The East Carolinian, August 28, 1997







THURSDAY
AUGUST 28. 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Residence hall overcrowding comes to end
Students in Jarvis could be
moved as early as next week
ANGELA KOENIG
NEWS WRITER
An end is near to the on-campus housing crunch that land-
ed more than 100 students in Jarvis Hall, previously slated
for renovations due to asbestos contamination.
The 140 students currently residing in Jarvis could be in
other dorms as early as next week. According to Manny
Amaro, director of University Housing Services, the moving
process will probably begin next Tuesday.
"We still have people moving into their rooms in other
dorms on campus Amaro said. "We are in the process of
calling them to see if they are coming
According to .Amaro there are approximately 200 people
left to contact who have not yet checked into their rooms
and out of this group approximately 150 will
not show up.
"By next Tuesday we hope to start making
calls to people in Jarvis and telling them we
have a new place for them Amaro said.
The latest possible date for students to
remain in Jarvis is the end of this semester.
"In December we will have people graduating
and that will open up spaces Amaro said.
"Our numbers always go down significantly
after that (graduation)
The housing problem began in mid-July
when more students than projected sought on
campus housing. "We were holding steady at
the average until then and then we saw a huge
peak Amaro said.
"We projected the number of people who
would want housing from the number (of stu-
dents) the administrative department gave
us. What happened was one percent more
freshmen were admitted and, on top of that,
the return housing number increased Amaro
said.
Normally an average of 48 percent of stu-
dents return to live on campus but the num-
ber has increased now to 53 percent. Usually
many residents cancel their housing contracts
during the summer, creating more spaces, but
these cancellations did not occur in such
quantities this year.
There are no longer triple occupancy rooms in Jarvis.
only double occupancy ones. According to Amaro. by
Monday. Aug. 18, students were no longer living in triples.
Placing three students to a room was not an option
University Housing officials wanted to use to solve the
space problem or to allow more students to live on campus.
"We actually could have tripled more, but at the last
minute when people were calling, we were telling them
'Here's an apartment listing Amaro said. "We used up all
Fridley,
McLawhorn run
A vi a n in B RI (� (. s
s 1 f f tt H I I i R
Manny Amaro,
director of University
Housing Services.
PHOTO COURTESY OF
NEWS BUREAU
Jarvis Hall (above) has been the site of temporary housing for many freshmen
Stephanie Miller, Ebbony White, and Megen Royerson (left to right, below
PHOTO BY AMANOA PROCTOR
the beds we had in the system and that's the best we could
do. We took care of everyone who we had put on a waiting
list who was a freshman
Although Jarvis can hold 160 students, only enough
rooms to house 140 people were opened. According to
Amaro, when the housing problem became apparent the
rooms were painted and fixed up for the incoming stu-
dents. The rooms do have air conditioning for which the
residents are not being charged.
According to Amaro there is asbestos in between the
walls, but there is
none in any places
which would be a
health hazard to the
residents living there.
Wayne Parsons, hall
coordinator for
Gotten, Fleming and
Jarvis, said the atti-
tude of residents in
Jarvis has been posi-
tive and the largest
dilemma has been
people wanting to
remain in their cur-
rent rooms with their
current roommates.
"Right now I'd say that hall has a better sense
of community more than any other I've been
in lately as far as interacting with the RA's and
each other Parsons said. "We've had more
requests about staying in there and not being
moved out than anything else
According to .Amaro on-campus students in
other residence halls who want room changes
will probably do so at the same time as stu-
dents will be moved out of Jarvis. "We are
going to try to have people do little quick
change arounds before moving people out of
Jarvis Amaro said.
Students will be moved out of Jarvis based on their
housing contract dates.
Renovations on Jarvis have been postponed until
January, when the students will be moved out. The resi-
dence hall is one of the original buildings on campus which
opened in 1909. According to .Amaro it was renovated 10-15
years ago and individual air conditioning units were placed
in the; rooms. The individual units ruined the walls and
caused damage to the hall, which now has to be repaired.
such as
left).
As the time for town council elections draws closer, two
candidates have stepped forward. Inez. Fridley. the asso-
ciate director for facilities management at Fast Carolina,
and Stephen McLawhorn, a student of East Carolina
University.
Kir the past l years 1 have enjoyed being on the
town council. I feel I have been doing a good job said
Fridley.
As a veteran of the town council, Fridley is currently
working on many projects. These projects include
Greenville's downtown area restoration, the Greenville
Greenway and the purchase of a new pump truck for the
city.
"I feel that the issues I stand for are very important.
The restoration of the downtown area is important for
the town and the university. I don't believe that the
downtown area will go back to retail stores. The area will
probablv ,tart opening up restaurant, insurance agencies,
and legal offices. The university has even become a play-
er in these changes said Fridley.
"1 have been on the council for a long time. Some peo-
ple believe that there should be a length on the time
spent in office, but I believe that if you are doing a good
job and vou are enthusiastic about what you are doing,
stick with it Fridley added.
McLawhorn. the new candidate in this election, feels
the need for some changes.
"1 started to get interested in the elections when we
where having some rental problems. There was some-
property across the street that was a real eye sore. We
could not get anyone to help us get it straightened out
McLawhorn said.
McLawhorn also had many other opinions that were
starting to form. These opinions have turned into his
campaign strategy. McLawhorn feels his points need to
be taken into serious consideration, because thev have a
strong effect on students. Greenville's no-parking situa-
tion downtown, the three-person occupancy law are
points of concern for the candidate.
"The new no-parking situation dow mown from one in
the morning until six will cause an increase in the
amount of people driving while intoxicated said
McLawhorn.
He also feels that the town needs to consider ECU
students when making and enforcing housing laws, many
of which are currently unfavorable to students.
"Since this is a university town, many college stu-
dents are living together. Greenville has a three-person
occupancy law that may students do not know about. In
one residence you are only allowed to have three people
with different last names. If this law is broken, you can
be evicted without a moment's notice. It is not fair for
many students who can not afford a different housing sit-
uation McLawhorn continued.
"I felt that my opinions need to be confronted. The
elections are non-partisan. I paid my S12 and entered
into the election. I had had enough said McLawhorn.
New
sciencetech
building in
ECU's plans
JACQUELINE I). CELL I'M
N E W S EDITOR
Carie Oavenport, a sophomore social work maior, started her day off right in one of the many new parking spaces created
this semester between the library and 10th Street
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
The final election dates come
in November, and both of the
candidates are hoping to get East
Carolina students to support
them.
"I have worked with the stu-
dents for 30 years. I have aware-
ness of the students concerns. 1
hope that they consider my cam-
paign said Fridley.
"I would like all of the stu-
dents to come out and vote; we
need as many numbers as we can
get said McLawhorn.
Important Issues for the Candidates
Downtown Area Restoration
Greenville Greenway
New City Pump Truck
Steven McLawhorn
Downtown Parking
Three-person Occupancy Law
Resolving Rental Problems
This close-up of campus shows the proposed site of
the future science and technology building. It will
stand between the General Classroom
building (28) and 10th St.
MAP COURTESY OF MARKETING FOR BUSINESS SERVICES
The Chemistry Department and the
school of science and technology have a
new facility in their future.
Funding for the first phase leading to
this building has been approved, but con-
struction is still far in the future.
"The money coming in now is for pre-
planning and design said Dan Bishop,
University comptroller. "The actual fund-
ing (for construction) will be down the
line. This is for hiring a designer and archi-
tect, and for layout. The architect will also
do an estimated cost of the building
This proposed building will enable the
Chemistry department to move out of
Flanagan and provide both the Chemistry
and the Science and Technology depart-
ments with updated equipment, labs, lec-
ture halls and research space.
The steps involved in obtaining funding
for a construction project such as this are
divided, and the money that will be need-
ed to prepare the site and construct the
building is still in the process of being
SEE SCIENCE PAGE 2
In Tuesday's edition of The East Caroimian,
Dr. George Harrell. assistant vice chancellor of
administration and finance, was incorrectly
identified. TEC appreciates students and fac-
ulty, such as Dr. Harrell, who cooperate with
us as we strive to bring accurate information to
the campus community:
THURSDAY
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' THURSDAY
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2 Thursday, August 28. 1997
no
V
The East Carolinian
LSU looking for answers to death caused by drinking
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - Administrators at Louisiana State University
thought they had done everything right, pushing through a campus-wide alco-
hol ban that covered fraternity and sorority houses.
Still, the school's wild reputation persisted. Just last week, an annual list
tabbed LSI as the nation's lOth-best "party school
Rarlv Tuesday, police called to a fraternity house found a dozen students
passed our on the floor, some of whom had apparently celebrated bids to join
Sigma Alpha Kpsilon with heavy drinking.
One was dead. Three others were hospitalized.
The coroner said Benjamin Wynne. 20, had a blood-alcohol level of 0.588
percent - nearly six times the legal limit for automobile drivers. Authorities
said he apparently drank himself to death at an off-campus party and bar.
Vvnne. of Covington. L likely had at least 24 drinks Monday night,
Marcus Wright, director of the local Office of Alcoholic Beverage Control, said
in today's editions of The Advocate newspaper. Wynne then returned to the
fraternity where he was a pledge.
"What is frustrating is that there is no way to manage them (students) off
campus Chancellor William Jenkins said. "It is difficult enough managing on
campus
After Wynne's death, the national headquarters of Sigma Alpha Epsilon
suspended its LSI chapter, which has 130 members and recruits, and shut
down pledge activities until an investigation was completed.
It was a staggering blow to the university and also to fraternities, which
have struggled for years with an "Animal House" perception of binge drink-
ing and wild parties that sometimes end in death.
In the past year alone, severa; fraternities have been suspended and sued
over deaths linked to alcohol. In one instance. Lambda Chi Alpha suspended
a I niversity of California-l-os Angeles chapter last month after two members
drowned at Like Mead, ("riminal charges also resulted. Eight members of a
Maryland fraternity were charged with manslaughter after an alcohol-poison-
ing death. And in Potsdam. N.Y, eight members of Theta Chi pleaded guilty
in the hazing death of a 17-year-old pledge who choked on his own vomit after
drinking alcohol.
Sigma Nu and Phi Delta Theta fraternities decided in March to ban alco-
-hol at chapter houses nationwide l)eginning in 2XH). Some universities
��alreadv have banned alcohol at fraternities.
� Last fall, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation chose six schools to take
part in an S8.6 million program to curb binge drinking on and off campus. In
April, the National Interfratemity Conference chose five colleges to test a fra-
ternirv and sorority conduct code that included a ban on alcohol.
