The East Carolinian, July 23, 1997







WEDNESDAY
JULY 23, 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Summer enrollment remains
Officials say summer numbers generally
coincide with fall and spring
Daws ERNTEMAN
lENTATIONHiENERAI Ol.tEOI
STAFF W'KI II, K
Though the reasons students decide to attend classes during the summer
vary, summer school enrollment levels have remained about the same over
the past three years.
According to students and administrators, summer is not only a time for
students to take a load off from the hectic schedules of the regular school
year, but also a time for many to catch up with their credit hours.
Associate Director for Summer School and Non-credit Programs, Clayton
Sessoms, said enrollment numbers for summer sessions are directly depen-
dent on enrollment numbers from the regular term of the past year.
"Typically, if the numbers are up in the fall and spring, they will be up in
the summer as well Sessoms said. "The preliminary numbers indicate that
there has been a very slight increase in enrollment for rhis summer. In com-
parison with the past three summers, there has not been any significant
change in enrollment numbers
Most departments offer a vanet of courses to choose from, ranging from
1000 to 6000 level classes for summer sessions, whereas some departments
only offer graduate level classes. Students are not only fulfilling general edu-
cation requirements, but also requirements lor their major or minor during
the summer.
The national trend supers student' lied ; dimmer school typical-
ly achieve better grades than during rhe teg ' vear. Sessoms sug-
gested that students do better beca leyaretakn rcredits, fiepro-
gram is more intensive and students neci to be relatively motivated i m-
plete the work. Focusing attention on only one oi two classes allows student
to organize their time better and perform better on class a signment
Rising junior and sociology major, Nadia Johnson, said summer school is
the answer when a student is a credit ot two short from being in the next clas-
sification during the regular semester.
"Before summer school I was one credit short of being a junior Johnson
said. "But that was not really a big deal. Taking classes this summer will
enable me to take less hours in the fall or spring to make time for extracur-
ricular activities
There are a variety of reasons students enroll in summer school.
"Summer school is the opportunity for students to catch up. make up or
get ahead Sessoms said.
Jeanie Coleman, a rising
junior, said she enrolled in the
summer session to make her
schedule more manageable-
late, on.
There are so man
requirements to have to grad-
uate on time. Til be doing an
internship and I don't want to
have to take c lapses tun
Coleman said.
Many students who do not
do as well as they had hoped
in a class taken during the fall
or spring semesters will take
the class over in the summer
to get a higher grade for their
transcripts.
Although summer school
can be very demanding for
students, the general consen-
sus on campus is that it is all
worth it in the end. The abil-
ity to get ahead, or to improve
viating some of the stresses
Rising junior and sociology maor Nadia Johnson
takes advantage of study time in Joyner Library.
Many students take summer classes to improve
grades or to avoid a heavy load during the regular
fall or spring semester.
PHOTO BY MARGUERITE BENJAMIN
rades. will inevitably lie a
issoeiated with graduation.
:reat help in alle-
Proposed censorship
shouldn't affect theatre
department
J ACOCK I. INK I). KKI I I M
s s i s r i h f. ws 1111 11 p h
Although the recent proposal on arts cen-
sorship may affect some departments on cam-
pus, the playhouse should not lie one of them.
The playhouse is the producing arm of the
theatre department and is responsible for
putting together the mainstage productions
during the regular school vear and the summer
theatre productions.
"It shouldn't affect us at all. We use vcrv
little state funds for the playhouse said Cars
Haircloth, the Managing Director of the play-
house.
However, even if state funds were used for
the production costs of the university's plays.
Haircloth said they have never had major prol
lems with audience objection to sensitive-
material in any of their plays.
"Obviously someone out there doesn't
approve of censorship, because they keep
coming to our shows Haircloth said.
Haircloth said he was sometimes surprised
by which plays elicited a negative response
and for what reason.
For example, the theatre department once
did a play called the Hoys in thr lltmr, which
concerns eight gay men at a birthday party
haircloth said there was no negative response -
at least that he knew of- about the homosex-
ual content. But a play called lir Dhinrrs,
which contained one instance iif nmiiB "�
stage, resulted in two Of three objecting let-
ters.
Despite the tact that the proposed censor-
ship will most likely not affect his depart-
ment, haircloth still objects to the proposal on
principle.
"I don't believe in censorship in anv way
Haircloth said, and continued, "mv tax dollars
pay for a lot of things that I don't like, but I
can't pick and choose
In recognition of the fact that not all mate-
rial is suitable for all audiences, the theatre-
department implemented a rating system two
years ago, attempting to warn parents in par-
ticular of material that may Ik inappropriate
for children.
Haircloth said that he has never had signif-
icant problems with censorship, not only at
HCI but also anywhere else.
"It's hard to pass censorship, especially
since there are so many artistic people out
there who object to it Haircloth said.
PICTURE PERFECT
Caroline Roberts finishes a landscape for an art education class assignment,
trying to bring the outdoots in
PHOTO BY AMANDA PROCTOR
WEDNESDAY
lifestyle4 ��
Vviiu is. uii
Jeopardy7
opinion3
Columnists with
attitudes n
sports6 i
Baseball coach
slides into home
the east Carolinian
SlUOfNT PUBtlCATlQN BLOC
GRHNViliE. Nf 27858
across Imm Joyner library
WEDNES0AY
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e-mail
uutecHecuvm cis ecu �M
PIRATESS
Do you usually do
better in summer
school or during the
regular fallspring
semester?
FAR FROM HOME
Several Russian exchange students are attending summer session at ECU to study business law and international business. Ftom left to right,
front row Maria Mishliaeva, Kirill Lomakin, Vastly Nenashev. Back row: Alexander Zolotatev. Alexander Galkin. Roman Pestov, Petr Donovsky.
PH0T0 BY AMAN0A PROCTOR
Muscovite students study at school of business
MAN DA IlKM.I.s
si'I i I l rni'i l i ins I-si I- �
s I I I � � I I I H
You don't have ro turn on the television to see Americans and
Russians working together. Thev are studying together right here at
ECU.
This summer, ten law students from Moscow International
I niversitv are enrolled in business classes. This program was tbrmed to
increase rhe number of international students and place an emphasis on
international studies.
"We starred this program because business is becoming increasingly
internationally focused. We have mined into a global economy. Our goal
is to concentrate on international studies and give students a chance to
travel overseas said I )r. Robert Schellenberger. professor and chair of
the School of Business and Decision Sciences.
The Russian students .ire currently attending the second summer
session. I hes are enrolled in two classes, business law taught by Carlos
Murray and a course in the Cultural Environment ot International
Business from Dr. Hawa Mcnc. The business law class is combined
with other last Carolina students, but the Cultural Environment class
was exclusive to the Russian students.
"The students seem to be settling in tine said Schelienberger. "We
were hoping for the Russian students to have more interaction with
other students here on campus, but their business law class is their only
chance for interaction
The students have been enjoying mans social activities, and trying
to stay cool In using the Student Recreation (Center's pool. They have
also been diving head first into merican culture.
from being teased about reading a book on the X-Rles and trips to
the beach, to being completely clothed in irw.ilk attire, the Russian
students don't seem to be an different than other merican college-
students.
"School is a lot of fun. Wc have gone to the beach, and made a few
trips downtown to play pool, and we hang out with some friends we
have met in the dorm said Alexander Zolotatev.
With their Cultural Environment class finished, they have two weeks
to enjov a little extra time to concentrate on their business law class and
explore more of the campus.
"The Russian students just finished my tinal and they were really
great. Thev seem to be extremely bright, er receptive and vcrv inter-
ested in their studies. This is the first time I have taught this course.
but there does not seem to be any difference in mv students. We had
terrific discussions, and they just finished a final project about different
countries. It was very interesting said Mcnc.
Since finals are approaching quickly the extra time may be spent
studying for their business law tinal. The Russian students may have a
slight advantage over other students in their class because they already
have a strong background in law.
These students were selected out of high scl 10I to enter into a law
program at the Moscow International I niversitv. Once thew complete
the four vear program at the university they will be employed as lawyers
for the cirv of Moscow.
"Tliev are doing really well, they have a good background in law. and
there English is really strong. Since, thev were selected for this program
thev definitely show that thev are above average students, thev are very
bright s.ud lurrav.
There may be some similarities in social activities, but when it
comes to inside the classroom the Russian students said there was an
extreme difference.
"We are having some problems with the English, but not mans. I am
really enjoying how the professors treat you as equals. ! he system ot
teaching is completely different. Thev are not snobbish like Russian
professors. We are even allowed to cat and drink in class said IVtr
I )onov skv.
The Russian students are finishing up then st.iv here they will then
ttavel to Washington !).( return to Russia ugtisi 4.
n the sueet
Siimim i.
I 'mt HarffrJhafk, o this is ms' �' u ssion.
Leslie Upson
I

i"v limit have enough rim to

Samuel Hobbs
Oauid Fckherg
normally mah
Annmatie Colameo





Mr 23, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Disnsy's tviition history miffs Ohioan
DAYTON, Ohio (AP) - Writ Disney World's treatment of the Wright brothers
doesn't fry with Tbffl Bush.
