The East Carolinian, November 13, 1997






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THURSDAY
NOVEMBER 13.1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROtiNA
don't just
PLUNDER

AMANDA AUSTIN
NEWS EDITOR
This is the time of
year when Christmas
wish lists are being
made and
students
have a chance
to help make
those dreams
come true.
The Third
Annual ECU
Holiday Drive for
toys, clothing and
food has begun
and will last
through Dec. 12.
Collection boxes
can be found all around campus. These
boxes are to collect items for less
fortunate families in Pitt county.
Put County Social Services has
provided "wish lists" for 10 families,
including 25 children. The children arc
between the ages of two and 14, but the
majority arc between the ages of six and
eight.
If it fany item donated fits in the
wish list for a family, it will go to them
said Leslie Craigle, director of
marketing for business services.
Holiday
toy drive
makes
dreams
come true
The most
needed items
include new
toys, non-
perishable
food items,
oT doused donatedfits
clothing in
good
condition,
educational
materials and
household
appliances.
The
Holiday Drive
for Toys was
coordinated
by ECU'S
business
services
departments.
- W e
wanted to do
something for
Christmas and
we took it
upon ourselves to start it Craigle said,
"ft has grown over the past three years
to include many different
departments
According to Craigle, several
departments have called to say they
want to help.
"If it any
item
in the wish
list for a
family, it
will go to
them
Leslie Craigle
director of marketing for
business services
It. Johnnie Umphlett of the ECU Potto Oept, Huohtene Crisp of University Printing and Graphics, and Leslie Craigle of Business Services and
Marketing, place items in one of the many donations boxes located in various locations around campus.
PHOTO BY MARTHA PEACOCK
One department. Student Health
Services, is collecting money to buy
new bicycles that many of the
children requested on their wish
lists.
"We have gotten great response
from ECU Craigle said. "Students
tend to give more canned food,
because it is something they already
have and they don't mind giving it
Faculty and students are
encouraged to give something and
make a child's dream come true this
Christmas.
Where
to go
A few of the places collection
boxes can be found are:
Construction Management
ROTC
Biology department
Special Education
Student Store
Dining halls
Residence halls
School of Medicine News and
Information

i
Tillery, ECU Medical School celebrate 10 years of partnership
i
Community imploring
due to clinic
AMANDA BRIGGS
'STAFF WHITES
The town of Tillery is holding an
anniversary celebration to show its
appreciation to the ECU Medical School,
which helped found a health clinic there
over a decade ago.
In 1984, ECU Medical School, in
conjunction with Tillery, a small town on the
outskirts of Greenville, came together to
form a medical clinic to provide education
afcd health care to the community.
"The health clinic was started 10 years
ago in conjunction with the East Carolina
School of Medicine as a result of a health fair
in 1984, sponsored by the North Carolina
Rural Health Correlation. The clinic was
started by Dr. Nina Shaw Sehgai. The clinic
is run by volunteers, including medical
school students and the community said
Gary Grant, executive director of
Concerned citizens of Tillery.
The high cost of medical treatment is
reduced by using volunteers. The clinic
offers free health care for needy recipients.
"The clinic was set up because of high
costs of medical care and racism. Ninety-
eight percent of the Tillery community is
African- American, and they were not well
received by other physicians Grant said.
The community seems to be improving
due to the education from the clinic. The
clinic's main goal was, and still is, education.
The clinic provides service and training
in first aid, community health advocacy,
teaching how to monitor blood pressure and
hypertension and many other educational
components. The clinic and the partnership
with ECU School of Medicine has made the
community much healthier. Seventy
percent of all people in the
community over 60 have
made drastic dietary changes
due to the education
provided by the clinic
Grant said.
Presently, 23 medical
students volunteer their
services to the community.
In return, the students gain
valuable experience in
patient treatment.
"This is a classroom for
the medical school students.
Interns and fourth-year
students perform the exams
patients Grant said.
A grant provided from Learn and Serve
America was obtained in 1995. This has
allowed the clinic to maintain the former
The clink was set up
because of high costs of
medical care and racism.
Ninety-eight percent of
the Tillery community is
African- American
Gary Grant
Concerned Cilinns of Tiflery
on the
programs and add some new educational
and recreational activities.
"Dr. Sehgai extended allied health
services at the clinic; a
walking trail was built, a
basketball court is currently
being built, an occupational
and physical therapy
program has been started
and we are now able to
expand our services due to
the grant from Learn and
Serve America Grant said.
The anniversary celebration
will be held Nov. 15, 1997,
starting at 9 a.m. and
continuing throughout the
day. Participants will enjoy
an array of different activities.
"A dedication of the walking trail will be
held at 9 a.m. Nov. 15. We will have a whole
day of activities planned to celebrate the 10-
year anniversary of the clinic and its
partnership with, the medical school. There
will be a recognition of the third year with
ground water, community protection
program, food, special recreation class
directed by Dr. Elizabeth Heininger,
community protection programs and
intergenerationai activities with elders. The
activities with the elders include a dance.
The elders are going to teach the younger
generation how to dance, and in turn, the
youth will teach the elders the hottest new
dances. The day should be a lot of fun
Grant said.
The activities for the anniversary were
set up by the Director of Community
Health Project Doris Taylor Davis, student
coordinator Gray Davis, Director of the-
special recreation classes Dr. Eiizabeth-
Heininger, Director of Learn and Serve
DeeDee Glasscoff and an eight-person:
community organizing committee.
Representatives' comments vary on low voter turnout
Some reps concerned,
others not
JENNIFER VlCKERS
STAFF WHITE
rith 33,642 people registered to vote, a
huge voter turnout was expected last
Tuesday; however, only 5,609 voted.
"I'm kind of ashamed of the voter
turnout, although I believe that a majority of
people didn't vote because they didn't want
to see a change in representatives said
Chuck Autry, who won for representative-at-
largc.
"I don't think it was just students that
didn't vote, but the people of the city also. I
believe the people were satisfied with the
city's efforts and wanted to continue seeing
those efforts
Autry has represented the city at large for
the past two terms.
"My main priority is crime. I would like
to see a drug-free university. We have a lot
of good programs; I believe the 'Weed and
Seed' drug program has helped, and the
police are beginning to be trusted by the
people Autry said.
Autry owns Chuck Autry's Paint-Body
Shop located on Dickinson Avenue. He has
held two drug programs there, with over
100 people attending each meeting.
"We also have fund raisers and donated
$2,000 to the Cancer Fund at the hospital
last Christmas. Soon we'll start collecting
food for the needy. Autry's Body Shop is the
point where they drop off food Autry said.
Autry also went on to say he has a good
relationship with the students.
"If the students want to register a
complaint, I will deal with it myself and not
just turn it over to the city Autry said.
Jack Wall, who lost to Autry for
representative-at-large, believes that the
majority of people will not vote unless it
concerns national or state attention. He
Inez Fridley
commented about the movement of city
council years to an off-
year.
"In the two previous
terms that I served, I won
in an election which had
40 percent of city votes,
which were on even years,
like state, federal and
senate elections are.
After city council voting
was moved to an uneven
year a few years ago, the
city votes went down to 22 percent. This
year voting turnout was only 16 percent,
which is very disappointing Wall said.
The question of why there was such a
low voter turnout remains to be answered.
"I feel that the switch to an off-year is a
preventative method to keep the majority
from voting Wall said.
The city council election is held every
two years.
This year's winner of District 3, Inez
Fridley, won by 176 votes against Steve
Steve McLawhorn
McLawhorn, an ECU student. Two years
ago she won by 38 to another ECU student
runner, Bill Gheen. This
year Greenville
redistricted.
"I feel that students
have as much a voice as
anyone. When they
redistricted most
students were deluded
and moved around to
other districts. I believe
this was done to protect
Fridley's district because she almost lost to a
student two years ago Wall said.
Wall believes the concern about city
council voting by the students and citizens
of Greenville will improve if the elections
are moved to every two years, alongside
state and federal elections.
Mayor Nancy Jenkins, who won 4,980
votes, feels very strongly for the university
and the students.
"I have worked for the past 35 years for
the good of the citizens and the students. I
consider our students the 'adopted citizens'
of the city and I treasure them very much
Jenkins said.
However, Jenkins feels that the students
do not feel the same way and wants to
reassure students that she wants their
input.
"We have seven city council members
over town who students can address their
concerns to. We believe the students of
Greenville are more an integral part of city
than in any other city Jenkins said.
City Council meetings are usually held
every week on the third floor of City Hall
and all are welcome to attend. Jenkins said
the meetings arc well-ordered and serious.
"The students are welcome to come to
any city council meeting. I bet 90.percent
of our students haven't seen our City
Council meetings Jenkins said. Jenkins
also said her door is open to any student who
wishes to discuss a concern.
"One of the top priorities of the
infrastructure is crime. The university and
SEE C0UH1CII PAGE 2
THURSDAY
TODAY
rainy
High 53
.044
TOMORROW
rainy
High 62
Low 53
Did you know that
Wednesday, November 19
is the last day to remove
incompletes given during
spring andor summer
terms 1997.
opinion.
Use Lifestyles
condoms? Pay
attention.
lifestyle.
Up, up and away!
sports.
10
Welcome, freshmen, to
Pirate basketball!
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION 8LDG.
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
across from Joyner library
phone
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328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
on line
www.studentmedia.ecu.edu
A