Jenkins said rolkv ruixe no o idenc: the students were forced to drink :n
,iart of a hazing :tual.
Vnne apparently went to a private party and to Murphy's Bar, a few
blocks from the fraternity house, Wright told the newspaper. Witnesses said
.people were so drunk ar the bar that some were taken out in shopping carts.
Fraternity President Jason Griffin works at Murphy's, said Hillar Moore
" III, an attorney representing the fraternity. Investigators were checking to see
whether laws were broken at the parry or bar.
. The bar earlier this year paid 81.650 in fines for allowing underage patrons
to drink or have alcohol. It was closed Tuesday night.
LSU's "top 10" party ranking came a week ago in a guide for high school
J, seniors issued by the Princeton Review. The listing and the school's reputa-
tion bother school officials.
Heavy drinking at the 28.000-student school is "a myth LSU health ser-
" vices coordinator Nancy Matthews said. Drug and alcohol consumption sur-
veys show the school to he "about average" when compared to other univer-
sities, she said.
-v
Science
continued from page 1
I
approved by the State Legislature.
"Nothing's final; the signatures are not on it. It has been recommended
Bishop said.
Senator Fd Warren. O-Pitt. has supported the bill for the new building in
the Stare LefpstotufC.
The Board of Trustees decided at their meeting on July 25 that the new
building will be located between the General Classroom building and 10th
street. The prelimmarv plans attempt to leave the majority of the trees
located in that area undisturbed.
ECU Names Brinson Distinguished Professor
Dr. Mark Brinson, a professor of Biology at East Carolina University, has
been named the College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor for
1997-98.
In announcing the award, Dean Keats Sparrow of the College of
Arts and Sciences, said the recognition is one of the highest honors given to
the member of the faculty.
Brinson is a 24-year veteran at ECU. He has been active in research
related to coastal wetlands and has helped developed courses for both
undergraduate and graduate students.
Brinson is the author of 29 journal articles, seven book chapters and
29 reports. He was the associate editor for "Estuaries" and the co-editor of
"Forested Wetlands a volume in the Ecosystems of the Wforld Series.
ECU Picks Greek And Roman Expert
For Endowed Humanities Post
Dr. Roger Allan Hornsby, a professor of the University of Iowa, has joined the
East Carolina faculty as the Whichard Distinguished Chair of the
Humanities for the 1997-98 academic year.
Hornsby is the third professor to hold the Whichard Chair. He will teach
in the classical studies interdisciplinary program in the ECU College of .Arts
and Sciences.
Hornsby holds an international reputation as a Latin scholar and literary
critic whose interests extend to the study of coins and to greek and Roman
archaeology. He is the author of several books and numerous articles whose
subjects range from Platonic philosophy and the epic poetry of Vergil, to
Byzantine and early Christian art and architecture.
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r
oDinion
The East Carolinian
:
eastiSarolinian
AMY IROYSTKRftaw
CELESTE WILSON Men" ���
MATT HEOE IMM A-ANDAROSSSp-M.
1Jlm� D. KELL.M ��.�� T�ACt I.AUMCH taM"
AM NOA A.ST.N .�- DAVID SOTHE.LAND taM�
ANDY TNM IM.H. C-OU M�H� H-ewlte
HEATHKn munass ���
jr-iinii it i �'�- � "�-���
oimew
11, .he laa, i�ue we focuaed our a.rennon on d. fumbled acadium expansionproject. Thi,
:week another impending campus project, a new science and technology building otters
i KU orropportumty to leam to. past mistakes, .f the scence and tech-
ZZZ buildina will not be ready until the year'2010, then let's jus. say so.
5 I�� as 7arge � d are going to be planned, there redly should be some son of
j tlEvSure. we undersund that things J�� "
: is a point when someone should put their foot down and call it like it is.
hernias if all projects taken on by the university take a lifetime to start, build and
: complete. Students can finish a degree before some structures are finished.
: Takine a elance back at past projects, a pattern emerges. , -
5 StudentTecreation Center took approximately five years untd ,t was compte and
: ,he Lib� Science Building still stands looking like an empty shell while students walk
��� torn acon LL are. just to get to their classes. And, of course, the expan-
i of fTwdTFiclden Stadium has caused an uproar because it will not be completed m
�meters, home fedrt game, nor the second and most M,j ��e
The university promises time and time again these projects will be completed for the
1 uJtheSU But, the projects continue to be heIM.�� � -�
already. With the enrollment at the univers.cy mcreasmg at the ra eit is today, people
he earme outside on the ground before we have a new dining facility.
The ��t� and Technology Building is to hou the chemistry department and
provide the university with much more modem labs and equipment. How long will flm
Ittuld ending three, to or seven year, before any student wil, be able to enjoy
vV he unTversity the credit it deserves fo, building such facilities to enhance our educa-
rion strengthen our bodies and practically giving us the opportunity to touch the sk We
�hope"ome students who are here now are lucky enough to get the benefits of the ted-
ities before they graduate.
OPINION
Commenting on women's size always inappropriate
OPINION
Natasha
fHILLlPS
Generalist Physician Program helps poor
ECU'S involvement in this
program's origins should
bring great pride to the entire
student body and faculty, I'm
proud to say I attend a
university that promotes and
encourages helping those less
fortunate.
The Generalist Physician Program at
ECU is an excellent concept which
continues to positively affect every-
one it touches. This six-year $20 mil-
lion project is a necessity. Anyone
who has ever been in need of medical
attention knows the significance of
having access to trained and obtain-
able physicians.
The program was started in 1W
with the intention of increasing pri-
mary care availability to those in rural
areas. Often, people living in such
locations lack access to medical facil-
ities and qualified doctors. By
encouraging medical students to par-
ticipate in this reform process, every-
one benefits.
The Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation, the Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, the North
Carolina Office of Rural Health and
others have or will invest millions of
dollars promoting this program Also,
several scholarships have been
awarded to numerous students who
promise to practice as general physi-
cians in rural areas.
Hopefully, by establishing such a
program, interest will be heightened
and more medical students will
become involved.
Many medical students andor
doctors choose to defer from practic-
ing in rural areas because it's less
desirable than working in private
practice or working at a hospital;
however, others choose to participate
because they believe in the concept
of bringing aid to the poor andor des-
perate. Whatever their choice may
be, all doctors are needed, appreciat-
ed and valued.
ECU's involvement in this pro-
gram's origins should bring great
pride to the entire student body and
faculty. I'm proud to say I attend a
university that promotes and encour-
ages helping those less fortunate.
Letter to the Editor
Three-person ordinance important issue in upcoming election
Healthy thin women have in
recent years bared the
suspicious eye of media-fed
strangers who, armed with
their new knowledge of eating
disorders, often think nothing
of openly questioning the
health of thin women.
Would it ever be acceptable to
describe someone as diabetically fat or
even canccrouslv thin? Probably not.
Why then has it become acceptable in
our society to describe thin women as
anorexically skinny?
In a world where supermodels
dominate advertising campaigns and
the svelte image is heralded as the
pinnacle of physical beauty, damaging
pressures to maintain a thin line have
become the issue du jour.
This is as it should be. The increas-
ing number of women suffering from
eating disorders is alarming The only
hope for combating anorexia and
bulimia may be through national
attention.
This said, there are thin women
who are healthy Granted, it may be
that nature has simpiy blessed these
women with a few more years of thin
thighs before inevitably taking its
course.
Whatever the case, healthy thin
women have in recent years bared the
suspicious eye of media-fed strangers
who, armed with their new knowledge
of eating disorders, often think noth-
ing of openly questioning the health
of thin women.
I am five feet, seven inches tall and
I weigh approximately 115 pounds. I
am underweight bv 15 pounds. I have
asKeu ooctors aoout my wesgnt ana
they tell me that considering my level
of activity and my mother, who was
also underweight until her thirties, I
am perfectly healthy. I have been told
to watch mv weifjht in case it should
drop, but otherwise not to worry.
So, when women like myself hear
the half-joking tone of casual acquain-
tances asking as they often do, if I am
anorexic, what should I say?
Over the years I have thought of
some excellent answers which I am
usually too afraid to respond with. If I
actually said, "Yes, I have anorexia, I
wonder what they would say back. I
mean, what if I responded, "Yes.
Please, could you help me?" to a casu-
al acquaintance? They would be
shocked. . , �
They would be shocked because
even if someone does suffer from an
eating disorder, he or she would likely
not discuss this casually.
Most commonly thin women hear
well-intentioned comments about
their size. People will say, "You are so
thin or "Do you eat?" or "What size
arc you?" When I hear these com-
ments, I never know what to say.
Usually I want to tell most people,
"I wish I were your size
If I responded back, "What size
are you?" I may very well be offending
larger people.
I alreadv hear the lofty protests ot
readers who have no svmpathv for my
position wnatsoever. it is commoniy
held that the chin person has no right
to complain.
People who insist on commenting
are cither tactless or insecure with
their own weight.
If the society which places thin
women on a pedestal is to blame for
negative body images and conse-
quently disorders, then I wish casual
commenters would consider this: by
commenting they are perpetuating
society's obsession with women's size.
The Greenville City Elections are
upon us again and we find that
Greenville's three-person occupancu
ordinance is still unchanged. Inez
Fridley helped to create this law and
openly supports it. I don't understand
how someone such as Inez can work
in the ECU Department of Housing
and yet condone the practice of evict-
in" unrelated people in our communi-
tysimply because they choose to live
in groups of four. I feel that this ordi-
nance is unjust and an invasion of our
privacy, as do the vast majority of peo-
ple I've talked with. I feel that we
cannot allow anonymous and
unfounded phone calls to put city
inspectors in our bedrooms any longer
and we must stop the continued evic-
tions of innocent people under Inez
Fridley's occupancy ordinance.
I would like to know why a com-
munity that is blessed to host the
third largest public university has the
most restrictive occupancy code in
the state. I look forward to hearing
Inez Fridley and the incumbents of
the Citv Council explain.
Luckily, another candidate has
risen to the challenge of providing
representation for our entire commu-
nity, young and old. Steve
McLawhom has filed as a candidate
in City District 3. I fee! that
McLawhom is a balanced candidate
because he is a homeowner, married
and a student at ECU. 1 approve of
Steve's campaign promise to change
this ordinance to accomodate four
unrelated people, thus bringing
Greenville into league with the rest of
the state.