Me has organized a letter-writing campaign to get the Wrights' hometown of
Dayton mentioned on the "Carousel of Progress ride in Disney World's Magk
Kingdom.
Bush, 33, said he and his Imwry went on the ride last March. In the narration,
a mechanical figure dressed in garb of the early 1900s says he hears of two broth-
ers "from" North Carolina who are building a frying contraption.
Orvilfe and WSlbur Wright's historic first powered flight by a heavier-than-air
craft too place at Kitty Hawk, N.C, on Dee. 17,1903.
But the fiMChtn waa conceived mi built in Dayton, where the Wrights lived.
,itwiDJOTthstl�ebwfi�re
iff ihtft Huffman PhaVie experiment after Kitty Hawk.
fash, 01 (he suburb of Moraine, is proud of Dayton's aviation history - his
grartdaaihef knew Witter Wrigbt. So da fired off a letter to Disney complaining
annsjT � EV9SX ItsBsHSMlOvu
Me says Dtatiey official wrote back m May, saying they were aware of the dis-
cfepancy and weuW correct it to either include the Wright brothers' hometown or
to lay (he Wights had been testing their frying machine in North Carolina.
The change has been made � but it doesn't include Dayton.
Smittifitld Foods ftdoral suit goes to trial
NORFOLK, Mi. (AP) - A government lawyer asked a federal judge Monday �o
severely penaliite Smithfield foods Inc. for illegally dumping pollution into a
Chesapeake Bey tributary and falsifying or destroying records.
However, attorneys for the meatpacking company argued that many of the
nearly 7,000 Clean Water Act violations claimed by the government since 1991
were permitted under a deal with the state or were the fault of a former
Smithfield foods employee.
Lorraine Reynolds, an Environmental Protection Agency supervisor, testified
during the start of the government's lawsuit against Smithfield foods that the vio-
lations included excess amounts of phosphorous, nitrogen and oil and grease.
Some discharges into the Pagan River exceeded limits by 1,055 percent, said Ms.
Reynolds.
The EPA is seeking a fine of up to 125,000 for each violation, for a total of
$174.6 million.
UN. envoy waris Bosnian Serbs against
harassing peacekeepers
PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) - The UJ. ambassador to the United
Nations has warned Bosnian Serbs against further assaults on NATO peace-
keepers, saying the attacks could lead to fresh confrontation in the Balkans.
NATO raids earlier this month nabbed one Serb war crimes suspect and
killed another in northwestern Bosnia, leaving Serbs on edge and provoking
a series of smatl-scale bombings aimed at NATO and international officials.
Two U.S. soldiers have been wounded in the attacks.
Richardson said Monday that further attacks posed grave risks for the
self-declared Serb republic.
Richardson also traveled Monday to the northwest Bosnian town of Banja
Lulu, a show of support for Bosnian Serb President Biljana Plavsic.Waste
contaminates water supplies and increases the risk of diarrhea, which kills
2.2 million children each year. It also pollutes open areas and attracts vermin
that carry disease.
PRACTICON, INC
practice lerVlcee
Customer Service Representative
Practicon, Inc. is a successful dental supply company with a consistent
record of growth.
This part-tima position requires an individual with excellent
cornmunicatiori and telephone skills. Bilingual-EnglishSpanish and
computer experience preferred. Hours will be 2pm to 7pm Monday-Friday
Please send resume and salary requirements to:
Human Resource, Practicon, Inc.
1112 Sugg Partway, Greenville, NC 27834
ECU
student files as candidate
ir City Cr
foi
.ouncil
ECU student Steve McLawhom filed as candidate for city council on
Tuesday July 22. He is a junior physics major with a 3.6 GPA He will be run-
ning for District 3, which includes Gotten, jarvis, Fleming, and Garret res-
idence halls, as well as Tar Rivet apartments, Wilson Acres, Wesley
Commons, and other areas heavily populated with students.
District 3 is currently held by Inez Ridley, who works for the ECU
Department of Housing. She has been the councilperson for District 3 for 12
years.
Steve McLawhom believes a student representative is needed on the
council.
"We realty need a student on the Greenville City Council. Students are
the lifeblood of this community and we need someone that understands our
concerns on the city council McLawhom said.
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Reno savs she fsvore more eouity in creek
cocaine, powder lentencie
MIAMI (AP) � Attorney General Janet Reno and the nation's drug policy director
have recommended dosing, but not eliminating, the disparity in mandatory sen-
tences for possession of crack cocaine vs. powder cocaine.
The recommendation waa issued in a letter that Keno and (Jen. Barry
McCaffrey sent� President Clinton on Jury i, TTie New Ibrk Times reported in
Tuesday'j editions.
The officials said federal judges should be required to impose a minimum
prisnn term of IK years tor pmweasinn of 25 pom of crack or 250 gram of nmV-
der cocaine, the newspaper reported.
federal law now requires a five-year minimum sentence for possession of S or
more grams of crack, Rw powder cocaine, the threshold for a five-year sentence is
500 grams or more.
The recommendation would narrow the sentencing disparity from the current
100 to I down to 10 to I.
The plan was first repotted in Newsweek's July 28 issue.
Tk.vA iniw n,
ATLANTIC CmC N.J. (AP) - After years of being covered up, beirybuttons will
be back on center stage at the Miss America Pageant.
In a break with tradition, contestants this year will be allowed to wear a two-
piece suit in the swimsuit competition. But there are limits.
Thongs and teenie-weenie bikinis are a no-no. The two-piece suits must have
"full or moderate" bottoms, while tops must be "full coverage" with straps at least
a half- inch wide.
The suits must be bought off the rack by contestants, who will have to tell
where they bought it and certify it wasn't custom-made. They will also wear san-
dals with heels of 2 inches or less, three years after switching to bare feet from the
traditional but uncomfortable high heels.
One-piece suits are still permitted, although all suits must be a solid colot
With last year's telecast drawing the lowest ratings ever, pageant officials
insisted Monday that the changes are not for sex appeal.
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UNICEF: Half tjii world withput proper toilets,
raising risk of disease
LONDON (AP) - Half the world's people do not have access to a toilet or even a
decent latrine, the United Nations said Tuesday, warning of the heightened risk
of wide-scale epidemics of cholera or other diseases.
The number of people lacking decent sanitation has grown from 2.6 billion in
1990 to 2.9 billion now, driven by population growth, urban crowding and pres-
sures on the budgets of developing countries, UNICEF said in its annual Progress
of Nations report released Tuesday.
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5





i
3 WwJawday. My 23. 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
!astil!arolinian
AMY IROYSTER EW
CKLRSTR Wilson Mmjinjeiw
Amanda Ross SanCdtor
Patrick Irki.an PtiwoMuoi
David Southeri-and PradwhonMiMtw
Carole mkhi.k MndCwEdum
JOHN Mt'RPHY SllH HhaiiMft
Heather Biirgess WnUm
m�l M ECU mm �� KM (mfm MM Oil MM �n �� � � "� Ml�� ������ t
M M Mow to na t� CmiMi mMm Mm � M HM. iM � M M. � H MM � cm� � Mw� 1 f M
CmTm �mw M t � �� a Mn Mm mMk M mm �� to HMI Una MM to Md � w�� Mm t t�
CwtoMillltMtt.mtmm.7m�4m.himmm.M3a.Sm
Matt Hege Mwmmg &���
MARGliKRITE BENJAMIN Ntw� Etw
JACQUELINE D. KELLl'M AsMOMHunEtftw
ANDY Tt'RNER lite tin
PATRICK REID Aaitiiml�?!l�iw
umnists
Does gun control deter crime?
DUELING
Jeff
BERGMAN
Columnist
No: People will buy and use weapons regardless
The oldest public university system in America has chosen the best qualified candidate for
President of the University of North Carolina System, Molly Broad. In a state that is used
to being labeled as provincial, conservative and unfriendly to outsiders, it is interesting that
one of North Carolina's most important public posts has been filled by the person most qual-
ified for the job, period. Yes, she is a woman and yes, she is not from North Carolina, or any-
where else in the south for that matter.
Broad, originally from Pennsylvania, graduated from Syracuse University with an under-
graduate degree in economics, obtained a master's degree from Ohio State University and
completed all course work toward a doctorate at Syracuse. Since th-�v she has held the job
of vice president for government and corporate relations at Syracuse for eight years. She was
named executive director and chief executive officer of the Arizona Board of Regents. She
was the top administrator for Arizona's three-campus university system before moving to the
California State University System (CSU) in 1992. There she served as senior vice chancel-
lor for administration and finance for a year before being promoted to executive vice chan-
cellor and chief operation office for the 23-campus University. CSU is the largest senior sys-
tem of higher education in the country.
In a university system where one of the campuses, namely ECU, has female professors
who are paid on average $2,815 less than their male counterparts, Broad may certainly bring
welcome changes. But before everyone begins expecting miracles we must remember that
she will be working with the same people who have, until now, never chosen a female pres-
ident. Hopefully, this is because the most qualified person for the job has been chosen every
time. Unfortunately, it is probable that the selection process has been more closed minded
than we would like to think. So, congratulations for looking outside of the circle. Vfc at TEC
encourage Broad to not only do the job she has been hired to do, but also to remember that
she represents a group of people who often feel under represented in academia: women.
