and
Northern Illinois University.
"She has the confidences and
respect of the School of Education
faculty. I am looking forward to
working with her, as are all of her
colleagues and die other deans
Ringeisen said.
Suspension
continued from page I
be formally requested, approved by
the dean, reviewed, and die request
. "Telehealth takes a new
approach to addressing regional
health problems by targeting ado-
lescents in schools using telecon-
ferencing and the Internet said
Dr. Susan Gustke, executive direc-
tor of Eastern AHEC.
Health Education experts from
across the nation met to discuss the
program. The conference was
designed to introduce the Eastern
AHEC School-Based Telehealth
Program to other program repre-
sentatives who want to develop
similar programs with rural public
schools. The conference covered
topics ranging from funding to
website design.
Attendees said the conference
created a "how-to" atmosphere as
opposed to a "this is how it is"
approach.
"Rural teens need additional
resources for health education, and
telehealth has been creative in
meeting these needs Gustke said.
Eastern AHEC, the National
AHEC program and Pitt County
Memorial hospital currently spon-
sor the telehealth project. More
information about the program can
be accessed by visiting the website
http:www.TeleHcalthNC.com.
that the Minges family, patrons of
the university for whom Minges
Coliseum is named, owns the local
Pepsi bottler.
Steve Crouch, vice president of
sales and marketing with the Pepsi
Cola Bottling Company in
Greenville, said he was led to
believe the decision had been
made in Pepsi's favor, but, "If they
choose to go to a bid process, we'll
participate
Crouch added that both Pepsi
and Coke have supported ECU in a
very professional and strong way,
. but the decision ultimately lies with
the university.
"1 hope when the board makes
its decision that they look at the
whole picture of what is best for
ECU in the future rather than just
what benefits the university today
said Eric Rivenbark, SGA president
and member of the board of
trustees.
Internship
continued from page 1
internships.
Edward "Ted" Barr of
Washington was a finalist in both
programs. He has recently finished
the levels of interviews for a posi-
tion with the FBI in Washington,
D.C.
"I didn't think I had a
chanceof getting either one of
them Barr said. "There were
about 3,000 people (eligible to
compete for) the PMI and 30 for
the governor's internship
Director of the Sure
Department John Witley told
Carmine Scavo, director of the mas-
ter in public administration (MPA),
that ECU must be doing something
right to have received both intern-
ship awards
v" .Andrew "Aftdy" Brown of.
Rocky Mount also won the
Presidential Management
Internship. Brown is working for
the Department of the Interior in
Forestry in Asheville.
Along with Barr, Melissa Byers
of Somerville, N.J. received the
governors internship. She will work
two-years in Raleigh at the
Department of Insurance with
Managed Care.
"Being given this internship it a
wonderful opportunity and with
die eight of us being the inaugural
group, I hope that we can pave the
way for future interns Byers said.
The governor's internship- was
established by Gov. James B. Hunt
Jr. in April. This is its fust time to
is sent to accounts payable where a
check is then cut
Irons said the investigation
should will take at least three to
four weeks. If Faircloth requests a
statement of reasons and a hearing
t
concerning the account irregulari-
ties, the process will be prolonged.
Faircloth was unavailable for
comment after several attempts to
reach him at his residence.
Th7
BUMMER!
YOU HAVE
TO GO TO
SUMMER
eastcarolinian And student Media
your window to
the world
around you!
MAKE IT
BETTER
AT CHICO'S
LET'S FIESTA!
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
i.nvnvir" T-
BLOODY MARYS
SANGRIAS
12 PRICE PITCHERS
DRAFT BEER
$2.25
$1.75
$.95
LIME MARGARITAS $2.50
MEXICAN IMPORTS $1.75
HI-BALLS $1.99
PINK MARGARITAS $2.75
HEINEKENS $1.75
Mwrtofln Hwta uj1 11 ?t
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
757-1666
THE COOL PLACE TO SPEND
YOUR HOT SUMMER NIGHTS!
NO COVER ALL WEEKEND LONG
FOR 21 AND OVEI
�fll�. II�, I I i.W��.������ ���
LOTS OF OTHI
- i L!
T THE 1 CE
L ON WEDNESDAY
���� ����- � �
THE BEST
ALLWi
UR REQUEST
HEELBOUU
3 Widnitdiy,
How couli
The answi
The comp
and in our
This mt
be roiling
Unfortu
Apparent!
the generc
were so pi
Now, bi
obligated i
Miles's
over Pepsi
chased in
Coca-Cola
Tactics
don't warn
But if tl
of their he
rest assure
ily's pet sc
All we a
quality ed
don us if v
Until th
We don't r
LET
I would like ti
over the firin
Chancellor I
ECUforallcg
leagues with l
per the April I
tenured speet
professor witl
years of servi
think this de
PhD prograrr
from the i
DeMarco has
cially true c
majority of sp
hold PhD's. '
rassment anc
North Carolii
attract more ji
dard of living
ing to be prog
As a speei
payer, I canni
disregard for
Due Process
This is frighte
seems to im
infrastructure
.put professor:
;put before tl
LET
John Davis i
opinion. But
be voiced in
I your publicat
i front page nt
I minded male
' attack, disgu
LET!
If I may, I wo
forum to publii
personal remar
Sheppard in n
Tuesday, May
tion largely a
already written
of apology, but
ments were ma
I feel it is only
gizc to her in p
I won't try t
I wrote; I kn





3 Widnndiy. Miy 27, 1998
opinion
Tin t�it Csrallaiaa
eastlSarolinian
Amy L.Roys it� Mm
Hevi hkr Burgess MingioiEdiw
Amanda Austin Hunltiw Tracy m. lauiach SjoraEiw
Holly Harris Ami NbhEdam Sieve Lossy aw.SjoraMiw
Andy Turner Ulntylt EdiM Carole Mehlk IMCkiMh
John Davis Aswtim Mtstyli Eiitot John murphy Sufflftntiwr
Matt Hece Adnming MkMM
Bobby Tugcle Wtbmwtt
Sm�n M ECU cmwiwi "� S!5. � f�l C��i� MWn 11.000 mm mn lmlnmTtmlttVitilitmmiidiimltlm-
m Hi � EikUMl Boant. n� !�i tmtnm wkmn M to turn. KM � W �" ��� �! !��� ��"��'��!��
Cm&m mm � "9�l � �i� mm Iran l� pNMft � Man �� to � Umn MM li w� Oicnw ii� H� Sm
CwM� siamoi mioim HM ten. Giniiii BWMt e� iii�� 0 taaum
OUNIGW
How could something as seemingly trivial as the cola wars affect ECU's financial status?
: The answer is simple: both Coca-Cola and Pepsi want our business exclusively.
' The companies are vying for exclusive rights to sell their products at our sporting events
and in our dining halls and vending machines.
This means that our beverage choices will soon be limited. But on the good side, we'll
J be rolling in the dough as both companies try to sway ECU's decision with financial gifts.
Unfortunately, Pepsi thinks that a good old-fashioned guilt trip may work better.
' Apparently the Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company of Greenville is owned by none other than
the generous Minges family. The philanthropic donations of Miles Minges, now deceased,
were so plentiful that Minges Coliseum was named after him.
; Now, banking on ECU's loyalty to the Minges family, Pepsi assumes that we will feel
obligated to accept Pepsi's advances over Coke's.
Miles's grandson Tom is distraught over the very idea that ECU may choose Coca-Cola
over Pepsi. He claimed that his father would turn over in his grave if Pepsi couldn't be pur-
" chased in the coliseum. What's next, a heartfelt plea from Max Headroom on behalf of
: Coca-Cola?
Tactics like this aren't fair. They put ECU in a bad position. We need the money, but
don't want to offend the Minges family.
But if the Minges family had given the money as they should have, out of the kindness
: of their hearts and love for education rather than the insured business of Pepsi, they should
rest assured that our loyalty to them will remain constant; it just may not extend to the fam-
ily's pet soda company.
All we at TEC really want is what's good for the campus and its programs. We want a high-
quality education, and we're reasonably sure that's what John Minges wanted, too. So par-
don us if we advocate selling out to the highest bidder. That's what business is all about.
Until the deal is made, however, we'll be content to toss back any fizzy brown beverage.
We don't really care who makes it, as long as it tastes good.
LETTER
to the editor
DeMarco wrongly dismissed
I would like to express my disbelief
over the firing of Sal DeMarco by
Chancellor Richard Eakin from
ECU for allegedly intimidating col-
leagues with threats and ridicule as
per the April 21 Daily Reflector. As a
tenured speechlanguage pathology
professor with a PhD and over 10
years of service at ECU. I would
think this department with a new
PhD program would like to draw
from the expertise that Dr.
DeMarco has to offer. This is espe-
cially true considering that the
majority of speech therapists do not
hold PhD's. This is a true embar-
rassment and setback to eastern
North Carolina, as we attempt to
attract more jobs and a higher stan-
dard of living for some, by proclaim-
ing to be progressive.
� As a speech therapist and tax-
: payer, I cannot believe the blatant
disregard for the decision of the
Due Process Hearing Committee.
This is frightening to me because it
seems to imply that there is an
infrastructure at ECU that does not
put professors first. They must be
;put before the administration for
new thought and discoveries to be
made. If not, this will mimic corpo-
rate America today where there is
very little free thought or speech.
The role of the administration is for
support and is not an entity of its
very own.
Dr. DeMarco has kept up with
what goes on in the field of speech
pathology outside the university. I
know because I have treated some
of the patients that he has and he is
quick to answer my phone calls.
This is untrue for many of the other
speech therapists in this depart-
ment. I suggest that we put every
speech therapist in this department.
I suggest that we put every speech
therapist in this department
through the scrutiny that Dr.
DeMarco has received. I doubt very
many of them would pass the test.
They need to be fired as well.
Dr. DeMarco has fought to keep
this department at least partially
clinically based. For this university
to truly serve this community, this
has to happen. Eastern North
Carolina is very underserved. When
speech deficits are not addressed,
children have difficulties in school
academically and socially. Dr.
DeMarco is aware of this and I have
a feeling that this is one reason he
wants to remain at least partially
clinical. I do not feel that the major-
ity of the speech therapists in this
department are even aware of this.
It takes a special person to be able
to do research and remain clinically
based. Does this sound like a per-
son our community needs to lose?
No.
Dr. DeMarco is also suffering
from Multiple Sclerosis. It is widely
known that stress exacerbates M.S.
I find this department's blatant lack
of understanding of this basic con-
cept to be unexcusable. I would
question these people's ability to
deal with any sort of disability.