fw0
2 Thursday. November 13, 1997
lews
The East Carolinian
a c ros s
the state
i
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I
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1
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New area code for
western NC starts
in March
CHARLOTTE (AP) The new
western North Carolina area code
of 828 will gointo use March 22,
10 weeks earlier than previously
announced.
The change will give callers
more time to adjust, BellSouth
Corp. said Monday.
The new area code zone is
being split from 704 and covers
Hickory, Asheville, Morganton
and Shelby and most of the rest of
western North Carolina. Callers
will be able to dial either 704 or
828 until Oct. 5, 1998.
After that, the new area code
becomes mandatory.
New area codes also are set to
take effect Dec. 15 in the
Greensboro and Winston-Salem
area, which becomes 336 after
splitting from 910; and March 22
in the northeast part of the state,
which splits from 919 into the
new area code of 252.
Charlotte police increase
speed enforcement
CHARLOTTE (AP) m Police
; have written about 330 tickets in
three weeks during a crackdown
� on speeders in Charlotte and
! Mecklenburg County.
Police officers say they could
have written more tickets, but
concentrated on the worst
offenders.
It's like shooting ducks in a
barrel said Officer Wes Eubank.
The aim of the campaign is to
prevent fatal wrecks.
' It's hard, to stop the number
of accidents, but if we get people
to drive slower, the number of
serious accidents will go down
Eubank said.
Last year, the county had 64
traffic fatalities. So far this year,
the number of fatals stands at 49.
In August, the AAA Carolinas
motor club ranked Mecklenburg
as the most dangerous North
Carolina county for drivers for the
third year in a row.
Drink Wise
progam offers
alternatives to
problem
drinkers
Molly Broad impressing college officials
. - . � . i -ii. M�rk tmJ&na hovp nprfnrmance. She does
Fighting airport workers
fall through plate glass
PHILADELPHIA (AP) Two
airport workers got into a fight and
crashed through a plate-glass
window Tuesday, falling about 30
feet to the tarmac.
One man was hospitalized in
critical condition, the other in
stable condition.
Police said they did not know
why the men were fighting and
did not release their names. One
works for Delta Air Lines, the
other for an airport magazine
vendor.
Fifth-grade students
share needle
in science project
COLLINS, Ohio (AP) At least
18 fifth-graders used the same
needle to take their own blood
during a science class experiment.
Several diseases can be
transmitted through the shared
use of needles, including
hepatitis, an inflammation of the
liver that can be fatal, and AIDS.
The students took the samples
I about three weeks ago so they
- could examine their blood under a
microscope.
The needle was disinfected
with alcohol, but the Western
Reserve School District later
found out that may not have been
enough to stop the possible
spread of disease, superintendent
Dennis Bahmer said.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
the east Carolinian
0 N L I N E
www.studentmedia.ecu.edu
Program
emphasizes
moderation, not
abstinence
AMANDA BR10GS
STAFF WRITE
Drinking before bed to relax,
having one too many drinks at a
party and the inability to say no
when a drink is offered may be
signs of alcoholism according to a
faculty member of ECU's School
of Medicine, who directs a
substance abuse program. The
program, designed to help with
substance abuse, called Drink
Wise, promotes moderation
instead of abstinence and is
gaining national attention.
Theresa D. Edmondson, the
Director of the Drink Wise
program for Alcohol and Drug
Abuse Studies, at East Carolina
University's School of Medicine,
said many people are responding
to the program. Edmondson
beleivcs this is due to the
expansion of the program and
articles printed in both a Detroit
news paper and U.S. News and
World Report.
"This is a genuinely different
program in helping with alcohol
abuse. The program is not
abstinence based, it teaches
moderation in drinking said
Edmondson.
Problem drinkers are people
who have had problems due to
drinking such as receiving
citations for Driving While
Intoxicated,showing up late to
work, or marital problems. They
do not drink steadily, they know
they have problems, and they do
not go through withdrawal when
they stop drinking.
Alcoholics show signs such as
persistence of drinking even with
health problems; inability to cut
down, tolerance, giving up work or
family to drink, devoting time to
obtaining and drinking alcohol;
First female UNC-
system president
regards state's
colleges highly
JON! SlRETTE
STAFF WRITER
Molly Broad, the. first female
UNC-syscem president, has been
in office for several months now,
and, according to Broad herself
and many school officials, she has
settled into the
position well.
Broad, a Syracuse
University graduate
and former executive
vice chancellor of
California State
University, downplays
the gender issue.
"I do not believe
that gender is a big
deal in the process
said Broad.
Broad said being
the first woman to
ever take over this role
was just a "happy
coincidence Broad said women
Molly Broad
COURTESY OF THE ECU
NEWS BUREAU
throughout North Carolina have
expressed to her how
important it is for them
to have a woman in this
role.
Many ECU staff
members feel strongly
about the arrival of
Broad to this position.
"I'm very
impressed with Molly
Broad; she is very
people-oriented and
possesses terrific
leadership skills said
Brad Sneeden, director
of ECU's Office of
School Services.
I am most impressed with her
performance. She does her
homework. She is also extremely
bright and very personable. She
has a firm grasp on N.C already
said Emmett M. Floyd, assistant to
chancellor for constituent
relations.
Broad has visited the ECU
campus on several occasions. She
attended the first home football
game against Wake Forest.
"Mrs. Broad is very responsie
in attending all of the functions
the university requests of her
Floyd said.
With three main priorities set
so far, she has high hopes for
improving the university system.
SEE BROAD PAGE 3
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SEE DRINK PAGE 3
Council
continued from pagel
Dengue Hemorrhagic
Fever kills at least
37 in Indonesia
JAKARTA Indonesia (AP) An
outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic
fever has killed at least 37 people
in a western province of
Indonesia, a report said Tuesday.
Citing a government health
official, the Suara Pembaruan
newspaper said the victims died
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Passion for the opera takes many forms.
the city are synonymous and
greatly affect each other. I am
very proud of the university, the
Medical School, all of the
programs and the caliber of
students. They call me
'Greenville's Cheerleader'
because I rave about the
university Jenkins said.
Blanch Forbes is the only new
City Council member this year;
she defeated last year's member,
Van Brown, in District 4. She
hasn't served for the past two
terms, but served for six terms
prior to that.
"I felt good about winning. I
had people come to me and ask
me to run. I feel that a lot of
people were dissatisfied with this
district and wanted to see a
change Forbes said.
Forbes wasn't that concerned
with voter turnout.
"In my district there was a
turnout of 30 percent. I believe
the low turnout was because
there was no opposition for
Mayor, and also the election is
held on an off-year Forbes said.
Forbes' main priorities for
Greenville are safety, traffic
problems and the parking
situation downtown.
"I feel we need to work with
the department of transportation
to solve traffic problems. I am
more for unmarked cars and
policemen in plain dress in the
neighborhoods. I think that
there is a parking problem
downtown and would like to see a
rrkin deck I � : Forbes :iid.
Forbes feels that Greenville is
fortunate to have ECU.
'The university generates so
much revenue. I like the fact
that we have 18,000 students
here Forbes said.
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Allow us to recommend alternatives
Western Opera Theater
Friday, November 14, 1997 8:00 pm Wright Auditorium
Advance Student Tickets $15 Tickets at the door $30
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS Monday - Friday 8:30am to 6:00pm
919.328.4788 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS: Deafspeech-impaired access 919.328.4736
Student discount tickets available with ECU ID at the Central Ticket Office until 6 pm
on the day of the event, providing rickets remain. All tickets at the door ait full-price.
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The East Carolinian
K3W
Broad
continued from page 2
Broad is focusing her term in
office on providing unlimited
access to universities, thus
improving the annual attendance
rate, bringing enhanced
technology to the students, not
vice versa, and lastly, establishing a
partnership with the K-12 schools.
"Having a close relationship
with grade schools, I feel, will
provide responsibility from both
ends Broad said.
Other strategies include
making tuition affordable enough
and providing adequate financial
aid. Broad would also like to see
universities partner with local
community colleges, thus making
universities accessible to students
who need to remain home based.
Broad seems overall impressed
with North Carolina so far.
"North Carolinians have a high
regard for their universities, which
is very impressive to me Broad
said. "Citizens across the state
have great pride. This is a good
environment for a president to
enter
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Drink
continued from page 2
and withdrawal.
"We have had success with the
moderation program. The people in
the program do not need
abstinence because they are not
alcoholics, they are not dependent
on alcohol. These people admit
that they have a problem, and want
to change their habits, because the
alcohol can cause social, physical,
and emotional harm said
Edmondson.
Edmondson pointed out alcohol
abuse contradicts the current trend
toward a healthy lifestyle.
" Recently society has been on a
big campaign about health choices.
We are taught to modify our fat,
choleric, and cholesterol intake,
but there is not any information on
the moderation of alcohol. Good
health practices should include
teaching appropriate limits with
alcohol, said Edmondson.
The Drink Wise program has
been successful in Canada for 23
years.
"Other countries have alreadv
formed moderation programs. The
Drink Wise program is the first
state wide alcohol moderation
program. We are only the second
prevention program. Doctors in
the area are very excited. The
Drink Wise program is the largest
effort made in the United States
said Edmondson.
75 percent of heavy- drinkers do
not become alcoholics, but the
Drink Wise program is not focused
for people who have a dependence
for alcohol. "The program will not
admit people with severe alcohol or
other drug dependencies, nor
people that are going through a life
crisis said Edmondson.
Most problem drinkers believe
that the binge drinking began in
their 20's, at college parties,
hanging out with co-workers, and
other social events. Research has
shown that college students with
problem drinking and put into the
program reduced binge drinking by
80 percent.
"Most people that are problem
drinkers begin binge drinking in
their college years. Every year you
hear about a college student dying
Thursday, November 13, 1997 3
from alcohol poisoning. Many
people as they grow older naturally
evolve into moderation, but some
people continue with their habits.
We need to teach good practices
with drinking said Edmondson.
The program only allows for no
more than nine drinks within one
week for women, no more than
three drinks in one day. For men it
is only 14 drinks within one week,
and no more than four drinks in one
day.
"Most people do not know how
to clarify responsible drinking.
Some of the ideas we promote is
long intervals between drinking,
amount of drinks you have, and
never drive after you have been
drinking said Edmondson.
"The program is inexpensive,
$700. This treatment is relatively
cheap compared to in-treatment
programs that can cost well over
$700 on the first day. Also, the brief
intervention seems to work
wonderfully, 70 percent of all
individuals that enter into the
program are still successful after
twoyears said Edmondson.
Toll free hot lines have been set
up to reach the Drink Wise
program at 1-888-816-2736.