If you do not like
guns, do not buy
them. If you believe
outlawing guns will
solve the crime
problem, think
again.
Guns, we all know how dangerous
they can be. We all know gun con-
trol works, or do we? If gun control
really works, drops in crime rates
would occur in places that gun con-
trol laws are in effect. The truth
reveals gun control has minimal or
no effect on crime.
Washington, DC has had a ban
on handguns for nearly twenty
years. This ban on handguns should
surely reduce the crime and homi-
cide rates. In 1992, DC had a homi-
cide rate of 75.4 people per 100,000,
as opposed to the national rate of
9.3 per 100,000. DC also has a vio-
lent crime rare that is nearly four
times the national average.
Look at Japan and England, the
gun control enthusiasts say. Their
crime rates are significantly lower
than the United States. Sure the
homicide rates in England are lower
than the US but look a little bit clos-
er and you wijj find some amazing
tidbits of knowledge. Since enact-
DUELING
ing tight licensing procedures,
England has seen its handgun relat-
ed robbery rates climb 200 percent
over the past twelve years.
Japan has a lower crime rate than
the US on account of a more effi-
cient criminal justice system. Japan
has a trial conviction rate of 99.9
percent and a suspect confession
rate of 95 percent. Part of the rea-
son behind the low crime and high
conviction rates is the Japanese
police routine of searching person's
homes at will.
High conviction rates mean more
criminals in jail. Around 70 percent
of suspected murderers in the US
have criminal records. Consider
this, the US has around 8 million
serious crimes in a given year. Of
the 8 million, only 193,000 adults
are ever convicted. Around one-
fifth of the convicted adults spend
less than a year in jail. Put criminals
in jail and the crime rate should
drop.
Japan's conviction and confession
rates can best be described as high-
ly inflated. Sure they might convict
tne crson Hit under hat means
Listen to the Tokyo Bar .Association
on why conviction rates are high,
"Even in cases where suspects
claimed to have been tortured and
their bodies bore the physical rraces
to back their claims, courts have still
accepted their confessions
Give me the rubber hose and
bright light treatment for a couple
of days and I will confess to the
Kennedy assassination.
Another favorite of people in
favor of gun control is the waiting
period. The waiting period is sup-
posed to keep guns out of people's
hands for a few days. I agree on this
issue. A day, or two, waiting period
could be used to make sure the per-
son buying the gun is really who
they say they are and not a convict-
ed felon.
Proponents of gun control say
guns in the home are more likely to
kill a family member than a crimi-
nal. The 'fact' stems from a study
on Cleveland, Ohio. The study
found a total of 148 accidental
deaths involving firearms and 23
intruders killed by home owners
over a 16 year period. On the sur-
face, the study seems to make a
valid point. But scratch the surface
and you find a nice paint job cover-
ing a rusty car.
The study counted all accidents
outside of the home. The
researcher did not include self-
defense that occurred outside of the
home. On top of that, nearly half of
the criminal intruders killed were
not included in the study because
the criminal might have known the
person defending their home.
Suicides were also counted in the
study.
Another study concluded that a
home with a gun has homicide rates
higher than normal. The researcher,
Dr. Kellermann, was extremely
selective in his study. He only
looked at homes where homicides
had occurred. Kellermann left out a
very important part in his research,
trie millions oi homes with gun
that no killings take place. Two
other important contributing factors
left out were prior criminal records
and a history of violence.
If you do nor like guns, do not
buy them. If you believe outlawing
guns will solve the crime problem,
think again. I am sure that when a
person comes up to rob you, heshe
is thinking, "Gosh, using a gun to
rob someone is illegal, maybe I
shouldn't do it And if you believe
that, I have same ocean front prop-
erty in Arizona for you.
The only people who should not
have guns are those not of legal age,
and those with violent or felony con-
victions. Keeping guns out of the
hand of law-abiding citizens is a vio-
lation of our fundamental rights. As
Thomas Jefferson said, "No free
man shall ever be debarred the use
of arms
Yes: Moderate control, education are solutions
Coupled with
education, suffer
conviction rates
and harsher
penalties, moderate
gun control is an
effective key to
decreasing violent
crime in America.
It is what is known as a culture con-
flict. American stands divided on the
issue of gun control perhaps more
than any other issue of national
importance. Certainly, the emotions
behond gun control lean toward
vehemence.
Anti-control supporters list
numerous reasons why guns should
not be regulated or controlled. Guns
are not the "root cause" of violence.
Guns are a constitutional right. Guns
areprotective.
After all, our forefathers (200
years ago) said all U.S. citizens had
the right to carry an armed gun. But
does that mean today, in a very dif-
ferent world than colonial America,
we should all walkaround armed to
the teeth? Do you really think that
will make you feel safer?
Come on, common sense tells us
that if a child is playing with match-
es, you take the matches away. It
doesn't mean that fire will be gone
from this earth. It just means the
child is a lot less likely to burn hum-
self or someone else.
One can spout statistics until
they are blue in the face. Look at the
statistics in New York or Los Angeles
or Washington, D.C. Look at the sta-
tistics in japan. Look at th�statistics
in Europe. Statistics, statistics, sta-
tistics.
Statistics are not the reason why
i've changed my jogging hours from
nighttime to daylight. Statistics are
not why my nephew and niece have
been given twilight curfews.
Statistics are not the reason my girl-
friend no longer goes grocery shop-
ping at night.
Sure, every dissertation ever writ-
ten shows some decrease in the
growth rate of violent crime � even
if minimal � in areas that have
enacted gun control laws. Waiting
periods en purchasing guns have
lessened the number of crimes of
passion. The growth rate of the vio-
lent crime rate in New York City has
actually decreased for the first time
in about 200 years since gun control
and stiffer regulations were enacted
in 1992.
Certainly all the research on gun
control is burdensome to anti-con-
rrol advocates, but they'd tend to
shun all this. "It's minimal change"
or "It's not a significant change
The bottom line is this: Coupled
with education, stiffer conviction
rates and harsher penalties, moder-
ate gun control is an effective key to
decreasing violent crime in America.
In many respects, the question of
guns and control isn't so much an
argument over the legality of nine-
millimeters, 3006's, AKs, hand
grenades or hand-held nuclear
devices. It is a question of western
ideology. It is a question of the role
of good and evil, right and wrong.
Whether through congressional
measures of the Brady Bill or the
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and
Firearms' toughened stance on sale
proccd'ires for gun dealers, areas
where gun control has been enacted
have shown a decrease in violent
crime.
Western society has a way of cre-
ating fears. It's as much a part of my
Irish ancestry as poverty and corrup-
tion in politics. Genius is the mind
that sees beyond the hegemony, that
sees beyond fear, that sees beyond
corruption, that understands order
in chaos.
Foresight is attainable if the
vision is within the self. If America is
treated as the self, if a stronger
future is what is hoped to achieve,
then America must look within,
must measure all the elements,
poverty, crime, alcoholism, drug use,
education and knowledge. Only
then can productive change occur.
Our forefathers simply did not
have the vision to see the result of
legalizing guns for every American.
They were trying to create a free-
standing militia to rid the U.S. of
tyranny. It's a trying state when
another tyranny, a tyranny of subtle
proportions, has grown to an annual
death rate of 40,0000 cicixns
through legalized gun ownership.
To this optimist, I believe all rid-
dles can be answered, America. No
doubt about it, gun control certainly
seems a major piece of the puzzle.
"Pursuit of truth is not a license to be a jerk
Jack Fuller, newspaper executive. 1996
.
:
t
-





4 Wednesday, July 25. 1997
review
Hipbone
Hipbone
8 OUT OF 10
JENNIFER LEGGETT
STAFF WRITER
Hipbone's new self-titled five song CD leaves something to be desircdmorc songs!
Though a very young group, this jazzy bunch has made a cohesive compilation that
expresses an incredible amount of talent.
Comprised of Aaron Bittikofer on standup double bass, electric bass and backing
vocals; Chris Bcntry on sax, guitar and backing vocals; Kevin Brock on drums; and
Brion Snyder on keyboards, organs, guitar and lead vocals, it's not hard to understand
why this group has had such success opening for big acts such as The Dave Matthews
Band at Walnut Creek in Raleigh and Widespread Panic in Charlotte.
Hipbone has the feel for jazz, and are just as much fun to listen to if you are a dis-
cerning jazz ran as if you arc into rock, pop or funk. Their original, evolved style is an
atmospheric, polished type of jazz with just enough edginess to keep things interest-
ing. The CD starts out with "Everybody" and a groovy organ intro. With this song,
Chris Bently shows his skills on sax with a couple of smooth, gorgeous sax solos. It's
a neat little song with a vague reminiscence of a 70s TV show theme.
The second song really gets a groove going with blistering sax, some hard core jazz
rhythms and a lyrical scat that sounds lite its own instrument. But it's the organ that
once again makes the music have that funky feel. The smooth simplicity of Snyder's
organ cuts through the harder edged fusion that backs their songs.