I can only hope that this situa-
tion is brought to the attention of
the appropriate people. I will also
place this department in the light
and in my prayers
Missy Cooper
Speech Therapist
LETTER
to the editor
There's a page for opinions
John Davis is allowed to have his
; opinion. But shouldn't that opinion
i be voiced in the opinion section of
! your publication? After all, making
! front page news out of one small-
I minded male chauvinist's personal
attack, disguised as an objective
report of an art exhibition. The
front page is for factual news, not
personal attacks.
Heidi Lusk
Editor's note. Davis' opinion was
clearly labeled as a review of the
exhibit and was not published on
the issue's front page. The review
was published on the front page of
the Lifestyle section, an inside
page of TEC.
LETTER
to the editor
Critic sorry for unprofessionalism
If I may, I would like to use this
forum to publicly apologize for the
personal remarks concerning Kelly
Sheppard in my article printed in
Tuesday, May 5 "Graduate exhibi-
tion largely a success I have
already written her a personal letter
of apology, but as my original state-
ments were made in a public forum,
I feel it is only proper that I apolo-
gize to her in public as well.
I won't try to explain away what
I wrote: I know full well that 1
crossed the line between good cri-
tique and judgment of the artist I
can only say that this was not my
intention, and that I am ashamed at
my lack of discernment. I wouldn't
have accepted such remarks from
any of my writers while I was an
assistant editor, and so I certainly
won't try to justify them in my case.
Although I endeavor to treat all
human beings with love and respect
(and sometimes fail), I do not con-
sider myself a feminist, and I dis-
agree strongly with many of the
popular tenets of feminism and
feminist critical theory.
Once again, I apologize to Kelly
Sheppard; I had no intention of
attacking her or hurting her feel-
ings.
John Davis
Former Assistant Lifestyle
Editor
OPINION
Columnist
Jeff
BERGMAN
Union money should be controlled
want a say in how these
organizations spend their
money .they should respect
my wishes and ask me if they
can spend my money on
campaign donations.
California voters have a choice
when they go to the polls on June
2. Aside from choosing, the
Governor and numerous other leg-
islative offices, the voters can vote
yea or nay on Proposition 266, a
proposal is designed to stop unions
from giving money to campaigns.
This proposition before
California voters will force unions
to, in effect, to stop giving money
to political campaigns. The new
law will require unions to get the
permission of their members
before sending money to cam-
paigns. The supposed reason
behind this law is some people fear
unions do not represent the views
of individual members.
Well guess what? Unions are not
supposed to represent the views of
individual members. The collec-
tive organizations, that unions are,
represent the members as a whole.
The groups lobby for and against
matters that will help their mem-
bers as a group. Unions were not
designed to support or oppose the
political beliefs of their individual
members.
Those opposed to unions will
probably like the new requirement.
I will support this proposition if the
rules are extended to everybody
else.
I have sent money to National
Public Radio, Public Broadcasting
System, Muscular Dystrophy
Association, and quite a few others.
I want a say in how these organiza-
tions spend their money. As long as
I send them a few bucks they
should respect my wishes and ask
me if they can spend my money on
campaign donations.
The National Rifle Association,
the Heritage Foundation, and the
Republican party should be treated
the same as unions. Any money
they receive should not go to cam-
paign-related business unless the
members of the organization agree
on the matter. These organizations,
are not any different than Unions,
They have dues paying members
and use some of their money for
political purposes.
I would also like to see Prop.
266 expanded to corporations. �
own a few stocks. The stockholders
should have a say as to whether sgf
corporation spends money on a lobf
bying. The reason behind this is
the money going to pay lobbyist
should be included into my divi-
dends.
Finally, I am against this propo-
sition, for many of the same reasons
I am opposed to nearly all other,
propositions: politicians with no,
chutzpah. If politicians really had.
political will, they would not send
this matter to the voting public'
Instead the politicians should vote
on the matter themselves.
Politicians do not have enough
time to understand all bills before
them. In fact, many politicians vote
on bills they do not remotely com-
prehend. Yet, these politicians
expect the voting public to make
an educated decision on this mat
ter?
LETTERS
to the editor
Critic treated artist unfairly
I
I am writing in response to John
Davis' art review, "Graduate exhi-
bition largely a success" that ran on
Tuesday, May 5. Art students have
to learn to take constructive criti-
cism in stride � but attacking
Kelly Sheppherd's work on a per-
sonal level is vastly inexcusable and
disturbingly unprofessional. Mr.
Davis states that Sheppard's exhib-
it only serves to . . draw more
attention to the fact that Sheppard
is overweight Davis even thought
it wise to include a comment some
mentally-challenged patron had
scribbled in the guest book about
Kelly needing to lose weight. I feel
that John Davis should reexamine
his article, hopefully with a more
discerning eye for the difference
between constructive criticism and
the unprofessional warblings of an
art rookie. I did notice that some jfi
the accompanying photos taken btSr
Davis had some clarity and cohe
sion of space and composition!
Perhaps The East Carolinian should
just let him be the photo boy.
Christina Stephens
BFA PaintingArt Education
I read the John Davis article on the
School of Art Graduate Exhibit in
the May 5 issue of The East
Carolinian and was angered by his
crude remarks on the body shape of
Kelly Sheppard. He transgressed
the true role of art critic by person-
ally attacking Ms. Sheppard. His
conduct was extremely unprofes-
sional and he slanders The East
Carolinian by his actions.
Amanda Proctor
Art Education
I would like to respond to John
Davis's article in the May 5 issue of
The East Carolinian, entitled
"Graduate exhibition largely a suc-
cess
Implicit in your focus on obesity
is a sexual prejudice, which you
assert as valid for all men: "the
average American man isn't attract-
ed to obesity I would have
thought that the average man,
American or otherwise, is attracted
to another person. Thank you for
correcting me. The average
American man is, then, attracted to
an image � the current one in the
fashion magazines being an extra-
ordinarily skinny, adolescent girl
with broomstick hair, dressed in
lycra exercise clothes, a sort of
"neo-Twiggy" which seems to be
in line with a general nostalgia for
1950s life. Then, perhaps women
would prefer non-average, non-
American men.
Artists like Kelly Sheppard are
making serious attempts to create
works of art The least they can
expect from their reviewers is that
you make an equally serious
attempt to respond with intelli-
gence to what you see. Anything is
less than either conceptually lax or
intellectually self-indulgent An
informed response might not
express all those "existentialist
angst thingies but it would serve
your readers and the works of art
better.
Joyce Joines Newman
MFA Candidate, School of Art
In the article "Graduate exhibition
largely a success John Davis
describes Julie Spivey's work as
"centered around the theme of how
women fit into American culture
"How women fit into" presupposes
that culture exists separately from
woman, and so it seems, in the
mind of Davis, that men are the cul-
ture into which women must "fit"
It seems almost redundant to point
toward the obvious sexist descrip-
tions like elegant, gorgeous, subtle,
lovable, playfulness and compar-
isons to Toy Story in the context of
discussing these women artists'
work and at the same time dis-
cussing Mark Cooley's work in
terms of existential angst. The
depth of though and experience
Davis feels are in pretty much all
the works has been projected onto
the works by him (or more accu-
rately through him by a sexist soci-
ety) and insofar as his values are
shared by others, male and female,

change will not happen. That is a
problem that requires "a bunch of
complaining The terms that
Davis has laid out in his article, that
good feminist art must be done
"subtley with just a bit of tongue-
in-cheek humor" perdetermincs
that the subject, for him, deserves
no seriousness.
Mark Cooley





I
I
I
4 Wednsday,May27. 1998
FOR RENT
ROOM FOR RENT: CLEAN, respon-
sible person needed to share new 3
bedroom house. $225 plus utilities.
2 miles from campus. Upperclass-
man or grad student
preferred. Available July 1st. 752-
2116.
ROOMMATE WANTED: 2 respon-
sible students looking for 1 room-
mate to share nice 3 BR duplex.
Fenced in yard, back deck, WD,
dishwasher, central heat and air.
Great locationl Available now! 830-
6921.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $295
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
125 Avery St Greenville. 758-6596
TRAILER ON PRIVATE LOT behind
home, to responsible individual,
$150. Contact Maggie at 766-0438.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
share 2 bedroom. 1 12 bath
townhouse, $225. 12 phoneutili-
ties, on ECU bus route. Call 756-
7128, leave message. Need ASAP.
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM, 1 bath
apartment, $275 per month. Free
watersewer, range, refrigerator,
pets OK. Call 758-1921.
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus, $250 per month, 15
utilities. Ask for Tim. 931-9165.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 302 Lewis St
3 BR, LR. DR. kitchen, central AC,
garage. 5 min. walk from campus.
No pets. $750mo. 919-504-2052,
leave message.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted to fill 6 bedroom house.
$225 per month. Split food and utili-
ties. Two blocks from campus. Call
919-438-4427.
classifieds
The East Carolinian
ECU AREA, ONE BEDROOM, cen-
tral heat, window air. ceiling fans.
Off-street parking, pets OK. Available
July 1st, $210 monthly. Call 830-
9502 for more info.
DUPLEX FOR RENT 2 blocks from
campus. Inside completely remod-
eled, central heat 6 AC. large back-
yard. One available now. one avail-
able August. Call 551-5025.
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE im-
mediately. Walking distance from
campus and downtown. Large room
(15' x 15) private phone linecable
in room. Washerdryer included.
$175 per month plus utilities. Call
Mike at 752-2879.
DUPLEX FOR RENT: 2 bedrooms.
I bath. 1204 Forbes St. (close to cam-
pus). $300 per month. Pets OK.
($100 deposit). Call 752-3333.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE
two bdrm. townhouse on ECU bus
route. $200 a month 12
phone.utilities. Call 752-3855. leave
message.
ECU AREA, CLEAN, two bedroom.
Quiet neighborhood, central heat,
window air. Off street parking, small
pets OK. Call 830-9502.
WILSON ACRES, SECOND sum-
mer, roommate needed.male or fe-
male. Swimming pool and free ten-
nis lessons. Call Justin. 328-3135.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
share three bedroom. 2 12 bath
townhouse $225. 12 phone and
utilities on ECU bus route. Call 919-
335-4917. Leave message. Needed
July or August 1st.
SEEKING STUDIOUS, CONSID-
ERATE, responsible individual, fe-
malegrad student preferredduplex.
Wyndham Circle on bus route or
short walk to ECU. No pets, non-
smoker. Call JC. 931-9090.
SUMMER ROOMMATE, CUTE
apartment, your own bedroom and
bathroom, washerdryer in apart-
ment, very close to campus. Call
Kathleen 752-2705.
TWO BEDROOM, 2 BATH in
Dockside for rent. If interested,
please call 551-3455.