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Mm PrfcCoodTtrUNo�.lS.19S7 101 c I Wt 141 515 I
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not you're a leader of Marines. It's a career that's
fitted with unlimited opportunities, pride and
of us. But if you're exceptionally smart, tough gf honor. If you want a career that's a world apart
and determired, then Officer Candidates School ff�SJttOS from the ordnaty se? f you've got what it
IOCS) will be the place you can prove whether or nrmn.AMinMnM takes to lead in this company.
For a career that is worlds apart, see Capt. Beltran in the Student Stores
on November 13 or phone (800) 270-9874 ex. 1815.
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opinion
Thursday. Novgmbw 13 1997 5 -
eastSarolinian
AMY L.RoYSTER Editor
Celeste Wilson Managing Editor
MATT HEGE Mverasinrj Ouacwr
Amanda Austin Hrmiiw
Jacqueline D. Kellum as$i UrnsEm
Andy Turner iiitafrUnix
JOHN Davis Assiflam Utetyle Editor
AMANDA ROSS SpinsEditor
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This Thursday night, ECU will be known to millions of people, thanks to ESPN.
The ECUCincinnati game will be televised nationally and will be the only football game played
on Thursday night at 8 p.m. The players are psyched and you, the fens, should be too. ECU has
aired all its home games on Fox this year, but this is the first ESPN coverage this season.
Fans last year painted their faces, bodies and made signs. Why not do the same and even more
this year? Get crazy with the paint. The ESPN camera's love to pan the crowd and put wild and
crazy students on TV So this is your time to be seen nationally.
It's vital that you pack the stands early, as the cameras will pan the crowd for the cheering fans.
To say the least, it would be embarrassing if every seat were not filled. This is ECU's chance to
shine nationally, and it's important that every student come prepared to support their team.
But, on the other hand, you don't want to be so drunk that you make a fool of yourself. Not only
are you representing yourself, you represent ECU. If fans tune in and see a bunch of sloppy,
drunk students, that's what they will think of our school, not the kind of impression school
officials or the football players want the fans to convey.
But more important this is the time to support your football team. They are on a three game
winning streak, and this is the last home game for the seniors. It will be a special day all around
and you can put the icing on the cake with your support.
A lot of emotions will be flying around among the players and they have always said it makes a
game better to see the fans in the crowd going nuts supporting what they are doing on the field.
The football team puts in hard hours of practice on and off the field and the least we can do as
students is show them how much we appreciate their work. Let's make their last home game a
special one and fill them with memories they will never forget.
Get your tickets and your purple and gold face paint ready for the last home game of the season
and represent your school and players well.
OPINION
DAY
Columnist
Greeks have much to learn
The dehumanization of
Greeks can be detected in
even tie way they relate to
one another
From the art of
saying thank you to
how to treat your
fellow man, the Greeks
have a lot to learn.
The cruelty of the Greek system
was brought home to me on a bright
day in the spring of 1986. While
sitting in the outside area of the
campus pub, I noticed all the tables
had been occupied by large
numbers of fraternity brothers and
sorority sisters. It was traditional at
Berkeley for the Greeks to meet and
party there at that time of the
afternoon. You wouid think that a
school as distinguished as Berkeley
would have a relatively civilized
student body, a belief that the
school's Greeks belied.
Sitting surrounded by these
people, I attempted to read a
homework assignment for one of my
history classes. At some point I
noticed a sudden laughter
originating simultaneously from all
the tables. I looked up and, on the
other side of the iron fence that
enclosed the tables, F saw the object
of all the laughter. A fat, poor black
man, whose babbling confirmed
serious mental problems, was
standing there faced by several frat
boys, who had risen from their seats
and made this disturbed man the
target of sadistic taunts. For several
moments, I observed the reactions
of those who made this medley of
meanness their focus. Beyond the
collective jeering and brutal
entertainment, it was what these
people failed to do that so incensed
me. There, amidst well over 100
people, I never detected a single
objection to this most disgraceful of
behavior. I saw not a single look of
regret or disapproval, and observed
not a single person leave out of
disgust.
months went by, when I
observed a similar incident on a
smaller scale. In a bar one night on
the popular south-side, ECU's
equivalent of Fifth Street, I
observed no less than ten frat boys
� I counted them � taunting a
poot, obviously deranged black
woman. This time I acted. I
approached these sorry excuses for
human beings; I remember my
exact words: "You boys are real
brave, ten of you to give shit to one
female Their reaction was as
degraded as the one I was reproving
them for, letting out a collective roar
of "AH and, of course, never
articulating a response. I convinced
the poor woman to leave with me
and escorted her down the street,
where I left her, babbling some
bitter words against her detractors. I
returned to the same bar, where
several moments later, one of the
frat boys approached my table and
offered me a quarter for a cigarette,
a request which I honored. This is
the most gracious thing I've ever
seen a Greek do, and these are only
a few of the deplorable observations
I've made over the years.
The dehumanization of Greeks
can be detected in even the way
they relate to oive another. In Greek
Personals, published in this paper,
the very act of expressing gratitude
constitutes a means of self-centered
indulgence. Look at this thank you
message from a recent TEC: you
made us proud by representing us
during Homecoming! We love you
In a mere seven words, the writer
has succeeded in using the word us
twice. Gratitude here is expressed
in terms of what the person being
thanked did, not on the kind of
person they arc. Here's another
example: "Thank you, Delta Zeta,
for coming to our house for dinner
last Thurs. We had a great rime
From the first part of the sentence,
I get the feeling Alpha Delta
considers it a privilege to allow
Delta in their house. But it's the
lack of mutuality that I notice so
missing here, the exclusive focus on
Alpha's own good time. There is no
mention that Alpha hopes their
guests shared in the happiness.
From the an of saying thank you
to how to treat your fellow man, the
Greeks have a lot to learn.
LETTER
to the Editor
Cochran's research inaduquate, unresearched
I am writing in response to William
Cochran's "Do away with required
English courses As a graduate
teaching assistant at ECU, I find Mr.
Cochran's opinion unresearched and
inadequate.
The combination of English 1100
and 1200 serves as a liaison for the
college writing curriculum. The
courses arc structured to inform
freshmen of the methods necessary
to complete the writing process.
This also includes the transition of
one's thoughts or ideas into writing.
This form of communication most
often presents the greatest level of
difficulty for the student.
I have often heard that you
cannot undo 12 years of negligence
in one semester. Thus, there are two
mandatory writing courses.
Unfortunately, most students enter
college with little to no knowledge
of proper writing methods. Please
understand, the writing process is a
stair-step process. By providing
students with the foundations of
writing, we are saving them from
future frustrations in the classroom
and in life.
If you do, indeed, take these
students and place them into
specified classes according to their
INTENDED major, then you are
doing an injustice to the students.
Come now, Mr. Cochran, how many
times did you change your major?
How many of your friends and
acquaintances changed their
majors? In turn, your
recommendation would put these
students further behind in their
educational careers as they would
have to take the preliminary writing
class for each specified major.
Therefore, I would highly
recommend that you. Mr. Cochran.
reconsider your statements and
teach in the classroom before
candidly presenting your opinion.
Please keep in mind that what
sometimes looks good in theory
does not always work in practice.
Jennifer R. Bonney
Graduate Teaching Assistant
English Department
.
OPINION
Jeff
BERGMAN
Subliminal advertising easy money?
Hidden pictures of naked men
and women may not work
now, but give researchers a
couple of decades and watch
what happens. Science is
progressing at an alarming
rate. The smarter we get, the
faster we get smart.
"Drink Coca-Cola That phrase
was flashed upon Kim Novak's face
during the movie the Picnic and
with that, Coke sales rose nearly 60
percent. It was flashed too fast for
the conscious mind to sec, but easy
enough for the unconscious mind to
see and understand. Thus, a
Pandora's box was opened.
Technology for subliminal
advertising has been around since
the late 1950's. Today the
technology is more refined. Sex sells
and advertisers know this.
Take a gander at most of your
Kp culture magazines: Glamour,
oplc, foguc, Sports Illustrated,
most if not all have some type of
subliminal advertisements. Most
subliminal advertisements include
pictures of male andor female
gcnitalia. Others just write the
words sex in hard to see areas. If you
know what to look for, seeing these
vulgar ads is relatively easy.
Don't believe me? The most
common example is the Camel
cigarette package. A male with a
distinct erection can be seen in the
drawing of the camel. The now-
defunct cartoon caricature Joe
Camel is supposedly a subversive
advertisement. Joe Camel's nose is
often claimed to be a representation
of a penis.
Some would say I have a dirty
mind and am seeing what I want. Ir
I sec something in an
advertisement, that is sex related, I
have a dirty mind? Do I instead
pretend I did not sec the image?
Sure, some of the advertisements
with nudity or simple "SEX" might
be pure coincidence. As more and
more examples exist, the chance of
all this being a coincidence is slim to
none. As one of my friends puts it,
"Don't trust coincidences; you'll end
up getting killed by one
Subliminal messages are easy to
stick in print ads. Most ads are
cither computer touch-ups or
drawings. Artists can play with these
ads to show your unconscious mind
a suggestive message.
Even television ads arc easy to
play with. Add a l3000th-of-a-
second picture of what you feel will
influence your audience to buy your
product, repeat it several times and
watch sales increase.
Look for yourself. Subliminal
messages are easy to hide in ice
cubes, drinks, liquids or patterns in
clothes. Vaseline, Liquid Plumr and
most alcoholic and cigarette
manufacturers have used subliminal
advertisements.
Research is divided upcji
whether subliminal advertisements
work. Of course, given ene-ugh
money � something,the public
relations and advertisement
industry have a lot of� I can find
researchers to prove or disapprove
anything you want.
If subliminal advertisements, for
the most part, do not work, great.
Then a problem exists with this
Orwellian technology. Hidden
pictures of naked men and women
may not work now, hut ghfc
researchers a couple of decades antf
watch what happens. Science is
progressing at an alarming rate. The
smarter we get, the faster we get
smart.
I am aware of no state or federal
law prohibiting subliminal
advertisements. No proof of
subliminal advertisements working
is the most used argument. Fine,
they do not work. Why not outlaw
the suggestive material?
The other big argument is
defining subliminal advertisements.
Forty years since the use of
subliminal messages in selective
movie theaters and we still cannot
define this flagrant violation of our
minds.
Some psychologiscs even go as
as to say our subconscious
remembers most everything wc see,
taste, smell, feel, hear or do.
Consider this: the human eye looks
at nearly 100,000 images in a day
You will be lucky to recall l5000th
of what you saw or, in some cases,
what you did not see.
OPINION
Race not factor for segregation
Is tie symbolic melting pot
image just a myth? Has
America had enough of
multiadturalism ?
Racism wrought through
ignorance of each other's
cultures increases every
negative aspect you can think
of.
Politics, race and religion - three
very prickly issues which often
cause many friendships to break up,
families to squabble and sometimes,
nations to divide.
My mom frequently advises me
to avoid these topics. She does not
believe in "inst'iiuing" any r pe of
emotional over-boil. Rr her, these
subjects arc definitely taboo.
However, as far as I'm concerned,
particular situations are just plain
hard to ignore.
For example, I believe that the
majority of students on campus
practice some type of "mutual
segregation This in itself is not
necessarily a bad thing, depending
on how you view it, but evidently
people feel uncomfortable even
acknowledging this fact.
Birds of a feather flock together.
as the old saying goes. It's totally
understandable when blacks want
to hang out with blacks and whites
with whites. Just check out the
Wright Place and it becomes
obvious. Caucasian students seem
to prefer lounging around the tables
and chairs set outside the snack bar.
African American students, on the
other hand, prefer congregating
next to the Rawl building, which is
directly opposite the Wright place.
This is where they often sit and chat
with each other. It happens
naturally.
In a few of my classes, students
were required to break up into small
groups to make presentations. I
found it extremely interesting that
all of the black students separated
into their own groups, as did the
whites, regardless of whether or not
they knew each other.
One more example: a couple of
days ago I was at the Mendenhall
lounge when I saw a similarly
revealing situation. Several students
were watching the same TV
program. As is usually the case,
these students were bunched into
their own race groups. Several of
them passed occasional remarks to
other members of their own group,
shouted at the TV and offered
encouragement and advice to the
actors. But totally ignored the
opposite race group altogether. It's
as if they did not exist.
Personally speaking, I don't
believe in forcing anyone into
situations that they find
disagreeable. We all know that
segregation is illegal. Kaput. A thing
of the past. But what do you do
about "de facto segregation as my
friend March calls it? Is the
symbolic melting pot image just a
4
myth? Has America had enough of
mulriculturalism?
Racism wrought through
ignorance of each other's cultures
increases every negative aspect you
can think of. Take hate crimes as an
example. a
Danny Gilmore was driving
through a black neighborhood irCL
Cleveland when he had a minors?
accident with a moped rider. Barely3 r
a few minutes later, he was beaten
up in retaliation by a group of 40 orT
more blacks. When he fell down onj
the street, one of the blacks droveS
Gilmore's truck over him and fatally
crushed his skull while the rest o�
the blacks cheered loudly This was?9
in Jury 1988. f
A few years later in January 1991,3
four other blacks decided to kill thcr
first white person they saw. AS-
Northwestern University student
by the name of Mark Bc!morcr
happened to be that person. He -
was stabbed to death. Vt
Just this year in North Carolina
three white males in the military
were charged with executing anj;
elderly black couple who were out
for their evening walk. There was,
no rhyme or reason for the horrific;
slaying. It was basically dnc�j.
because of the color of their skin, r I
In New York, a young Haitian
man was badly beaten up by theCC
police and then sexually violated
with a toilet brush handle. He, of
course, was black C
The list goes on and on, but you"3
get the picture. I have deliberately '
confined this column to whites and u
blacks, not because other
minorities don't figure in this'
picture, but because the biggest'
racial problem faces these two
groups. "
� �. � U 11
Ai
S V
'