It is my opinion that Steve
McLawhom's opponent has abused
and neglected the members of our
community in many ways. I hope that
your readers will choose to elect
someone that is more fair and com-
passionate. We cannot re-elect a
politician that is unfairly kicking pec
pic out of their homes while at the
same time stuffing three people m a
room over in Jarvis Hall at ECU.
Please be a better neighbor by reps'
tering to vote before Oct. 10 and sup,
porting Steve McLawhom for cicf
council on Nov. 4. Thank you.
Lucy Goodwin
Senior
PhilosophyPsychology
The only difference between the expression of an
opinion and an incitement in the narrowersense is
the speaker's enthusiasm for the result.
Eloquence may set fire to reason
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Supreme Court Justice, 1996
t
��
� f





Thursday. Auquw 28, 1997
comics
The East Carolinian
HOP-SCOTCH
by Nick Holt and Kate kohn
Wacred-Out Sam
BY WALLY LAMB
UW)b
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LAKH IMP USA
DO 14 F��l? i
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3 bedroom2 bath units
watersewerbasic
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all major kitchen
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� phone jacks in all
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� washerdryer hookups
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YOU DON'T
a HAVE A CAR?
Answers from Tuesday
EJUUO UUUUU UUUU
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Mexican Restaurant
M WE'RE HERE FOR YOU!
e 1997 Triburw hUdla StrviM. Inc.
All rights rMrv�d.
ACROSS
1 Sir's counterpart
6 Strikebreaker
10 Of this kind
14 Type of skirt
15 Sea eagle
16 Woods scion
17 Laughing
18 A job for the
police
20 More docile
21 Reverence
2� Rental contract
23 Have being
251 � Camera"
27 Call for attention
28 Calendar abbr.
30 Engaging in
chicanery
33 Gloomy
35"� Miserables
36 Classic cars
40 Middle East
bigwig
41 Entrances
43 Supporting shaft
44 Speed contest
45 Clamor
46 Publisher
48 Framework
51 Short haircut
52 Elec. unit
55 Sounds of
hesitation
56 Related
maternally
58 Rhone feeder
60 Understanding 8
62 Pocketbook 9
65 Laboratory 10
denizen 11
67 Rio data� 12
68 Relaxation
69 Feed the kitty 13
70 Feudal serfs
71�the mark 19
(obeyed) 24
72 Addict 26
73 Dilapidated
DOWN 28
1 Trading center 2g
2 Inter �
3 Antithetical
4 Certain building
5 Prosody
6 Tranqullize
7 Ship's personnel
Pangolin 39 Eastern
Hive occupant European
Overfill 42 Waterproof
� Heep garments
Bring to 47 Fish
conclusion 49 Sharp
Term of 50 Framework for
endearment drying
Highland group 52 Balance sheet
Snake, at times item
Special 53 Portuguese
Just A Hop, Skip & A
Jump From Campus.
Eat In Or Carry Out -
You'll Love Chko's
Without A Doubtl
assignment
Hebrew
measure
Unconscious
state
31 Without help
32 Mardi �
territory near
China
54 Composure
57 OK city
59 Requisite
61 Italian noble
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6 Thursday. August 28, 1997
The East Carolinian
reviews
Fleetwood Mac
The Dance
9 OUT OF 10
PAT RE ID
SENIOR WHITER
Run
tha.
did
� 1
Chalk up another reunion tour from the seventies to hit the big time. This time
the band in question is none other than the relationship wrecked Fleetwood
Mac. In the seventies, Fleetwood Mac had a good run of things w ith successful
tours and albums, but by far their outstanding achievement was the album
Rumours. Now, during the 20th anniversary of that album, the band's line-up for
t album have seen fit to try working together one more time. Not that they
n't get along the first time, it's just that they got along too well.
For those who know nothing about Fleetwood Mac, the main core of the
band was made up of two couples. The then-married John and Christine
McVie, and Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. Rounded out by drummer
Mick Fleetwood, the band was probably most well-known for their excellent
harmonies courtesy of Buckingham, Nicks, and the McVies. Unfortunately; dur-
ing the time of Rumours, the relationships in the band were beginning to sour,
and extraneous relationships were forming outside the band. While this was
excellent material for songs, it wrecked havoc on the members. Songs like "Go
Your Own Way "Dreams and "The Chain" were written by one member and
directed towards their significant other. Then in the case of Christine McVie's
"You Make Loving Fun the object of the song was her lover rather than her
husband John. These beautifully written testimonies of love helped make
Rumours one the most successful albums ever, but it led to dissension that even-
tually broke the band up.
Recently however, time has helped heal the wounds and members have
aided each other on individual projects, as well as playing together at the
request of President Clinton. Clinton used the band's hit "Don't Stop" all along
his campaign trail and has repeatedly declared himself a devoted fan. Finally,
when Buckingham enlisted Fleetwood as the drummer on his current solo
album, they realized enough time had passed that maybe they all could work
together again. Before long MTV had their grubby little hands in the project
and a live concert performance was planned. The fruits of that show were the
televised version oi The Dance, and the recorded version now available in stores.
The CD of The Dame actually plays a lot more like a greatest hits package
than a live album. The sound is so crystal clear and the versions are so dead-on
to their originals that the only really "live" aspect of the album is a bit of crowd
noise between the songs. With all the hits like "The Chain "Everywhere and
"Landslide The Dance seems aimed less for the devoted Fleetwood Mac fan
and more for the novice looking for a good starter CD.
Specific highlights include a beautiful piano verse intro to "Rhiannon" and
wonderful three part harmonies on songs like "Silver Springs Also included on
the disc arc some new songs. "Bleed To Love Her" is a new song that
Buckingham was working on at the time of the reunion, and "Sweet Girl" is
another new song that is typical of the Stevie Nicks ballad.
The lowest point on the album comes in the form of "Tusk Surprisingly
shoddy lyrics and music make listening to this one a chore. But the band more
than makes up for that with the final track, "Don't Stop Accompanied by the
University of Southern California Marching Band, "Don't Stop" flows with an
energy and a power that makes it irresistible. The ending of the song has each
member of Fleetwood Mac leaving the stage in turns as the USC Marching
Band continues playing, until finally it's only the Marching Band playing. This
saves the audience from any long drawn-out endings or good-byes and ends the
show with a class that was apparent throughout the show. Clearly not your usual
live CD, but Fleetwood Mac isn't your usual band either. Whether you're look-
ing for a way to get all of the great Fleetwood Mac songs, or if you're just look-
irfg for a CD to put on in the background while entertaining company or doing
some last minute work, The Dance is an excellent choice.
ECU artists honored in Kinston
Jennifer Tafe
STFF WRITER
ECU's artisitic influence expands beyond the boundaries of the Emerald City.
The Community Council for the Arts in Kinston is currently showing exhibits
bv four artists who are connected with East Carolina University.
Roxanne Reep, Seo and Sherri Eo, and Amanda Taylor Durant arc each fea-
tured in the Ans Center's latest exhibition. Their works will be on display until
Sept. 27 at the Arts Center at 400 N. Queen St. in downtown Kinston.
Despite the East Carolina connection though, each artist's work was select-
ed independently for the show.
The submission process begins when artists submit their works to the
Gallery Commission for review. Commission members from the community
vote on the works and choose the ones which appeal to a majority of the mem-
bers.
"They all submitted their work individually and were selected without any
plan to choose art from East Carolina University said Community Council for
the Arts spokesperson Bill Dermody.
He added the committee's decision came as no surprise.
"It really isn't surprising that many of the artists end up being from East
Carolina though, considering the reputation of the School of Arts
An installation by ECU professor Seo Eo and metalwork by East Carolina
graduate Sherri Eo are on display in the Hampton Exhibition Gallery.
"Seo Eo's work is an installation that was specifically designed for our gallery
space said Dermody.
Mixed media work by Roxanne Reep, another ECU professor, can be viewed
in the Arts Center's Minges Exhibition Gallery. Paintings by East Carolina grad-
uate .Amanda Taylor Durant are highlighted in the Permanent Collection
Gallery.
The Community Council for the Ans is a non-profit organization that was
founded to bring an to Lenoir County and Eastern Nonh Carolina. In 1990, the
Council renovated the historical Summrell and McCoy Building to house the
Ans Center.
"Basically, Kinston has a really tenacious community of artists; the new build-
ing and the Council's success is due to them explained Dermody
In its efforts to bring art into Lenoir county, the Community Council of the
Ans presents 24 exhibits each year. These presentations range from the Lenoir
County Locals Only Show to a national exhibition which attracts artists from all
over the country.
"We try to present a variety of exhibits instead of focusing any particular
theme said Dermody. "There isn't anything like the Community Council of
the Arts anywhere else in Eastern North Carolina
The public is invited to stop by the Arts Center to view these exhibits.
Regular operating hours are 10 a.m6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m
2 p.m. Saturday.
Comics capture the mainstream
This is the
column
where we focus
on the stuff you
miss and the stuff you
missed. We will examine
the books, albums,
movies and television
shows we feel deserve
further exploration. It's
the stuff we dug back in
the day
ITIOViereview
Cop Land docs crime right
ANDY TURNER
LIFESTYLE EDITOR

8 OUT OF 10
Good crime pictures should be dark
and dirty like a New York City gutter.
The stench should sting your nose
and make your stomach chum. The
rcaler, the better. Of course, it has to
be much more than that. Style up the
yang won't remedy tired plots and
rank acting performances. Most
importantly, it should not be a buddy
movie or involve anyone associated
with the movie (for lack of a better
word) Tango & Cash.
So listen, there's this new actor,
calls himself Sly Stone or Slyvester
Stallone or something, and he does a
hell of a job in Cop Land, a tale of
police corruption by New York cops in
the Jersey suburbs. So devoted to the
craft of acting, this guy didn't even
get paid for the movie. Hell of an
actor.
Honestly, Stallone does an impres-
sive job with a very low-key, non-typi-
cal performance in Cop iMnil. He
doesn't come out blazing as Sheriff
Freddy Hefflin. Freddy's no Rambo;
he reflects tenderly on his day while
"listening to a flaccid Springsteen song
tin one of the movie's few lame
moments). Freddy lost hearing in one
car after diving in a riser to save the
life of Liz Randone (Annabella
Sciorra). He serves as sheriff of the
fictional Garrison, New Jersey, a town
populated with cops from the Big
Apple. These cops are a crooked
bunch, and they are sans respect for
Mr. Freddy, whose dreams of being a
big city crime dog are unrealized due
to his hearing impairment.