3 OR 4 BEDROOM HOUSE for
rent. 5 blocks from campus, fenced
in backyard, central heat & AC.
Available August. Call 551-5025.
5 BEDROOM, 2 BATH house for
rent. 12 acre wooded lot com-
pletely fenced in. Central heat & AC.
built in brick patio, next to Pi Kappa
Phi fraternity house. Available Au-
gust. Call 551-6025.
DUPLEX FOR RENT 2 blocks from
campus. Inside completely remod-
eled, central heat �r AC. large back-
yard. One available now. one avail-
able August. Call 551-5025.
ECU AREA, 3 BEDROOMS, 1 bath,
central gas heat and window AC
unit. Washer, dryer included, pets
OK. $550.00 month, yard work in-
cluded. Call 830-9602.
HELP WANTED
DJ'S WANTED: MUST KNOW va-
riety in music; alternative, classic
rock, techno, top 40, strong influ-
ence in dance. Call The Cellar, 752-
4668.
BARMAID FOR LOCAL COUNTRY
pool room and bar. Players Retreat,
call after 3:00 p.m. 758-6856.
NEEDEDI SOMEONE TO do
teleservicing and selling of office
furniture. Must be enthusiastic, posi-
tive and willing to work. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
AIM HIGH AIR FORCE Put your sci-
ence of engineering degree to work
for an aerospace leader. Consider be-
ing an Air Force officer. Excellent
training and benefits. For a free in-
formation package, call 1-800-423-
USAF.
MISTRAL WINDSURFER, 12 foot,
centerboard 3 sails, $350. 355-
6668.
BROTHER WORD PROCESSOR
with monitor. Model WP3500, com-
plete with 3.5 disks and several ink
cartridges. Excellent condition. Also,
new 4.4 cubic ft. refrigerator. Only
3 mo. Call 919-826-5806.
CHRYSLER LEBARON, 1984, 4
cylinder "talking car one owner,
55,000 miles, new parts, needs
some mechanical, a steal at $550.
756-1451.
'89 DODGE RAM 350 work van.
Complete with cage. Good condi-
tion. Asking $3200. Call Chris at
758-5930.
GREEK PERSONALS
THE BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA
Alpha would like to congratulate our
new brothers: Paul Whan, Preston
Godwin, Brian Sclotheis, Nathan
Yang and Roberto Oclardi. Congratu-
lations guysl
OTHER
WANT TO BUY GUITARS, JEW-
ELRY, etc. Call 252-637-6550, 1:00-
5:00 p.m leave message.
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000, ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
FOR SALE
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919) 496-22X4
PAPPASON CHAIR WITH cushion,
$50; super single waterbed with
bookcase headboard, $75; end
table, $5; TV cabinet, $10; wooden
twin bed frame, $20. 353-4244.
Dapper
Dan's
Sale in Progress
Rclrn .ind Vintage C lothing,
I I.hhIih.hI sl it leweln & More.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Security Deposit
with pm�nt�tion st Hill coupon, ofl�r npirea
60198 not v�W wilh �ny oiiwr coupon
-WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: 10t"S Bedrooms.
1 bath, range. refrigerator, free watersewer
washerdryer hookups. Irse basic cable in
some-units, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from
campus. ECU bus services.
-LANG8TON PARK: 2 bedrooms. , bath
ranga, refrigerator, dishwasher, free
waierftewer, and basic cable, approx. 900 si
It washerdryer hookups, ceniral heatair,
blocks from campus.
COMPLETStY RENOVATED UNITS AVAILABLE
All Properties have 24 hr emergency maintenance-
onoQement
HmmritltUHiMN
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Need Timberf.ind boots
and shoes! Good jeans.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
Wo also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 &. SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot liont of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzz.
Student Swap S h o
Very tfticietu - Altwut Frutv
9 iS
Save S3.78 �,?&,�;
lvalue Meal for Two
2 Heavier the Sesame Ctikktn (�34) w
PHIKESE FOOD Steamed tico. 2 Soup (choose fiom Hat
tSaur, Wanton, or In Drop seep), 1
Wlnrt-DMt MirketpUc. jgggggg ! 9E"J
" Saw $5.2;
310-F E. Arlington Blvd. I
GrttnvlUt
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
12:00 noon - 10:30 PH
PICK-UP OR FREE DELIVERY
� -? i -8300
lt6.
Coupon for Party
2 Large Hates Sesame Chkkee(M4) i
2 Steamed nice, 2 Soap (choose float
Hot A Sour. Wanton, or Cog Drop soup)
2 Liter of CoU fepsl,(l) Sweet Apple
Cheese Woaton.

Wyndham Court Apartments
"DOK'T GO HOWE
WITHOUT OWE
�Now leasing for Summer and Fall
� Two bedroom Apts. convenient to
�On II bus route
�Pets OK with deposit.
561-RENT
imrniRECi
Student Summer Membership
May 16 -J
-Aug.
f session
Here's What's Happenin-SummerPass May16Aua
Adventures Fitness
.� fl For students not enrolled in classes
about
YOU
High Adventure Camp I Aerobics Session I
Date June 8-12 Date May 19-June22
Ages 12-17 Registration May 4
Cost130
Lifestyle Enhancement
Power Walking Clinic
Date May 27
Cost Free
Place SRC Rotunda
Strength Training Clinic
Date June 9 5:30pm - 6:30 PM
Cost Free
Place SRC239
Intramural
Tennis Singles Deadline 4-on-4 Volleyball Reg. mtg.
Date May 27 Date June 24:00pm SRC 202
Registration 5:00pm SRC 128 Registration 4:00pm SRC 202
Outdoor Pool
Movie
9:OOpm
June 4
Aerobics Summer Passes
feHl!�Hmmer $25
White: Per Session $15
Purple: 5 Classes 810
GO
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES .
CAIOLIWA
For More Information Contact Recreational Services At 328-6387.
).





The East Carolinian
RSONALS
I OF PI KAPPA
o congratulate our
ul Whan, Preston
iclotheis. Nathan
Oclardi. Congratu-
GUITARS. JEW-
2-637-6550. 1:00-
message.
RANTSI College
ness. Medical bills.
II free 1-800-218-
6.
t FROM $175
:s. Chevys, BMWs.
Jeeps, 4WDs. Your
300-218-9000, ext.
Save $3.78 S50
al for Two
Sosomt Chkktr. (134) �
2 Soup (choot from Hot
i, or lag Drop uupj. 2
tptt, 2 CrHpy Hoodl
Save $5.2
II.UJ
r Party
I Stsomt Chkktn(l34) w
c. 2 Soup (choou from
tonton, or Igg Drop toup)
i ftpl,($) Smoot Apptt
$30
$30
$60
5 Wedneid.y, May 27, 1998
lifestyle
Till Eitt CirolialM
cd;
revews
Parlor James
Old Dreams
8 OUT OF lO
Andy Turner
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Part of the fun of being a jerk-off
critic is labeling bands. Backing
them into a corner like an alley
thug, stripping them of their iden-
tity, we tear them apart like a tom-
cat gnawing on a fish head. It is,
then, with great pleasure, I call
Parlor James the first "twang-trip
honky-hop" band, creating an
album that suggests a world where
Tricky humps Loretta Lynn's leg
to produce wonderfully spooky
country electronica.
Old Dreams is the band's debut
full-length release on Sire Records.
Discovery released the group's six-
song EP, Dreadful Sorry, in 19.
Parlor James features the tag
team of Amy Allison, daughter of
jazzman Mose Allison and front-
woman for the Maudlins and Ryan
Hedgecock.
SEE PARLOR. PAGE I
Tori Amos
Songs From the
Choir Girl Hotel
9 OUT OF 10
Miccah Smith
assistant lifestyle editor
Tori's latest offering, a liquid and
often startling fourth album enti-
tled Songs From the Choir Girl Hotel,
bolsters her already rock-solid rep
as a freaky girl but a wonderful
songwriter.
With its careful blend of tracks
from the tender yet mundane to
the frenzied divine, Songs proves as
unforgettable and inspired as Tori
herself.
Once again, she blows away the
competition. This time she sends
sprawling the likes of Paula Cole
and Meredith Brooks, those cheap
inventions of a music industry sud-
denly obsessed with female song-
writers. As I recall, ladies, Ms.
SEE TORI. PAGE I
Student Union offers God, Booty
and Jackie Brown
Films shown at Rec
Center swimming pool
Andy Turner
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
The summer stupor has begun.
Drunk on heat and watered-down
pitcher beer, you stumble around
the Emerald City looking for any
relief you can, find.
Fear not, dear summer school-
ers, you can find refuge from the
wonderful world of film courtesy of
the Student Union, who present
free movies each Thursday at 9
p.m. at the
Student Rec
Center swim-
ming pool.
You too can
watch mosdy
bad movies
that are
already on
video, but it
really doesn't
matter you
won't
remember
anything
when the
summer's
over anyway.
Here goes:
May 28,
Booty Call:
mm
mJZ b kvalM ak1lCS AfrtSn
am ��tola �WM� OMBOllaMHiMH .jmlHII.MMwmt.mmt'wmtumt. nmTmmi
There's 1 ike
some Seinfeld,
booty and except
B u n z instead of
(Jamie being
Foxx) and about
Rushon nothing,
(Tommy it's about
Davidson) somethin'
call it. some-
"Some thin Get
guys will it? So do
do any- Bunz and
thing for a Rushon.
little Good
somethin' golly,
some- now I have an entendre ache.
thin says June 4, An American Werewolf in
thetagline. Paris: The werewolf got tired of
So, it's London, so now he's in "gay" Paris.
kind of Sexy mamawolf shagger Julie
Jack gets frisky with a pooch in As Good As It Sets.
PHOTO COURTESY OF TRI STAR
Delpy is in
it,
June 11,
Jackie
Brown:
Robert
DeNiro,
Samuel L.
Jackson,
Pam Grier,
Robert
Fors t e r
and
Bridget
Fonda as
the beaver.
Tarantino's follow up to Pulp Fiaiom
is one of the many movies that got
lost in the wake of that movie about
SEE MOVIES PAGE I
review
This giant Iguana bites
We tear Godzilla
a new one
2 OUT OF 10
Mark Brett
senior writer
Every once in a while, a movie
comes along that just hurts. I'll be
sitting there in the theater, munch-
ing my popcorn and sipping my
drink, and slowly but surely I'll feel
the pain. Something, be it bad act-
ing or a poor script or simple filmic
ineptitude, will work its way under
human condition, let's discuss the
action. Godzilla is a movie about a
big freaking lizard tearing up New
York. Knowing that, you can expect
a few things. You can expect build-
ings to collapse. They do. You can
expect lots of things blowing up.