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"�P
The East Carolinian
review
aja Sevelle
"oys of Vanity
10 OUT OF 10
NICK WlNSTEAD
STAFF WRITER
An "artist" is what many musical
i cts claim to be in today's music
s wne, but it is something that few
ver achieve. Taja Sevelle is an
srtist in her own right and her
(lD,7bys of Vanity, is a masterpiece of
t rrical genius. She manages to
infuse marvelous poetry with super
vocal talent and interesting forms of
i nstrumentation. She manages to
lake the listener to a different
emotional landscape wkh each
song, much like a masterful
paintingor an Oscar-caliber piece of
feting. The listener is taken to new
and exciting places in care of
$evelle's amazing use of beats and
focal ranges.
j The album's first track "I & I"
uses well-written lyrics and
seductive backbeats effectively
-frith Sevelle's sultry voice. The CD
ihim. ovxww. vx rb- frjrsnfiiJ anH
beautiful "Us This song shows off
Sevelle's vocal strength nicely and
the dazzling lyrics will bring tears to
your eyes.
"Killing Time" is the halfway
mark of this album, and Sevelle
incorporates a country flavor into
the feel good flow of this song. The
simplicity and innocence it
presents are a nice change of pace
land add more flavor to this album.
The second half of the CD picks
up where the first half left off.
"Making Love to the Air" brings
back the jazz flavor heard earlier
With a force and makes the listener
sit up and pay closer attention.
"Fleet of Angels" is a dazzling piece
�f music. The love in this song's
i
SEE TAJA. PAGE 9
lifestyle
Thursday. November 13. 1997
The sand dunes of the Outer Banks have been the sight of flight attempts from the Wright Brothers to amateur hang gliders.
PHOTO BY PAT KID
Pat Reid
SENIOR WRITER
Life in Greenville got you down? You
don't feel like shelling ouj the bucks for
a big time movie on a little time screen,
no good bands are playing and your
usual hang-outs are looking way past
routine. Then break away and
experience the adventures that wait
only a few hours away in North
Carolina's Outer Banks.
In a mere two and one half to three
hours (depending on how you go) you
could be driving along the beach on
North Carolina's beautiful Outer Banks.
Of course, it's 3 little cold this time of
year for swimming or sunbathing, so
whar rise, is rhere to do? Discover what
the Wright Brothers did decades ago:
the sand dunes of the Outer Banks are
perfect for flying.
In recent years, hang gliding has
become a popular form of flying. In fact,
the inventor of hang gliding lives on the
Outer Banks himself and, despite his
getting along in years, he still manages
to get in frequent flying time. Now,
most people turn pale at the thought of
soaring above the ground with a sheet
and some aluminum strapped to their
body. But beginner hang gliding isn't
like that at all. In fact, for the beginner
course you only get a few feet off the
ground and even if you crash, the soft
cand of Jockey's Ridge keeps you from
pain or injury.
Kitty Hawk Kites, the largest
outfitter in the Outer Banks, offers
beginning and advanced certification.
So, if the idea of flying through the
clouds is for you, try tandem hang
gliding. In tandem hang gliding you and
an instructor are lifted in the air by boat
in the summer and by ultralight in
winter. Depending on which package
you desire you can go up to 1,500 or
2,000 ft. After reaching the destination
altitude, you are cut free from the tow
craft and allowed to land the glider. If
you panic or start to mess up, the
instructor is right there to guide you
along.
Still, there are many who have no
desire to feel their feet leave the
Sound. So why not try a kayak ecotour?
utcr Banks Outdoors offers 12
different kayak tours ranging from
leisurely floating down canals to going
out searching for dolphins. Most cost
S30-S40 which includes all your
equipment and expert guides. Or, for
the real adventure in you, package deals
are available for multiple kayak
excursions.
Does kayaking sound too challenging
for you? Don't knock it until you've
tried it. With your guide to help you
along and provide instruction, you'll be
paddling like a pro in no time. Plus, in a
kayak you can go where few other craft
can fit or maneuver. This allows you to
get intimately close with many species
of plants and ducks. Muskrats can often
be seen as well. For the real nature
fanatic, summer tours often see many
varieties of snakes along the shore as
well.
Still, if paddling doesn't quite appeal
to you either, you could always rent gear
ranging from in-line skates and bikes to
wind riders and catamarans. Or just stop
by their shop and try the rock climbing
wall. Perhaps you just want a quiet
weekend at the beach to take in some
sights. Besides being a great historical
location, thanks in part to the Wright
Brothers, the Outer Banks offers many
public events.throughout the year. The
next event like this will be "Kites With
Lights" on December 6. Kite
enthusiasts from all over will be there to
provide a unique show on Jockey's
Ridge in Kitty Hawk.
No matter what you're in to, if it is
outdoorsy, there is a way to do it on the
Outer Banks. So, next time you're
sitting at home planning another boring
weekend, pick up the phone, gather
some friends and do something totally
different. There's a whole world of
excitement and adventure out there
just waiting for you.
Jockey's Ridge is a popular spot for beginners.
PHOTO BY PAT REIO
Want to get away from the
Emerald City for the weekend?
The Outer Banks may offer a
peaceful getaway.
GHLiGHTS OF
NORTH CAROLINES
OUTER BANKS
Hang gliding on Jockey's Ridge
Wright Brothers National Memorial
�weekdays 9:00-5:00'
919441-7430
Outdoor Outfitters:
Kitty Hawk Kites (1-800-3344777)
hnp:www.kittyhawk.com
Outer Banks Outdoors
919480-3128
i
Carmen comes to Wright Auditorium Friday night
Guitar Wolf
Planet of the
Wolves
7 OUT OF 10
ANDY TURNER
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
The boys with the most black
leather arc back.
Guitar Wolf, the Ramonesy,
Crampsy, trashy rockabillys from
Jay-pan, bring the noise to the
States again with Planet of the Wohes.
This planet is much cooler than
Planet of the Apes, although, those
apes are pretty damn cool
cucumbers. It's a planet ruled by
Billy (bass), Toru (drums) and Seji
(guitar); its necessities are dark
sunglasses, tattoos and, most
importantly, loud and dirty rock-n-
roll, not of the Bad Company,
isports-sock-in-thc-spandex variety,
but of the '50s juvenile delinquent,
knife-fight, Link Wray-would-kick-
jElvisass variety.
Missile Me, the group's last effort,
'running while the album was being
'recorded. This one a little less so.
This one sounds like it was
recorded during a welding-a-thon.
SEE Mir P4RC 9
Opera was first
performed in 1875
RON CHERUBINi JR.
SENIOK WRITER
NEW YORK � If only Georges
Bizet could have lived to see what
became of his little lady.
Though he died just weeks after
Carmen was pulled from the stage at
the Opera-Comique in Paris in
March of 1875, Bizet did give life to
a grand-scale operatic
masterpiece which has
since become one of opera's
most-noted productions.
Following the opera's
ungraciously-received
debut, Bizet reaped
posthumus acclaim for his
dark, comedic adaptation of
the 1845 novel by Prosper
M6rimee. Once shunned by
the artistic community in
Paris, Carmen is embraced
by today'sjstage performers
and opera-goers.
For those performers
fortunate enough to land a
role in a major production of
Carmen, it is an experience
that transcends the
performance itself. For
conductor Delta David
Gier, the experience has
been nothing short of
fantastic. And, for the more
than 60 other performers in
the current Western Opera
Theater touring ensemble,
Carmen's reception has been
nothing like what Biet
em: i'j'I ihat ojv i ni.V
more than a century ago.
"What makes Carmen a lot
of fun is that it's very accessi-
ble to audiences Gier said.
"It's a double-edged sword. A
big portion of it is comedic,
but in the end, it's tragic.
The audience hates to see it
end. It's almost like, you hate
to see her die, because you've
really enjoyed
"(Director) Ted Altschuler has
done a wonderful job. This
production is very, very fun in places
and evokes a lot of emotions
To hear Gier talk about the
production, it is hard to believe that
this masterpiece could have ever
bombed on stage. Gier explained
the intitial reception.
Carmen was doomed to failure
he said. "Bizet was set up by the
Opera-Comique. At the time, Bizet
was seen as an outsider and
perceived to be a disciple of Wagner,
who was considered to be very anti-
French
Gier, who is conducting with the
Western Opera Theater for the first
Put a leg up.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MARKETING DEPT
time in his career, explained that by
opening at the Op6ra-Cemique
rather than at the grand opera in
Paris, Bizet's dark comedy had no
chance of being accepted by the
Parisian opera community.
"Opera-Comique was sort of a
theater of family values he said.
"People could count on certain
stock characters. People took their
families to the Op6ra-
Comiquethcrc were children
there. Carmen had no gods, or
kingswhich is what people
expected to see
Bizet's Carmen had anything but
stock characters. The story's main
characters are of a class not normally
brought to the stage in those days.
So, it failed.
Eventually, it was
those missing
elements, the
exposure of the dark
underpinnings of
society, that did, and
has since, packed
the opera houses.
What the Western
Opera Theater's
production of Carmen
has is plenty of
talented performers
and loads of energy.
Western Opera
Theater, the touring
branch of the San
Francisco Opera,
exists to provide a
professional venue
for some of the
world's finest up-
and-coming stage
performers. Carmen
is no exception.
Gier, who is a veteran
conductor and an assistant
conductor with the famed
New York Philharmonic,
has been been impressed
with the young, but high-
ly-professional cast though
he admits it has been chal-
lenging from his perspec-
tive.
"You'd think that the
biggest challenge would
be keeping the
performance fresh, but that hasn't
been a problem he said. "It's
always fresh and livery. My biggest
challenge is to keep up with all
three Carmens
The story of Carmen, is
essentially that of a young,
sensuous gypsy girl who seduces
the good soldier Don Jose
Eventually, Carmen tires of Jose
and spurns him, oniy to bring on
tragic consequences. Throughout
the opera, the audience istaken on
an emotional ride filled with
tension, romance, comic relief and
ultimately sadness.
uCarmen is the perfect opera to
cut your teeth on Gier said. "The
characters are very much alive and
it packs a variety of music in the
score.
Gier has found that audiences
have been more than receptive to
the Western Opera Theater's
production.
"This wing of the San Francisco
Opera gets opera out to where it
normally doesn't get Gier said.
"It's a thrill seeing 2-3,000 people
in the audience in a place like
Butte, Montana
The show in Greenville comes
at the end of a very long tour for the
ensemble, but both performers
assured that that shouid be no
concern to concert-goers.
"Those shows are towards the
end of the tour Gier said. "So,
we'll be giving vintage
SEE CARMEN. PAGE 8
Historical Perspective
When Carmen is set (circa 1820):
When Carmen debuts on stage (1875):
PelibeS Mussorgsky. Rimsky KorsaJW
" h.nki.vsky, Verdi, and V
y fry � -�





8 Thursday. November 13, 1997
in -style
The East Carolinian

November
13 Thursday
Rice Off at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theater (runs through Nov.15)
Pirate Underground featuring
Rufus Grove and Phineas Gauge
from 8-10:45 p.m. in Mendenhall
The Floyd of Oz at The Attic
Live jazz at Stacatto
Moe, with Strange Folk at Cat's
Cradle in Chapel Hill
14 Friday
Carmen, Western Opera Theatre
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium
Far Too Jones at The Attic
Poetry Slam at 9 p.m. at Forum
and Function in Raleigh
Claire Holley at Lizard and
Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill
15 Saturday
Cravin' Melon at The Attic
16 Sunday
Brass Quintet Chamber Music,
Britt Theurer, director, at 3 p.m. in
Fletcher Recital Hall
17 Monday
uesdayThursday Jazz
Ensemble! Contemporary Jazz
Ensemble, Paul Tardiff, director, at
8 p.m. in Fletcher Recital Hall
18 Tuesday
ECU Vocal Quartet at 8 p.m. in
Fletcher Recital Hall
The Cypher (open mic poetry)
at 10 p.rri. at Underwater Pirates
Cove
Live jazz at Firehouse Tavern
19 Wednesday
Ballet H'ispanuo at 8 p.m.
Wright Auditorium
in
Do you have an upcoming event
that you'd like listed in our It's
Showtime column? Send relevant
information to:
It's Showtime
co Lifestyle Editor
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
CLEARANCE
SALE
CONTINUES!
Nicolas Cage and guns. Good.
PHOTO COURTESY OFBUENA VIST
ECU Ring Event
Nov. 10th
Nov. 11th
Nov. 12th
Nov. 13th
Nov. 14th
10am-4pm
10am-4pm
10am-4pm
10am-7pm
10am-4pm
Special Hours: 10am-7pm on the 13th
Officially Licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer"
Student Stores
UpI ffiffe 'Special Payment Plans Available
1RTQ1RVED
X. CQLLgGE JEWELRY
Bu
EAST
CAROLINA
fMVEHSrrV
: Downtown
Location
Only
atalog
Connection
Division Of CSiiiS-
Further
discounts, more
shoes and winter
merchandise, and
some spring and
summer goods!
Three Days Only
Fridav.Xov. 14 10'til 6
Saturday, Nov. 15 10 'til 6
Sunday, Nov. 16 1 'til 5
?()E.5thSt. 758-xW)
Dress To Impress
Arlington Village, Greenville
321-1714
200 Different
Styles of
Cocktail
and
Formals
in
Stock!
Important
Information
ALL I
ECU Students,
Staff, and Faculty1.
( VROIINA
I MJKS1IY