The most exciting song on the CD is the last one. Maybe I lite this one the best
because it ends with a smooth, quiet exit played out by Snyder and Bcntry. After such
a rockin' song it was nice to hear something a little more ambient and it was a perfect
way to end this CD.
Each song on Hipbone's new five song disc has enough diversity to capture a lis-
tener into a serious groove, while at the same time possessing similarities that tie each
song to the others. Even though Hipbone's songs have a certain degree of sameness
about them, it is this similarity that pulls the CD together, making it a whole, cohe-
sive recording.
Hipbone is an amazing jazz funk fusion quartet that is undoubtedly on its way up.
The amount of talent they embody shows al! over this incredible five song disc. I can't
wait to hear a full length
If you arc interested in catching Hipbone live, you can see them on Friday, July 2a
at the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
concertre
Hoe-down hits Raleigh
M provMad Co�ii�ry Cofcrt last tear
PHOTO COURTESY Of HMD WKUMM JR HOME RUE
lifestyle
n
The East Carolinian
ECU alum tackles Jeopardy
JENNIFER TAFE
STAFF WRITER
Answer General Norman Schwarzkopf, Tony Randall and Luke Perry have
this in common.
Question: What is they have all been contestants on Celebrity Jeopardy?
That's right, Jeopardy. And incidentally, Schwarzkopf really racked up the
points and the money during his appearance.
So what's the deal with the 1 ranked quiz show in America anyway? The
contestants are all brainiac rocket scientist types with nothing better to do
on a Friday night than sit down and peruse an Almanac for obscure tidbits of
information, right?
Wrong! I met with ECU alumni, and recent Jeopardy contestant, Henry
Brabble to get a firsthand account of the Jeopardy experience. Brabble's
appearance on Jeopardy will air Sept. 4 on WCTI. This was a rare opportuni-
ty for me to find out all of the little things I had wondered about the show
all along. Stupid things like "Do they make you pick the small money ques-
tions first?" (They don't.) And important things like "Why don't contestants
go straight for the $1000 questions?" (Those questions are much harder.)
Being a fan myself, I must admit to having a few ideas about the show in
mind before my meeting with Brabble. Basically, these ideas revolved
around the assumption that anyone on Jeopardy must be way smarter than
those of us who sit in our living rooms shouting answers at Alex Trebeck and
wagering all of our imaginary winnings in final Jeopardy.
Sitting in an office space covered with Led Zeppelin shots and discussing
education and various other ideas, however, Brabble proved to be anything
but the stereotypical information jockey one might expect.
Brabble, who is currently the night manager at Joyner Library, got the
opportunity to compete on Jeopardy through a contestant search in
Washington, D.C. These contestant searches take place in major cities
throughout the country. Prospective contestants from all walks of life are
required to answer 50 fast-paced questions on a broad range of topics.
"It's more about knowing a little bit on a broad range of subjects than
being an expert in one particular thing Brabble said.
Ever wonder why the contestants on Jeopardy rarely choke up and get ner-
vous being on television? Well, it turns out the screening process carefully
curries the competitors before their TV appearance.
"The contestant search is like a cattle-call. They shuttle you through a
screen test, diction and make-up Brabble explained. Basically, the produc-
ers do anything they can, from wardrobe advice to verbal coaching, to guar-
antee a smooth presentation. Competitors are even coached on the little
anecdote thcv share during the "getting-to-know-you" segment. I have to
admit that I was a little bit disillusioned.
The actual show went off without a hitch. As a history major at ECU,
Brabble's strongest subjects arc concentrated in history and the civil war
Who is an ECU jrad whe wort an .iuptntf Answer Henry BrabMe (above).
PHOTO BT CHRIS GAYOUSH
period. He even managed to pocket a Daily Double question in
Shakespeare category. Brabble said that the only category that really
him trouble was Opera.
SEE JEOMRDV, PAGES
Jackie Chan invades America
Dale Williamson
SENIOR WRITER
By now, just about everyone in America has at least heard of Jackie Chan, the
Hong Kong superstar who kicked his way into U.S. movie houses in 1996 with a kick out ot tnc tact mat u. u.c�c y �� � ��
the popular Bumble m the Bronx. Ever since, Chan has invaded Americas from popular culture. First Smke. which is theifourth installment �f�
.r r � , �- I Menry series, has Chan dome a lames Bono Dit,
Condor, both of which are filled with such joys as cheesv English dubbing over
Chinese dialogue, nutty slap-stick humor, shamefully cliched stereotypes;
bone-breaking action sequences and, of course. Char, s irresistible, almost
childish charm.
There's no need to delve into the plots of these two films. Suffice it to say
that Chan is the good guy taking on a bunch of bad guys. Film buffs may get
a kick out of the fact that in these films Chan docs his own take on two icons
Pat Reid
assistxnt lifestyle editor
Welcome to the year of the "theme fes-
tival show Among the ever present
H.O.R.D.E. and Lollapalooza shows,
this year has offered the estrogen driven
Lilith Fair, the new rock G-105 Big
Shindig, and last Saturday, Fruit of the
Loom brought us the Country Comfort
Tour. Despite being sponsored by an
underwear company, the Country
Comfort tour actually provided artists
who know the meaning of entertain-
ment. From Southern rock legend
Charlie Daniels to the rockcountry of
Travis Tritt and Hank Williams Jr
Country Comfort proved to be one hell
of a show.
After a short set by newcomer JoDce
Messina to warm the crowd up. The
Charlie Daniels Band hit the stage
ready to boogie. From rhe opening notes
of "The South's Gonna Do It Again Charlie and the crowd worked off each other
for the next 50 minutes. Stopping after "Hard Headed Woman Charlie remarked
how happy he'd be when football got started back up. "How about them
Panthers?" Charlie asked the crowd. "I've been telling people for a long time that
the south's gonna do it again he joked. "You know, after football season there's
just not a lot on TV that I'm interested in. I don't care much for Roseanne, and I
really don't care if Ellen is out of the closet or not. In fact, I didn't really know she
was in After a few more remarks on the country's state of affairs, the CDB
kicked into their 19K9 hit "Simple Man much to the approval of the crowd.
Finally, after short solos by the CDB members, Charlie led them in a rendition
of the fiddle classic "Orange Blossom Special" to end the show. As Charlie walked
'off the stage a local radio DJ informed the crowd that thev were about to be part
or nistorv. With tnat ne introduced the North Carolina Secretary of State, and two
board members of the North Carolina Music and Entertainment Hall of Fame.
After a speech full of praise for Charlie Daniels, the Secretary of State inducted
the Wilmington native into the Hall of Fame. With tears in his eyes Daniels
!thanked the crowd and stated. "After that the onlv thing we can do is plav 'The
;DJ:vil Went Down To Georgia With the crowd singing and dancing along, the
�CDB tore through an eight minute version of their signature song before leaving
�Che stage for the last time.
! : Aftet a short intermission, the stage filled with smoke and Travis Tritt came
irOnning onto the stage from under the drum riser. Kicking into "Put Some Drive
In Your Countrv" Tritt danced, pranced and sang his way into the audiences'
hearts. From "Drive" Tritt slid straight into the Rolling Stones classic, "Honky-
Tonk Woman After that it became hit after hit as Tritt proved that he has earned
every bit of his fame. Tritt's show was pure energy as he ran around, talked to the
audience, and did whatever else he thought it would take to entertain the crowd.
Finally, after "Here's a Quarter (Call Someone Who Cares) Tritt concluded his
SEE H0E-00WN, PAGE t
mainstream media with a vengeance. He has
appeared on countless talk shows, glamorized numer-
ous magazine covers, and even had a comic book pub-
lished featuring him as the karate-kicking superhero.
But the most significant part of Jackie's newfound
American fame (he had already been a success in just
about every other comer of the globe) centers around
his films. In just a little over a year's time, three
Jackie Chan films have been released to U.S. theaters
and many others have crowded the shelves at video
stores. .Although these films were made years ago and
released elsewhere in the world, they had, until
recently, been unavailable in the Stares (unless you
count the bootleg market).
This all may seem like overkill, but one of the
magical and mystifying characteristics of Jackie Chan
flicks is that they never get old and fans of the action
genre can never get enough. His films are simplistic
and even idiotic, but they are still mind-boggling and
unlike anything American cinema lias ever produced.
American audiences have grown accustomed to
the likes of Jean-Claude Van Damme and Chuck
Norris, two martial artists who are impressive and
tough enough, but they lack one essential clement
necessary for something as ridiculous as a karate
movie. They aren't fun.
Instead of playing his characters with a brooding
seriousness, Chan makes his heroes clumsily vulnera-
ble yet tenaciously unstoppable. His hero is someone
who will repeatedly make mistakes and take many
beatings along the way, but he is always someone who
will pull through in the end.
Chan, unlike most modern-day actors, performs all
of his stunts, so physical action is extremely impor-
tant in his films. He decidedly draws energy from the
comedic talents of Buster Kcaton and Charlie
Chaplin, blends this physical humor with the martial
arts skills of Bruce Lee, and surrounds the entire concept with nonsensical
plots that would be fodder for Mystery Science Theater 3000. The result is sheer
genius, when accepted for what it is.