Freddy is divided between loyal-
ties after a young cop. Murray Babitch
(Michael Rapaport), accidentally kills
Dale Williamson
SENIOR WRITER
I am and always have been a geek. As
a young child, when other five-
and six-year-old boys were
sparking their interest in
such activities as base-
bail, I was lost in the
world of toys and
comics. When I hit
those awkward
teenage years and
those same six-year-
old boys matured
into energetic youths
who had perfected the
art of baseball and
moved on to such things
us cars and (ikcs!) girls, I
was stili glued to my comics (I
had overcome my dependency on
toys by this point).
I continued to grow, and so did my
interest in comic books. As an under-
graduate, I was exposed to a whole
new world of comics, one that wasn't
necessarily for kids, one that dared to
explore more than men in tights. And
now, as a graduate student, I am still
an avid comic fan, and worse yet, my
addiction for toys has infected my sys-
tem again thanks to the resurgence of
StarWars.
Star Wars is not the only piece of
popular culture that is enjoying a
resurgence with the mainstream pop-
ulace. My old, true friend the comic
book is also on the rebound - sort of.
Way back in 1989, a little film
known as Batman broke box office
records across the nation and legit-
imized the superhero genre for
Hollywood. As a result, Hollywood
(and everyone else) took an intense interest in comic
books, thereby causing a significant boom in the industry.
That boom has since softened, but Hollywood has not for-
gotten the past. 0
Comic book merchandise is once again a hot commod-
ity, and many major film studios are investing in comic
book concepts hoping to capture another Batman. If this
summer is any indication as to what audiences want, then
Hollywood is not wasting its time and money. Men In Black,
based on the independent Malibu comic, looks to be this
year's biggest hit. Spam, based on the very popular Image
book of the same title, had an amazing $20 million open-
Even Batman and Robin think those tights are funny.
PHOTO COURTESY OF 0C COMICS
ing weekend, and even the critically and publicly panned
Batman & Rorni has grossed over $100 million in the U.S.
alone.
And the craze doesn't even begin to slow down there.
Many top talents in the film industry are wheeling and
dealing to get certain comic book projects off the ground. E
Wesley Snipes will soon be seen on the big screen as Blade,
the vampire-hunter hero popularized in the late 70s
thanks to Marvel's comic series The Tomb of Dracukr, David
Hasselhoff has agreed to play American super-secret super
hero Nick Fury in a feature film: and Kevin Sorbo's barbar-
SEE MOVIES, PAGE 7
cpncertreyie
Dylan upstaged by DiFranco
Cop Land stan the four horsemen of the apocalypse: Keitel. Stallone. DenNiro and Liotta.
PHOTO COURTESY OF MIRAMAX PICTURES
two black kids. Senior cop Ray Dolan
(Harvey Keitel). Murray's uncle, and
the other Copland cops try to get
Murray off by faking his death.
Internal affairs agent Moe Tilden,
played with excellent bravo by Robert
DeNiro, smells a rat and asks for
Freddie's help in getting to the bot-
tom of the matter. Freddy does not
know w hat to do. I le looks fur assis-
tance in the way of undercover
copdope fiend Figgsy (Ray Liotta).
But maybe Figgsy is full of it, too.
Written and directed by young gun
James Mangold, Cop Land is a great
little story. There are enough twists in
the story to avoid making the movie
stale. You get great tough-guy dia-
logue. Figgsy to Freddy: "Being right
isn't a bullet-proof vest There's suf-
ficient action and drama that builds
to a fairlv realistic ending.
Unfortunately, they have to tack on
that wretched tagline: No one is
alxve the law. You even have DeNiro
doing a voice-over at the end with
that moral-of-the-story-B.SSteven-
Segal-philosophy bit. That's really a
minor complaint though. Cop hind is
a powerful little movie with wonder-
ful performances. Stailone comes up
second onK to Liotta performance-
wise. Liotta's complex character owes
much to Jim Thompson's psycho red-
eyed crazy men. He looks like he has-
n't taken a bath since the end of
Goodfellas. DeNiro does well with his
limited time on screen. Keitel seems
to be walking through the motions in
this one, but still does a mote than
credible job.
If you're looking for a well-round-
ed and original crime movie, you owe
it to yourself to check this one out.
John Davis
assistant liff.styi.f. editor
Well, the problem with old legends like Bob Dylan is that
they're legendary. It is not without difficulty that legends
in their own time avoid the fact that their reputations usu-
ally precede and outweigh them. Such was the case Friday
night at the Virginia Beach Amphitheatre when Bob Dylan,
who is arguably the greatest modern songwriter, pulled a
big boo-lux) by having Ani DiiTaneo open up for him. Bob
was verv eclipsed.
This is not to say that I'm dissing Bob, whom I could
never dis, because in my mind he is the greatest modern
songwriter. Unfortunately, Bob's voice is not quite the
singer he once was. His voice, the entire show, was little
more than a mumbly whine. His song choice was also less
than exciting; most of his offerings were muddy countnfied
ballads that were not intended to fill the space of these
fancv new amphitheaters (which, by the way; all look the
same. I'm convinced the Illuminati are behind the
amphitheatct craze.) Most of Dylan's songs were new
songs from his latest albums, which meant that I was real-
ly unfamiliar with the entire show. Id have been happier it
someone had popped in a copy of Blood On The Tracts, even
though that is a pretty selfish thing to think.
It wasn't too thrilling to be pushed into easy hstening-
land after Ani DiFranco's show, which was electrifying and
energetic, to say the least. She delivered a powerful perfor-
mance, jumping and skipping all over the stage, giving her
fabulous band knowing looks and throwing her entire five
Ani DiFranco could do no wrong Friday night in Va. Beach.
PHOTO COURTESY OF RIGHTEOUS BABE
foot frame into the music. She played a mix of older mate-
rial as well as a healths dose of material from her last stu-
dio album. Dilate. The crowd, whom were Dylan fans tor
the most pan. responded enthusiastically to her songs, to
the point of demanding an encore from her.
Some of the best moments of the show included her
tear-jerking rendition of "Joyful Ciirl a song she vv rote for
her mother (veah. I know it sounds cheesy), a charged per-
formance of ��Gravel and a preview of the title track from
her upcoming album. "Little Plastic Castle a rant about
rude coffee shop owners (which I am convinced was
SEE DYLAN PAGE 7






r
s � , (i -i '�-
I
Thursday. August 28, 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
August
28 Thursday
Pirate Underground at 8-10:45 pm
in Mcndcnhtsll.
Groove Riders at Firehouse Tavern.
Paul Tardiff and Co. (live jazzat
Staccato
John Loy at the Percolator
Dambuilders and Cinnamon at
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
The Gladhands and The Fountains
at Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
Hobex and The Veldt at Lizard
and Snake in Chapel Hill
29 Friday
TBA at the Attic.
Colouring Lessons at Firehouse
Tavern.
Morris Day and The Time at
Walnut Creek in Raleigh.
Dyli
Da La Soul ptforms Aug. 30 in Raleigh
with 311.
PHOTO COUKTESY Of TOMMY BOY
SEE ITS SHOWTIME. PAGE 7
lan
continued from page 6
inspired by Raleigh's Cup A Joe).
She even delivered a few poems read
poetry slam style, much to the delight
of the crowd.
Unlike Dylan, who had a huge
cluttered stage with a large band.
DiFranco's setup was just herself on
acoustic guitar, her powerful drum-
mer and a new bass player. The trio
was dynamite, playing together flaw-
lessly.
It was amazing to watch this little
woman and her three piece acoustic
band draw an amphitheater full of
people into a no holds barred full on
rock and roll show. To top it all, her
soundman deserves much praise for
his crystal clear, CD-quality mix.
Sadly, there comes a point in
someone's careei when they are
bound to be eclipsed by the newer,
fresher talent. (Mv favorite example
of this: The J. Gcils band had U2
open for them in the early '80s.) At
least Dylan picked the best possible
artist to be eclipsed by. DiFranco is
quickly becoming one of the nation's
most influential and skilled musi-
cians.
Comics
continued from page 6
ic Kull The Conqueror is set to be
released any time now. And these are
rather obscure figures as far as the
non-comic book population is con-
cerned.
More significant projects include
an X-men movie, Nicolas Cage show-
ing off his muscles as the lead in a new
Superman movie, and, yes, another
Batman movie.
But this comic book craze does not
stop with feature films. It's spreading
like a plague all over the place - into
toystorcs, live-action TV shows, car-
toons, trading cards and even novels.
Comic fans and those in the comic
business see this widespread interest
as a good and bad thing. "Comics are
great because they let the general
public recapture their youth says
Eddie Sutton, manager and owner of
Heroes Are Here Too, a comic shop
located downtown. "The movies,
however, are a mixed bag
David Tilley, an employee of
Nostalgia Newsstand, another local
comic shop located off Dickinson
Avenue, agrees. "Batman ami Robin was
geared for non-comic book readers. It
was campy and over-the-top he
notes. "Spawn picked up interest in
that character, who is not that well l
known outside the industry. Still, I
don't think they've yet to do a really
good (comic book movie. I'm hoping
that the new Hate series on MTV will
help people realize that there is more
to comic books than men in spandex
and women with big swords
Both Sutton and Tilley are fasci-
nated by the fact that comics are so
popular in movies and television, yet
the industry itself is not fairing as
well. "The industry itself is collaps
ing, yet you have movies like Men In'
Black, which was an independent
comic that nobody bought, doing
great business says Tilley.
But don't worry about the future of
the comic book world. Sutton insists
that the industry is on an upswing
once again, thanks partly to the flood-
ing of merchandise and partly to the
restructuring of creative teams and
creative ideas. "People are finding out
that the basics still work. JLA, which
is a newly envisioned concept of an
old super hero team filled with the
likes of Superman, Batman and
Vender Woman, is the hottest new
mainstream book out at the moment.
And the team itself has never been
hotter
It does the heart good to know that
something as geeky as a comic book
can be hot with the mainstream. In
the immoral words of Huey Lewis, it
is indeed "hip to be square
PREREQUISni: ADRENALINE
your character, confidence and
decision-making skill, Again,
words other courses seldom use.
But they're the credits you need to
succeed in life. ROTC is open to
freshmen and sophomores with-
out obligation and requires
about five hours per week. Reg-
ister this term for Army ROTC.
ARMY ROTC
TKSittiTOTfmUtaCOOTSETOOCAKiaW
SSfn up for Military Science 1001 during drop-add. Check out the equipment
display on die 21st of august next to the Wright Place for details or visits
346 Raw! Building or call 32t-e9�7
inhtvA tftxttnmmi
Stop Complaining about Campus Issues
&
Do Something about Them.