mst
CA
OU
utf
VEsin
neWe
GU
statson
tf534
32
DOORPRIZE
EACH DAY!
Get your name in early
�, for a chance to win
each day!
"Visit the ECU t Card web page,
linked from "Business Services'
on the ECU home page:
www.ecu.edu
We Charge No Application Fee.
Now Offering $300 Security Deposit for 2 Bedrooms,
& $400 Security Deposit for 3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom Townhouses � 1.5 Baths
Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
Small Pets Ok With Fee
5 BLOCKS FROM ECU WITH
' BUS SERVICE AVAILABLE
MANDATORY
RECARDIN6 EVEHT FOR ALL
STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF
TO HAVE NEW PHOTO I.D.
Students, staff and faculty who have already been through
the ECU One Card recording process need not participate.
The ECU One Card will be required as of January I,
1998 for all Campus Libraries, Recreation Center access,
Campus Dining, Student Activities, Financial Aid Defer-
ment accounts, and everything you needed an ECU I.D.
card for in the past!
To produce your new identification
Current ECU ID card OR . Driver's
November 8 -21,1997
Location: One Card Office
ECU Student Stores, Wright Building
Monday -Thursday
9:00 am - 12 noon & 1:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Friday
9:00 am - 12 noon & 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Saturday, November 8, 1997 ONLY
10:00 am-3:00 pm
NOTE: Thursday, Nov. 13 &
Wednesday, Nov. 19
STAFFFACULTY ONLY
9:00 am - 12 noon & 1:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Stafffaculty also welcome any other
date & time listed above.
card you must bring with you:
license and social security card
Questions should be directed to the ECU One Card System Office, 328-2015, located inside Dowdy Student Stores.Wright Bu.ld.ng.
I
- y






The East Carolinian
S j
stvle
Thursday. November 13, 1997
i1
Presbyterian
Campus Ministry
Looking for a place for fellowship,
friendship, and dinner?
Then come join us
First Presbyterian Church
Every Tuesday 6pm - 8pm
Bring S3 to cover cost of dinner
Future events planned:
Various Speakers
Weekend Retreats
Mission Trip to Haiti
For more information
call Nancv at 758-1901
ROCK-A-THON
ALL DONATIONS
WILL GO TO
PEDIATRIC
FUNDS
THROUGH ECU
SCHOOL OF
MEDICINE
Wednesday, November 12th Student Recreational Center
East Carolina Unversity
9am-9pm
Saturday, November 15th
Lone Star Steakhouse and Saloon
llam-llpm
Co-Sponsored by Nantucket Nectars
ADQ
ALPHA PHI
OMEGA
NATIONAL
SERVICE
FRATERNITY
Taja
continued from page
message is warm and evident.
The song's beat increases and
makes you want more.
Sevelle's vocal ability is at its
peak here. "Toys of Vanity"
brings back the strong,
sensual vocals that Scvcllc
started the album with. This
song's pov
instrumentation ma
listener become lost in the
world of self-indulgence rhat
Sevelle singi about.
"Subconscious Me" keeps the
CD on course with wonderful
vocals and emotional gospel
tracks from a backup choir.
This song also manages to
incorporate a small bit of
rap. which is a pleasant
suprise.
The track "Why" uses
mystic beats and vocals to
create a new image in the
listeners head. The effect is
spellbinding and imaginative.
and brings a sweet, dreamlike
qualit to the album.
Toys of liiniry never loses its
ability to dazzle and amae.
The songs' Krics are poetry
and Sevelle's vocals are
astounding. Rach track on
this 'llnim is i masterpice of
Scv !i
Ik around to create more
works of art as equally
superior to this one. It is like-
all good art. in that it is
worthy of respect and
appreciation for what it does
to the people who take the
time to enjoy it.
HIPNIBBIBdEllliMS
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Be sure to redeem your orange Thirsty Thursday coupon at
The Spot for a free 16 oz. drink when you make a purchase.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Guitar
continued from page?
If you're looking for refined,
smoothly produced music,
listen to Garth Brooks.
Hanson or any other music
designed to bu record
executives new Porsches:
Guitar Wolf, on the other
hand, will steal your car. and if
it's not a convertible, they'll
saw off the top (and it better
be a Cadillac).
Guitar Wolf lay clear their
aspirations with the song
titles: "Kawasaki Zl 1750 Rock
�N' Roll "Motor Cycle
Leather Boy "All Through
the Night Buttobase and
"Kung Fu Ramone's Passion
Their aspirations are that they
have no aspirations, it's rawk-
n-roll. liummv. Hell, the entire
Krics to the title track consist
of "Ow()wOw()w
Most of the lyrics retain the
same complexity. For
example, there's "Energy
Joe "Energy JoeEnergy
JoeBaby BabyEnergy
JoeC'mon Dylan would be
jealous.
The band pays tribute to
its heroes, doing sloppy, sleazv
covers of the Rolling Stones' "I
Can't Get No Satisfaction
Link Wray's "Rumble" and
Japanese trash rock deities,
Teengenerare's "Let's Get
Hurt
The covers show that
energy and abandon are not all
that drive Guitar Wolf. They
are truly passionate about
rock-n-roll and play music that
is wild and fun. the way rock-
n-roll should be.
Guitar Wolf are not
proficient musicians, solid
songwriters, chart toppers.
They're rock-n-rolters.
i
i!


f
:�

r3

ii
;?
;
H


?�&o, For more information, call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004. All films start at 8:00 pm unless
8�L � otherwise noted and are FREE to students, faculty, and staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
Vfcry No backpacks allowed in the theatre.
Resident Advisors
Thanks For All You D
o!
APPY
RAA
PPRECIATION
D
ay!
SCOTT HALL:
Tyrone Maxwell
Jason Barciift
Vernon Shoaf
Chris Strain
Joe Ramsey
Chonte Calvin
Chad Hux
Brandon Metcalf
Greg Fry
Doug Hoskins
An Tipton
SLAYUMSTEAD:
Craig Hassel
James Sturdivant
Edwina McKoy
Emily Freeman
Ty Guine
Carl Mothes
Vanessa Cullers
Shaun Johnson
Valerie Rose
Brandon Huss
Sharlynda Fleming
Lisa Vexler
TYLER HALL:
Candra Midgett
Lindy Hemming
Erika Swarts
Rachel Lindsey
Krystyna Dehu
Reagan Craddock
Kristine VanRensselaer
Sherita Young
Amber Roberson
Kristin Edwards
WHITE HALL:
Fabian Williams
Amy Staton
Kevin Parks
Amy Bisogno
Rodney Mountain
FLETCHER HALL
Bob Cutright
Ellyn Felts
Lee Tuck
Heather Natalie
Shane Barham
Julia Huskins
Dwayne Wright
Tiffany Hoffman
Tracy Mason
Amy Miller
Amie Briley
Meredith Manoly
Steve Jernigan
Mavis Gant
GARRETT HALL
Grant Gale
Dennis Norton
Delvin Vick
Jason Gerhardt
Chris Knotts
Chris Seymour
Kevin Smith
Corey Algood
GREENE HALL
Shawnda Canady
Laura Benfield
LaShona Jones
Carla Cole
Melissa Beaman
Ashley Poplin
Corey Pressley
Rashida Brown
Anna Rogers
JONES HALL
Brian Bauer
Doug Smith
Tory Bryant
Celena Haaland
Virginia Walser
Kristen Alford
Amy Fitzgerald
Nathan Novak
Jeff Mobley
AYCOCK HALL
Patches Hill
Michael Cerminara
Carl Brienzi
Stephanie Webb
Ty Howard
Shannon Healy
Heather Rowland
Ami Brasure
Lee Ann Eagle
Seth Campbell
Jason McHone
Robert Gray
BELK HALL
Victor Putze
John Batchelor
Jeff Barrus
Adrian Floyd
Eyup Karca
Nancy Wazenegger
Nicole McClam
Giao Nguyen
Michelle Morton
Melissa Stuart
Mary Schubert
CLEMENT HALL
Andy Medina
Kevin Earl
David Brewer
Joe Guardabascio
Laurie Horwitz
Jessica Danylo
Lakeisha Palmer
Alicia Talmadge
Emily Benton
COTTONFLEMING
JARVIS
Teresa Stone
Virginia Anderson
Jennifer Rutherford
Elisa Kellogg
Jennifer Phillips
Heather Holzworth
Nicky Goins
Josh Beardsley
Jaime Bradley
Meit Osmanovic
Crystal Wade
Pain Winslow
Nikki Blanchflower
From UHS
Professional Staff
752-7303
"The Undefeated Best
Place to Hear Live Music
in Greenville
-Greenville Times
Carmen
continued from page 7
performances
For Gier. t e end of the
tour will be a job well-done,
but for audiences who take in
the show, it will be an
unforgettable witnessing of
lilC coining of age of Bii's
little ladv.
NC's legendary nightclub.
Voted 1 at ECU and
Top 100 College Bars in the
Nation by Playboy magazine
October 1997
Thursday Nov. 13
ECU vs. Cincinatti
on 15 ft screen.
After the Game
The Floyd
ofOz
Domestics
free
admission
THE DARK SIDE OF THE
MOON MEETS
THE WIZARD OF OZ
THE MOVIE
Friday Nov. 14'
Far too Jones H
Special Guest EOUSC Of DreSUIIS
(Just Opened for Sister Hazel)
$1.50 domestics
Saturday Nov. 15
Mercury Recording Artist
Cravin Melon
Special Guest:
The Ultraviolets
ADVANCE TIX AVAILABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SKUUY'S
EAST COAST MUSIC & VIDEO
WASH PUB � ATTIC
Thursday, Nov. 20th
RCA Recording Artist
Agents of
Good Roots
Special Guest:
Blue
Miracle