Two prime examples of how fun Jackie's films are have recently been
released to the American public, Jackie Chan's First Strike and Operation:
Story series, has Chan doing a James Bond bit,
while Operation: Condor, which is the second part
of the Armor of God series, and is surprisingly
enough, playing at Greenville's $1.50 theater,
owes much to Indiana Jones.
This may be a positive or negative thing tc say,
but just about all Jackie Chan films can be
reviewed in the same manner. Action is the sell-
ing point and the main focus of his films. Jiut
watching Chan in action is like riding a looping
roller coaster on Prozac.
The printed word does no justice to Chan's phys-
ical feats. You have to see it. He does it all: he sin-
gle-handedly, with lightning speed and exhaust-
ing energy, battles anywhere up to 10 men. using
anything from his own body to a 12-foot ladder;
he races a motorcycle through crowded streets as
several cars chase him, and he still manages to
save an infant in the process; he skis down an icy
slop and jumps onto the side of a helicopter with
guns and missiles firing at him; he zooms through
the air, kicking and punching two opponents as a
huge aircraft propeller sucks him closer and clos-
er to potential death; and he defies the odds
underwater with no oxygen tank as he faces down
many armed opponents and a hungry killer shark.
Remember, this is not a stunt person; this is Chan
in the flesh doing his own dirty work.
For the most part, a Jackie Chan film is brain
candy. With the exception of films like Drunken
Master 2 (which examines such concepts as the
Chinese culture, divided families and alco-
holism), Chan's movies serve not to invigorate or
challenge the intellect but to simply entertain.
Those new to Chan's world, watch out fo the
cheaper videos that are for sale in every Wal-Mart
or Blockbuster. Those exemplify the earlier part-
of his career before he took creative control over his films. They do not rep-
resent or do justice to his full capabilities. To experience Chan at his best,
catch the films mentioned above or rent Rumble in the Bronx, Superrop or Crime
Story. These are the films that will clearly illustrate how Chan is a master at
what he does and whv, in truth, nobody does it better.
Jackie Chan is one bad mother.
PHOTO COURTESY OF JACKIE CHAJ IMAGE SAllERY
Guided by Voices ties one on Cradle crowd
HV TURNER
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
A former elementary school teacher armed with a
new band, leg kicks and a huge cooler of beer took
over the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro last Friday night.
Before disappearing into the hot Carolina night,
the man dazzled the crowd with his perfect pop
concoctions and, perhaps more importantly, his
willingness to throw beers out of said cooler to
audience members.
Robert Pollard and the newest incarnation of
Guided by Voices performed for more than an
hour and a half to the pleased, packed crowd at
the Cat's Cradle. Most of the band's material con-
sisted of songs from theit new album, Mag
Earvhig and their recent albums. Under the Bushes
Under the Stars and Alien Lanes, as well as Pollard's
1996 solo effort. Sot In My Aujorte.
The new band members, made up of members
of Cleveland glam rockers Cobra Verde. hac
added a new energy to Guided by Voices' live
show. The new guys' sound kind of reminded me
of the Glam Rock Explosion tape I bought for a
quarter in the budget pile at mv local chain record
store. That, of course, is a compliment. I mean I
was sorta sad they didn't bteak out with "My
Cocca Choo
Pollard, however, is still the focus. Unlike many
bands of the "alternative" crop, he understands
the concept of "entertaining If you want to get
the crowd involved, you at least have to pretend to
be having a good time. Pollard doesn't pretend; he
really seems to be having the time of his life up on
stage. He dances around, throws his legs in the ait,
swings the microphone around by the cotd. He
thrusts his arm high in the air like a triumphant
fotk lift driver lifting a 30 foot high load. But he
manages to do all of this without it coming off as
generic rock star posturing. Pollard looks like a guy
alone in his room, shouting the words to a
Loverboy song in the mirror. He acts like the rest
of us.
Guided by Voices played about 30 to 40 songs -
a small nibble of their total repertoire. Their
albums average about 20 songs each. Even with all
of that output, the band manages to avoid pro-
ducing lots of crap filled ditties. .As Pollard
observed, the band has "too many damn hits
Thev cranked out great song after great song: "M
Valuable Hunting Knife "I am a Scientist "The
Official Ironmen Rally Song" and "Motor Aw
The crowd licked up each song, finding them-
selves flying buck naked in pop feedback heaven.
The band played two encores, the crowd still
wanting more after the second encore. But it was
not to be. The man and his coolet had left the
building.






5 Wednesday. July 23, 1997
i(i style
The East Carolinian
Jeopardy
continued from page 4
Having seen H'hire Mm Can't Jump
several times. I felt pretty confident
assuming that hnparth contestants
spend a lot of time just reading
almanacs and dictionaries for trivial
information. Not so.
"The quickest way to learn is to
pick things up from those around
you; people you admire and respect,
your friends Brabble said. Although
he admits that working in Joyner
Library and exposure to Internet
resources have contributed to his
knowledge on a broad range of sub-
jects. Brabble maintains that experi-
ence is the best way to learn.
Different experiences are some-
thing that Brabble has had a lot of
practice in. As a child. Brabble's
familv lived in the mid-west. New
Jersey and North Carolina. Before
his present job at Joyner Library,
Brabble was a student teacher at
Greene Central High School.
Brabble explained that each of these
new situations became a learning
opportunity.
"People look, for excuses not to
have new experiences. No money,
no time; this keeps people from try-
ing new things and learning from
them Brabble said. "If you want to
do something he said, "it's just a
matter of striving and getting it
done
Hoe-down
continued from page 4
show with Elvis' "Burnin' Love
and Bob Seger's classic "Night
Moves
Now the crowd was getting
rowdy, as fights were breaking out
more and more frequently. Finally,
the natives were soothed as the
video screens began to show clips of
Hank Williams Jr. through the years.
After a couple of minutes of footage,
the man himself appeared on stage
in a Carolina Panthers jersey and led
his band in "Born To Boogie
Much like Tritt, Williams did
whatever it took to entertain as he
swapped off between guitar and
microphone, and talked of football,
liquor and girls. "I love that all of
vou are here, but if 1 had my
druthers I'd druther be at a honky-
tonk getting drunk and meeting
some girls Williams remarked. Of
course, most of the audience had
done plenty of drinking themselves
before and during the show, and
were loving every word that came
out of their hero's mouth.
After such hits as "Hog Wild
Williams came out by himself and
plaved acoustic versions of songs
like "Country Boys Can Survive"
and the Aliman Brothers song
"Midnight Rider Williams also
paid tribute to his father with songs
like "Your Cheatin' Heart" and "Hey
Good Lookin Finally, after a med-
ley of rock songs including "Cat
Scratch Fever" and Aerosmith's
"Walk This Way Williams said his
final good-byes and left the stage.
Due to Walnut Creek's 11 p.m. cur-
few, after leaving the stage at 10:57
Williams didn't leave enough time
for an encore, but the crowd seemed
satisfied anyway. After all, they had
just seen three Southern rockcoun-
try legends play their hearts out.
' Whoever was behind these artists
playing together must be congratu-
lated. Rarely do artists on tour
together compliment each other as
well as these three did. Keep an eye
out for the Country Comfort tour to
return to our area as it's a show not
to be missed.
Flemine fresh air (licks

SIZZLE 0utside
When You Can Be COOL With the Professor
The Student Union Presents SS
&enjoy movie under the stars
Wednesday July 23 @ 9pm Fleming Hall Courtyard. Free With ECU ID.
GREAT
Drink Specials
Every Night
TUESDAY (Ladies Night) 25Wine By the Glass
12 Price Appetizers After 9pm
SATURDAY 2.95 Double Shot Margaritas
Also: 12 oz Hand Cut Ribeye only $9.95
5-2946 Located In th1
th� corner �fC
i
July
23 Wednesday
Navy Seals in Fleming Hall
Courtvard.
Mike Mesmer "Eyes" at the
Comedy Zone at the Attic. �
Kevin, M ah and Bernie from;
Purple School bus.
Old 97s : "id Blue Mountain at
Local 506 .n Chapel Hill.
24 Thursday
Mike Mesmer "Eyes" at the
Comedy Zone at the Attic.
Kutphatt at Peasant's.
Sue Witty and Fair Play at The
Cave in Chapel Hill.
Big Sandv and his Fly-Rite Boys at
Local 506 in Chapel Hiil.
25 Friday
Far Too Jones at the Attic.
New Brown Hat at Peasant's.
Jupiter Coyote at the Lake Boone
Country Club in Raleigh.
Hipbone and John Thursday at
the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Verbena at The Lizard and Snake
in Chapel Hill.
26 Saturday
Agents of Good Roots at the Attic.
Elephant Boy at Peasant's.
Boston at Walnut Creek
Amphitheatre in Raleigh.
Doxy's Kitchen at the Brewery in
Raleigh.
Triangle Blues Society Talent
Showcase at the Cat's Cradle in
Carrboro.
Kingsized at Local 506 in Chapel
Hill.