The ECU Media Board
WELCOMES APPLICATIONS FOR
DAY STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVE
The board is seeking full-time students interested in serving as the day
student representative on the Media Board, the 11-person board which
governs the media at ECU.
The day student representative is one of nine students on the board and is
expected to attend a late afternoon meeting monthly.
For information, contact: ECU Media Board office
2nd floor, Student Publications Building
. 32&-6009
Deadline for applications is Friday, Sept. 5 at 5 p.m.
Register now for Student Legislative positions.
Also, positions for Elections Chair is open for the 97-98
school year.
Call 328-4726 or come by
Mendenhall 255 Between 9 a.m. & 5p.m.
! Before Sept 5th (1997).
The Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee
presents
' - -c-
Free live music!
i
�&
&
Thursdays, 8-10:45pm
?
Mendenhall Student Center
Social Room
(Across from WZMB)
ust 28,1997
Sky Dive
The ECU Media Board
WELCOMES APPLICATIONS FOR
Student Assistants
1. At least one student assistant is needed to assist with office
work at The East Carolinian.
2. One student is needed to provide graphics and design
assistance to the Media Board adviser.
You must be a full-time student with a minimum 2.0 GPA to apply.
Applications are now being accepted at ECU Media Board office on the 2nd floor
of the Student Publications Building. For more information, call 328-6009.





8 Thursday. August 28, 1997
in-style
The East Carolinian

Ashley Stove at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill (through Sunday).
Claire Hollev at Lizard and Snake
in Chapel Hill
30 Saturday
Melanie Sparks at Fi rehouse
Tavern
TBA at the Attic
Sneaky Pete at Peasant's
Bunker! at CD Alley at 4 pm and
the Percolator at 9 pm
311 and De La Soul at Walnut
Creek in Raleigh
Gilchard's Jaunt and Dom Casual
at Lizard and Snake in Chapel Hill
King Sized and the Tonebenders at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill
31 Sunday
The Veldt at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill
September
2 Tuesday
Funkytow n at the Attic
Lord Hill at Peasant's
Psycho Trash and Zoot Suit at
Lizard and Snake in Chapel Hill
3 Wednesday
Comedy Zone : Todd Yohn and
Bruce Frye at the .Attic
Hayride and Shirking Teeth at
Lizard and Snake in Chapel Hill
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event
that you'd like listed in our It's
Showtime column? If so, please send
us information (a schedule would be
nice) at:
It's Showtime
co Lifestyle Editor
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publication Bldg.
Greenville. NC 27858
SCHOOL OF MUSIC SEPT. SCHEDULE (Part one)
5 Friday
Faculty Recital: Duo Recital of Works by Beethoven, Schumann, and
Shostakovich, Kelley Mikkelsen, cello; Paul Tardif, piano, 8 p.m. at AJ. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
11 Thursday
Guest Recital: Gail Williams, horn, from the Chicago Symphony; Mary Ann
Covert, piano, from Ithaca College, 8 p.m. at AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall.
12 Friday
Guest Recital: Kick-off concert of "Viva Viola" workshop, Jonathan Bagg, violin,
and Jane Hawkins, piano, from Duke University School of Music, assisted by
Fritz Gearheart, violin, 4 p.m. at AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall.
13 Saturday
ECU String Orchestra with "Viva Viola" workshop guest violists, Fritz
Gearheart, director. A viola extravaganza featuring Bach's Brandenburg
Concerto No. 6, 3 p.m. at AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall.
15 Monday
Faculty Recital: Twentieth-Century American Music for Clarinet and Piano,
Nathan Williams, clarinet; Audrey Andrist, guest pianist, 8 p.m. at AJ. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
ATTIC
irtisement that
1997 contained
id listing for
igust 26.
Carolinian
regrets anyconffusion that
this may have caused.
an Spin
AN LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
must be typed, 250 words or
less, and must include your
name, major, year, and phone .
12-3 AM on yuffliu
Immediate openings are
available for the following
magazine staff positions:
0 Staff Writers
0 Staff Illustrator
O Advertising Sales Reps
0 Contributing Writers
& Illustrators
To apply, come by the Student Media
Board office on the 'second floor
of the Student Publications Bldg. or
call 328-6009 for information.
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�iT �k
5
: �.
9 Thursday, Augutt 28, W97
sports
The East Carolinian
Rrchouse spot for Pirates march their way to top
gridiron action
The Firehouse Tavern is the place to be for Sunday's NFL games. They also show the
Monday Night NFL game of the week, along with college football on Saturday's.
PHOTO BY JONATHAN SHEEN
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS F.OITOR
Ai the NFL and college football season begins, one bar in Greenville gives you
Jalf the games you need to see.
The Firchouse Tavern, located downtown on 5th Street, is the area's only
NFL licensed bar. This allows them to show several different NFL games
ISunday afternoon, and the Monday night game of the week. The Rrchouse
fTavern will also'show college football games Saturday afternoons.
r Paul Temple, the general manager, said there will be a game for any fan.
"fe have the DSS satellite Temple said. "We have the game packages, so
f we will be playing multiple games at once. You can come in and check out a
feature game on rhc wide screen bur we have 17 other TVs downstairs which
2 wit! be available to play a variety of other games as well
This Sunday will be the first time The Firchouse Tavern will be airing the
! Sunday NFL games this season. There will be no cover charge. Temple also
; said for the patrons who are over 21, there will be drink specials as fans cheer
for their favorite earns. fc
"u're getting some good drink specials as well on both days Temple
said.
As this is the first time The Firchouse Tavern has rried something like this.
Temple said they hope to get a good crowd in.
"I ope that.we'll establish a pretty decent crowd Temple said. "I don't
think there is anyone else downtown who has the space and has the satellite
package we have, so I think we'll be the only ones to have it, so that should
work for us
Another plan, in the near future, is live of bands after the games. Temple
said that probably won't be the case this week, but the plan is in the works.
"It probably won't be this Sunday, but don't hold me to that because we
may run it this Sunday, but we're calking about implementing some bends
after the game on Sunday, which will leave us just one day a week we don't
have bands Temple said. "We have live music every night of the week except
for Sunday and Monday right now, and we're talking about implementing on
Sundays, so we'll see
All football fans know that you can't watch a game without food, so Temple
has already put a plan into action that will feed the patrons.
"We are going to cater some food from a couple different places Temple
said. "It will be Subway one week. Pizza Hut the next week, and so forth. I
think this week I will plan on catering some food from Subway
The Firchouse Tavern will open up on Sunday afternoons at 1 p.m. and 8
p.m. on Monday nights.
Temple notes that if this goes well, and there is an established crowd, then
they might consider doing the same thing during basketball season.
"After football season, if it's going well if we have an established crowd on
Sunday for those games, I wouldn't be against running basketball games
Temple said.
Temple said they plan on adding another big screen television in the near
future.
"We're going to have another wide screen put in here soon, so well have
two wide screens down here Temple said.
So for all you football fanatics who want to watch several games, The
Firehouse Tavern is the place to be.
"There just isn't a better setting to watch football on Sunday than down
here because, like I said, you can watch all the games at once Temple said.
ECU H0M� GAMES
THiS WEEKEND
.SSdMHwIfCUwI-
Seyfeet tHantit Jk4 tf� ECU Class,
ftariwawig m rAtaw day tsiaf
fMt note's �e tegm ft jm& �
and Ss&nJey's Kim wot JNgm at 4
p,m. AS pras wit be fjfcp! at
Miftges Ceflstum.
teg. 30 $fcj women's Meet
iair
fel 31 (Stm.f The bhr's soccer team
w$ Ita! ttoft CoJag tt 2 pm
A teeter matches m played m
fjuffiiftg Twck this year, beftmd
Karrmgton FW off Charles 5M
I
Wide feeerwer Larry Shannon wtH
rrria a? least two fames this season
with a severe sfMatned ankle and a
norMhapiaced fracture of the fibu-
la suffered this weekend in a
scrimmage game. Law season
Shannon caught 39 catches ft 834
yaawdthme touchdowns.
In Monday's Conference USA
weekly teleconference. Head
Coach Steve Logan said be hopes
Shannon will be back soon.
"Lorry Shannon, oar wide
receiver, took a severe, server ankle
sprain in the scrimmage Iogan
said. "He's going to mis probably
the first two games maybe more
We'ie gptitg to have to see how
dial works oul Tm hoping he'll be
back for Conference USA gsmea,
but other than (hat we've
remained retariveh'heatthv
Greenville native, junk Troy
Smith, will replace Shannon. The.
6-3,180 poundJunk has 51career
catches with three touchdowns
Login is confident in his
replacement.
"He's as good as Larry Shannon
and he's been proving that for the
last two years Logan said.
Ellen Walker
STAFF WNITF.R
Football games, fall weather and the marching band are all coming out to play a
tune of their own this season.
A lot has changed in the past five years since Chris Knighten has been in
charge of the band.
"I see a lot more positive energy among this year's group and they are will-
ing to work hard at practice, even in record heat Knighten said.
In addition to the change of morale, the squad is now sponsored by
University Administration, the athletic department. Student Government
Association (SGA) and the School of Music. Such sponsorship allows for finan-
cial help and also helps for recruiting people with majors other than music or
music education.
Such sponsorship also allows the Marching Pirates to go to one NFL game
per year, in addition to at least one away conference game. This year the band
will go to N.C. State on Nov. 22. Other places the band has traveled to in the
past include Virginia Tech, Duke and the University of South Carolina. Last year
the group went to Washington, D.C. and played at a Redskins game and this
year the band will play on Sept. 29 at Ericsson Stadium in Charlotte during the
CarolinaSan Francisco game.
"This will be a big game, Monday night football will give us national cover-
age which is very exciting Knighten said.
The Marching Pirates are not all music majors. Only about 40 percent are
music majors, the other 60 percent comprise majors such as nursing pre-med,
pre-physical therapy and education. The marching band is open to anyone who
has playing and marching experience. Although there is an .audition required,
Knighten said most people who try out are accepted.
"We turn away very few people, because most of the people that try out are
very proficient Knighten said.
Students wanting to audition obtain the music six months in advance and
practice, then the week before school they audition.
"No marching test is given because most people coming in are freshmen and
they have three or four years of marching experience already Knighten said.
Color guard prospects learn a two-minute routine at auditions to test their
skills and memory.
Music education majors are obligated to march for two years.