E
�&�
10 Thursday. November 13. 1997
sports
The future of
Pirate Hoops
Basketball teams look for
freshmen to step up
James Camp
STAFF WRITRR .
Sports fans it's that time of year again. Time for the
leaves to change colors, time to get your jacket out
of the closet and time for the balls to start
bouncing at Minges Coliseum. That's right, it's
college basketball season and that means a new
season here at ECU. With every new season there
comes a group of unknowns to the program. Who
are they? They are the freshmen.
Every year freshmen enter basketball programs
ready to work hard everyday. Most are away from
home for the first time and are trying to balance a
new college lifestyle with their athletic schedule.
Throughout their first year or so few will get very
little recognition. Some will step it and be noticed,
while others might not get the chance because
they play behind upper classmen. So here is a brief
look at the freshmen of the men's and women's
basketball teams:
For the men's team Head Coach Joe Dooley and
his staff have four new players to work with.
"We're really excited about having all four of
these guys Dooley said.
One plus for the men's team is they return a lot
of key players from last years team to help out with
these new guys.
The freshmen backcourt players this year are
Larry Morrisey, a 6-foot-2 point guard who played
high school ball at Fayetteville's Seventy-First
High School. Joining him in the backcourt is
Vlnston Sharpe, who can play either shooting guard
or small forward. Sharpe is 6-foot-5 and played at
Hillside High in Durham.
The men's team has also added two new front-
court players this year. The first is 6-foot-7 Steven
Branch, a forward from St. Benedicts High School
in East Orange, N.J. Another newcomer you can't
miss, who sat out last year, is Alphons Van Ierland.
The big guy is 7-foot-0 and hails from Tilburg,
Netherlands.
These are the new players for the men's team.
They arc young and trying to gain experience.
"Our goal is to get them as much playing time as
possible to help them gain experience Dooley
said.
For the women's team Coach Anne Donavan
and her staff might not be as fortunate as the men.
The Lady Pirates are only returning six veteran
players. That means some of these young freshmen
will have to step it up early.
"We're looking for all the girls to come in and
contribute early, especially in the backcourt where
we currently have three sophomores Donovan
said.
To help out in the backcourt there is Tricia
Peckham a 5-foot-6 point guard from Apex High in
Cary and Charette Guthrie who is 5-foot -2 out of
North Forsythe High in Winston Salem. Both of
these players could see minutes early due to their
play during the preseason. Also in the backcourt is
Jennifer Moretz a 5-foot-8 guard from Watauga
High in Boone.
For the Lady Pirate frontcourt there is Nicki
Brown a 6-foot from Penn Hill High in Pittsburgh,
Pa. Donavan believes Brown will play a significant
role early on.
"Nicki has played strong so far and can expect to
contribute pretty early Donavan said.
Also, the Lady Pirates add Anne Murden who is
5-foot-8 from Nansemond Suffolk Academv in
Portsmouth, Va and Opal Johnson, a 6-foot post
player from Leesville Road High in Raliegh.
Senior
Profiles
20 Linwood DcBrew
Wide receiver
Newport News, Va.
Major � Business
Caught 12 passes for 64 yards
(1997)
Long reception of 20 yards
Tore right knee ACL four weeks
9 Dan Gonzalez
Quarterback
Neptune, N.J.
Graduate student with
Marketing degree, working
towards MBA
Hit 79 of passes for 337 yards
and four touchdowns against
Houston
Has thrown 1,913 yards and
completed 59.7 passes (1997)
Named to all-time passing
yardage top 10 list (No. 4)
Freshman Nikki Brown lays the ball up during drills, while Ann Murden. another freshman, looks on.
Freshmen will play big roles on both the men's and women's basketball teams this season.
PHOTO BY CLAY BUCK
Freshman Piratebasketballplayers
Men
NamePositionHeightHigh SchoolHometown
Alphons Van IerlandCenter7'Koneing Willem II Tilburg, Netherlands
Steven BranchForward6'7"St. BenedictsOrange, NJ
Larry MorriseyGuard6-2"Seventy-FirstFayetteville, NC
Vinston SharpeGuard6'5"HillsideDurham, NC
Women
NamePositionHeightHiqh SchoolHometown
Tricia PeckhamGuard5'6"ApexCary, NC
Jennifer MoretzGuard5'8"WataugaBoone, NC
Charette GuthrieGuard5'7"North ForsytheWinston Salem, NC
Anne MurdenForward5'8"NansemondPortsmoi'th, VA
Nicki BrownForward6'Penn HillsPittsburgh, PA
Opal JohnsonForward6'Leesville RoadRaleigh, NC
For the Lady Pirates, these freshmen will have
to play hard and try to contribute. With so few
�eturning plavers there is no guarantee of any
players position or playing time.
"There are no locks on starting spots for
this team, these young girls need to come
in here and play hard, Donavan said.
There they are fans, the freshmen of
your 1997-98 Pirate Basketball teams. To
see these freshmen and the other piayers
in action check out the Pirates at home.
The men's first home game is against
Ferrum on Nov. 29 at 7 p.m. and for the
women it's Nov. 25 against NC State at 7
p.m.
The East Carolinian
Preparations
being made for
final home game
Pirate fins always get hyped up when ECU football is on ESPN. Kkkoff for
tonight's final 199? home game is set for 8:01 p.m.
FILE PHOTO
Rx)tball team gearing up for last
conference match up
Amanda Ross
sports kditor
A Thursday night ESPN game is exciting for the fans, but a lot more
work for the players.
With the shortened week, the Pirates have altered their prac-
tices to accommodate for the shortened practice time. Head Coach
Steve Logan said this week in drills the team will work as a whole
unit.
"We just have to go out and get the game plan as quick as we
can Logan said. "What you do is cut down on your fundamental
work and individual work and everything becomes a team-orientat-
ed practice to try to get the big picture as quickly as possible
ECU will have to concentrate on stopping the Bearcat's option,
which has netted them 2,219 yards through 10 games.
"They're an option football team Logan said. "They're going to
run it and throw it as little as possible. If you can win second down,
they'll break down and throw it on third down. They're not partic-
ularly prolific but at the same time, when the quarterback gets
loose, that's their best weapon
That weapon is Chad Plummer. The junior quarterback has
completed 80 of 175 passes for 1,107 yards and six touchdowns, but
more importantly, he has rushed for 631 yards, and seven touch-
downs, which leads the team. Besides Plummer, the Bearcats have
four other players who have rushed for over 100 yards this season.
Running backs Robert Cooper, Daryl Royal and Orlando Smith
have rushed for 542, 437 and 165 yards, respectively. Fullback
Landon Smith has 439 yards
In comparison, ECU has two 100-yard rushers � Scott Harley
has 411 yards this year, and Jamie Wilson follows with 254. In the
air, the ECU receiving corps got a blow last week, when Larry
Shannon took a blow to his healthy, right ankle. Earlier in the year.
Shannon severely sprained his left ankle, which kept him out for
the first four games. Logan said he is definitely out this week, but
next week is still a question.
"Larry, probably is done Logan said. "I know he's not going to
play this week. Whether he comes back next week or not I don't
know
A bright spot among the Pirate receivers has been Troy Smith.
With 695 yards and three touchdowns, Smith has been the go-to
guy with Shannon out with injuries.
SEE FOOTBALL. PAGE 12
ECU fans, don't forget to pack the
stands early for tonight's football
game. Support your seniors as
they play their final game in Dowdy-Ficklen on
ESPN. Kick off is set for 8:01 p.m.
2 Perez Mattison
Defensive Back
Anderson, S.C.
Major � Communications
Former kick returner and quar-
terback
4 total tackles (1997)
Long return of 49 yards against
10 Matt Levine
Holder
North Potomac, Md.
Major � Business
Starting punter as freshman and
sophomore before becoming
holder
Long punt of 43 yards vs. South
Carolina (1996)
55 Jason Shell
Snapper
China Grove, N.C.
Major � Business
Saw action in every 1996 game
as deep snapper
2 total tackles (1997)
4
28 Tabari Wallace
Cornerback
New Bern, N.C
Major � Rehabilitation Studies
One interception and fumble
recovery this year
24 total tackles (1997)
.Vas a free safety before stepping
80 Larry Shannon
Split End
Starke, Fla.
Major � Business
Named to preseason All-
Conference USA team
Holds ECU career record for
touchdown catches with 21
Has caught 94 career catches
for 1,631 yards to rank third
Ranks fourth on ECU's top 10
career receptions list with 94
Missed first four games of
1997 season due to sprained
49 Matt Semenza
Linebacker
Hazlet, N.J.
Vlajor � Communications
Ended 1996 season early with a
knee injury
28 total tackles (1997)
1 Jason Nichols
Flanker
Norcross, Ga.
Major � Information Processing
All-time pass receiving leader with
136 career catches for 1,420 yards
Has caught 28 passes for 209 yards
(1997)
Fourth consecutive season as start-
30 Dwight Henry
Cornerback
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Major � Social Work
Named to coaches' preseason
All-Conference USA team
Has started in 30 games in 3 seasons
Returned in 1997 after missing pre-
vious season with a knee injury
One fumble recovery, and two inter-
ceptions for one touchdown this sea-
son
75 Staccy Whitehead
Offensive Tackle
New Bern, N.C.
Major � Communications
Played as reserve offensive
lineman for every 1996 game
Junior college transfer
� . f 1 I, �






?��
The East Carolinian
s
ports
Thursday, November 13. 1997 11
�fune into
ffKur$day Nbv. 13,
for Pirate toothall Play by Play
fl
?
ATTENTION
Graduating
Students
Representatives of the Japanese Consulate in
Atlanta will be in the lobby of the General
Classroom Building Friday, November 14th
from 9:00 -12:00 AM to distribute
application information about the Japan
Exchange in Teaching (JET) Program.
u
PLANT SALE
ECU Biology Club
Thursday Nov. 13
730AM-1PM
Friday Nov. 14
7:30 AM-2PM
at the
Biology
Greenhouse
Room 5-111
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years in
the Army, your college loan
could be a thing of the past
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit.
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the first of
many benefits the Army
will give you. Get the
whole story from your
Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN
www.goarmy.com
Determination pays off
for volleyball team
Lady Pirates win
final CAA matches
FOR MORE INFORMATION
the east Carolinian
0 N I I N E
www.studentmedia.ecu.edu
PAUL Kaplan
STKK WRITRR
After losing 10 consecutive games,
the ECU women's volleyball
team's "never give up, fight until it
is over" attitude has motivated
them to win their past three
games.
In their last three games, the
Pirates have beaten UNC-
Wllmington, James Madison
University and Elon College. The
Elon College game which came
after over one full month without
a win, was the catalyst in
motivating the team through their
next two wins.
"We've turned around back to
where we were in the beginning of
the season; back to where we don't
quit Head Coach Kim Walker
said after the win over UNC-W
Mondav night with their win
over UNC-W 15-6, 12-15, 13-15,
15-4, 15-12, the Pirates improved
their overall record to 15-17 and
their CAA conference record to 4-
8. In the fifth and final match of
Monday night's game, the Pirates
found themselves down 9-6 and
about to be handed their 18th loss
when Walker called time out to
regroup her team. .Alter the time-
out the Pirates went on a quick 3-
0 run and continued on to only
give up another three points and
winning the final match 15-12,
proving that although they are a
very young team, they have the
heart and the desire to the get
the job done when it counts.
"This was a rypical UNC-W
game. .After we lost those rwo
straight matches the girls fought
back hard Walker said. "I told
the women before the match it
would be a dog fight tonight, I'm
very proud of the way they played
tonight.
Not only was last Monday night
the Pirates third straight win, but
it was also the return of freshman
Liz Hall from a two week absence
with Mononucleosis. Hall
contributed with five kills, while
grabbing five digs and one block.
"With Liz Hall back in the
lineup that makes us all some
what healthy going into the end of
the season Walker said.
Last Monday's game also
assured ECU a tie for fifth place in
the CAA, meaning that they will
most likely play third-ranked
James Madison University in the
first round of the CAA tournament
November 21 at George Mason
University.
ECU's two remaining games
are at Campbell, Wednesday, Nov.
12, and at home Nov. 15 against
Wofford at 2 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum.
Newman Catholic Student (-enter
Stnulav las
1 :M) am
SO'pm
�.v-ljm
'3 E, 10th St.
(2nd house tram Fletcher nuisie hldji.)
Relationships in the 90s.
Mission Impossible?
Wednesday, November 19,1997,8:00pm
Hendrix Theater, Mendenhall Student Center
Host: Dwayne Featuring: Fabian
Why dont women like nice guys?
Do you think all men are dogs?
IIV
I
n
y:
East Carolina's 1 Live Talk Show! FREE!
dwayne
show
Or are you just asuperfreak?
Why do black men date white women?
Where have all the good men gone?
For further info, about becoming a panelist, contact: dvvayTieshow@hotrnail.com
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Cultural Awareness Comm ttee. For more information,
call 328-4715, or check out our web page at www.ecu.eduStuderrt UnkxVTHEHOMEPAGE.htrnl.
25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryl's
Just show your ECU student ID at the
Darryl's across from campus and get a 25
discount on your entire dinner check. Try our
famous Saucy Barbecued Pork
Ribs. Award Winning Fajitas
Grande. New Wood-Fire Grilled
Steaks. Fresh Vegetable Fasta,
RESTAURANT & BAR
llll Illii I � I I L
800 East I Oth Street � 752-1907
Roadside Chicken Sandwich. Steak and Cheese
Sandwich. Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of i ur
Delicious Desserts. It's all spi ed for
ECU students. So stop b tonight
and enjoy!
place for rood and fun!