28 Monday
Greg Hawk and Friends at The
Cave in Chapel Hill.
29 Tuesday
Angry Salad at Peasant's.
Wednesday July 23rd & Thursday July 24th!
COWetf
MIKE MESMErTEYES"
The World's Most Powerful Hypnotist
$8
Adv Tix
ADVANCE TIX AVAILABLE AT
CD ALLEY � SKUUY'S
EAST COAST MUSIC & VIDEO
WASH PUB � ATTIC
Doors Open at
9PM
No Reservation
Accepted
FART
With Special Guest
HOBEX
Friday
111
JONES
Need a reecue from the heat?
Meet new folks & snacks to eat
Float on in to the
Eastbrook & Village Green
Open HousePool Party
on Saturday, July 26th!
We'll be sunnin' & funnin' on Heath St.
(behind The Wash Pub) from 11 to 3
Tour our apartment homes then spend
the afternoon by one of our cool pooe
SEAT THE HEAT DEPOSIT PEAL
Move into a 2-bedroom at
Eastbrook or Village Green
between August 22 & September 13
& pay 12 security deposit!
former members of Dillon Fence & Johnny Quest
Saturday
RCA Recording Artist �
AGENTS OF GOOD ROOTS
Sunday
t�J
Eastbrook & Village Green Apartments
204 Eastbrook Drive
(919) 752-5100
&
Adv Tix
$8 Too Skinnee J's
99X Record Contract Signing Party
Early Show � Doors Open at 7PM
ADVANCE TIX AVAllABlE AT
CD AUEY � SKUUY'S
EAST COAST MUSIC 4 VIDEO
WASH PUB � ATTIC





Search for baseball coach over
Amanda Ross
SPORTS EDITOR
Yankees outfielder arrested on sexual assault charge
MILWAUKEE (AP) - New Tferk wnkees outfielder Mark Whiten was arrested
Monday on a charge of second degree sexual assault involving a 31-year-old
vKhmlttl was arrested at 3:05 p.m. on the final day of the Yankees' four-day
trip to Milwaukee, police Lt. Ernest Meress said. Whiten was released Monday
night on 110,000 bond, according to his attorney, Steve Glynn.
The ankees were scheduled to take a flight from Milwaukee to New York
after their 7-3 win over die Brewers. Whiten was not going to travel with the
teThe district attorney's office reviewed the case Tuesday and decided whether
to file a charge, Meress said. Whiten was to meet with the district attorney, Glynn
Police officers were called about 4 a.m. Saturday to a downtown location in the
same block as the Pfisrer Hotel where the ankees stay, Sgt. Eameli Lucas sud.
The officers conducted an investigation but "at that time there was no allega-
tion of sexual assault Uicas said.
"fe developed information that some incident did occur. It wasnt until this
morning when we re-interviewed the alleged victim that we developed enough
information to pursue a possible charge of sexual assault he said.
"He (Whiten) was contacted and he voluntarily came to Milwaukee police
headitfattets Tuesday. Shortly thercaftei; he was placed under arrest Lucas said.
The Yankees declined to discuss specifics about the alleged incident, whiten
missed two games last week to travel to Ctearwatei; Fla to be his wife when she
delivered the couple's second child, a boy.
Former Buffalo Sabres captain expected
to be named head coach
BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) - Former Buffalo Sabres captain Lindy Ruff is expected to
be named the team's new head coach Tuesday, taking over a position once held
by the popular Ted Nolan. .
Ruff's appointment is expected to be announced officially at a news conter-
x this morning at Marine Midland Arena.
"There's still some legal work to be done, but it's true Ruff said in Sunday s
lition of The Buffalo News. "I'm looking forward to rhe challenge
Ruff, 37, served as an assistant coach to the Florida Panthers and was with the
team when it went to the Stanley Cup finals two seasons ago.
As new coach, Ruff will have some tough shoes to fill. Rwmer head coach Ted
Nolan was a favorite among fans and players after leading the team to the
Northeast Division title, their first in 16 years. Nolan also earned the NHLs
Coach of the Year award.
Late last month, Nolan rejected a one-year deal, and general manager JJarcy
Regier refused to return to the table. Nolan had been seeking a multi-year con-
tract.
Bookie safety already making his presence felt
SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) - Mike Minter has an engineering degree from
Nebraska. EaHy indications from the Carolina ftnthera' training camp are that,
barring injury he won't need it anytime soon.
Lew than a week into the camp, the rookie safety is drawing rave reviews as
the Ptaithets starting nickel back, and coach Dam Capers isn't ruling out the pos-
sMrtyofan even larger role in the secondary.
Minter. a second-round draft choice, seems a little taken back by the relative
ease with which he has fit in as a member of a defense that was among the best
in the NFL last season. ' . .
�HusehankGod for the opportunity" he said, "because this is definitely a
place where I know I can make a home '
TTie transition from college to the pros has been eased by the fact that
Nebraska and Carolina both use forms of the 3-4 defensive scheme.
"It's definitely a perfect situation for me to come into Minter said. "I ve
come to a team that plays defense like I like to play defense. I've come to a team
that needs a safety. And I'm coming into a team that has that mentality that we
had at Nebraaka. They're a dose ramify. And that's what it takes to win
At S-fboc-IO, 188 pounds, Minter is smaller than what most NFL teams have
been envisioning recently as the perfect safety. The Panthers, however, don t
appear to be the least bit concerned that Minter isn't 6-3 or 210 pounds. A 40-
yarddash time of 4.43 seconds helps make up for his relative lack of size.
After searching for a new baseball coach, ECU has finally found their man.
Keith LeClair, former head coach at Western Carolina, was officially named
the head coach of the Pirate baseball team on Sunday at a press conference wel-
coming LeClair to the Pirate family.
LeClair posted impressive seasons at Western Carolina finishing with a uv-
135-2 record and a .630 winning percentage. As Western's head coach since the
92 season, he ted the Catamounts to three Southern Conference regular season
championships, three conference tournament titles and four NCAA
Tournament berths. He was voted the conference's coach of the year in m, 94
and97. � .�
Athletic Director Mike Hamrick said they were looking for someone who
could take the Pirate baseball to new levels.
"We felt we needed someone that was a proven winner Hamnck said.
LeClair fit that profile and last season led his team to a 42-20 record en route
to winning the Southern Conference regular season and tournament champi-
onships. His "97 team ranked in the country's top 25 for three consecutive
weeks and advanced to the NCAA East Regional in Tallahassee.
The Catamounts finished the season ranked fourth nationally in overall bat-
ting average (.351) and broke records in the Southern Conference that had
stood for 77 years. Those records included runs scored, RBIs and hits. Dunng
last season, LeClairs team posted impressive victories over Georgia Tech,
Clemson and Georgia.
Hamrick said they found the total package in their new coaching pick.
Mike Hamrick (L) welcomes Keith
ueClair (R) to ths Pirsts family.
PWT0 ST MTMCK �HA�
"W; wanted someone who had their
team at the top level of college baseball
and that's the direction we wanted to
take this program Hamrick said. "We
found that in Keith LeClair
The 31-year-old coach compared the
football program to the baseball program
and said that he hopes it's not just the
football team that is competing national-
ly-
"I want to compete on the national
level LeClair said. "I want to play the
best people in the country. I want to beat
the best people in the country. I want to
try to take this program to Omaha
Omaha is where the college world series is played and LeClair came within
one win of getting his team there in 92. LeClair wants his players to give it
their all when they are on the field.
"I want kids to play hard LeClair said. "I want them to hustle off the held
and4 want them to do all the little things it takes to be successful
But for LeClair it's not just about winning, but also about enjoying the game
of baseball. � � .
"I want kids to enjoy the game and I want kids to play the game, LeClair
said. "When you get these two things they'll have a bettcrtime playing the
game and people will have a better rime watching the game
LeClair hopes to bring the successes he had with the Catamounts to the
Pirates. . �
"Hopefully the qualities 1 bring from fcstern Carolina I can bnng to this
program and make it successful LiClair said.
Officials say stadium will be ready
KALVIN LEE KELLEV
STAFF WHITER
The time is drawing near for the Pirate football season.
A new addition to Dowdy-Rcklen Stadium that adds a
full 8,000 seats for crazy Pirate fans is being constructed
as we speak. The deadline is September 13 just in time
for the first home football game against Wake rnrest.
When you look at the stadium now and see all the
cement, wires, scafftes and that big crane yoc may ask:
"Will the new stadium be completed September 13 or
even this year?"
The construction firm of Davidson, Jones & Beers
have assured ECU Officials that the project is on sched-
ule to be done on time. The new addition to Dowdy-
Fickten with it's $14.1 million dollar price tag really
needs to be complete. One reason is that the for these
new seats have already been selling. The Assistant
Athletic Director Henry fcnSant gave an update on tick-
"W'rc selling tickets (for the new seats) like it 's
alreadv done" VanSant said.
The project will no doubt be close to the deadline
that has been set. This excludes any delay's that may
arise.
One such delay was a faulty beam. This little prob-
lem occurred earlier this month. The beam was in ques-
tion was then quickly taken down after gaps in the con-
crete were discovered.