"Since all of these students will eventually teach marching bands, it is very
useful for them to participate Knighten said.
Marching band is not an extra-curricular activity as popularly believed.
Students who march receive a one hour Fine .Arts credit and they meet regular-
ly just like any class. The group meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. and practice is open to the public to watch. This provides a iittle
extra incentive for non music majors to come out and it is not a bad resume
builder either.
The Marching Pirates prepare for tha beginning of football season. They fine tune their
skills each weak at the bottom of College Hill.
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
This year's drum majors are head drum major sophomore Audrey Murphy
and assistants juniors Bryant Copeland and Adam Snipes. Squad leaders include
graduate student Tim Odom, who is working on a masters degree in conduct-
ing Odom oversees the woodwinds and brass sections. Percussion leaders are
graduate students studying percussion performance and senior music education
major Andy Wright. Color guard instructor Meredith Dowdy choreographs rou-
tines and plans costumes. Feature twirler senior dance, major Melinda Mann, "is
also a very important part of the band Knighten said.
In addition to these leaders are 45 other band members who help out.
"It is good experience for these students because most of these students will
go on to leadership positions in their professional careers, "Knighten said.
This year's band is 200 members strong. 110 of which are freshmen. Every
year more and more freshmen come in.
The band works very closely with the cheerleaders. The two squads coordi-
nate the pre-gamc show and the fight song
"This creates more unity to arouse the crowd more Knighten said.
This year the band has three different half-time shows. The first one consists
of "Caravan Jazz "Twist and Shout and a medley from Independence Day .
The second and third are combined arrangements of the Star Wars trilogy.
"This should be an exciting year, so everyone should come out to the games
Knighten said.
So at the next football game, plan to got to the bathroom earlier and hang
around at half time to watch the marching Pirates in action.
Players hope to make difference
Tku.i Lai ba.h
ASSISTANT SPORTS Ull I I'D
Players to Watch
ECU's athletes are ready ta rumble as each team
kicks off their 1997 season hungry for wins. With
guidance from the best coaches and assistants, and
a so from those who are looked upon as team lead-
ers, the teams shouldn't have any problem finding
the success they are looking for.
A team leader is one who has been through it all.
In good times and bad, these are the athletes who
keep team spirits up, give everyone the confidence
boosts that are needed, and play with alt their heart.
Every team needs a leader, someone to follow,
and someone to set an example. The athletic teams
at ECU are fortunate enough to have such people
this season.
VOLLEYBALL
Leading the Lady Pirate Volleyball team this season
will be Senior Kari Koenning and Sophomore
Shannon Kaess. Coming off a tough year in 1996
with only seven girls on the roster, the girls have
benefited tremendously already just by having more
Women's Soccer returns 17 sophomores who are
now playing with rhar one year of college experience
that makes so much of a difference in an athlete's
performance. With so many returning, the team has
already established good team chemistry.
Cause said that of her fondest ECU memories,
the one that stands out the most was at last season's
first conference win, where she had an assist that
led to the goal that won the game 1-0.
(L-R) Kari Koenning and Shannon Kaess
PHOTO COURTESY Of SPOUTS INF ORMATION
numbers to work with at practice.
"We were at a big disadvantage last year because
we couldn't really create a competitive situation at
our practices Koenning said. "This year with 12
people on the team, we have been able to develop
some good team chemistry
Kaess agrees that this season is one for change for
the team. The girls are looking to go as far as they
possibly can this year by playing to earn a record for
the books.
"There is so much communication because
everyone has clicked Kaess said. "We have seven
new freshman players, who are all adjusting really
well
As team leaders, Koenning and Kaess said that
staying focused will lie one of the key factors to
walking away from games with ins.
"The thing to remember is to keep our heads up,
and not to get down when things are going our way
Kaess said. "It's never too late to turn a game
around
WOMEN'S SOCCER
Senior Stacie Cause and sophomore Jill Davis are
the ones to keep your eyes on this season on the soc-
cer field. Both are North Carolina natives with great
expectations for the upcoming year.
f rause, in her la�t year as a lady Pirate, is hoping
to make this one a season of memories.
"I am really looking forward to this year and I am
hoping that I can make it a memorable one Cause
said. "I definitely have a team that can help me do
rhr
(L4) JiH Davis and Stacie Gauss
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION
Davis said this season's success may come from
the five freshman who joined the team this season.
Posted as a sweeper, Davis' role on the team is of an
automatic leader.
"We need a tot of mental support from each other
in order to keep our spirits up and our adrenaline
flowing Davis said.
Davis was nominated last season for All-
Conference and will he a team starter in this season.
MEN'S SOCCER
The Men's Soccer team is playing with a lot more
confidence this year. Led by returnees Jay Davis and
Jon Smiley, the Pirates arc determined to shine this
season.
Davis, team captain, is excited to play this year
because most of the team will be out there knowing
what to expect, something that the team lacked last
year. A CAA leader in saves and overall save per-
centages, Davis said it is important that the team
start the season off on the right foot.
"The guys need to be positive at all times
WOMEN'S
CROSSCOUNTRY
"Everyone needs to understand that not everyday
will be a good day Kerri Harding said. Harding
along with Karen Reinhard will lead the Women's
Cross Country team. Harding a junior from Long
Island, NX also said the season has started off the
right way because everyone kept up with their sum-
mer training
"I haven't sen enthusiasm like this before, at
least not this early in the season Harding said.
"Everyone is really fired up and motivated to place
as high as we possibly can in our conference
Hartling's advice to her teammates is to be in it
in head and heart, and that in being there for each
other, there is no where to go but up from here.
Reinhard, of Burke, Va said that for those with
no college experience, the start can be tough.
"It is overwhelming when you go to meets
because it's nothing like how it was in high school
(L-R) Jay Davis and Jon Smiley
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION
Davis said. "If somerhing bad happens, we can't
dwell on it. We have to move on
Teammate and co-captain Jon Smiley said that
the biggest difference between this year's team and
last is an uplifted work ethic, coming from good
recruits and determined returners.
"We have a lot better offense out there, and more
size up front Smiley said. "We will lie able to gen-
erate more attacks
Men's Soccer is another team to put a large num-
ber of sophomores on their roster, something that
Smiley feels will be extremely evident on the fieid.
"More years of playing at the college level equals
more success Smiley said. "You know what to
expect, and there are no surprises
L-R) Karen Reinhard and Kerri Hartbng
photo cauntsr of spoto information
Reinhard said. "You have to be prepared because in
college athletics; cvervone out there is at your
level
Reinhard said this team has no relaxed attitudes,
and everyone is willing to put it on the line for the
sake of the team's success.
"Unity will carry us through our meets, and will
pick up when we are down Reinhard said. "Putting
in the hard work now will pay off in the end, and we
have each other to lean on when we need extra
strength
MEN'S
CROSS COUNTRY
According to Sophomore Justin England, the Men's
Cross Country team has been pulling together to
prepare for a season to beat last year's incredible fin-
ish. As a team leader, England encourages his team-
mates to stay focused and positive.
"As long as everyone runs their hardest and does-
n't let the team down, we are going to do great
England said, who is a biology major from Raleigh.
In his first college meet ever last season, England
(L-R) Brian Beil and Justin England
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION
finished second overall, boosting his confidence and
pushing him even harder to work for wins.
"1 was a little nervous before the meet, but fin-
4.





r
10 Thursday August 28 1997
snorts
��.�
Th East Carolinian
Harris
Players
���' continued from page 9
ting so well gave me the confidence I
needed England said,
i With about 10 freshmen on the ros-
ter for this season, there are plenty of
athletes out there running in the shoes
�hat England was in just one year ago.
' Also leading the team is Brian Beil, of
.Stafford, Mi- Beil said the team is at an
advantage this year because of its size,
fine team is the biggest it has been in
TO years.)
"I hope to be able to lead by exam-
ple Beil said. "There is no point in
talking about it; we just have to go out
arid do what needs to be done
Beil said that the team has a lot of
depth this season and is looking forward
�the UNC-Wilmington matchup.
i "UNCW has always been our biggest
fival because they are at the same skill
tevel as us Beil said. "W; have to fight
with them for the place we are looking
for, so we know them better than any
iqther team out there
m.
�.
Conference USA
This week there is only one game in Conference USA.
With most games beginning next week,
tonight at 6 p.m. Cincinnati hosts Tulsa.
Your Neighborhood Food Market
TRIVIAtime
Name the U.S. Open winners
from last year's tennis
tournament.
pan tgnspm snjdmi? juj
KINQTONINDIANS
FINAL REGULAR QEASON
GAMES THIS YEAR
AUGU9T 27th-30th
Donf miss the LAST
THIRSTY THURSDAY
FRI Fan Appreciation Night
SAT Fireworks following the
game
Call 527-9111 for more info.
BASEBALL
25 Off Your Entire Check At Darryl's
just show your ECU student ID at the
Darryl's across from campus and get a 25
discount on your entire dinner check Try our
famous Saucy Barbecued Pork
Ribs. Award Winning Fajitas
Grande. New Wood-Fire Grilled
Steaks. Fresh tegetable Rasta.
Ik
L
Rl-STAURANT & BAR
� t � t M I t I I I I I I
800 East 10th Street � 752-1907
Roadside Chicken Sandwich. Steak and Cheese
Sandwich. Spicy Buffalo Wings, or any of our
Delicious Desserts It's all specially priced for
ECU students So stop by tonight
and enjoy East Carolina's favorite
place for food and fun!
Ooes not include Alcoholic Bv
5 Easy Steps For A
FREE
Thanksgiving Dinner!
1. Slop at Harris Teeter and pick up a card
like the one shown at the right.
2. Shop 10 out of 13 weeks between
August 27 & November 25,1997.
3. Spend $35.00 or more each week on one
visit. (Excludes alcohol and tobacco.)
4. Show your VIC card and have the cashier
validate your Thanksgiving Dinner Card.
5. When 10 out of 13 blocks are validated,
you are eligible to receive a FREE
Thanksgiving Dinner.
Ifs That Easy!
See Store For
More Details.
W-16C.
BaU Park
8 ct Fresh Baked In Our Bakery
Hamburger Or
Hot Dog Buns
10-12 lb. Grade A Frozen
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6 oz. Stove Top Chicken or Corn
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Two 14S oz. Cans Del Monte
Green Beans
16 oz. Can Ocean Spray Jellied .
Cranberry Sauce
13 oz. Package Folger's
Automatic Drip Coffee
82S oz. Betty Crocker Super
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lOlfc.beg
Kuigsrord.