They do.
But you can also expect to see a
lot of people get squashed by all the
big stuff crashing down around
them, and that doesn't happen once
in this film. That's right; there's a
giant monster stomping around
Manhattan, and not one pedestrian,
not one curious reporter, not one
hapless soldier gets stepped on.
The top of the Chrysler Building
tumbles to the street, and we actu-
ally see the entire platoon of army
Don't worry, pal. It's a PG-13 movie. You're perfectly fine.
PHOTO COURTESY OF TRIITAA PICTURES
my skin and I'll start to squirm.
Godzilla is such a film.
I shouldn't have been surprised.
The last movie to pain me as much
as this one was Independence Day,
which was also put together by the
Godzilla team of Dean Devlin and
Roland Emmerich. I thought I was
ready for the hurting. But I was
wrong. Oh, so wrong.
It's not that the movie is actively
bad; the special effects are quite
nice, and there are a few moments
that I was able to enjoy in some
reluctant, tainted manner. It's just
that it's so flat. Stuff that should
have been edge-of-your-seat excit-
ing was just kind of blandly inter-
esting. Stuff that should have been
interesting was simply boring. And
characters that we were supposed to
care about (I guess) never become
appealing enough for anybody to
give a rat's ass.
For a full two and one half hours
I was pinned under Godzilla's
mediocre thumb. Now it's my turn,
and I'm gonna rip that lizard a new
asshole.
First of all, to remove any doubt
that I expected this movie to be a
deep and serious exploration of the
guys standing underneath it leap
out of the way!
What were they thinking?
Godzilla fans want carnage, damn
it! We want to see innocent people
getting turned into puddles by the
big G! Sure, he chomps on a few
pursuit helicopters along the way,
and tries to eat a taxi containing our
heroes, but nobody gets stepped
on! In the name of not scaring the
kiddies (who looked bored during
the whole thing), and in the name
of getting that bloody PG-13 rating
that will allow those kiddies into
the theaters and then out to buy the
toys, everyone who's not safely hid-
den from our sight by a large metal
object scrapes by safely. Most of
them don't even get a scratch.
And I really wanted some of the
people in this movie to hurt While
Devlin and Emmerich leave a real-
ly interesting cast of scientists and
Army command to languish in brief
cutaway scenes, we're forced to
watch the antics of Matthew
Broderick and his ex-girlfriend's
gaggle of reporter pals. These are
supposed to be the normal folks
moviegoers can identify with, but in
reality they and their petty lives are
i
just an annoying distraction from
what's going on with the monster.
Not that the story surrounding
Godzilla himself is all that interest-
ing, cither. Despite the hype,
Godzilla is not a remake of Godzilla.
It's actually a remake of the
American film The Beast From
20,000 Fathoms, with some plot ele-
ments from the Japanese Rodan
thrown in for good measure. So
Godzilla is atomically-created, but
not atomically powered; no nuclear
breath for this monster. He wreaks
havoc in New York, not Tokyo.
And, like Rodan, he's there because
of some monster eggs he has to take
'Ahhhl I'm in a really had movie
PHOTO COURTESY OF TRISTUR PICTURES
care of.
And, in one of the strangest
pieces of plot noodling I've come
across in a long time, he's created
not by American or Japanese
nuclear testing, but in fact by bomb
tests conducted by the French.
That's right, the French, a people
well-known for their warmongering
nuclear arsenal.
Again, I can only wonder what
the filmmakers were thinking here.
The French angle does give them
an excuse to use super-cool French
actor Jean Reno (The Professional),
and he is the one bright spot in the
film, but I still can't figure it.
Since the film lacks even the.
smallest moral recriminations for
Godzilla's creation, I can only
assume they figured that nobody
could get mad at the French. I
mean, they're the French after all.
They've got such wonderful chefs.
How can we hate them for creating
a monster that destroys New York
and whose very existence threatens
all life on Earth? You wouldn't want
to get too heavy.
Which brings me to another big
problem with Godzilla. There is no
message inherent in the film. You'd
SEE GODZIUA. PAGE t





4 Wdnsday,May27.1998
FOR RENT
ROOM FOR RENT: CLEAN, respon-
sible person needed to share new 3
bedroom house. $225 plus utilities.
2 miles from campus. Upperclass-
man or grad student
preferred. Available July 1st. 752-
2116.
ROOMMATE WANTED: 2 respon-
sible students looking for 1 room-
mate to share nice 3 BR duplex.
Fenced in yard, back deck, WD,
dishwasher, central heat and air.
Great location! Available now! 830-
692I.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bed apt $295
mo avail, now. Tanglewood Apts
125 Avery St Greenville. 758-6596
TRAILER ON PRIVATE LOT behind
home, to responsible individual,
$150. Contact Maggie at 756-0438.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath
townhouse. $226. 12 phoneutili-
ties, on ECU bus route. Call 756-
7128, leave message. Need ASAP.
FOR RENT: 1 BEDROOM, 1 bath
apartment, $275 per month. Free
watersewer, range, refrigerator,
pets OK. Call 768-1921.
2 MALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
for Fall to share 3400 sq. ft. home
near campus, $250 per month. 15
utilities. Ask for Tim, 931-9165.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 302 Lewis St
3 BR. LR. DR. kitchen, central AC.
garage. 5 min. walk from campus.
No pets. $750mo. 919-504-2052.
leave message.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted to fill 6 bedroom house.
$225 per month. Split food and utili-
ties. Two blocks from campus. Call
919-438-4427.
classifieds
The East Carolinian
ECU AREA, ONE BEDROOM, cen-
tral heat, window air, ceiling fans.
Off-street parking, pets OK. Available
Jury 1st, $210 monthly. Call 830-
9502 for more info.
DUPLEX FOR RENT 2 blocks from
campus. Inside completely remod-
eled, central heat & AC. large back-
yard. One available now, one avail-
able August. Call 551-5025.
PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE im-
mediately. Walking distance from
campus and downtown. Large room
(15' x 15) private phone linecable
in room. Washerdryer included.
$175 per month plus utilities. Call
Mike at 752-2879.
DUPLEX FOR RENT: 2 bedrooms,
I bath. 1204 Forbes St. (close to cam-
pus). $300 per month. Pets OK.
($100 deposit). Call 752-3333.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE
two bdrm. townhouse on ECU bus
route. $200 a month 12
phone.utilities. Call 752-3855. leave
message.
ECU AREA, CLEAN, two bedroom.
Quiet neighborhood, central heat,
window air. Off street parking, small
pets OK. Call 830-9502.
WILSON ACRES, SECOND sum-
mer, roommate needed,male or fe-
male. Swimming pool and free ten-
nis lessons. Call Justin. 328-3135.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
share three bedroom. 2 12 bath
townhouse $225, 12 phone and
utilities on ECU bus route. Call 919-
335-4917. Leave message. Needed
July or August 1st.
SEEKING STUDIOUS, CONSID-
ERATE, responsible individual, fe-
malegrad student preferred, duplex.
Wyndham Circle on bus route or
short walk to ECU. No pets, non-
smoker. Call JC. 931-9090.
SUMMER ROOMMATE, CUTE
apartment, your own bedroom and
bathroom, washerdryer in apart-
ment, very close to campus. Call
Kathleen 752-2705.
TWO BEDROOM, 2 BATH in
Dockside for rent. If interested,
please call 551-3456.
3 OR 4 BEDROOM HOUSE for
rent. 5 blocks from campus, fenced
in backyard, central heat & AC.
Available August. Call 551-5025.
S BEDROOM, 2 BATH house for
rent. 12 acre wooded lot com-
pletely fenced in. Central heat & AC,
built in brick patio, next to Pi Kappa
Phi fraternity house. Available Au-
gust. Call 551-5025.
DUPLEX FOR RENT 2 blocks from
campus. Inside completely remod-
eled, central heat & AC, large back-
yard. One available now, one avail-
able August. Call 551-5025.
ECU AREA, 3 BEDROOMS, 1 bath,
central gas heat and window AC
unit. Washer, dryer included, pets
OK. $550.00 month, yard work in-
cluded. Call 830-9502.
HELP WANTED
DJ'S WANTED: MUST KNOW va-
riety in music; alternative, classic
rock, techno, top 40, strong influ-
ence in dance. Call The Cellar. 752-
4668.
BARMAID FOR LOCAL COUNTRY
pool room and bar. Players Retreat,
call after 3:00 p.m. 758-6856.
NEEDED! SOMEONE TO do
teleservicing and selling of office
furniture. Must be enthusiastic, posi-
tive and willing to work. Call 931-
6904 and leave a message.
AIM HIGH AIR FORCE Put your sci-
ence of engineering degree to work
for an aerospace leader. Consider be-
ing an Air Force officer. Excellent
training and benefits. For a free in-
formation package, call 1-800-423-
USAF.
MISTRAL WINDSURFER, 12 foot,
centerboard 3 sails, $350. 355-
6668.
BROTHER WORD PROCESSOR
with monitor. Model WP3500, com-
plete with 3.5 disks and several ink
cartridges. Excellent condition. Also,
new 4.4 cubic ft. refrigerator. Only
3 mo. Call 919-826-5806.
CHRYSLER LEBARON, 1984, 4
cylinder "talking car one owner,
55,000 miles, new parts, needs
some mechanical, a steal at $550.
756-1451.
'89 DODGE RAM 350 work van.
Complete with cage. Good condi-
tion. Asking $3200. Call Chris at
758-5930.
GREEK PERSONALS
THE BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA
Alpha would like to congratulate our
new brothers: Paul Whan, Preston
Godwin, Brian Sclotheis, Nathan
Yang and Roberto Oclardi. Congratu-
lations guys!
OTHER
WANT TO BUY GUITARS, JEW-
ELRY, etc. Call 252-637-6550. 1:00-
5:00 p.m leave message.
FREE CASH GRANTSI College
scholarships. Business. Medical bills.
Never repay. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000. ext. G-3726.
SEIZED CARS FROM $175
Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys. BMWs,
Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4WDs. Your
area. Toll free 1-800-218-9000, ext.
A-3726.
FOR SALE
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919) 496-2224
PAPPASON CHAIR WITH cushion.
$50; super single waterbed with
bookcase headboard, $75; end
table, $5; TV cabinet, $10; wooden
twin bed frame, $20. 353-4244.
Dapper
Dan's
Sale in Progress
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
$100 OFF
icurlty Q�
Secur
eposit
wHh praMnUflMltf this coupon. oiler ixpires
63196 not v�Hd with My other coupon
WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: 1OT t Bedrooms,
1 bath, range, refrigerator, free watersewer,
washerdryer hookups, free basic cable in
some units, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from
campus. ECU bus services.