The faultv beam mentioned above has already been
taken down from it's place on the first raker on the end
of the upperdeck closest to the scoreboard. This past
week on July 16 the construction men with the use of
the crane were scheduled to put in the pre-cast risers
that hold the seats in place. So pretty soon the outcome
of what the finished upper deck will be in sight.
Davidson, Jones & Beers are in charge of the new
SEEC0NSTMICTI0N.PAGE7
SURVEYING
THE CHANGE
Construction on the upper
deck expansion cwrtmtes as
a worker survey's wort
Often say Aeepprfcck
wtt bo rtady for tfw horns
' against Wake Forest
an September 13.
tball ticket sales up
from last season
PHOTO W CHMS SAYMtK
Sports information department links athletes and media
Travis newkirk
STAFF WHITE
During the last several months
Dowdy-Ftekkn stadium has been filled
with onfy the sound of construction
work on the upper-deck As the sum-
mer draws closer to the end, and the fall
football season right around the comer,
Dowdy-Ficklen stadium will have a
much more familiar sound. The sound
will be an additional 8,000 screaming
fans bringing the stadium's capacity to
43,000 seats.
With the Pirates entering
Conference USA for its inaugural sea-
son and the stadium expansion, ticket
sates have been on a steady increase.
Assistant Athletic Director Lee
S5ETrCMTima7
AMY BASS
STAFF WHITE
Going to a school like ECU has its benefits. Not
only is the college known for its educational pro-
grams, but ECU sports is common knowledge
throughout the US.
Credit for the athletic department's popularity
falls on many shoulders; the coaching staff, the
community support, fans and, of course, the ath-
letes. All of this hard work would not be national-
ly known if not for the efforts of the Sports
Information Department (SID).
"Our job is to promote and publicize all of
(ECUs) athletic teams and the student athletes
on those teams in the best way possible Norm
Reilly, director of the Sports Information
Department said. "The SID is a link between the
media and the athletic department
Even though most Pirate fans probably have
not heard of the SID, all are affected. SID works
home events, writes weekly news releases, game
programs and media and recruiting guides for
each sport. All interviews with players and coach-
es are set up by the Sport Information
Department.
"The SID is critical to a university as far as
dealing with athletics Travis Newkirk, a junior
wide receiver said. "They let us know what time
we have an interview with a particular reporter
The responsibility of the SID is great.
"There's not a slow time during the year. Si Js
probably ths one office (on campus) that you can
usually find someone in says Reilly. "You're
either getting ahead or catching up
This year's staff is rclatrvery new. There are
two full-time assistant directors: Joanna
Sparkman, who began in June, and Jerry Trickie,
who will begin in the fall. Other staff members
include: Pam Forrest, the secretary and a 15-year
veteran of ECU's SID; a post-graduate intern; and
6-8 under-graduate assistants.
"The student assistants are the backbone of
the office. They have a lot of responsibility
Keiihsaid. .
Reilly, who has been awarded the "Citation for
Excellence" by the College Sports Information
Directors of America 11 times, enjoys his job.
EG Li Ring Event
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7 Wednesday. July 23, 1997
snor
The East Carolinian
TICKETS
continued from page 6
Workman said ticket sales have gone
up.
"Our season ticket sales are
ahead of where thev were last year.
we have between 12 and 13 thou-
sand season tickets already sold as of
today Workman said.
With the Pirates playing one of
their toughest schedules in years,
there is a peak of interest from a
fan's perspective. Fans want to see
how the Pirates will do against Wake
Forest, South Carolina and the
Conference USA opponents.
The Pirates' home opener with
Wake Forest is expected is to lie
nearly sold out. The Pirates' second
home game against South Carolina is
sold out with the exception of the
remaining season tickets and stu-
dents tickets.
The increase of ticket sales are
due to a number of things.
"Pirate football is growing in the
area, the stadium expansion is
another reason, and the success of
the football program in the past
have all contributed to the increase
in ticket sales Workman said.
Ticket prices for this year's home
football games have gone up from
Si8 dollars a ticket to S20 and $22
dollars a ticket. The prices for the
Wake Forest and South Carolina
games are S22 per ticket.
Workman says the increase in
ticket price is because of the stadi-
um expansion.
If you're looking for an exciting
atmosphere, get your Pirate tickets
and support Pirate football as they
go for their first Conference USA
championship.
To order ECU football tickets,
contact the ECU ticket office at
328-4500 or dial 1-800-DIAL-ECU.
READY FOR A BREAK?
MONDAY
SUNDAY Sangrias1.50
Bloody Marys $2.25
12 Price Draft Pitchers!
112 Price Nachos Grande
T U E S D AY Lime Margaritas $2.50
Buy I appetizer get I freei
WEDNESDAY Mexican Imports $1.50
12 Price pizza grande
iTHIRSTDAY Hi-Balls $1.99
12 Price Buffalo Wings
?Specials Sun-Thurs. After 9 p.m. Dine-in only
l UK' 1 � �
eastcarolinian
Make sure to catch
our Welcome Back issue
available August 18
CONSTRUCTION
continued from page 6
construction describe the new addi-
tion. With the new upper deck will be
an concourse level complete with con-
cessions, rest-rooms, and club seating.
There is also arms on the new part to
allow more space for even more lights
to be added.
There is another reason why a
speedy completion is necessary.
Besides the tickets being sold up
there, a dedication is also planned
before the game on September 13 to
officially open the upper deck. This
event aiong with the first home game
against Wake Forest sounds like it will
be a great event to check out.
So, Pirate fans, get ready for a new
place to hang out and catch the game.
Visit the new addition and get a heav-
enly view of the Pirates and Demon
Deacons on Sept. 13 � only if you're
not afraid of heights.
Mexican Restaurant
zJ
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free, Confidential Service & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
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Hours: 7:3oam-5:oopm
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f
8 Wtdntsgay. July 23. 1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
i bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE NEEDED: PROFES-
SIONAL OR graduate student to
share 3 bedroom duplex in Oockside.
Please call 757-0623.
DOCKS DUPLEX 3 SCDROOM
AVAILABLE SSPTEMMR 1 TO
TAKE OVER LEASE. ENDS IN MAY.
CALL 7S7-OS23.
r$7ieow"siwimrDs
f vrm fwmntation or
J iMtcouraN
tmtmm
I IMotCmV
WMtv, Ofmt H.c
Hi moat unfts-Laundry FwcGff,
Sw4VM�i Court.
�BOSDOMS
2 EsMlrBWR aMMSftUs. mw, butt ,
$ WBQaf wOfVI C6fTOj6. rNtV OMPasOTERp.
BROOKHUi. � 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath.
$450. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. $600. Call
Pro Management 756-1234.
ATTNl FRATERNITY 8 BED-
ROOMS2 bath house. Private 12
acre wooded lot, fenced. Also lor sale
or lease purchase. Ideal for frat house.
8757-9387
SUBLEASE ONE BEDROOM
APARTMENT $26Smonth. Energy
efficient, convenient location. Avail-
able mid-August. Call 353-0881.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
three bedroom duplex on 4th Street.
$230 a month 13 utilities. No pets
and no smokers, please 11 Call 757-
9348.
WOODS4DE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 bath
on ECU bus route. $280month. Call
Pro Management 756-1234.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed August 1st. Rent 191.66 plus
13 utilities. 4 blocks from ECU. Call
Amis 830-2197.
3 BEDROOM. 2.S BATHS. Twin
Oaks. Washerdryer included.
$650month. Call Pro Management
756-1234.
PLAYERS CLUB SUBLEASE Ni 4
BR3 BA unit. No security deposit.
$220mo 14 utilities. Call Kristen 6?
353-0866 or Melissa Jones g 321-
7613.
ONE BEDROOM, ALL UTILITIES in-
cluded. 12 block from campus on Hol-
ly St. $305.00 a month. Call 757-9387.
Available now. Cats only.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM-
MATE WANTED. House located be-
hind Pitt Community College. $325.00
rent and half utilities. Deposit negoti-
able if necessary. Call 355-2705 or
leave message.
TOWER VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1
bath. $395month. Call
ment 756-1234.
Pro Manage-
TWO FULL TIME SUPERVISORS
are needed for The Center Court juice-
bar at the East Carolina University
student recreational center. Candidate
should be energetic, customer service
oriented and have previous super-
visory experience. If you enjoy a
heaithy lifestyle and like being around
others that do, this could be the job for
youl Please pick up applications at the
campus dining office at Mendenhall
Student Center, East Carolina Univers-
ity. No phone calls please. EOE.
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT LOCAT-
ED behind house on 14th St.
$350mcnth includes all utilities. Call
Pro Management 756-1234.
UPTON COURT. BEHIND OREEN-
VILLE Athletic Club on ECU bus route.
2 bedroom, 2 bath $525-560. Call Pro
Management 756-1234.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE
with 2 others in nice 3 bedroom house.
Walk to campus. Private yard,
screened porch, deck, patio. Non-
smoker. Available now. No deposit.
919-875-0788.