HARRIS TEETER COUPON
With This Coupon
2 Liter
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iCola
PLU 5108
GROC.
COUPON
VALUE
Limit One Coupon Per Additional $35
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Harris Teeter. This Coupon May Not
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2.199
Be Reproduced.
Aug. 27 Through Sept.
Harris Teeter
ff
Prices Effective Through Sept 2, �97
Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday, August 27 Through Sept 2,1997 In Our Greenville Area Stores
Only We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. Moi cWTb Dealers Vve5ladVA�X�ptFedaiaiFbod2tamp�
I

�ii





I

,
I
I

11 Thursday, August 28. 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
IBM THINKPADS AND OTHEH laptop
100 financing available. Student dis-
count. Finance for loss than $33.00 a
month. Can Alfred at (St)358-7057. Free
carrying cae.
LARGE COMPUTE DESK WITH
hutch. aklng $120.00. Heavy bedroom
drawer. esking $60.00. All prices are ne-
gotiable. Phone Be at 73-2944.
SUBLEASE UNTIL DECEMBER. TWO
bedroom apartment. $197.30 a month
per person plus phone end low electric
bill. King's How Apt 1. mUe from cam-
pus, on but route, speclou bedroom.
Cell 13-0764 and leave me�ge.
SBIMOUS MALE OR REMALE needed
ASAP, for 2 bedroom apt. close to Pla-
za on ECU Busline Celt Ph today for fur
therinfo 321-2813.
ROOMMATE WANTEDI12 BLOCK
PROM campus. Owr, room and bath.
$230 per month phi 13 utilities. Can
752-8118. Joh. Blalne or Derek.
TABLE AND CHAIRS. BLACK oval
table with ?chair. $78.Cal Amy at 328-
1723 (8-3) or 321 -232 (after 3).
1 Help Wanted 1
NEED A JOB? PLAY at day and maKe
money et night! Work nlghtt andor wee-
kends end heve your dayt free with The
ECU Tdefund. Meke your own �chedule!
$3.30hr. plus bonuses! Stop by the Rawl
Annex. Room 3 between 3-8PM for more
info
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE 2
bedroom townhoute. Grad student pre-
ferred. Non-moker. $250 plu 12 utili-
ties. 353-6190.
RESPONSIBLE. NON-SMOKING MALE
or female to shore 3 bedroom apt.
$160mo. plu 13 utilities Ak for
Shannon at 738-4383.
NONSMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted, would have own bathroom. Rent
$300 per month plus 1 2 utilities Locat-
ed in Doektide. Available Now. Call 732-
107.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR 2 bedroom
apt Univertity Apt $173month1t
month, on ECU Bu Route. 12 cable,
phone. utMtios. Nlkkl. 738-4323. Need by
August 31.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEBOED TO
there 3 bedroom house 1 Matt from cam-
put 13 rent. uMrBet e� cade. Nice
neighborhood Call Kim. lft-2800. after
8PM. 830-9036 :
FEMALE STUDENT T0?HA�� two
bedroom apartment. Ciee end in good
locetteh. Mutt be reteoiWjWe an con-
cerned about school. SJMeVper month
plus unities Call 333 W�3.
FEMALE ROOMMATE tiWrttT�. FIVE
bedroom house across ffdttf ECO. Rent
$143 phi uWrttes and phena. Needed to
move m ASAP. Contact �, 7SJT132
WPXI FOX814 IS LOOKING for e fall
intern CandWete mutt get credit for in-
ternship. Creative butinett or communi-
catlont mator preferred. Mut be willing
to work a minimum of 20 hours a week.
Intern wi laam various atpectt of tele
vision. Including copywrlttng. sales end
production of commercials. Applicants
should send resume to LSM. WFXI-TV.
600 Country Club Dr. Suite C. Greenville.
NC 27838. WPXI. GOCOM Broadcasting
i an EOE employer.
1.
Looking for a great HOW with
i great company? "
Brady offen:
Flexible hour
Clothing discount!
Part Time Oppoftunitie to:
Junior Sportswear,
Young Men's, and
Customer Service
Applications, accepted daily
lpm-5pm, at Customer Service,
SEEKING RESPONSIBLE. RELIABLE
STUDENT to pick up my child from his
school and keep in my home from 2.30
to 80. Monday thru Friday. Please call
Donna Walker et 758-9240 efter 6:00
p.m. to inquire.
NEEDEOI SOMEONE TO DO teleservto
trig and sefflng of office furniture. Mu�t
be enthusiastic, positive and willing to
work Cal 931-6904 and leeve e mes-
sage.
FREE 1-iJHIRI
$1000
Credit Card fundraiser for
fraternities, sororttiet 6
groups. Any campus
organization can raise up
to $1000 by earning a
whopping SB.00 WSA
application Call
1-800-832-0528 ext. 65.
Qualified cesert receive
FREE T-SHIRT
L
Travel
SPRING BREAK '��� sell trips, earn cash
end go free Student Travel Services is
now hiring campus repegroup organ
ers. Lowest rates to Jamaica. Mexico &
Florida. Call 1-800-646-4849.
WHEELPOWER AND ARISE: JOIN u
on Aug. 26 from 7-Spm for the Wheel-
power and Arise open house. It's a great
chance to meet new people here at the
Student Recreation Cantor. Dept. of Ree.
Service.
MOORE'S WALL: COMB JOB u for a
weekend at Hanging Rock State Park
Sept. 5-7 to experience some of the best
climbing in North Carolina. Be sure to reg-
ister by Sept. 1 in the Student Recreation
Center main office. Dapt. of Rec. Services.
"OtfieT

WHITE IRON AND BRASS deybed with
trundle Greet condition. Pteate cad 737-
0938.
CLASSIC ROCK GUITARIST SINGER
looking for drummer bass keys toed to
form a band. Experience and vocals a
plus. Can Patrick today. 355-9568.
Announcements
WILL hold their
3 at 4:30p.m. in
NON-SMOKING CAREGIVER NEEDED
for four veer old with mild lung disease.
Own transportation, references, criminal
check. Hours are 12-50 p.m Monday.
Wednesday. Friday. May also need some-
one on Tuesday and Thursdays. Call
830-9082 after 30 p.m. and leave mas-
�9
JOIN THE BBC - Join the Buffalo Brew
Crew. BW-3 is now hiring kitchen, cash-
ier and door taff for FaH Semester. Ap-
ply within M-F. 1-5PM. 114 E. 5th St.
THE RCLS SOCIETY
first meeting on Sept
Minges Room 142.
T-N-T ENERGY EXPLOSION Join u for
tree food and prizes on Aug. 27 from 4-
5:30 pjn. for a chance to meet the aerob-
ics instructors and find out e little Mi
about each aerobics class. Dept. of Ree.
Services
ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITY: EN-
RICH YOUR academic veer by attending
Youth DtodpHna class at St. James United
Methodist Church on 6th Street. The dees
It designed to explore the Bible and learn
how to be a Disciple. You w� form dote
bonds with the group as you attend week-
ly meetings on Monday night from Sep-
tember to Mey. Open to any Christian de
nomination. Cell Lento Shiva at 752-6134
to sign up endor for more details.
FACILITATOR TRAINING: ANYONE IN-
TERESTED in becoming a challenge
course feclWetor, needs to attend the
training on Sept. 9.10. Tl.16.17.18 from 4-
6:00 ojt. et the Student Recreation Cen-
ter. Be sure to regteter by Sept. 1 m the
Student Recreetton Center main office.
Dept. of Rec. Service.
FREE AQUA FITNESS: ANYONE
ested in finding out whet aqua fitness is
all about, join us for free aqua fitness on
Aug. 26 In the Student Recreation Canter
pool. Dapt. of Rec. Services
MALEREMALE ROOlflSTE WO-
ED: 3 beeYoom. TarRiver.nl pod. wash-
er and dryer, semi endoseef-ljerd. etate. 3
brocks from campus. M Dave et 732-
0009 i
MA-E ROOtiATE Nt-KD A
to share 3 lk�om eeerftnent at Wilson
Acre Smoker, soctot drinkers OK. Must
be neat also. Rent is $230mo. and 1 3
utilities. Cable, pod. tends included
Ptease contact �3-0384. ask for Chris or
- Jason.
PAWTTIME JOB POSITIONS eveHabie.
SreenvlHe Rtcreetlon 8 Perks Depart-
ment PALL YOUTH SOCCER COACH-
ES. The Greenville Recreetton 8 Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to 16 part-
time youth soccer coaches for the tell
youth soccer program. Applicants must
possets tome knowledge of the soccer
skins end heve the eMMy end pettonce to
work with youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 5-15. In soc-
cer fundamental Hours are from 3:00
p.m. until 7:00 p.m. with some night and
weekend coaching. FtetrtWe with hews
according te cleat schedules .This
program will run from September to mid
November. Setory retes stert at $3.13 per
hour. For more mformetton. please can
Ben James or Miched Ddy at 830-4S30
� 200 pm
PART-TIME CHILDCARE NEEDED two
days per week for my 3 and 8-yeer old
sons Need experienced, fun-loving, ener-
getic student with reliable transportation.
Pleese cdl 353-7446.
MOWrrlRtNG PLAYMATES MASSAGE
earn greet money. Confiettnti-I ewt-
ptoyoent Cell tootty, 747-76B6.
PART-TIME INTERIOR DESIGNER
needed to work In wdlpeper. window
treetmonts end carpet department. Stud-
ents please call 738-2300 to sd up a
time for en Interview.
TUTORS NEEDED: THE DEPARTMENT
of Athkttlc. Office cf Student Devdop-
ment is currently hiring full-time ECU
students and graduate students to tutor
student-ethletos m ari subject area. Min-
imum 3.0 GPA required Cdl 326-4590.
KING AND QUEEN OP the heNs: loin us
on Sept. 4 from 4-8:00 p.m. on College
rtm for fun. compditlon amongst the hdl.
end food and prize. Dept. of Rec. Servic-
es.
THE ECU GOSPEL CHOIR will hdd thdr
first reheersd on Thursday. Augud 28.
1997 at 5:00 p.m. In Room 105 Fletcher
Music Building. Come end experience the
joyous time m song. No oudlttons ere re-
quired. Look to see you there! Tare Wor-
rell. 736-3404. for Information.