M
v
I
&





r
12 Thursday. November 13, 1997
Football
continued trom page 10
"It's always crazy when Larry
gets hurt and is out of the game. I
know I have to step up and do any
part I can, and that's what I have
to do this week Smith said.
Quarterback Dan Gonzalez
said personally he is comfortable
with whoever he has to throw to.
"I think whether or not it's
Troy and Larry playing the same
fssition, or just Troy or just Larry,
think both of those guys arc able
to step up their game and perform
for a full game if they need to
Gonzalez said. "I don't know if it
sets us back, obviously we are
losinga leader if he's not able to
play Thursday night, but I think
some other guys are ready to pick
up the slack and the leadership
and get some confidence in the
huddle
The Pirate defense will have to
work on stopping the option,
something safety Kelvin Suggs
said they are ready for.
s
oris
The East Carolinian
"It's more assignment football,
so we can stick with our men, it
will be much easier than hitting
the hole, or the running back is
going everywhere. The option is
more like an assignment for us so
we know who we got, so you just
go take care of your business and
hope the next man will take care
of his
This year's opponents have
gained 1,576 rushing yards against
the Pirate defense with 15 rushing
touchdowns.
The is the home finale in the
seniors careers, with 11 seniors
playing in Dowdy-Rcklen for the
last time. Gonzalez knows the
emotions will be there, but they
still want to concentrate on
winning the game.
"It will be more a thing you
reflect on after the game is over
Gonzalez said. "I hope we go out
and really show what this senior
class has been about, which has
been a lot of hard work; a lot of
dedication they put into this
program. Hopefully we're able to
go out and show the kind of level
that we've been able to display the
last few years
Asian Student
Association
Announces Their First
Interest Meeting
Anyone Welcome to Attend!
When: Wednesday, Nov. 19th
Where: Mendenhall Rm 221
Time: 7:30- 8:30pm '
Refreshments Provided
For More Information
Contact: 830-1616
East Carolina Playhouse
A Tale of Witches and Outcasts
MOTHER HICKS
Rated: PG
November 20, 21, 22, 24 and 25, 1997 at 8:00 p.m.
November 23, 1997 at 2:00 p.m.
General Public: 9.008.00
ECU FacultyStaff: 8.007.00
ECU StudentsChildren: 6.005.00
Gall328-6829
McGinnis Theatre
ECU Main Campus
Corner of Fifth and Eastern Streets
The kickoff time for the Nov. 22 ECUNorth
Carolina State football qame has been set for 1p.m.
The game will be played at Carter-Finley Stadium
in Raleigh. The Pirates and the Wolfpack have
played 20 times with N.C. State leading the series
12-8. ECU defeated the Wolfpack 50-29 last
season at Charlotte. The Nov. 22 contest will be
the first between the teams in Raleigh since 1987.
There will be not television broadcast of the game.
Experience
Elegance & Fine
Chinese Cuisine
7 Days a Week
Serving Lunch & Dinner
Free Pregnancy Test
While You Wait Free And Confidential
Services and Peer Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Hours Vary as Needed
Appointment Preferred
757-0003
Qhnaio
CHINESE
QE&TAUQAOT
2516 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27858
Phone:830-2238 Fax: 830 1735
Join us for dinner
before or after ihe game.
Reservations Welcome!
SPRING BRCRK!
Sonoma Party
Cruise $279
6 Days - Most Meals - Free Parties - Includes Taxes
CanCIMI $399
7 Nfighto AirHotel - Free Meals - 24Hrs Free Drinb
Jamaica $419
7 Nighfc Air&Hotel - Save $150 on Food & Drinb
Florida $119
South Beach, Panama CHy, Daytona, Cocoa Beach
Spring Break Travel - Our 11th Year!
1-800-678-6386
��-
Are You Hunting
For a New Home?
Give us a shot You can have life
with all the trimmings at
Tar River Estates.
In our spacious 1 2 or 3- bedroom
townhomes, you can set sail to
freedom from high rent. Enjoy the
bountiful ammenities including free
cable, ECU bus service, a fitness
center, swirnming pool, volleyball
and tennis courts.
Tar River Estates
214 Elm St 5
Greenville, NC 27858
(919) 752-4225
�"
"





r
-
Thursday. November 13. 1397
ifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now taking leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency apartments.
CALL 752-2865
BIG THREE BEDROOM HOUSE in
ECU area. 1 12 baths, central heat,
ceiling fans, washer hookup, fenced in
backyard, pets OK. $550 month. Call
830-9502
4 BEDROOM RUHILRBLE RT
Players Club Rpts. 6-month lease
beginning Jan. Call Melissa at
321-7613.
EDWARDS PHARMACY IN AY-
DEN, location 7 minutes from cam-
pus, needs hard working, honest per-
son to work 20-30 hours per week run-
ning registers, cooking at grill, putting
up stock, helping fill prescriptions.
Phone 746-3126.
��AAAA!SPRING BREAK '98 Guar-
anteed best prices to Cancun, Jamai-
ca, Bahamas, & Florida. Group dis-
counts 8t daily free drink parties! Sell
trips, earn cash, & go free! 1-800-234-
7007. http:www.endlesssummer-
tours.com
WANTED: 2 BR. APT. for $390mo.
or less; would like to take over a lease
and move in January. Call Christine or
Rachel at 328-7815.
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
ASAP, Players Club Apts. 14 rent and
expenses (per person). Call Tracy at
353-6933.
WALK TO ECU, 3 Bedroom, 1 12
bath, central heatair, carpet stove,
ref dishwasher. $630mo. Call 321-
4712.
plUBLEASE TWO BEDROOM IN
Sttyindham Court from January 1998 to
Jr5ummer 1998. $350 for one person,
$425 for two. Call Stephanie at 931-
0573.
AVAILABLE NOW
1,088 SQUARE FOOT, FULLY
FURNISHED, 2 BEDROOM 2
BATH APARTMENT
$500MONTH. 758-5393
FOR SALE
EARN MONEY AND FREE Trips
Absolute best Spring Break Packages
available Individuals, student Organ-
izations, or small Groups wanted Call
Inter-Campus Programs at 1-800-327-
6013 or http:www.icpt.com
EARN CHRISTMAS MONEY, A
great service. No investment, part-
time. Make your own hours. Also,
great fundraiser. Call 353-4244.
CRUISE SHIP ft LAND-TOUR Em-
ployment- Learn about nationalinfl
Cruise Lines and Land-Tour compa-
nies. World Travel (Hawaii, Mexico,
Caribbean). Excellent benefits bo-
nuses! We can help you make the con-
nection. 517-336-0574 Ext. C53621.
���ACT NOW! CALL LEISURE Tours
for Spring Break packages to South
Padre, Cancun, Jamaica and Florida.
Reps needed-Travel free and earn
commissions. Group discounts for 6 or
more people. 800-838-8203 or
www.leisuretours.com
OTHER
SONY XE-700 CAR Stereo Graphic
EQ Cass program to display
messages across LCD screen. $400
OBO. Ask for Don, 758-3531.
PIONEER KEX-M800 SUPER Tuner
3, 6 CD changer wremote detachable
face and tape player. $400 OBO. Ask
for Don, 758-3531
MOTOROLA MICRO-TAC 1950 Cell-
ular f:ip phone, leather case, 2 batter-
ies, wcharger, $100 OBO. Ask for Don,
758-3531.
ROOMMATE NEEDED, WYNDHAM
CIRCLE Full size bath, wd, security
system. Non-smoker. $275 rent 12
utilities. Cable Phone 758-8936
ROOMMATE NEEDED UNTIL END
of spring aemester. Female to share a
two bedroom townhouse, 12 rent-
$170 plus 12 utilities. Call 321-7372.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED. COL-
LEGE student or professional to share
2 bedroom mobile home, behind Hast-
ing's Ford. Owner away often. $225.00
& 12 utilities. Call 756-4819 after 6:00
p.m.
MONGOOSE IBOC 17" XTR-LX
Syncos, $550.00. Manitou SX-Ti shock,
$225.00 Call 830-3952.
HONDA ACCORD LXI, GOOD con-
dition. Call for details, 830-9214.
GT MOUNTAIN BIKE. 1 12 years
old. Excellent condition. Kept indoors.
Shimano brakes and shifters. Must
see. Paid $525.00 new, asking $250.00,
will negotiate. 353-2911.
SERVICES
PHYSICAL THERAPY MASSAGE
CLINIC ECU PT Program is holding a
massage clinic Wednesday, Nov. 19
from 5-9 p.m. at the Betk Building ,
Charles Blvd. Advance tickets $3.0010
min. $3.50 at door. Look for us selling
tickets on campus.
GREEK PERSONALS
SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsch-
es. Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Cor-
vettes. Also Jeeps, 4WD's. Your area.
Toll Free 1-800-218-9000 ext. A-3726.
GOV'T FORECLOSED HOMES
FROM pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax,
Repo's, REO's. Your area. Toll Free 1-
800-218-9000 ext. H3726 for current
listings.
GET PAID TO SHOP, eat out and
more! Free details. Send self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope to Busi-
ness Basics, PO Box 97-SP, West Ber-
lin, NJ 08091-0097.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed! for Plavers Club apt. Please
call 353-2885, ask for John, Paul or
.Heather.
HOUSE FOR RENT ONE block from
campus, 4 bedroom, 2 bath. Available
Dec. 1 or Jan. 1. Call us at 758-4755.
Hurry, it will go fast!
FIREPLACE IN OWN BEDROOM!
Females: need someone to take over
lease Jan. 1st. 4 bedroom at Tar River
only $200 monthly plus 14 utilities.
Cail 830-6882.
FEMALEMRU R00MMRTE
UIRNTEO - Players Club Rpts.
14 of rent and eKpenses. Call
Melissa at 321-7613.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
NONSMOKER, neat, responsible
roommate wanted to share two bed-
room, two bathroom apartment at
Forbes Woods starting December 1st.
For more information, call Beth at 931-
0448.
FEMALE R00MMRTE NEE0E0,
N0N-smoker, studious, to share
3 bedroom, 2 12 bath town-
house on ECU Bus route. Fully
furnished, 13 utilities. No pets.
Call Lesley, 754-2942.
'FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 3 bedroom duplex, E. 3rd St,
avail. Dec. 15, reasonable rent. 561-
7981, leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
JAN. 1, really cute house one block
from campus. Rent $195.00. Great
deal Social drinker OK but serious
students please call Jennie, Liz or Er-
icka, 830-5419.
GOLF CLUBS. SLAZENGER ONE
and three woods. Great for beginners.
$60.00 for both. Excellent condition.
Will throw in head covers. Call 353-
2911.
GETTIN OUT OF GREENVILLE
Sale-Brand new twin bed used one se-
mester $50. Leather sectional couch
$100, regular couch, bedroom furni-
ture, weight machine $50. 830-8909.
FREESTYLE BIKES BY HARO.
Mongoose, Hoffman, and
Diamond Back. Check out our
freestyle accessories. Call 355-
3050. Ask for Derrick or Benny.
FREE MOTOROLA PAGER. AVAIL-
ABLE options include voice mail, e-
mail services. Call 1-800-784-6452 Id
1675167 or write to Free Pagers, PO
Box 4112, Greenville, NC 27836-2112.
THANK YOU PI KAPPA Alpha for
the Pre-Downtown Tuesday night I We
had a great time and can't wait for to-
night! Love, Sigma Sigma Sigma
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA, WE had a
blast Thursday at the social. Hope to
do it again soon. Love, the fraters of
Tau Kappa Epsilon
HEY PI DELTA-HOPE you're getting
excited. Grab a Mister is just a day
away.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
Sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha: Taryn Cava-
co, Sara Arnesen, Amanda Austin,
Melissa Parks, Lori Cobb, Sarah Mc-
Connell, Lauren Biconish, Beth Wolf-
gang, Katie Caffrey, Cara Smith, Dei-
dre Smith, Casey Rushton, Christa
Jewell, Jennifer Rightsell, Kristen Hun-
nell, Jen Bryant, Nikki Frith, Meredith
Brown, Stephaine Shiffler, Emily Poe,
Donna Gail Cooper
CONGRATULATIONS DANA PATE
ON being elected president of Order
of Omega. We are so proud of you.
Love, your Delta Zeta sisters
FREE CASH GRANTS! COLLEGE.
SCHOLARSHIPS. Business. Medical
bills. Never Repay. Toll Free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. G-3726.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID - Student
Financial Services profiles over
200,000 individual scholarships,
grants, loans, and fellowships - from
private and government funding
sources. A must for anyone seeking
Money for college! 1-800-472-9135 ext.
F53621.
TUE. NOV. 11-SENIOR Recital, Mar-
tine Wallace, soprano and Jennifer
Worley, soprano, A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7:00 p.m. Fri. Nov. 14-Graduate
Recital, Holly Grace Maxson, composi-
tion, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00
p.m. Sun. Nov. 16-Brass Quintet
Chamber Music, Britt Theurer, Direc-
tor, AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall, 3:00 p.m.
Sun Nov. 16-Senior Recital, Mary
Landers, voice and Nicole Holder,
voice, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 5:00
p.m. sun. Nove. 16-Senior Recital,
Scott Peoples, percussion, A.J. Fletch-
er Recital Hall, 700 p.m. Sun. Nov. 16
ECU Saxophone Quartets, Jeff Blair,
Director, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00
p.m. Mon. Nov 17 - TuesdayThursday
Jazz Ensemble and Contemporary
Jazz Ensemble, Paul Tardif, Director,
AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
TIPS FOR WRITING PAPERS Work-
shops: Monday from 11:00 a.m12:00
noon and Tuesday from 3:30-4:30 p.m.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development will be offering this
program the week of November 17th.
If you are interested in this workshop,
contact the center at 328-6661.
THE SOCIETY FOR ADVANCE-
MENT of Management (SAM) will be
touring the Norfolk Port Authority Fri-
day, November 14. Anyone interested
in going may sign up with Mr. Childers
at 328-6063. Tuesday is a general busi-
ness meeting. See you there.
THE RCLS SOCIETY WILL haue
a meeting on Nou. 19th at 4:30 in
Minges Room 144. We will haue a
guest speaker to talk about
Aquatic Therapy. We mill also be
announcing the new society of-
ficers! Remember to keep the
can food coming In. You haue un-
til Nou. 24th at 4:88 p.m.
S1000S POSSIBLE TYPING PART
Time. At home. Toll free 1-800-218-
9000 ext. T-3726 for listings.
220,000 Titles!
www.lstmusic.com7ecu
Great Discounts!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DEALING WITH DIFFICULT PEO-
PLE" on Monday, November 17 at 4
p.m. in MSC Multi-Purpose Room, Kar-
en Boyd, Assoc. Dean of Students will
teach us how to keep our cool and
handle conflict and confrontation like a
professional. Contact Student Leader-
ship Development Programs, 328-4796
for details
STRESS MANAGEMENT WORK-
SHOP: THURSDAY from 3:30-5:00
p.m. The Center for Counseling and
Student Development will be offering
this program the week of November
17th. If you are interested in this work-
shop, contact the center at 328-6661.
LEDONIA WRIGHT AFRICAN
AMERICAN Cultural Center Art Gal-
lery: An art collection from the Kuba
Village of Africa is featured in the Blox-
ton House Art Gallery on the East Car-
olina University campus during regu-
lar office hous. Hours are Monday-
Thursday 8:00 a.m8:00 p.m. and Fri-
day 8:00 a.m5:00 p.m. Feel free to call
328-1680 for more details.
ECU'S R0ULT EDUCATION
PR0GRRM is offering Putting
your Course Online: R Houi-to For
Faculty Nouember 13th, 2:38
p.m in Mendenhali Student Cen-
ter. Co-sponsoring the PBS Rdult
Learning Satellite course are the
School of Education Office of
School Services, and Diuision of
Continuing Studies. The one-hour
broadcast will take a hands-on
approach to putting your course
online, and be followed by a
question and answer session
with a panel of experts. The pro-
gram will benefit faculty, deans,
diuision chairs, and public school
personnel who are interested in
online instruction. Cost is $5.80.
for further information or regis-
tration, please contact Dr. Uiuian
W. Mott at 328-6177 or ed-
mottOeastnet.ecu.edu.
CONTRA DANCEGREAT MUSIC.
SAT Nov. 15. Beginner lessons 7:00-
7:30, Dance 7:30-10:30. At the Willis
Building, downtown Greenville, corner
of Reade & 1st Streets. $3 for students.
Riley Baugus on the Banjo (Winner of
Claw Hammer Banjo at Appalachian
String Band Festival.) Molly Stouton
on the fiddle, Steve Terrill on the gui-
tar. ECU Folk & Country Dancers, 830-
5403.
ATTENTION: ALL GRADUATE
STUDENTS Did you receive a gradu-
ate student survey? if so, please take a
few minutes to complete and send
back in the on-campus envelope that
was provided with the survey or send
to Student Development 211
Whichard. We'd like to receive them
by Friday, November 14, 1997. Thank
you for your time!
AKC COCKER SPANIEL PUPPIES.
beautiful colors, bred for tempera-
ment. First shots and wormed. Black
$250; buff $200. Call 353-4244.
1997 JEEP WRANGLER-SE. White
with black softtop. Immaculate condi-
tion, only 6K miles. 18 months left on
factory warranty. Many options.
$15,000. Call Rick 816-4423(w! 355-
0888(h).
1993 NISSAN SENTRA XE. Excel-
lent condition! Tilt cruise, AC, power
steering, AMFM cass. 67,000 miles.
Must sell! $6,000! Call Adam at 758-
6444.
1990 GEO STORM-GSI Sport, great
condition, AMFM cassette, air condi-
tioning, fog lights, recent tune-up.
$4,000. Call 321-3860.
HELP WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
FOR 4 bedroom house 5 min. walk
from campus. $182.50mo 14 utili-
ties. Call Elizabeth @ 752-7325.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED BY
January 1, 1998 to sublease 3 bed-
room apartment in Wilson Acres. $230
a month. Call Tracy, 758-9245.