-LANGST0N PARK: 2 &Ofoom$, bath
rangs, refrigerator, dishwasher, free
watersewer, and baste cable, appro 900 so
ft wtBherdrysr hookups, central heatafr. 6
blocks from campus.
COMPLETELY HENOVATED UNITS AVAILABLE.
All Properties nave 24 hr. emergency maintenance-
onocjemeni
Aoaw�i 6 �. HM�
r DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$i a O TT ff1 We Need Timberland boots
L A 5 n u) and eiioes! Good Jeans.
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
VJv also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking k. it: ont of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door k ring buzzer.
Stud i n t S w a p S h o f
PMIHFF FOOD stromed Pice, 2 Soup (choose from Hot
Wlincjc '�� � Sour, Woaton. or go Orop soup). 2
Winn-Dixie Marketplace jttof gggg!
Save $5.2!
Save $3.78 itSi
lvalue Meal for Two
I? Regular sire Sesame CJikkea (134) �
310-F . Arlington Blvd.
Greenville
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
S5�:
12:00 noon - 10:30 PM
PICK-UP OR FREE DELIVERY
i
i
! Coupon for Party
1 l Large hates Sesame Oikkea(l34) �
2 Steamed Rice 2 Soup (choose from
Hot t Sour. Wonton, or �aa Drop soup)
2 liter of CM repsl.(t) Sweet Apple
Cheese Wanton.
�rn-n -tt j
Wyndham Court Apartments
"DON'T GO HOWE
WITHOUT OWE
� Now leasing for Summer and I .ill
�Two bedroom Apts. convenient to campus
�On ECU Inis route
�Pets OK with deposit.
561-RENT
PlMISIfSIMI
Here's What's Happenin
Adventures Fitness
iiatthREC!
Student Summer membership
Session I
Session II
May 16-June24 $30
June 25-Aug.15 $30
Summer Pass May 16 - Aug
�vjlltir students not (���rolled in classes
about
YOU
Outdoor Pool
Movie
9:OOpm
tdoor Pool
ay 28l
June 4
High Adventure Camp I Aerobics Session I
Date June 8-12 Date May 19-June22
Ages 12-17 Registration May 4
Cost $130
Lifestyle Enhancement
Power Walking Clinic
Date May 27
Cost Free
Place SRC Rotunda
Strength Training Clinic
Date June 9 5:30pm - 6:30 PM
Cost Free
Place SRC239
Intramural
Tennis Singles Deadline 4-on-4 Volleyball Reg. mtg.
Date May 27 Date June 24:00pm SRC 202
Registration 5:00pm SRC 128 Registration 4:00pm SRC 202
Fry RECREATIONAL
J SERVICES
I A i T
CABOLINA
For More Information Contact Recreational Services At 328-6387.
Aerobics Summer Passes
Gold: lHil-J�!4mmer $25
White: Per Session $15
Purple: 5 Classes $10
I
I IKnowWIi Sun One I






The East Carolinian
RSONALS
i OF PI KAPPA
3 congratulate our
j Whan. Preston
clotheis, Nathan
Oclardi. Congratu-
GUITARS, JEW-
2-637-6550. 1:00-
nessage.
tANTSI College
less. Medical bills,
free 1-800-218-
i.
FROM $175.
s. Chevys. BMWs,
eeps, 4WDs. Your
100-218-9000. ext.
iave J3.78lj
il for Two
maun CHdrtn (13) �
' Snip (choost from Hot
or Egg Drop soup), 2
pi I. I Crispy Hindi
Save $5.2
sum:
r Party
Stsomt Cnkktn(IH) �
t 2 Soup (choes from
Mtoit, or Iff Drop soup)
rtpsl.(t) Sma Appit
$30
$30
$60
5 Wednesday, May 27. 1898
reviews
� ����� �� I � ��������� a lir a a at a ��� a a 11 � �
lifestyle
Thi East Carolinian
Parlor James
Old Dreams
8 OUT OF lO
Andy Turner
lifestyle editor
Part of the fun of being a jerk-off
critic is labeling bands. Backing
them into a corner like an alley
thug, stripping them of their iden-
tity, we tear them apart like a tom-
cat gnawing on a fish head. It is,
then, with great pleasure, I call
Parlor James the first "twang-trip
honky-hop" band, creating an
album that suggests a world where
Tricky humps Lorctta Lynn's leg
to produce wonderfully spooky
country electronica.
Old Dreams is the band's debut
full-length release on Sire Records.
Discovery released the group's six-
song EP, Dreadful Sorry, in 19.
Parlor James features the tag
team of Amy Allison, daughter of
jazzman Mose Allison and front-
woman for the Maudlins and Ryan
Hedgecock.
SEE PARLOR. PAGE I
Tori Amos
Songs From the
Choir Girl Hotel
9 OUT OF 10
Miccah Smith
assistant lifestyle editor
Tori's latest offering, a liquid and
often startling fourth album enti-
tled Songs From the Choir Girl Hotel,
bolsters her already rock-solid rep
as a freaky girl but a wonderful
songwriter.
With its careful blend of tracks
from the tender yet mundane to
the frenzied divine, Songs proves as
unforgettable and inspired as Tori
herself.
Once again, she blows away the
competition. This time she sends
sprawling the likes of Paula Cole
and Meredith Brooks, those cheap
inventions of a music industry sud-
denly obsessed with female song-
writers. As I recall, ladies, Ms.
SEE TORI. PAGE I
Student Union offers God, Booty
and Jackie Brown
Films shown at Rec
Centerswimmingpool
Andy Turner
lifestyle editor
The summer stupor has begun.
Drunk on heat and watered-down
pitcher beer, you stumble around
the Emerald City looking for any
relief you can find.
Fear not, dear summer school-
ers, you can find refuge from the
wonderful world of film courtesy of
the Student Union, who present
free movies each Thursday at 9
p.m. at the
Student Rec
Center swim-
ming pool.
You too can
watch mostly
bad movies
that are
already on
video, but it
really doesn't
matter: you
won't
remember
anything
when the
summer's
over anyway.
Here goes:
May 28,
Booty Call:
There'slikeDelpy is in
someSeinfeld,it.
booty andexceptJune 11,
B u n zinstead ofJackie
(JamiebeingBrown:
Foxx) andaboutRobert
R u s h o nnothing,R bbbbbI BaalDcNiro,
(To m m yit's aboutSamuel L.
Davidson)somethin'Jackson,
call it.some-Pam Gricr,
"Somethin GetRobert
guys willit? So doForster
do any-Bunz andand
thing for aRushon.Jack gets frisky with a pooch in As Good As It Gets.Bridget
littleGoodPHOTO COURTESY OF TRI STARFonda as
somethin'golly,the beaver.
some-now I have an entendre ache. Tarantino's follow upto Pulp Fiction
thin saysJune 4, An American Werewolf in is one of the many movies that got
the tagline.Paris: The werewolf got tired of lost in the wake of that movie about
So, it'sLondon, so now he's in "gay" Paris.
kind ofSexy mamawolf shagger Julie SEE MOVIE! .PAGE 1
review
This giant Iguana bites
We tear Godzilla
a new one
2 OUT OF 10
Mark Brett
senior writer
Every once in a while, a movie
comes along that just hurts. I'll be
sitting there in the theater, munch-
ing my popcorn and sipping my
drink, and slowly but surely I'll feel
the pain. Something, be it bad act-
ing or a poor script or simple filmic
ineptitude, will work its way under
human condition, let's discuss the
action. Godzilla is a movie about a
big freaking lizard tearing up New
York. Knowing that, you can expect
a few things. You can expect build-
ings to collapse. They do. You can
expect lots of things blowing up.
They do.
But you can also expect to see a
lot of people get squashed by all the
big stuff crashing down around
them, and that doesn't happen once
in this film. That's right; there's a
giant monster stomping around
Manhattan, and not one pedestrian,
not one curious reporter, not one
hapless soldier gets stepped on.
The top of the Chrysler Building
tumbles to the street, and we actu-
ally see the entire platoon of army
Don't worry, pal. It's a PG 13 movie. You're perfectly fins.
PHOTO COURTESY OF TRISTAR PICTURES
my skin and I'll start to squirm.
Godzilla is such a film.
I shouldn't have been surprised.
The last movie to pain me as much
as this one was Independence Day,
which was also put together by the
Godzilla team of Dean Devlin and
Roland Emmerich. I thought I was
ready for the hurting. But I was
wrong. Oh, so wrong.
It's not that the movie is actively
bad; the special effects are quite
nice, and there are a few moments
that I was able to enjoy in some
reluctant, tainted manner. It's just
that it's so flat Stuff that should
have been edge-of-your-seat excit-
ing was just kind of blandly inter-
esting. Stuff that should have been
interesting was simply boring. And
characters that we were supposed to
care about (I guess) never become
appealing enough for anybody to
give a rat's ass.
For a full two and one half hours
I was pinned under Godzilla's
mediocre thumb. Now it's my turn,
and I'm gonna rip that lizard a new
asshole.
First of all, to remove any doubt
that I expected this movie to be a
deep and serious exploration of the
guys standing underneath it leap
out of the way!
What were they thinking?
Godzilla fans want carnage, damn
it! We want to see innocent people
getting turned into puddles by the
big G! Sure, he chomps on a few
pursuit helicopters along the way,
and tries to cat a taxi containing our
heroes, but nobody gets stepped
on! In the name of not scaring the
kiddies (who looked bored during
the whole thing), and in the name
of getting that bloody PG-13 rating
that will allow those kiddies into
the theaters and then out to buy the
toys, everyone who's not safely hid-
den from our sight by a large metal
object scrapes by safely. Most of
them don't even get a scratch.
And I really wanted some of the
people in this movie to hurt. While
Devlin and Emmerich leave a real-
ly interesting cast of scientists and
Army command to languish in brief
cutaway scenes, we're forced to
watch the antics of Matthew
Broderick and his ex-girlfriend's
gaggle of reporter pals. These are
supposed to be the normal folks
moviegoers can identify with, but in
reality they and their petty lives are
I
just an annoying distraction from
what's going on with the monster.
Not that the story surrounding
Godzilla himself is all that interest-
ing, either. Despite the hype,
Godzilla is not a remake of Godzilla.
It's actually a remake of the
American film The Beast From
20,000 Fathoms, with some plot ele-
ments from the Japanese Rodan
thrown in for good measure. So
Godzilla is atomically-created, but
not atomically powered; no nuclear
breath for this monster. He wreaks
havoc in New York, not Tokyo.
And, like Rodan, he's there because
of some monster eggs he has to take
"Ahhht I'm in a realty bad movie
PHOTO COURtlSY OF TRISTAR PICTURES
care of.