GAMMA BETA PMk A meettng lor the t
called kxTues. Sept 2 �t5:0C in floom 242
Mendenha. AH oflcer are seked to attend,
questions � caM
Dawn d 757-3007
PLAS POOTlAU. OPPtClA-S MEET-
ING: offldds for Intreroufd flag footbdi
have an officials meeting on Aug. 26 at
9:O0 pjn. to the Student Recreetton Cen-
ter Ctoseroom 202. Dept. of Rec. Services.
THE ECU SCHOOL OP Anythlng-Goes
Adme returns with high-quaity Japanese
Animation for the GreerwHa areel You
need nd be a member to attend our sec-
ond meeting on Wednesday. September 3
d 7:00 p.m. In Mendenhdl Student Cen-
ter. Room 221.
HEY YOUIH THE CROSS Cm-TWJS?
an intordenomlnatlorid campus ministry
whose main objectives ere Christian fd-
lowsNp. mtddry. end evangetsm. Whtte-
wder rafting, talgeto parties, ewe wdk
outreach, drama, skiing, end many other
so�d and evangelistic activities fled led
yean calender and w� aged this year. We
will be meeting every Monday at 7:00
pjn. In Mandenhdl Socid Room. Ceme
end jdn ut for some greet music, new
friends, good infcedry. antote of fun. For
more IntermdSon cad SSB-MHI.
LOOKING FOR PRESENTERS. WANT to
team how to preterit workshops and pnv
grams? Become an ECU Peer Health Edu-
cator. For 2-3 hours each week this te-
mester you can learn how to design and
present workshops, and about leading a
healthier lifestyle. Topics include dcohd
and other drugs, sexuatty. eettog healthy,
sexual assault, and stress management.
Once trained, you can do presentations in
the residence hdls. classroom, and
GREEK house. Whd every your motor,
this Is e greet opportunity to become an
experienced presenter. For more inform
tton conteet Health Promdton and Wdl-
Bdng. 210 WhJchard. 328-6793.
AJLE. PLAY DAY: TRABeWW and ropes
course fac-tetort. join us on Sept. 13 far
a chance to med people In experiadld
education. Be sure to register by Sept. 1
in the SRC main office. Dept. of Hae. Serv-
ices.
MARROW THON WALK. THE BOW
Marrow Foundation. Inc which wet a
tabttshed in December. 1986 to assist pe
ttentt who heve received a Bone Marrow
Trantplent or on the wdtlng list. w� be
having thdr 2nd Annual MerrowT
Wdk on October 4. 1997 at J. H.
Track 8 Field. A8 proceeds w�i b
Bone Marrow Recipients end thdr
mliies. We wtl accept any donation t if
groups or individuals cannon wdk. If tnter-
estod in participating please contact Mar
lane Anderson. 756-797 or Connto Gor
horo-Wdston 355-7012.
ADVERTISE IN
eastcaroHnian
CLASSIFIEDS
BABYSITTER NBDEO TO SIT for two
children - ages 4 end 1. e� day on Tues-
days or Wednesdays. No smokers. Cdl
355-7875
It's easy to advertise in
the -
PRBE UTILITIES. 1 BEOROOM.12
btoek from cemp on HoUy St Cots d
lowed with deposit. Red $305 e month.
757-9387.
PART-TIME CHILD CARE needed 2:39-
6:30 1-2 afternoons per week for 2
children. Mud have own transportation
and provide references. 355-7398 before
10PM.
For Sale
PEPPER SPRAY STUN GUNS ANO
ALARMS Take respontWMy for your
curtty. For a free brochure e-meH Flrtin-
sacaad.com or write First Line Security.
PO Box 287. GreenvDte. NC 27635
TREK MOUNTAIN BKE POR sda: 1998
800 Modd. utedjwery �ttle Ceme with
bar ends and water bottle rack. Can John
d 328-3786. Asking $200
DBR AXIS PRO WXT. LX. X-ray. Slgu-
no Cranks. 8-tpeed cattdt matrix and
Bentreger rim, profile superUte handte-
ber Cell Hd. 736-3393 before 930.
$400
MALE DIVERS NEEDEOI ECU Swim
Ibam needs guy who like to flip and
twid. Cdl Coach Ro�e. ext 0010 or
come to Mlnge Pod Office.
HARMONY PRESCHOOL HIRING
PART-tlme subditute position. Flexible
hours. Gred for dudents. Ptoate cdl
�ftmmy Janowskl at 75S-629.
UNITED METHODIST STUDENT
WANTED for work with Bethd UMC
Youth group. AppHceni must have a
strong Christian forth. Youth med from
5.00pm to 6:30 pm. Sunday evenings.
Pays $30.00 per week. Cdl 825-8041.
WPXI POXS1 IS LOOKING for a fen
intern. Candidate mud gd credit for In-
ternship Creative butlnes or communi-
cations mejor preferred Mud be wining
to work a minimum of 20 hours a week.
Intern wi team various aspect ef tele
vision, including copywrttlng. sdes and
production ef commercials. Applicants
should sand resume to LSM. WFXI-TV.
600 Country Club Dr. SuiteC. Greenville.
NC 27858 WFW. GOCOM Broadcasting
Is an EOE employer.
Fill in the blanks and
select a category.
Name
Address
Greek Personals
ATTENTION MEMB-RS OP ORDER of
Omega. The flrd meeting of the year is
September 2 d MendenheM Student Cen-
ter.
1BB7 ISU-U TROOPER 4WD. runs
good, body damage. $1800 OBO. Cal
931-0203
BORA WITH A PULL-out queen size bed
end e matching ioveseat 3 years old.
Ptease cdt 7370936
NEED TRANSPORTATION AT A low
cod? . 1985 Toyote Corolla, silver 2-door
for only $895 Cell 335-7904.
MOVED! RBCLINER. $28. ROCKERS
$30-63. couches $75-100. end tablet
$10-25. deybed $10. shoe rack $10. arm
chairs $30. twin bunk beds. Good qual-
ity. OBO. 321-3495. leeve mestege.
POR SALE: VERMONT MAPLE ovel din-
ing roomdining aree table and 4 chair
Plut 2 .eavet. tedt 6 to 8M!$195.00.
Cdl 355-5873
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE. Joan's
Fashions. a toed Women's Clothing store,
it now filling part-time potlttens Em-
ployees are needed for Saturday andor
weekdays between 10:00 a.m. and 8:00
p.m. The positions era for between 7 and
20 hour per week, depending on your
schedule and on butinett need The
jobs are within walking dfdence of the
university and the hours mm flexIWe. Pay
it cemmenturde wrih your experience
end job parformence end is supplement-
ed by en employee dteeount. Apply in
person to Store Manager. Joan's Fash-
ions. 423 S. Evens Sired. Greenville (on
the Downtown Mall).
INTERIOR DESIGN STUDENTS NEED-
ED for rrtdl sdes. Mud be energetic,
outgoing, and have gred communication
skill Apply in perton. Affordable Home
Pathtont. 3110-A South Event (Next to
Bowen Cleaners). No edit please
BABYSITTER WANTED: PARTTIMB
titter to help day at home mom care for
three tmeH children. Prefer upper-level or
grad. rtudent in child education field.
Mud have experience wtth tmdl children
3 yrt. and under: good rderencet: own
transportation, non-smoker; extremely re-
liable: energetic; flexible end eeger to
wok: salary negotiable, mostly evenings
and weekends: occas day hours: occat
overnight Cell Paula. 355-9569.
TAU KAPPA EPSK.ON. THANKS POR
THE cookout and socid Saturday. We
hope you guys had as much fun as we
did. Leva, the sitters and new members
of Alpha Phil
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS AND
good luck this temeder to everyone!
Love, the stders and new members of Al-
pha Omieron Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL SOROR-
ITIES on an outdanding Ruth! Good
Luck to en frdemltte in your upcoming
Rush. From the sisters and new members
of Alphe Phi.
Phone
Student ID
Category (check one)
DForRent ?ForSale
Q Services D Personals
Q Greek Personals D Other�
D Help Wanted
? Lost & Found
Write your ad on the
lines.
THANK YOU FOR OUR praf night We
had a great time. Id't da It again soon!
Love, the titters end new members of
Ddta Zda.
13
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA OMI-
CRON PI and everyone else on a tuc-
cessfd rush. Love, the titters and new
members of Alpha Omieron Pi.
ALPHA PHI. CONGRATULATIONS ON
a successful Rush! You did a wonderful
job Leurie. we love you! Love the sisters
of Alpha Phi.
17
21
WANTED: ENERGETIC. PUNLOVING.
RESPONSIBLE individual to cere for
adorable, active 5-yeer old boy from 2.30-
5:30 M-F. Mud have own car and refer-
enees. Cdl 758-0252. esk for Jamie.
rtortlnretteni PJataai lItT"
Sates latcrasMg Avalla-I.
Rated in Top 10 Internship Programs
by Princeton Review
Contact
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
members of Dette Zde Kristin Boness.
Wendy Boulangar. Shannon Dean, Jessi-
ca Dobbins. Amber Foushee. Jennifer
Gibson. Ante Haley. Tiffany Howard. An-
gela Jonat. Amanda Kerum. Leslie King.
Erin McCracken. Jody McKerma. Mlchde
Nixon. Roxenne Paraschos. Dana PtA:
Reehel Royell. Kerrte Sirian. Amende
Smith. Ashley Smith. Jessica Smith. Mar
vehe SuHrvan. Amy Tatko. Use Warfle.
end Chridtne Yarbrough. Love, the sister
of Ddta Zete.
12
15
18
2D
24
27
Circle the date(s) you
want the ad to run
Semaj Entertainment
New York City DJ offering
Unda-Ground House,
Reggae, Hip Hop and
R&B. Contact J. Arthur
at (919) 524-4442.
Also Special rate for
Fratarnitiaa, Sororttiee and ail
Organizations.
i
JD HALL AND HOLLY KUNKLB
Thenkt for all the hard work during rush!
It redly paid off. We love you, the sisters
and new members of Alphe Omieron Pi
819826828929499911916
918923925930102109101410
16102110231028103011411611
111113111811201125124129115
1201221271292325210212
2172192242263335310312
326331424749414416421
423428430555276367106717
6247178715722729
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WEWILLPAYYOU WtHmtruMmiW
$ C A S H �c-i�
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buv: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
. Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Comeintothe parking tot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door - ring buzzer
Bring this form and
your payment before
the deadline to The
East Carolinian office
III � II I adUPan-aBaaeaaaa I alfcl lilllll Hital
�� mwm rtm rajM to reett any d fcr �M (awy � h t.
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VIEW OUR CAMPUS CALENDAR OhUh
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 28, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 28, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1220
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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