Northwester; Naieal Life
Sales lateraahip Available
Rated In Top 10 Internship Programs
by Princeton Review
Contact
Jtff MMassMV at 3SS-77SS
Szechuan Garden Needs
Part time or full time waitstafT and
cashier. No phone calls. Come after
2:00 pm in person only.
909 South Evans St. Greenville,
NC 27834 (10th &Evans)
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
bedroom 2 bath apartment at Tar Riv-
er. 12 rent and 12 utilities. Call 413-
0542.
COURT AND CEDAR
Court two bedroom 1 12 bath town-
houses. On ECU bus route $400-$415.
Call Weinright Property Management
786-6209 proteasing for fall also.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDEtTTO
share 3 bedroom apartment 2 blocks
from campua, 1 block from downtown.
13 utilities, $170 rent. Pun, outgoing,
nonsmoker. Call Nikki or Jen at 758-
3684.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
share 2bdr 112 bath townhouse. $225
plus 12 utilities and phone. Located
on ECU bus route. Call Laura at 756-
7128.
MD HIGH RENT. COUNTRY
, $250 a month, 3 tc 4 bedrooms,
for married couple, grad stud-
si or medical students. Inquire
1294.
NEARCAMPUS. 3-4bach
rooms. $700-766morrth. Call Pro Man-
agement 756-1234.
apartments on 10th street.
Proa basic cable, water and sewer also
proteasing for the fall $415.00. Call
Wainright Property management 756-
6209.
GRADUATE STUDENT SEEKING 2
male housemates. $186.00 each util-
ities. Located within walking distance
from the campus. Call Kevin @ 919-
467-5804.
t BEDROOM HOUSE NEAR cam-
pus. Available Aug 1st. $1100 month,
plus deposit. Call 355-4172 for details.
APARTMENT ON 1ST STREET. 1
bedroom1 bath. $270mortth. Call Pro
Management 756-1234.
BRAND NBWI BEECH ST. Villas. 3
bedroom, 2 bath with cable included.
$650month. Call Pro Management
756-1234.
ONE BEDROOM, LIVING ROOM.
kitchen and bath for $275 a month. Lo-
cated on 1st. Available August 1st.
Call (919) 754-2487
For Sale
Peony Gardens
Water
Stove
yraiiiei i us yei
JflLJudSMI
i ii t iii ii I i �fa ai ES
TTeWfirijnt rrvpCjfTj
Cad 714420a
2 bedroom
1 12 bath
$375 month
A NEW PAD? Roommate
wanted to share 2 bedroom, 2 bath du-
plex, walking distance from campus.
Lots of extras. Non-smoker requested.
$260 month plus 12 bills. Call 758-
2232.
MCE HOUSE CLOSE TO campus
looking for MF roommate. Call 752-
8682
WILD WOOD VILLA. 3 or 4 bed-
room, 2 12 bath. $650month. Call Pro
Management 756-1234.
WHJJAMSBURG MANOR - 2 bed-
room, 1 12 bath townhouses. $425-
450month. Call Pro Management 756-
1234.
FURNITURE FOR SALE: 3 pc. girl's
bedroom suit. Full size bed, desk
(chair), dresser. $150. 758-2230, leave
message.
TWELVE INCH RECORDS FOR sale.
Rap, Hip Hop, R&B, Reggae. Perfect
for DJs. Serious inquiries onlyl Call
John at 752-4715 and leave message.
GUITARS FOR SALE OR trade. Four
acoustic, throe electrics under $200.
Call 919-837 6550 before 8 pm.
REUPHOLSTERED "CRATE" FUR-
NITURE: COUCHLOVE-
SSATCHAM $275.00. Glees topped
tables (crate) $175.00. Oval maple din-
ing table (seats 4-8) and 4 chairs
$200.00. Call 356-5873.
MM THINKPADS AND OTHER lap-
tops. 100 financing available. Stud-
ent discounts. Call Alfred at (919)- 355-
7057.
A NM SYSTEM WITH the game
Hang Time, and two controllers for
$150. Contact Lennon Scott at (919)-
830-1098.
ATTENTIONI ASSISTANT WANT-
ED to help with mate freshman who
has cerebral palsy for the fall semester
1997. Minimal assistance required.
Hours and payment to be determined.
Call 919-732-4748 for an interview.
CATERING AT EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY is looking for a Full-
time delivery personbanquet attend-
ant that can work flexible morning
hours. Applicants must be able to lift
50 lbs have a valid drivers license and
have good communication skills.
Please pick up applications at the cam-
pus dining office at Mendenhall Stud-
ent Center, East Carolina University.
No phone calls please. EOE.
A SKILLED TYPIST NEEDED to type
70 words per minute. Must be able to
type classroom lecturesdiscussions,
word for word using a laptop comput-
er and an external keyboard. Equip-
ment will be provided. 5 to 10 hours a
week, starting this fall semester for the
1997-98 academic year. For more in-
formation, please contact the Depart-
ment for Disability Support Services at
328-6799 or come to the office located
in Brewster A -117.
Personals
HAPPY BIRTHDAY C.C.I I love you
very much and this will never change!
Love Always, J.
COUNSELING EDUCATION STUD
ENT LOOKING for carpooiera from
Jacksonville, Monday and Wednesday
evenings. Call Judy; daytime (910)-
451-6110 or evenings (9101-353-2528.
FOR
BW-3's. $250 a month. Plus 13 utili-
ties. Call 757-7749 ask for Troy or 919-
638-4941 and ask for Matt
Announcements
THE EAST
chamber ensemble will be performing
on Friday, July 25th at 8 pm. ECU
School of Music Recital Hall. Free Ad-
mission. All are welcome to attend.
Get your ads in for the
Deadline is
August 1.19971
Other
Got an Ear
for Sports ?
FREE BLACK AND WHITE male cat.
Needs home ASAP. Had all his shots.
Please call 931-0950. Ask for Julie.
-SELLING IS WHAT THEY Don't
Teach You At Harvard Business
School says Mark H. McCormic.
Gain valuable sales experience
through our internship. Call Jeff Ma-
honey at 355-7700.
v
SiSV Hour mi pm Hwr
m Son. ���o� ' ii�jri tt
KM �� SMI Hmtf fi
rt to at mm. 11 ymn of m
ftt�.BpaSa� � .

m
HIS Und Drm
Turn rtj�! on � (M�I
Turn Man Unto Drfc.
We Need Tlmbcftaml
Gaadlei
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MEWS SHIRTS. SHOES. PANTS. JEANS. ETC.
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVL GAP. ETC
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER- Jewelry & Coins- Abo bCg Pieces
� Stereo'3, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00, 2:00 -5:00 SAT FROM 1040-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door In
I with den
at Moss Creek Condominiums $300 a
month. AH utilities included except
phone. Looking for graduate or medi-
cal student Preferably male. No pets,
no smokers. Leave message at 355-
3375.
BEDROOM FURNITURE.
new mattress, boxspring, frame,
dresser, headboard and mirror. Full
sin bed 9600 or B0. Moving, must
sell. Call Marisa 758-8637.

condition. $125. 758-8625.
Help Wanted
NERD A SUMMER JOT Play at day
8t make money at nightl Work nights
andor weekends and have your days
free with The ECU Telefund. Make
your own schedulel $5.00hr. plus bo-
nuses! Stop by the Raw! Annex, Room
5 between 2-6pm for more info.
MALE PERSONAL CARE ATTEND-
ANT wanted for a freshman who is a
wheelchair user. Fall semester 1997.
Call 703-435-1630 for details.
eastcarohman
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ACROSS
1 Himalayan
carnivore
6 Allows
10 Burro
13 Zodiac sign
14 Buffalo's lake
15 Stupid ons
IT Hi
18 Maryland city
20 Female deer
21 Plus (actor
23 Vote into office
24 Ceremony
25 Untrue
25 Dluted
29 Bruins
31 Entertain
32 Thaw
33 Party giver
37 Short note
38 Covers
39 Potpourri
40 Ogle
41 "Me?
playwright
42 Attorney's
clients .
43 Worth
45 Dundee misses
46 On to
48 Fourth dimen-
sion
49 Marble
50 Sends
52 Race unit
55 In opposition to
57 The end
59 Division word
60 Comic Johnson
61 Piece of fiction
62 Decade number
63 Lager
64 Certain
Europeans
10 Ibsen We-
ll Shoe bottoms
12 CondJmsnt
16 Supertatve
suffix.
19Bosc.e.g.
22 Pig's place
24 Advance nottee
to a restaurant
25 Domino or
Waller
26 Financial street
27 Friend to Henri
28 Song
29 Light color
30 Fashion
magazine
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3 Egypt's river
4 Poor grade
5 Fred or Adele �
6 Renter's con-
tract
7 Nautical bird
8 Color
9 Red or Black
34 Cheers als
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35RegaltUe v
36 Throw
38Loatosome
42 Strong man
44Wargod
45 �Abner
46 Spy
47 Spend
careisaaly
48 Striped beast
49 0nassaJ,tohis
friends
50 Bog
51 Pay up
52 Son of Jacob
53 Matures
54 Chums
56 Label
56 Cut me grass
jr


Title
The East Carolinian, July 23, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 23, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1217
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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