FEMRLE NON-SMOKER R00M-
MRTE needed for apt. 3 blocks
from campus, $255 a month and
12 utilities. Call 752-1652.
WANTED: NURSING STUDENTS:
INDIVIDUALS interested in helping
the Dept of Health Promotion & Well-
Being to join us at an information table
for the ECU campus on Nov. 20, 1997
for Great American Siiokeout Day. For
more information call Nicole at 328-
6793. Please respond by Nov. 13,1997.
Also in need of Visual Demonstrations
such as model of smokers heart or
lung.
ALPHA PHI. YOU ALL are doing
great in soccer, keep it up! Special
thanks to our coaches Luke and Clay!
A GREAT BIG THANK you to the
Rugby Team for the social last Thurs-
day. We had a great time and can't
wait to get together again soon! Love,
the sisters and pledges of Pi Delta
�" TRAVEL
SPRING BREAK
Jamaica rw w
Panamas bmi'
�i8rMa �mn
NOW HIRING REPSI
hwn-tfiMww.andleWumroertours.com I
Book Today
VisaMCAmexDisc
1-800-234-7007
rfffl
FROM TOUR BUB
AM) WU2, RIC&ARD
PERSONALITY-WHAT TYPE ARE
You? workshop: Wednesday from
10:00-11:00 a.m. The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development will
be offering this program the week of
November 17th. If you are interested
in this workshop, contact the canter at
328-6861.
MANAGING TEST ANXIETY
WORKSHOP: Wednesday from 3:30-
4:30 p.m. The Center for Counseling
and Student Development will be of-
fering this program the week of No-
vember 17th. If you are interested in
this workshop, contact the center at
328-6661.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU . ��
$ A � T1 �n �� NeedTSnibtrlaiuIboots
G A S H ���!g�k�j.�
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We aiso buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coits � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereca, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI Ift00-12fl0,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in fcent of Wechovto downtown, drive to back door & ring buner
FEMRLE NEEDED BSBP TO sub-
lease 2 bedroom apt.
1212.58mo. plus 12 utilities.
CallRmy, 353-4153.
PAID MARKINGMANAGEMENT
INTERNSHIPS.
The Colorworks is currently recruiting on
campus tor a limited number of summer
�98 management positions. Gain Hands-on
experience and ouild your resume. Last
summers average earnings 7,223.
Minimum CPA 2.0. For more information
and 'n schedule an interview
Call 1-800-477-1001.
FREE SPRING BREAK TRIPS! Put
posters on campus, earn free trips! No
selling requiredl Bahamas, Cancun,
Florida, Jamaica! Best prices and
trustworthy company! springbreak-
travel.com 1-800-678-6386.
CYPRESS GRRDENS, 1 G-2 bed-
room condos on 18th Street. Free
cable and water seiner. Half
month free to ECU students on
new one-year contract. Call
Ulainright Property Manage-
ment, 756-6219.
-bLEAN ROOMMATE NEEDED IM-
MEDIATELY Two blocks from Plaza.
� "205 plus 12 utilities and phone. Col-
'ijge undergraduate preferred. Call Phil
'today for info: 321-2813.
CRNN0N COURT, 2 BEDROOM
townhouses on ECU bus route.
Free cable. Half month free to
ECU students on new one-year
contract. Call Ulainright Property
Management, 756-6289.
WANTED: INDIVIDUALS TO
SHARE their story it an infcrmation
booth on how tobaixo has mpacted
their life. Suggested topics might in-
clude heart disease and lung disease.
Please contact Nicole at Health Promo-
tions & Weil-Being at 328-6793 by Nov.
13, 1997.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn great money. Confidential em-
ployment. Call today, 747-7686.
HELP NEEDED WITH YARD work,
weedingtrimming flower beds and
shrubs. Yard is part of annual Green-
ville garden show Need your own
transportation. Flexible hours. $6hr.
355-1793
6 Days - Most Meals - Free Partie� - Includes Taxes
7 Nights AirHotel - Free Meals - 24Hrs Free Drinks
7 Nights Air&Hotel � Save $150 on Food 4 Drinks
EXOTIC DANCERS AND EXOTIC
Bartenders - $1,000-$1.500 weekly.
Sid's, 919-580-7084 Goldsboro.
Cruise
6 Days - Most Meols - Fi
CtifiCUft
7 Nights AirHole! - Free Mi
Jamaica
7 Nights Air&Hotel � Save $1
Florida $119
South Beoch, Panomo City, Daytona. Cocoa Beoch
Spring Break Travel - Our 11th Year!
1-800-678-6386
Reasonf 21
Featured
Features
ithe I � �
eastcarohnian
-
v yac
-1

�Jl"fe





Do
for ECU
Or for a portable CD player, whichever floats your boat.
The administration Has said they're
looking for a new university sym-
bol, something other than PeeDee Pirate.
We at The East Carolinian would like to
help them in their deliberations.
Send us your idea, for a new ECU logo
before our Nov. IS deadline.
We'll pick our favorite and give that per-
son a portable CD player. Then we'll run
all of serious logos we receive in the Dec.
4 issue of the paper and on our website at
www.studentmedU.ecu.edu.
Here's your big chance to help the ECU
administration and show your school
spirit (or how badly you really want a
portable CD player).
Bring your entries to our offices in the
Student Publications Building.
V r
X3 Q : X
� v- ��f �

1
,f
m(

f
I
I
!
Put on your
thinking cap
endu5
logo idea.

H �
��y , i" ma ljg
i
��li-iy


Title
The East Carolinian, November 13, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 13, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1240
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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