And, in one of the strangest
pieces of plot noodling I've come
across in a long time, he's created
not by American or Japanese
nuclear testing, but in fact by bomb
tests conducted by the French.
That's right, the French, a people
well-known for their warmongering
nuclear arsenal.
Again, I can only wonder what
the filmmakers were thinking here.
The French angle does give them
an excuse to use super-cool French
actor Jean Reno The Professional),
and he is the one bright spot in the
film, but I still can't figure it.
Since the film lacks even the
smallest moral recriminations tor
Godzilla's creation, I can only
assume they figured that nobody
could get mad at the French. I
mean, they're the French after all.
They've got such wonderful chefs.
How can we hate them for creating
a monster that destroys New York
and whose very existence threatens
all life on Earth? You wouldn't want
to get too heavy.
Which brings me to another big
problem with Godzilla. There is no
message inherent in the film. You'd
SEE eODZIUA. PAGE I





JMfeMfey. May 27.1998
lifestyle
Thi Eaat Carolinian
the honey rods
May
27 Wednesday
Bessie Mae's Dream, Ape Foot
Grove at Local 506 in Chapel Hill
28 Thursday
Booty Call at the Student Rec
Center swimming pool at 9 p.m.
Fighting
Gravity, Honeyrods at
the Attic
Barry Richman Band at the Ritz
in Raleigh
The Aqualads, Countdown
Quartet, The Blueberries at Local
506 in Chapel Hill
My Pal Trigger, Pest at the
Lizard & Snake in Chapel Hill
Collapsis, Running From Anna
at Cat's Cradle in Carrboro
29 Friday
Patriot at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
The
Jumpsuits,
the Usuals
at Cat's
Cradle in
Carrboro
3 0
Saturday
Asleep
at the
Wheel, Big
House, Faith Hill, George Strait,
John Michael Montgomery, Lee
Ann
The Honeyrods and Fighting Gravity perform Thursday night at The Attic.
PHOTO COURTESY OF HONEYDOGS
Womack, Lila McCann, Tim
McGraw at Carter-Finley Stadium
in Raleigh
Skeeter Brandon, Hwy. 61 at
Berkeley Cafe in Raleigh
Zen Frisbee, Evil Weincr, Crash
H.R.
Cradle in Carrboro
Cadillac at Local 506
in Chapel Hill
Crash Cadillac,
Festus at The Lizard
& Snake in Chapel
HiU
Fighting Gravity at
Pea body's in Virginia
Beach
31 Sunday
Ben Folds Five,
Collapsis, Hobex,
Marcy Playground at
Walnut Creek
Ampitheatre in
Raleigh
Treadmill Trackstar
at G 105 Big Shindig in
Raleigh
Method 51 at Abyss
in Virginia Beach
June
2 Tuesday
Alphonso Johnson,
Billy Cobham, Jazz is
Dead, T La Vitz at
Rogues in Virginia
Beach
Enemy Squad at Cat's
Parlor
continued from page 5
Allison's voice is a very severe,
very nasal (but good) twang that
makes Old Dreams all the more
engaging. Her voice is at its best on
songs like "Don't Go Downtown"
and "This Misery where she
pines for her sweetheart, "Tell him
that I miss him and send my best
wishesTell him that I'm sorry but
I've broken all the dishes A bro-
ken heart and broken china kicks
your ass every time.
Hedgecock gets the spotlight on
"The Pain I'm In a haunting
lament that Hedgecock gets right
with desperate, tearful vocals that
convey the confusion the song
expresses: "Sweet the hour was,
when I heard him saycome and
take my hand, but he just fades
awayI find myself alone in my
darkest hourMy soul's in need of
faith and God's the only power
"House of Flesh and Bone" is
good and eerie with lyrics like "The
night dropped in, the unwelcome
guestIt was in that tree that I
prayed for death
Both Allison and Hedgecock are
fine songwriters, but the band
offers interesting takes on other
people's songs as well. The album
begins with the Tom Petty-penned
"Turning Point which Parlor
James rave and funk up with inter-
esting results. Even more interest-
ing is the group's take on the tradi-
tional ballad "Clementine" that
manages to get across the horrible
death that the song tells the story
of.
Old Dreams explores the incredi-
ble possibilities of music. It's excit-
ing, moving, charmingly quirky
music that deserves to be checked
out.
Movies
continued from page 5
the big boat with that kid from
Growing Pains.
June 8,The Man Who Knew Too
Little. Bill Murray plays a dumb ass.
Inlv Tnmnrrnw Never Dies:
Pierce Brosnan is a dumb ass.
July 9, Good Will Hunting. Matt
Damon made this movie, had sex
with Minnie Driver and then he
dumped her. The end.
July 16, Playing God: Timothy
Hutton and David Duchovny learn
a lesson about life in this medical
crime thriller. You learn that
Timothy Hutton is not as good
looking as Gillian Anderson and
wait for the X-Files movie.
July 23, Ar Good As It Gets: Jack
took time off from his job as a Laker
fan to make this movie and win an
Oscar. He's a mean bastard until he
falls in love with Helen Hunt,
whose hobbies include getting
naked in front of gay men.
July 30, For Rider or Poonr:Tim
Allen and Kirstie Alley arc zany
fugitives who run away to Amish
country. Just shoot me now.
Godzilla
continued from page 5
Emmerich want badly to be Steven
Spielberg. They try to follow his
techniques to the letter, right down
Tori
continued from page 5
Amos was there first.
The album opens forcefully
enough; "Spark the epic first
track, runs on the bitter fuel of
doubt from its restrained opening
through the symphonic chorus.
Hints of personal pain, such as the
loss of her unborn child, spike the
song with real grief.
"Cruel" follows with a unique
and mysterious drumbeat. The
melody is a bit more commonplace
than usual for Tori, but this track
accentuates her breathing, making
the presentation far more personal
than the prepackaged tunes of
other artists.
What is there to say about
"Black-Dove?" The trickling piano
of songs from bygone albums
("Bells for Her "Icicle
"Horses") rebirths itself here in this
mossy confection, leading into a
bridge that echoes the best tracks
from Little Earthquakes. This track
begs for the repeat button.
One of the album's best surpris-
es is "Raspberry Swirl in which
she achieves a blend of pounding
piano, drums and techno gadgetry
that makes this a truly fresh and
diggable track. Her ingenuity and
artistry are apdy demonstrated with
this one, which may draw the ears
of some fans other than the patouli-
drenched, long-skirted, cat-loving
women who make up her core audi-
ence.
"Jackie's Strength" opens with a
pseudo-sensitive Richard Marx
sound, but quickly evolves into a
chilly, violin-laced Century-21 ad
for a house that's been haunted for
a long time, gardens and all. There
are skeletons in all of these closets,
and Tori flings the doors wide with
her peculiar brand of sardonic
amusement.
"She's Your Cocaine" is another
full-band undertaking, with heavy
drums, distorted guitars and the
like. Pleasant interludes of piano
and voice are pumped directly from
Tori's heart and mind, but the PJ
Harvey-inspired barrage of plead-
ings, gaspings and chokings nearly
to death at the end are strictly from
the gut. "Cut it again she says.
But I'm glad she didn't.
The heavy and amorphous
"Hotel drenched in electronica
and stumbling in slowfast-motion
toward a quiet resolution, is never
boring. "Give me more Tori
implores over a thick infusion of
synthetic sound layers. Drum-and-
bass rhythms grudgingly trade
places with old Depeche Mode-
style keyboard melodies that some-
how recall David Bowie's Low
album. The track winds down to a
bare organ solo which sounds stuffy
and British but still lends it a partic-
ular charm.
The boring "Playboy Mommy"
has neither hook nor lyrical beauty
to give it appeal, and the album
closes with Pandora's Aquarium,
which is just, er, weird. So, the
album comes in like a lion and goes
out like a lamb. Tori's still got more
talent in her little finger than all the
tepid Lilith Fair chicks put togeth-
er.
Buy this album. Buy it 'cause
you love Tori. Heck, buy it for the
cover art. The stunning full-length
photos of Tori, pencil in hand and
impish smirk on lips, will make
your hair stand on end. Not to men-
tion the music.
figure, with a nuclear-mutated
monster running amok, they might
have given up a few seconds of its
bloated running time for somebody
to say something about the mad-
ness of war. Or, if that's too cliche
for you, maybe they could make
some kind of point about animal
rights, or pollution or something.
But no. It's just a big splashy sum-
mer action film with shallow char-
acters, no plot and no ambitions
beyond being a thrill ride.
Now, there's not necessarily
anything wrong with that. The
Indiana Jones films are little more
than thrill rides, and I love those.
But Godzilla fails at even giving its
audience the basic action-oriented
thrills it claims to offer. Devlin and
Why can't Matthew Broderick be under those big feet?
PHOTO COUBTESY OF THISTAR PICTURES
to those "awe and wonder" shots of
our heroes staring open-mouthed at
whatever the special effects team
has cooked up for us this time.
But they lack Speilberg's
panache, his style, his talent and his
genuine love for thti craft of movie-
making. Even in his worst efforts,
the audience can tell
that he had a blast
making the film. With
Devlin and
Emmerich, you get
the feeling that
they're just going
through the paces.
There's no fire there,
and so their films fall
short. In the end, they
just don't get it. And
that's sad. It's sad for
them, it's sad for me
and now, it's sad for
Godzilla.
But hang in there.
Big Guy. Maybe they'll get some-
body good to do the sequel. I hear
Tim Burton's looking for a project,
and he could even make Mothra
look good
Check out
our new web address
WWW.TEC.ECU,EPU
Hove on Escape
BE FIRE-SAFE
Prepare and practice fire escape
plans with your family.
Unrted States Fire Adrrantsrrcrrion
Federal Emergency Monogement Agency
lrttKwww.�sfi.feaaa.ov
BBS
w
Est.
2800 E. 10th St.
Eaatgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon- Frl. 9-6
Walk-Ins Anytime
7S2-3318
EL TORO
Exclusive Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
968 - Specializes in AmericanEuropean cuts
SayPi�t& OBMESEEEJAk
Get Hair Cut
for $7 Every time.
Regular $10
$7.00
Haircut
Full line Professional Hair Care Products
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
The) Conk Book Stan
tl90kUMMi
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)751-6909
�TO DC Co. C It.
A PREFERRED
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CENTER
Abortions to 20 weeks
Licensed & NAF Certified
Private Doctor's Office
Spwl.il Reduced Riite Pkim
Anesthesia Available
Nitrous Oxide & vallum
One visit procedures
Same Day Appointments
All Major Credit cards
Insurance Filed
ConfMentkil ft Experienced
Caring Professional
Call Toll Free
18885627415
Mon - Sat 8 am - 8 pm
Kingston Place
Condominiums
2BR, 2 BATHS, washerdryer connections,
private balconies, all appliances, water,
basic cable included.
Kingston CandiBB
Newly Remodeled - Available August 1st
2 BR Condos, 2 12 Baths, Large Kitchens
and Large Living Rooms
11141088 square feet.
Free WaterSewerBask Cable
Pool - Clubhouse, Bus Service
& Much More
If you say you saw us in the East Carolinian you will receive a
$100 security deposit discount Call Ken at:
KINGSTON RENTALS CO. 758-7575
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
" ' I sI
Welcome Summer Students!
Mass Schedule:
� Sun: 11:30am and 8:30pm
�Wed: 5:30pm
� All Masses are at the Center
We look forward to seeing you!
k
7 Wad
B
r
C
Team
29-21
CM
TR
ASSISTS
The baseba
their season
Colonial A
Tournament
The Pii
tournament
seeded Old I
After seven
team held
continuing tl
third basema
especially
prospects of i
"We h
expectations
playing a lot I
of the year
Strug
year, riowar
increased by
last games of
total was at
1st
FirstECl
infasti
TRAVI
SPOI
ECU juniot
Isonettc Pol
named a 199S
second team
Polonius b
first ever Ail-
since ECU
fastpitch softb
Polonius li
Conference ii
home runs, R
She was select
Most Valuable
the league's Sc
Year.
Polonius fi
with a 25-gam
.476 batting a'
in the nation.
RBI totals also
Head Coac
that Polonius i:
to the Pirate sc
"At this pi
everything wc
said. "She's i
great athlete ai
Polonius wa
honors by Ariz
Mascarcnas.
players on the
the top ranked
Kee said tl
freshman beat
the first sp
tremendous 1
give ECU
recognition.
"She was
SEE POU
Tenr
Moore sa
bebe
TRAC
ASSISTANT
After directing i
for almost 10 )
sports psychol
member, Bill N
position with
He has
administrative
University, his i
school of busin
' Before joinii
Moore was an
Virginia from 1'






Tht Ent Carolinian
iliac at Local 506
hapel Hill
Irash Cadillac,
us at The Lizard
make in Chapel
ighting Gravity at
Kxiy's in Virginia
h
1 Sunday
en Folds Five,
ipsis, Hobex,
y Playground at
ut Creek
�theatre in
gh
eadmill Trackstar
105 Big Shindig in
gh
cthod 51 at Abyss
ginia Beach
June
ruesday
phonso Johnson,
Cobham, Jazz is
, T La Vitz at
:s in Virginia
Squad at Cat's
dAs It Gets Jack
his job as a Laker
lovie and win an
i bastard until he
h Helen Hunt,
include getting
ay men.
ierorPoorrr:Tm
Alley arc zany
away to Amish
me now.
lis talent and his
i craft of movie-
lis worst efforts,
idience can tell
te had a blast
g the film. With
1 and
srich, you get
feeling that
e just going
;h the paces.
's no fire there,
i their films fall
In the end, they
n't get it. And
sad. It's sad for
it's sad for me
w, it's sad for
la.
hang in there,
ey'll get some-
e sequel. I hear
lg for a project,
i make Mothra
EDU

FAVORITE I0RE!
EWSSTAMD juhL � �M JYOTc K 27834 -6909
7 Wednesday, May 27, 1998
sports
��.�mwMii�y wbi y 'wnwBaji" i ,yi. i ymffgggBF'
i � iV
hiUL
Baseball season ends with disapp
Team finishes with
29-21 record after
CAA tournament
Tracy Hairr
ASSISTANT SPOUTS EDITOR
The baseball team wrapped up
their season by competing in the
Colonial Athletic Association
Tournament May 12.
The Pirates entered the
tournament against the fifth-
seeded Old Dominion Monarchs.
After seven consecutive wins, the
team held high hopes about
continuing their progress. Junior
third baseman Jason Howard felt
especially good about the
prospects of the tournament.
"We had such high
expectations because we'd been
playing a lot better toward the end
of the year Howard said.
Struggling a bit at the plate this
year, Howard's batting average
increased by 28 points during the
last games of the season; his RBI
total was at 42, putting him in
Jason Colquitt
third place for the team all year.
With such accomplishments at
stake and
the whole
team's
improving
record, it was
no surprise
when ECU
moved into
t h e
tournament
and captured
a win against
t h e
Monarchs.
However, "am"a
according to
senior Jason Colquitt, a starter for
the team, the losses that ended
the tournament were due to the
team's lack of precision in certain
areas. ,
"We started out real well with
Old Dominion, then ended up
getting beat Colquitt said. "I
think the team could really have
improved their pitching skills.
Usually our records show that if
our pitching's on, we're on. If it's
off, so are we
Whether or not the pitching
benefited the team is not the only
idea in question though.
W e
didn't hit as
consistently
in the
tournament
as we had
been
before
Howard said.
"In fact, I
think we
pitched a lot
better than
we hit
Through
the CAA, the Pirates ended their
year with a 29-27 record that has
seen 21 wins here at Harrington
Field.
ECU's baseball team made
dramatic improvements this year
with individual players breaking
records such as saves and
strikeouts per season, but every
win or loss often seemed directly
affected by the surrounding
circumstances rather than the
team's performance.
"Overall I think we had a good
team Colquitt said. "We played
real good offensively, and
occasionally defensively too. But
it always depended on who we
were playing. So for most of us it
Overall Statistics for Eawt Carolina
Nam
Massimo. Ryan
Williamson. John
Salargo, Steve
Rigsby. Randy
Godwin. Cliff
Art
.376
.348
.330
.338
.311
6646 218
48-47 181
DO-OO etZD
6848 230
33-7 46
Colquitt, Jason
Jones. Macon
Gentrup. Chris
Fulcher. Kevyn
Simons. Brad
Sneed. Kidah
Monroe, Kevin
Forrest. Jimmy
Fields. Brian
Bucy. Josh
.246
.244
.227
.227
.222
.166
.130
.000
.000
.000
22-13
18-13
20-4
22-11
27-8
23-3
4-1
2-0
2-1
138
46
44
22
36
32
23
'4
1
1
!� I fl I !��
turned out to be a disappointing
season
With a year full of such fine
details, the team looks forward to
next year's season and the new
members' potential.
"We've got tome good baseball
players coming back Howard
said. "We'll have some young
guys throwing in a lot of innings.
Plus there will be freshmen and
transfer students, so we're secure
ihthatatpect"
Isonette Polonius named second WomenV tfeck ends at
team Ail-American ECAC Championship
First ECU All-American
in fast pitch history
TRAVIS BARKLEY
SPOUTS EDITOn
ECU junior third baseman
Isonette Polonius has been
named a 1998 Louisville slugger
second team Ail-American.
Polonius became the Pirates'
first ever Ail-American selection
since ECU started playing
fastpitch softball in 1984.
Polonius led the Big South
Conference in batting average,
home runs, RBIs, hits and runs.
She was selected as the Big South
Most Valuable Player as well as
the league's Scholar-Athlete of the
Year.
Polonius finished the season
with a 25-game hitting streak. Her
.476 batting average ranked fifth
in the nation. Her home run and
RBI totals also ranked nationally.
Head Coach Tracy Kce said
that Polonius is an all-around asset
to the Pirate softball program.
"At this point she has been
everything we have needed Kce
said. "She's a quality student,
great athlete and a good person
Polonius was denied first team
honors by Arizona freshman Toni
Mast-arenas. Arizona placed six
players on the first team and was
the top ranked team in the nation.
Kce said that even though a
freshman beat out Polonius for
the first spot, it is still a
tremendous honor and should
give ECU softball national
recognition.
"She was beaten out by
SEE POLONIUS PAGE I
Goins named All-East
in 100-meter dash
TRAVIS BARKLEY
SPORTS EDITOR
The ECU women's track team
concluded their season this past
weekend at the ECAC
Championships at George Mason
University.
On Saturday, junior sprinter
Nicky Goins finished sixth in the
100-rfieter dash with a time of
12.13, good enough to qualify for
Sunday's final. � ),
Freshman hurdler Marshari
Williams qualified fof theVv-
semifinals in die 100-meter high
hurdles, finishing with a time of
14.48. In the semifinals, Williams
finished 14th with a time of 14.42
and didn't
this team with the exception of
Nieky-Goins had "� ever
participated hi the ECAC
Outdoor Championships, I' was'
proud of their efforts Justice
tM��"� �" ���'
On Sunday, Cto earned Ail
Ed Ttdftow itit hef
performance � in the 100-meter
dash, finals. Coins - finished
seventh with a time of 12.23
seconds. Only the top eight
finishers in the event receive All-
(sWJ$w
OthUfes
smngtr team
pactseasfi
Nicky Gains
Ml Mrs
Junior third baseman Isonette Polonius was recently named a 1998 Louisville Slugger second team All-American. She became the
first Pirate to win the award since ECU began playing fastpitch softball in 1984. Polonius led ECU in 10 offensive categories.
Tennis coach resigns after decade
qualify for
the finals.
Junior Missy
ohnson also
r lined for
event,
but could
not compete
because of a
hamstring
injury.
The
Lady Pirate
4 x 100-
meter relay
team didn't qualify for Sunday's
final, finishing 11th.
"We have mixed emotions,1'
Head Coach Charles "Choo"
Justice said. "I had hoped that the
relay team and some of our
individual performances could
have been better
Justice said this team was
young and inexperienced.
"Considering that no one on
Charles Justice
find Coich Whffhtn't Trick
Ea� honors.
"She was tired and didn't get
Off to a good stan in the race today
but I wo pfond of her tsffort,
finals :ViV Sodhomore Lean
Ariding. who finished hindt Hi the
triple jrJihp with a distance of
"I waT pleased by her
perforrnarrce Justice said. "She
has ��' rnade significant
improvement over the past two-
to-three weeks
Justice said he was proud of
how, hi team tampered this
HW was a rebuilding year for
out tract add field squad Justice
said. "With netrty thfc entire team
returning next season combined
with the athletes that we red-
shrrted this year, we" will be a
stronger team heading into next
season.
Moore says leave will
bebeneficial
Tracy Hairr
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
After directing the tennis program
for almost 10 years and teaching
sports psychology as a faculty
member, Bill Moore resigned his
position with the ECU Pirates.
He has accepted an
administrative position at Pfeiffer
University, his alma mater, in the
school of business.
' Before joining the ECU staff,
Moore was an assistant coach at
Virginia from 1982-86 and a head
coach at East
Sroudsburg
University
from 1987-
88.
Moore's stint
at ECU
began in
1989 when
he took
control of the
Pirate tennis
program.
Both the
men's and women's teams have
been led by Moore and have
achieved records of 101-125 and
94-69 respectively. Also under
Moore's direction, the ECU men
captured third place in the
Colonial Athletic Association
" think it's a more solid
move professionally. My
responsibilities will officially
end here after the first
summer session, and then my
career will really change
completely. But it should all
be for the best since I've been
looking for a chance to
move on
Bill Moore
Head Tennis Coach
standings (1992, 93, 94). In the
same conference, the women
finished fourth in 1990 and 1991
and placed fifth in the CAA this
year.
Considering such
accomplishments, Moore's
resignation has certainly been
surprising and raised numerous
questions concerning his leaving.
Moore has made visits related
to academics to Wilmington,
N.C and one may arise as far as
Finland, but Moore said leaving
ECU simply will provide more
business opportunities.
"I think it's a more solid move
professionally Moore said. "My
responsibilities will officially end
here after the first summer
session, and then my career will
really change completely. But it
should all be for the best since
I've been looking for a chance to
move on
Regardless of the reasons that
surround Moore's leaving the
Pirates, there is nonetheless a
position here as head coach that
needs to be filled. Norm Reilly,
assistant athletics director in
sports information, along with
others of the Athletics staff are
currently awaiting prospective
applicants to take over the ECU
tennis teams.
"The process is ongoing, but
early in its stages Reilly said.
"We've advertised the position
and probably will through the first
week of June. Then we can
probably screen it down by mid
June and by the end of the month
I'm sure we'll have a good idea
about what will happen.
� � i i � i i iii I Jin i i
white we
aaaneNeMesMaapB
were gone
The ECU baseball team went 8-2, and finished their season 28-2T
DateOpponentScorn
MaySMount OliveW 8-4
6Mount OliveW 104)
9Wake ForestW �
10Duke (12 Inn.)W 11-10
12Old DominionW 8-2
13vcuL 24
14George Masont 14
Freshman outfielder John Williamson (baseball) was named to the
American Team.
rTWlwHIlem (f
wem named 1tret 1
Left-handed baseball pitcher Brooks Jemhaarfi and outfielder Jehu
CAA. Outfielder Steve Sataiwo was named t� the eeoajwtt
Marshari William, set a women's track school record in Ufa 100 meter hiflh hurdle May" 181h A the
JNrU Invitetional wrth a time of I4v2 ; V 'X
Freshman sprinter Tyrone Dozier of the track teem qualified for the NCAA S8tsJMliiatil8SJi in 'the 400-
meter dash. �
Golfer Kevin Miller and tennis player Mile Alomar were selected to the IffVYfJi ttt
District HI Teem on May 28. . .
Softball players Isonette Polonius and Jemi
were named to the
ttt arrUc�oA Offer m;
� i
� �wii
�sssSUassBa
-jii
iummM
�sstlhkl





I
WidneiJty. Mty 27, 1998
sports
Tha East Carolinian
Trustees extend
Hamrick's contract
Athleticdirectoron
board until 2002
STAFF REPORTS
East Carolina University
Chancellor Dr. Richard Eakin has
reccommendcd, and the Board of
Trustees approved, a contract
extension for Athletic Director
Mike Hamrick.
The contract of Hamrick, who
is beginning his fourth year at the
helm of the East Carolina
athletics program, was extended
one year through May 31, 2002.
Hamrick has served as athletics
director at ECU since April of
1995.
Among the accomplishments
of the athletics program under
Hamrick's direction have been
the Pirates' admission into
Conference USA as a football-
playing member. The ECU
football schedule has also
dramatically improved in recent
years under Hamrick, including
upcoming home-and-home series
with all four in-state ACC
institutions: North Carolina, NC
State, Duke and Wake Forest.
In addition, Pirate football
season ticket sales have doubled
in the past three years with
contributions to the ECU
Educational Foundation (Pirate
Club) also rising. Television
exposure for ECU football and
basketball have also increased
tremendously. Ten of 11 Pirate
football games in 1997 were
televised on either ESPN, FOX
Sports South or the Pirates Sports
TV Network.
Prior to being named AD at
East Carolina in 1995, Hamrick
held the Director of Athletics
position at the University of
Arkansas-Little rock from 1990-
95.
SILVER
BULLET
M
'fl TnurA Of Class'
756-6278
Located 5 miles West
of Greenville on 264
Alt. (Behind Aladdin
Services & Llmo) Doors open: 7:30 pm
Stage Time: 9:00 pm
TUESDAY: Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY: Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY: Country & Western Night
FRI. & SAT: Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
"Skylar'
10 OR MORE
GIRL DANCERS
EVERY NIGHT!
Male Dancers
Available For
Bachelorette
Parties
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
Brown & Brown
Polonius
continued from page 7
someone from the number one
team Kee said. "There were
only two kids from the east coast
selected
Polonius became eligible for
Ail-American voting after being
named first team All-Southeast
Region. She was also named to
the GTECoSIDA District Three
Academic All-American team.
Polonius is
majoring in
Business
Management
and carries a
3.87 grade-
point
average.
Polonius is
at her home
in Curacao,
N e t h .
Antilles and
w as
unavailable
for comment.
Isonette Polonius
FIIE PHOTO
TORNI-YS AT
Truth,Equalily,Justice
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
102B East. Victoria Ct. -7 r r rC C 1
Bedford Park, Greenville O A-Jy OZ
Eah& Drinking
HEY! WE JUST MISSED!BIG TUESDAY
D0H7 WORRY THERE'S ANOTHER ONE NEXT WEEK
Polonius'Career Statistics
YearGRH2B3BHRRBISBAVG.
1998646188194156218.476
199771517117195010.333
Totals1351121593652411228.400
BODY PIERCING

Cubbie's Downtown
STUDENT SPECIALS
3PM-9PM MONDAY THRU SATURDAY W COLLEGE ID
FREE HOTDOG W FRENCH FRIES & DRINK
FREE FRENCH FRIES W ANY CUBBIE'S SIZED
SANDWICH OR A CHICKEN SANDWICH
2 Hot dogs for $1.00
$1.00 domestic beer w any food purchase
VOTED BEST CHEESEBURGER -� r- - gLAQI
& HOTDOG IN PITT COUNTY DZ0t37
SK1NCRAF1X
Navel-Eyebrow Up ft
Ear Cartilage
$25.00
Tongue - Labret:
$35.00
Exotic Piercings Cal
For Price
All prices include autoclaved sterilized jewelry. Autoclaving jewelry and
utensils is the proper method of sterilization. Not soaking In Betadlne
Or Alcohol as other shops are doing.
Come to the only Health Dept. Inspected Studio In the Greenville area. We have
been In business for over seven years, and we are Greenville's first real body pierc-
ing studio. We are here to serve you dally with one stop In our own public facility.
We are without a doubt the safest, cleanest, most professional studio In the area!
NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTIST
For More Information Call: 756-0600
Located At: 4685 US HWY 13 Greenville
(from Downtown - straight down Dickinson Ave.)
ON TUESDAYS
meat has finowiii
THE BURGERS ON TUESDAY ARE HALF A POUND
OUR MttftSTS HIVE 6MWM!
ALL CHICKEN BREASTS ARE HALF A FOUND
BUOWEtSER, BUD LIGHT AND LITE BOTTLES ARE 220Z.
ALL DRAFT BEER COMES IN 1602 GLASS
BIG6ER IS BETnit AT O'COOLS REGULAR PRICES
'EVERY DAY THE PROFESSOR
SERVES UP ONE OF YOUR
FAVORITE DOMESTIC
BOTTLES FOR JUST $1.50"
WINN DIXIE SHOPPING CENTER
CORNER OF GREENVILLE AND ARLINGTON BLVDS,
"iiiiniiiimiiiii
Move over mayo. Ranch It here. We took our famous Spicy Chicken
Sandwich, and added a twist. Cool ranch dressing. The 99 Spicy
Ranch Chicken Sandwich. It even makes our hamburgers jealous.
Checkers. Fresh because we fust made it.
A VI IIL
l I . mi i l Mi'it Mi � ill
752-7303
T��I.UJ.I.IIJ-MM
VAJMedl ECU ID
25PNE KEVIN HUGHES ����
'SIX THERAPIST HALL OF FAME �!�!M
! ONLY $4 ADM
! FOR MEMBERS
fi6HTin6 uflirr ���"
IMOim OlllfT TNI HOMY RODI
ONLY $5 ADM
FOR MEMBERS
UNSOUND
KUTT PHATT 7 TON DIESEL
ONLY $5 ADM
FOR MEMBERS
directions to site
unit plan -1230 sq. ft.
?student housing
gets no better!
NEW STUDENT
CONDOMINIUMS FOR SALE
YOU GET THESE FEATURES
AND MANY MORE:
�3 BEDROOMS
�3 BATHROOMS
�3 WALK-IN CLOSETS
�WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
�SELECT YOUR OWN ROOMMATES
�SAVE THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS ON
EDUCATIONAL COST
DON'T MAKE THE MISTAKE OF NOT
DISCUSSING THIS WITH YOUR PARENTS.
AVAILABLE AUGUST 1, 1998!
A SMALL DEPOSIT WILL RESERVE YOUR UNIT
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
CALL TOLL FREE 1 SOO 440 i378
ONLY 24 UNITS
SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE!
SUNNYWHEAT
�eitJS�,SPECIAl SURPRISE
May 28
&�&,
328-64436387
Free admission with valid ECU One Card or valid
SRC membership card. One guest per ID.
Coolers Welcome - NO ALCOHOL ALLOWED! 328-60044715
!
WEDNESDAY
JUNE 3,1998
$1.2 mih
to Chap
Tl
STA
Beginning th
ECU will face
lion, second o
tem to UNC-
$1.4 million.
"I have d
ECU funding
islacure ai
trustees are ta
to members tl
Jordan Which;
trustees' finani
The $1.2 n
larger cutback
million from
account of the
According
vice chancello
and finance, th
been used to r
and a garbage I
Fu
cam
Costes
rvugkl
M o II A M
STA!
Archaeologists
bones" on H
summer due t(
ing which has
on an archaeol
student volunt
to participate ii
The dig, p
finding the his
and some valu;
by ECU archi
Phelps. Phel
shortages have
Na
"Vol
Honor
Special
Natash
SEN1(
The Director
Services, Ms.
recently hoi
Greenville-Pitl
Olympics comr
of the Year
Mize was na
tion and contini
the organizatior
the east
4


Title
The East Carolinian, May 27, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 27, 1998
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1274
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy