The East Carolinian, March 20, 1997







THURSDAY
MARCH 20. 1997
man
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
ECU Medical students meet their matches
"Match Day" finally for
fourth year students
ANGELA KOENIC
HEALTH ENVIIIOHVIENTAI ISSt ES
s r r f w RIT t
At Match Dav ceremonies across the country
Wednesday approximately 16.000 foutth year
medical students gathered to learn the fate of
their next four years. Senior students at ECU'S
School of Medicine gathered in Brody
Auditorium to learn where they will complete
their residencies.
"This is a big day for them (students). It's
like going from high school to college said
Tom Former, director of the Medical Center
News and Information Bureau.
Dr. Ann Jobe. senior associate dean for the
School of Medicine, agreed.
Deadline for
London
summer
program
extended
Students have until the
end of March to apply
JA.CQ1 EL1NI D. KK l.l.lIM
"There's going to be a lot of energy in
Brodv Auditorium as students find out where
they're going Jobe said before the ceremony.
"I liken it to getting married, only you don t
know who's going to be at the end of the altar.
Senior Cordi Rjwell was ecstatic when she
received her placement at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
"It was my number one choice Rjwcll
said. "Match is like the NBA Draft. You're
finding out where you're going for the next
four vears of your life
After completing four vears of medical
school, graduates must complete at least three
years of residency in their specialty area.
Residencies for certain specialties can take as
many as nine vears to complete. Match Day is
the dav when students across the country-
receive their placements beginning at 12 p.m.
eastern standatd time.
"On May 9 at the university commence-
ment they (students) become doctors but
can't practice independentlv until after their
residencies, jobe said.
During students' senior years they submit
applications to the institutions where the
would like to complete their residencies. The
applications are then reviewed b the contact-
ed hospitals, who select which students will be
interviewed.
After the interviews, the panel of hospital
officials ranks the students in order of prefer-
ence to fill available residency positions. The
students also rank the hospitals in which thev
wouid like to work. They can rank as many as
15 schools.
These rankings are sent to the National
Resident Matching 1'rogram in Washington.
D.C. where by computer the students are
matched with hospitals.
"The computer goes through potential
matches and matches the highest program
they (students) want and highest institutions
that wanted them Jobe said.
Tuesday was I n-Match Day. On this day
students who had not been matched received
a phone call notifying them of this. The
unmatched students received a book listing all
the programs with residency positions avail-
able. The students then had to call the pro-
grams and find a position for themselves. 1 his
is known as the "scramble
According to Jobe. the medical school holds
career development sessions for students,
helping them to plan their fourth year of med-
ical school and information on preparing appli-
cations and interviews.
"The largest amount of help comes in the
form of one-on-one counseling with advisers in
the specialty areas students plan to pursue
Jobe said.
This vear 6H percent of students at ECl
were placed at their first choice and K2 percent
were placed at one of their top three choices.
Fourth sear medical student I.onnie
Lassiter gives credit to ECU for his success in
placement.
"I give a lot of credit to Fast Carolina
Lassiter said. "The School of Medicine has
STA ft VI It I I K K
The Office of International Affairs is sponsor-
ing a new program this summer which will
give students the opportunity to spend over
three weeks in London. England.
The original deadline for this program was
Mar. 15. but Dr. Linda McGowan. overseas
opportunities coordinator, says students can
apply until the end of March. Any students
interested in this program should begin the
application procedure as soon as possible.
The exact dates for the program will be
Jun. 26 to Jul. 19, duting LCI second sum-
mer session. Students will lie able to take two
courses, one in humanities and one in stcial
sciences. These will lie taught b ECU facul-
ty in a special facility in London.
"The literature class will of course focus
on literary London, and Dr. Richard Taylor
will be teaching that part of the course
McGowan said. "The other cou.se is the
social sciences course, and that one will focus
on politics and other aspects of British culture
and society.
Students will be staying in apartments in
the Bloomsburv district of London near the
same place they will be taking classes.
"It's reallv a very literary area. A lot of the
Btitish authors have lived in that area
McGowan said. "It's central to a lot of activi-
ties, theater, shopping, everything
If students are unsute where to statt to
make the most of London. McGowan says the
International Affairs Office will help.
"There will be an orientation to London,
there will be information about how to get
around, where to shop for food, where to shop
for other things, how to get cheap tickets to
theaters McGowan said. "They will he given
an information packet, so they'll have maps
and guides
The program fee is 12,351, and includes
housing and ground transportation to the
apartments. It will also include two excur-
sions, one to Stratford-upon-Avon and one to
Bath. The excursion to Stratford will include
the performance of a Shakespeare play. The
International Student Identity Card (ISIC) is
tequited for this trip, and is also included in
the fee.
Not included in the program fee will be
airfare, books, meals, and K( :i tuition for sec-
ond summer session. McGowan sas ECl
SH LONDON PAGE 4
THURSDAY
lifestyle 7 THURSIAY
Howard's Prime J� ,am
Pens are reviewed � high 0
by our critic low 56
opinion5
"Skippy" talks � ' , WEEKENO
back
sP�crts
Senior enioys
success in softball
the east Carolinian
STUDfNI PUBLICATION BLDG.
GREENVILLE. NC 77858
across Irom Joyner library
phone
328 6366 newsroom
328 2000 advertising
328 6558 tax
e-mail
ite � ivn Bcu.edu
MAJORMINOR FAIR
BT554 vt vv u n im
arch 1W

WOMEN'S
STUDIES
PROGRAM
'Y-
Senior music major Joe Phillips looks into the Womens Studies maior with director Dr Linda Allred
PHOTO B� CHRIS GAYD0SH
reallv opened doors for me across the country
wherever I've applied. Even the most compet-
itive programs in the country were interested
in me because l was from ECl
According to Jobe. students remain pre-
dominant in the south for their residencies.
Thirty-one of this year's graduates will remain
in NC. after graduation, and 23 of them will
remain at "itt County Memorial Hospital.
John Paschall is one of the students who
will remain at PCMH.
"I was so impressed with the faculty, facili-
ties and atmosphere here Paschal I said.
"Medical students should have a lot of confi-
dence for coming to Fast Carolina becau
have proven in residency to be extremeh
trained without being boastful.
Sixty-three percent of students will be
working in the field of primary care. I
school of medicine was recenth ranked I Oth in
this field by US. News and World Report
Honor Board
to expand
membership
Positions open on
Residence Hall Judicial
Board an d Academic
Integrity Board
EMtLl LITTLE
SPECIAI 1HHMI ISSUES
sT-xr-F wm
Every semester when a new group of inno
cents arrives, fresh off the high school bus,
parental authority is replaced by the rules ot
the university and the enforcement ot the
Honor Board.
Students unsatisfied with the punishment
the Dean of Students suggests for their charge
mav take their situation to the Honor Board
The Honor Board consists of five to seven ot a
student's peers who often sta late into the
night to hear the case. Each member has at
least a 2.0 GPA and sophomore standing.
Some have a historv of discipline problems,
though none are currently on proharion. The
Public Defender comes to his aid while the
Attorney General reveals the evidence against
him until the morning arrives and there is
nothing left to tell, when the Board reaches its
51 percent decision to find his guilt and pun-
ish him accordingly.
The following Wednesday night he is wel-
H0N0R
I m
r
rie
Marrow-thon planned for ECU employees daughter
The ECl) American Marketing Association will be having rhe second annual marrow-thon for
bone marrow victims on Match 24 at Mendenhall Student Center.
The event is for E( :l employee, Marlene Anderson's daughter (orncha and tor several Other
people in NC who need a marrow match including Business man and Nasc.it owner Rick
Amframes can call 32S-6368 or e-rraii
ship. The event will take place from 9 -5 p.m and we would like to break our record from last
year.
Student scholarship deadline approaching
College students who are I .S. citizens and have grade point average of B or better arc eligi-
ble fot a $1000 college scholarship. To receive an application, send a request in nl111997
to the Educational Communications Scholarship foundation at 721 North McKinlev Road. I I
Bon 5012. Lake forest. L 60045-5012, or fax a request to (847) 295-3972.
�Ml requests for applications must include the student's name, permanent home address, city,
state ipeode name of college, approximate GPA, and year in school during the 1996-9 acad-
emic scat. Applications will be fulfilled by mail only, on or about April 22, 1997. 35 winners will
be selected on the basis of academic performance, involvement in extracurricular activities, and
some consideration for financial need.
Local health issues for
minoritites to be dis-
cussed
SCULPTURES IN ICE
Noted minority health scholar I r
Sherman James will speak at the
ECl School ot Medicine on
Thursday, Mar 20.
t 12:30 p.m James will present a
lecture. "Hypertension in African-
Americans: Selected Findings from
the Pitt Count Stud (1988 93) "
During the discussion of hi- findings, lames will rev icw physical activ ity, obesity, stress and social
support and alcohol consumption in the local Vrican American population lames lecture.
which will be held in the Brody Medical Sciences Building Boom 2E-92. will be broadcast across
eastern N ' via the medical school s telemedicine network
BRIEFS
Nasty weather made ,ce sculpting more difficult for ECU art students This masterpiece was completed
Tuesday, March 4 - just in time for Spring Break
?H0TO Bf PATRICK REIAN





2 TUsrilsy. March 20. 111?
news
Tht East Carolinian
�news
Is n ere
T
Environmental comments don't stop TrtnsPtrk
J (AW � Comments from state agencies about the environmental
i of tht GtotosJ Transftrk m Lens �aunty indicate the project will go
ahead, a spokesman says.
While there was nothing that would halt the project, agencies did express
coiwirra about water quality and loss of wetlands. The comments from all
trtejgcttcies were available for inspection Tuesday
The comments were befog made on a first draft of an environmental
impact statement remitted tor the proposed IrtnsPark, a manufacturing
complex that surrounds a cargo airport. The project would be built at the
Ktrntonttegfertfjeq
and the federal Aviation Administration.
Gay-rights activists sty chastity amandmant will drive
homosemitisfrom church
CHARLOTTE (Aft � Christian gayrights activists see an amendment
passed by leaden of the Presbywrnn Church (U.SA) requiring chastity of
stride ministers as a major setback.
Repteaentadves of the U,000-ntmbef Presbytery of Charlotte adopted
the controversial amendment� be added � the denomination's Book of
Order by t vote of 20S-I2J Tuesday with three abstentions.
The rule. to apply to prospective pastors, elden and deacons � would bar
church port torn to Mftgte peopte who have had prernarital m ami married
rtHnuwrial candidates who have been unfaithful if they don't repent
Scott Anderson, co-moderator of Presbyterians for Gay and Lesbian
Concerns, said the change wttl force rrwre aay ami letan Presbytcnant out
ttJt ihsa l9 9 aaakittLthaau.iai i�tae sS �� � ��- ��
or enc �; mttnorwiiciTiDcr cnwcti
Kfomingatar Presbyterian elder Miry Lynne Calhoun also said the
amendment wrongry puts gave ouafrde the church.
T4MA found living in cava finds a home
OCALA, Fla. (AP) � A 1-year-old who was forced to live in a cave after
his rather lost his job and his mother kicked him out has found a home and
a family willing to take care of him until he's able to live on his own.
Cliff Mfclry had been surviving on handouts and whatever food he could
find until his story attracted national attention.
The couple who took Wfelty in over the weekend wants to remain anony-
mous, but say they offered their help because it was the right thing to do.
Jvelty will be staying in a one-bedroom apartment connected to the main
house � an arrangement he's quite happy with.
Afelty was whisked away to New York last week to tape an appearance on
the Montel Williams show. He's also been offered movie deals and book con-
tracts.
Welty lived with his father for most of his life, but they both ended up liv-
ing out ofa car after the man lost his job just before Thanksgiving. The fiither
sent him to live with his mother, but the teen said he was kicked out after
two weeks.
Welty returned to Ocaia in January, but his father had left town and the
only place he could think of going was a cave he played in years earlier.
Chapel Hill area accepting
volunteers to study safe
sex practices
Cable channals look for creative)
Amaricaa homos
mo
NIWOWJLANS(AP-Hndir�srfbrr
KptgBj, about a� easyasfindwaparte�sceinMaiihMtan.
The ihunagais fordug channels faoiang foraheme mget wearive: Some
hiweetosfeootftetiaitloaldrdiin
ershaivearjught ro take over seldom watchud, dty�run channtla.
The average system haa S4 channels. Doaer senw ratw, some not - arc
chawing for stoaton those crowded systems.
There arc channels devoted m sports, fliat,irai(tialaita,aBaOe shows, fit-
ness and boakworms. Representatives of these channeh came to the
National Cable Itdevinta Oanventfen hm
mnments.
What's a network to do to get carried?
Tobreafrevencwchsnn&ncedcairioge isanMisksnunu tuwliiii at teaat
S�&� mttton �"����� Starnruj channel can rake Sttntilbon
to $100 million depending on how elaborate the pfogrsffimtng needs to be.
Mrs. Clinton visits South African housing projects
CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) - Hillary Rodham Clinton, watching
women build their houses brick by brick, today compared their work to the
building of a post-apartheid South Africa,
Accompanied by her daughter, Chelsea, the first lady toured the Victoria
Mxenge housing initiative, a U.Sbacked effort to replace squatter homes,
often made of scrap wood or cardboard, with concrete block bungalows.
She watched as women in flowing skirts and colorful head-dresses hurried
by, wring bricks or pushing wheelbarrows of rruwad cernent. SeveraJ women
painted one house, while others gathered nearby to offer encouragement in
�out, applause and ululating calls.
WHO announces breakthrough in tuberculosis
BERLIN (AP)-The globai tuberculosis epidemic is leveling off for the firsr
time in decades because ofa new treatment strategy that haa trained health
care workers to make sure patients take rheir medication, the World Health
Organisation said today
But Russia and other former Soviet bloc countries, which have yet to fully
adopt the method, have seen a TB explosion in recent years that threatens
alt of Europe, WHO officials said.
Tuberculosis, the worid'a top infectious killer, is spread through coughing
and sneeamg and can be highly contagious.
Although effective and aflbttkbk drugs have been available since the
1930s, they generally must be taken for six to eight months. Many patients,
eapecia in poorer countries, atop taking them as seen at they begin to feel
better because of the inconvenience or to save money
That slows thestranger TO prmstr�t resisted the initial drag onslaught
�reproduce, making k harder, if not impossible, to cure later.
The problem is becoming especially bad in eastern Europe, where TB
�� had been on tie decline, WHO officials said.
CHAPEL HILL (AP) - Wanted:
Candid couples willing to open their
sex lives to researchers seeking
answers to the big question - how
effective are condoms?
Volunteers get 195 and all the
free condoms they can use, but they
must be willing to fill out a form
every time they have sex.
"Wry little is known about the
efficiency of the latex condom said
Mike Waugh, senior project director
for Health Decisions, the Chapel
Hill company conducting the six-
month clinical trial.
Vvaugh said condoms have been
around so long they were exempted
when the federal government began
regulating contraceptives.
"And while there is a certain
amount of historical information,
there is little in the way of clinical
triab said Waugh.
"What we are doing is trying to
evaluate just how well condoms
work, in terms of prevention of preg-
nancy, when used as the only
method of birth control said Dr.
Michael Rosenberg, the study's
principal investigator.
Volunteers are being recruited in
Seattle; Phoenix; Birmingham, Ala
Memphis, Tenn and the Raleigh-
Durham area.
Rosenberg said 16S couples have
signed up since canvassing for volun-
teers began in September, he is
looking for 200 more by April.
The only comparable study used
prostitutes as subjects, Rosenberg
said.
"I would say ours is the first major
study of typical users he said.
"Although prostitutes use condoms
well and often and, of course, would
be highly motivated to do so, they
are not really your typical user
Study participants must fill out
forms after sex, describing how well
the condom fit and noting any
breaks or slippage.
Besides providing free condoms
and cash, Health Decisions also is
offering the test subjects free Pap
smears and free exams for sexually
transmitted diseases.
Preliminary results have been
encouraging; said Rosenberg.
"We have a well-motivated group,
and the success rates are very very
good, comparing favorably to oral
contraceptives, he said.
Traditionally, condoms have been
attributed a 10 to 15 percent failure
rate, but this study has so.far shown
condoms work better than that
Albanian insurgents
threaten more unrest if
president does not resign
TIRANA, Albania (AP) - Insurgents
who have taken over a dozen towns
in southern Albania warned of more
unrest and the speaker of
Parliament said he feared a coup by
former army officers and secret
police if the president refuses to
resign.
Amid the continuing chaos, a
European Union fact-finding mis-
sion traveled Tuesday to Afcania's
biggest seaports, Dunes and VJora,
to determine how to deliver food
and medicine On Monday,
President Sali Berisha had request-
ed EU aid to keep the country from
sliding further into chaos. ,
A spokesman for Albania's navy
speaking on condition of anonymity,
said VTora was overrun by mobs who
have come to the city's naval base in
hopes of finding passage out - even
though there are no boats these.
While desperate, would-be
refugees flooded the beaches of
Durres,ajumping-off point for Italy
vandals ransacked the city's royal
see mug?, rasa
Arvftl Waiting tor tour Kkfe
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Gear and Clothing -Guide Books & Maps
Come checkout our selection of
climbing sear by Petzl. PMl. Misty Mountain
Treadworks. La Sportiva, and
Ken Armstrong � Darwin's Pststonia &
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3 Thursday, March 20. 1997
news
Tht East Carolinian
VILLAGE GREEN APARTMENTS
"The Best Value In Town"
FREE Cable TV
�Cr FREE Water & Sewer
a FREE Gas Heat (Townhouees)
�Cr BIG 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
ft BIG Mirrors and Vanity Lights
ft BIG Modem Kitchen
ft Central AC & Heat
ft Stove
ft Refrigerator
ft Nice thick carpeting
ft Nice Mini Blinds
ft Sparkling Clean Bathrooms
ft Freshly Painted
ft Lots of Closet Space
ft Private Balconies
ft ECU Bus Service
ft Walk or Ride Your Bike to Campus
ft Plenty of Parking
ft Swimming Pools
As Low As
$135.00 Per Person
The Best Value Period.
Open Every Day
24 Hour Emergency Maintenance
On Site Managers
Quiet
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Routine Maintenance and Pest Control
204 Eastbrook Drive
752-5100
You Are Invited To Attend
in YsJCfeatlon Seminar
Seventh-Day
2611E. 10
Saturd
Professor of Biology and Adjunct a
UNC Charlotte for 10 years
Dr. Rid
llWorshijgHour
Evojfio:li3rdi
Greatest Hoax
2:00p.m. Afternoon
Lecture
Free Vegetarian Dinner
Creation or Evolution: The Evidence Speaks
Church
tiville
22
Presently Chairman of Biology Dept
Brunswick Community College
rown, PHD
BIBLE
BL�9 9 mm 4K' W M�� " 4wk
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S to Mendenhall Student Center
13
YOUR CENTER OF AC T I V I T Y
Athletic, Lyrical, Sensual.
And you thought you saw moves at The Elbo.
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series
Saturday, March 22 at 8 p.m Wright Auditorium
Advance student tickets are $7 from the Central Ticket Office until
6 p.m. Friday and all tickets at the door are $15
SACKED SPACE
PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE MISSISSIPPI DELTA
Black and white photography on loan from the Southern Arts Federation
on display Feb. 28-March 28 in the Mendenhall Gallery.
M I

"�r
�fd
:
m
AN EVENING WITH .NEW ARTIST SHOWCASE
Catch some of the newest sounds featuring The Alison Brown Quartet,
Farmer Not So John, Greg Howard, and Vickie Pratt Keating.
April 3 at 8 p.m. Advance student tickets are $8.
Tickets go on sale March 3 at the Central Ticket Office.
Glory Days
33
The Pedagogy of Bruce Springsteen
with School of Education professor Dr. David Gabbard
Free beverages and desserts
Tuesday, April 1 at 12 noon in the Underground.
M agic 8-& all
8-Ball tournament Monday, March 24 in the Billiards Room
$2 registration fee
Trophies and prizes awarded to 1st, 2nd and 3rd place.
Registration begins at 6 p.m tournament begins at 7 p.m.
Valid ECU ID required.
:
is
Briefs
coniinued from page 1

4 '? �

SaVffc- �
I �s:
it?m � �'� :f?!B
staff may have about nutrition, healthy eating and food
options. Throughout the two-week promotion, a nutri-
tion survey will be condut, d to measure student eating
habits. The booths will be set up at Todd and
Mendenhall Dining Halls and at Croatan and The
Wright Place campus cafes lctween 11:00 a.m. and 2:00
p.m. Mon Mar. 24 through Thurs Mar. 27.
ECU'S World
Wide Web
service pros-
pers
Carr.jus Dining Services celebrates
National Nutr.r'on Month
The theme of this year's National Nutrition Month
is "All Foods Can Fit and ECU students will learn just
that during Campus Dining Services' nutrition promo-
tions scheduled for Mar. 17-28. Campus Dining
Nutritionist Laura Hartung, R.D. has put together a full
slate of events that will be held in and around the six
campus restaurants.
Nutrition booths will be set up and staffed with vol-
unteers from the Student Dietetic Association on
selected days to answer questions students, faculty and
EastNet, an
Internet access
service based at
ECU, has
released figures
reflecting two years of operations and a continued climb
in usage by subscribers from the public education com-
munity.
Since its official opening date of Mat 1, 1995, the
service has grown from 250 to more than 4,000 regular
users. About one fourth of the users are ECU faculty and
staff; the others are mostly school teachers and adminis-
trators.
One of EastNet's best known features is its Parking
Cam, a camera mounted at the ECU School of
Education that shows live shots of a parking lot outside
of the building. Last fall, CNN televised the site to keep
its viewers up-to-date on the progress of Hurricane Fran.
Threat
continued from page 2
palace - stripping even the wallpa-
per.
But the navy spokesman said the
city was under government control.
The anti-government protests
began after nearly every Albanian
family lost money in shady invest-
ment schemes that collapsed in
January.
In the south, the insurgent
National Salvation Council warned
of more unrest unless Berisha steps
down. If he capitulates, they said, he
would be replaced by a committee
that includes insurgents.
Parliament speaker Pjeter
Arbnori said Tuesday the insistence
by former army officers and secret
police that Berisha resign by
Thursday "threatened the constitu-
tional order
In Italy, authorities promised
Tuesday to send back dozens of
criminals blending in with the wave
of Albanian refugees fleeing to Italy
About 9,500 Albanians had crossed
the Adriatic Sea to Italy as of
Tuesday afternoon, Italian Interior
Minister Giorgio Napolitano told the
Senate, calling the flow "alarming
and difficult to manage
Another 3,500 others also have
arrived in Greece, according to the
U.N. High Commissioner for
Refugees.
In Macedonia, meanwhile, resi-
dents of the border town of Debar
said they were afraid the violence
could spill over into their country.
In the middle of the ethnic ten-
sions are 500 American troops, part
of a 1,100-strongU.N. peacekeeping
force deployed in Macedonia since
1992 to stop Bosnia's war from
spreading.
Some of the U.N. soldiers in
Macedonia have been moved from
the border with Serbia to the one in
Albania since the unrest began. U.N.
officials, however, refuse to say how
many and which nationalities.
ELTORO
wiS"
2800 E. lOlh St
Eattgate Shopping Center
Acron From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain GSm
Ins Anytime
318
Say PIRATES &.
Get Hair Cut for
17 Everytime
i
rattf gpggiai
7.00
Haircut
News
Writers'
meeting
tomorrow at
5 p.m. in the
newsroom.
Attendance is
mandatory.
UNFOKTUNATEIi; TfflS IS
WHERE PEOPLE ARE PUTTING TOO
MANY RETIREMENT DOLLARS.
i
� "Yd
SERVICES: MeetingStudy Space � Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards � Video Games
�ST � Student Locator Service � ATMs � Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge � RidesRiders Board Ik
� Art Gallery � Mail Services � Lockers � Newsstand � � fl
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.ml 1 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.ml 1 p.m. ����
lft:fr&�lalUf!aU.lf&UTft:lfSSfi&l�.
Every year, a lot of people make a huge
mistake on their taxes. They wind up send-
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r





Thursday, March 20. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
To: General Body A.B.L.E. mem-
bers
From: A.B.L.E. Executive Council
The A.B.L.E. Social will be at
BW3's on Friday, March 21 at 8
p.m.
The organization will also be
sponsoring a Talk Show in Room
244 of Mendenhall Student
Center at 7 p.m. on March 26.
Honor
continued from page
To: Minority Students and
Faculty
The Annual Black Faculty and
Staff Award Ceremony will take
place on April 2 at 6 p.m. in the
Great Room of Mendenhall
Student Center.
The First Annual Minority Spring
Ball will take place on April 11
at 7 p.m. at the Du Bois
Banquet Facility (200 Hooker
Road.)
London
continued from page 1
A.B.L.E. is now selling ad mate-
rials for the Spring Ball.
Procedes go to the Sickle Cell
Anemia Foundation. For more
information, contact Kecia
Adams at the Ledonia Wright
African American Cultural
Center at 328-1680.
ADVANCED VEGETARIAN
COOKING CLASS
TRY COOKING WITH ALL NATURAL INGREDIENTS
PLEASE CALL AND PRE-REGISTER
CALL 757-0930
If no answer, leave name and number of attendees
There is no fee for this class-absolutely free
come to take his case to appeal,
should he find the grounds, and a
different group of Honor Board
members will hear him explain his
injustice.
Today from 11a.m. to noon some
of the current board members seek
new ones at an information booth
outside the student store where
interested parties can pick up appli-
cations, which are also available at
the Dean of Students' office.
Students can also apply for other
branches such as the Residence Hall
Judicial Board and the Academic
ntegrity Board.
In addition to the application
students must go through an inter-
view and a mock trial and if they are
selected they have to attend a train-
ing retreat and at least one meeting
a week whether there is a case to
hear or not.
Though there arc currently
about 15 members, there is no
quota to fill.
"Finding open-minded people is
more important than filling 10
sfotsAmy Funderburk, White Hall
coordinator and intern to the Dean
of Students office said.
- Aside from the positive effects
on a resume membership can have,
Honor Board members say they
have learned useful skills in the
process.
"You have to make sure it's all
clear in your mind because you're
dealing with someone's life mem-
ber Bemadcttc Yarborough said.
students will be traveling together
on a flight arranged through the
International Affairs Office, and
they are in the process of trying to
obtain the lowest group airfare pos-
sible.
There will also be other ways for
students to reduce costs slightly,
such as cooking their own meals in
the apartments, which are equipped
for meal preparation.
"My estimate for the total cost
of the program is about $3,500, and
that includes the other parts of the
program McGowan said. "I recog-
nize that that's a lot of money. I wish
that there were some way to reduce
that. But this program is London,
and London is expensive
Students interested in this pro-
gram can contact McGowan at the
International Affairs Office, Taylor
in the English department, or Dr.
Yuhang Shi in the political ccience
department. They would also need
to begin applying for their passport,
I SIC, and financial aid as soon as
possible.
While this trip obviously will cost
more than attending second sum-
mer session at ECU, McGowan says
she believes the enrichment offered
makes the trip worthwhile.
"London is a fantastic city
McGowan said. "There's no better
place to study the literature that
has grown up around London, been
written in London, than in London
itself. You actually get a sense of
'this is history You live right within
it. If you're studying British politics,
and you have a chance to go to
Parliament, you know what it looks
like, and that it's been there a long
time, and this is the way it's done.
You can remember that
WHEN:
Thursday, March 27 7 p.m. til 9 p.m.
-Making Breakfast a Better Meal
Monday, March 31 7 p.m. til 9p.m.
-Planning a Balanced Menu
Thursday, April 3 7 p.m til 9 p.m.
-Get Adequate Protein. Inexpensively
Monday, April 7 7 p.m. til 9 p.m.
-Simple, Healthful Deserts
General Class Bldg 2015
General Class Bldg 2014
General Class Bldg 2015
General Class Bldg 2014
FREE COOKBOOK!
FREE TASTY SAMPLES!
The Appearance of
666
is now on everything you buy.
(buried in the bar code)
Can You Find It?
Do You Know What Is Coming Next?
LISTEN TO WZMft ALL WEEK
FOR GIVE-AWAYS FROM
PEASANT'S CAFE, KANftAG CAFE,
EAST COAST MUSK t VIDEO AND
THE ATTIC.
Q1.3 FM
East Carolina University
APMISS10N
9:00-10:00.00
10:00-11:00100
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FOR MORE INFO 757-3778
SPECIALS
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'

Tharttfay. March 20. 19S7
opinion
Tht East Carolinian
east&rolinian
BRANDON WADOF.I.L Edttor
MATT HBGE MwrniajDmcnx
MAKfiVERITK BENJAMIN NM EMM
AMY L ROYSTER Atuawl Itnri fw
Jay Myers Wwiyn ew
Amanda Ross Sfonttam
PATRICK IRRLAN PhoHt EttftBT
celeste Wilson hoduowIMbm
Carole mehi.e Hud Con Editor
ANDY FARKAS Stiff IllirtintiU
Dale Williamson Aisi�nmiirnt�i�tditoi
Heather BiR(kss Wmtottot
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oumcw
JrVhat does it mean to be human?
In the scope of possible answers there might be mentions of souls and divine creation or per-
haps unique sets of genes derived from sexual reproduction. Until recently there was another
Mssible answer which belonged only in the realm of science fiction�an answer which was mild-
y startling and then we put the book down.
With the recent cloning of Dolly the sheep and a monkey, the idea that a human's genes could
e scientifically reproduced and replicated in the form of a clone is not far-fetched anymox.
Resident Clinton has ordered a ban on federal funding for work leading to a human clone, but
hat cannot stop speculation, fear or private research. The ban certainly won't stop people from
asking fundamental questions about the ethics of science and what it means to be human.
These are questions which even the slightest possibility of human cloning demands to be
swered. Who doesn't remember the moment when they first heard the news about Dolly the
eep? Did the news source draw the implications that the new science could have on humans
did you slowly realize the repercussions of this latest scientific advance?
The debate commenced.
Rr some the news was as exhilarating as Neil Armstrong's first walk on the moon. Trekkies
ndered what Saw Ttrt's writers would come up with next, now that the subject for several
isodes was no longer fiction. Animal rights activists joined with human rights activists in blast-
g the medical and scientific ethics of cloning animals, let atone humans. People began argu-
in public and forums, questioning whether or not a human could ever be replicated. While
occurred to some that God had been cut out of the creation process altogether and the
nests stories no longer held water, others reasoned that God allowed for all scientific
Advances. Immediately after the news was released, people asked unanswerable questions about
fpptying the new technology to human beings. Would a clone have a personality identical to its
original or could there be instances of a calm person and a wild clone? How could we use clones?
liVhat tights would a cloned person have? Who would a clone identify as its family?
The President rightfully sensed the confusion, fear and paranoia of a public whose thoughts
turned to Frankenstein-type horrors. Understanding that concerns most immediate to this issue
such as the ethics of animal cloning and the possible advances enabled by genetic testing of
cloned animals needed to be carefully considered, the President enacted the ban and Senate
hearings began. Sunday, during a hearing, a law professor raised an interesting question asking
the Senate whether or not the first person to clone a human would be put in jaii or awarded the
Nobel Peace Prize. Tf is ;s an important time; the findings from the hearings will affect-gov-
erning it regulations and these regulations will affect the future of research.
It's easy to fear new a- ances and the unknown, especially when the issue at hand has long
been the subject of scary science fiction and The Twilight Zone. It is important to consider the
research possibilities of these new advances. Scientists have told the hearing committee that
research involving clones could result in further breakthroughs in the fields of genetics and in
understanding more about terminal diseases. When deciding our position, the editors at TEC
first oohed and ahhed over the possibilities of cloning. Then, we shied away from celebrating
Dolly and her primate counterpart mostly because of serious ethical concerns for both the
cloned animals and potential human clones. We decided that we reflected the general public in
being uncertain and grateful for the scientists and politicians who, for the moment, are trying
hard to come to a consensus and adopt regulations.
Isn't that just like a human to want to control the unknown?
Keith
OOPER
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was truly a
hero and civil rights giant whose
accomplishments are being praised
many yean after his assassination.
King epitomized courage, persever-
ance, and the determination to
expose racism and discrimination that
too often bear their ugly in America.
Yet, King was silenced by assassins
who wanted to turn Dr. King's dream
into an abominable nightmare for mil-
lions of politically and economically
oppressed African-Americans around
the country. Who lulled Dr. King? Did
James Earl Ray act alone? Why has
Ray been denied a trial? Wfell, I inter-
viewed Dr. John Hope Franklin
(renowned African-American histori-
an) and sought answers to my ques-
tions.
Many Americans believe that
James Earl Ray (near death) deserves
a trial to test some of the conspiracy
theories about King's assassination.
Franklin agrees that Ray deserves a
trial. Important information about the
assassination has yet to be released.
America is more technologically
advanced than it was at the time of
King's death. Laboratory testing (bal-
listics, etc.) should uncover crucial
evidence that may shed light on
King's murder. When addressing the
possibility that the murder was mas-
terminded by more than one person.
Franklin responded, "I don't know.
I'm not satisfied with the way it was
adjudicated. I don't think all the facts
have come out
It is evident that King's telephone
had been wiretapped extensively.
Moreover, the fact that King's electri-
fying, vociferous speeches jolted the
nation might suggest that govern-
ment officials wanted to silence King.
Nevertheless, King's family wants a-
sense of closure. America should nor,
have to wait until 2020 to receive the,
shocking facts about the King
nation. "I would say that knowing
Ray's background, I'm amazed that he
would pull this off alone. It seems to
me that he had some assistance
Franklin said.
I sympathize with how the Kings
are agonizing over the slaying of their ?
beloved father, sutcsmun and civile
rights warrior. Everyone responsible
for that man's death should be "bull-
whipped" and imprisoned for life.
King might be silenced, but his mes-
sage will incessantly resonate in
hearts of Americans until the "land
the free, home of the brave" honors
the Biblical command of Isaiah and
"let the oppressed go free
"0 THF FD.ITOR
Critic responds to ipei
Scholarly sites not only credible ones
lb the Editor,
I am writing in response to an arti-
cle by David Boraks in TEC's Tuesday,
March 4 issue. The article, titled
"Check for credibility before you cite a
site warned about unreliable web
sites and listed tips for choosing the
best ones. Borak interviewed Frank
Moiinek, a librarian at Davidson
College. Moiinek insisted that sites
which aren't associated with any gov-
ernment or research group are not wor-
thy of study or citation.
Upon reading this article I ques-
tioned the criteria that makes up a
legitimate site. Moiinek mentions that
web sites should pass the "usual tests"
to determine if they are irrefutable.
Does this indicate that these tests
(however many there are) vary among
sites among sites and are not routine?
As a researcher, I am very capable of
distinguishing trash from well-
thought-out concepts. This assump-
tion that students are not able to "sift
the good from the bad" (assuming
there's a difference) underestimates
us. Like most of us, I have been ana-
lyzing facts on research papers for
years; if the data is doubtful, I reflect
that in my report.
Why should students rely solely on
material gathered in "scholarly jour-
nals as Moiinek suggests? Is the brain
capacity of those researchers larger
than that of mine or yours? Absolutely
not. (When Fred Smith, an average col-
lege student, developed the Federal
Express system, his professor laughed
at him.) It is important to recognized
all individual sites as potentially bene-
ficial. If we are limited to those that
are authorized (by the chosen ones),
than well restrict ourselves to the good
ol' card catalog again. I feel like the
extensive advantages in accumulating
knowledge that the WWW offers to me
are being hindered.
Giselle Santiago
Researcher
R.T.R
lb the Editor,
I am writing in response to the let-
ter "Manager responds to critic" that
was printed in the March 6 edition of
TEC I am the critic to whom Mr.
Edwards responded, and I'd like to
have a chance to answer some of his
accusations.
First of all, Paul, I never received
the letter you say you sent directly to
me. I have no control over, nor can I
respond to, something I have never
seen.
Secondly, I can understand why you
would be upset with what I said in my
Feb. 25 Scream at the MM column, enti-
tled "You get what you pay for down-
town I expected it. Criticism is often
a hard thing to take, especially if much
of it is true.
But I didn't actually set out in my
article to attack you, your club or the
bands you manage. What I wanted to
do was tell those readers of TEC, who
had complained to me about how bad
the musk scene in Greenville is, that
they should stop complaining and do
something to change it. Namely, that
they should take their money away
from Greenville and stop supporting
the mediocre choice that is provided
for us here.
In fact, you seem to agree with me,
Paul. In your letter you state that your
band, "hope that, by example, other
bands will develop here and make this
the thriving music scene that ir has the
potential to be That means that the
music scene here isn't thriving now, it
only has the potential to be, which is
exactly my point. Thank you for mak-
ing it so clearly.
But seriously, I find it hard to take
any of your opinions at face value. You
manage several local bands and you
have a prominent nightclub in
Greenville. In fact, much of your letter
reads like an advertisement for both.
You are paid to like the local music
scene. You would be hurt financially if
people took their money elsewhere,
like I suggest they da Therefore, your
opinion is unfairly biased.
I, on the other hand, am not paid to
like or dislike the local musk scene,
nor does my paycheck depend on its
success or nilure. And no guilt trip
from you, nor infantile attacks involv-
ing fast food and toilet paper; are going
to change my mind.
However, I am open to having a dia-
logue with you about it. Your idea of
having an open forum on WZMB
sounds great. Anything to further bet-
ter communication and create possibil-
ittcs is always welcome. Since it was
your idea, why don't you set up a time
with WZMB that is convenient for you
and I will be there.
In the meantime, I suggest .that we
ask all the reading public who are inter-
ested in joining this debate, to contact
one or both of us and tell us what they
think. I can be reached at The East
QmMm and I believe, Paul, you can
be reached at Peasant's Cafe.
Don't be shy, people, let Paul and
Skippy know how you fed.
Jay Myers
English Graduate Student
Lifestyle Editor, TEC
White's not right
Guest columnist application for Campus View
This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEC what you think about a certain
topic. Please return this form The East Carolinian office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please
print.
Name
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Please consider me for a portion as guest columnist for TEC. I agree to allow TEC's staff to edit my submission for
grammar, punctuation and libelous content Other than those changes I will be notified of any changes that may
I affect the length or content. I understand TEC reserves the right to reject my submission. If I am selected, TEC will
I notify me two weeks in advance of publication; at that time a deadline for submission will be assigned by the editor.
Fr Q SophQ JrQ Srrj
Phone number
Topic(s) about which I would like to write.
lb the Editor,
I would like to address Mr.
Richard White and the article he
wrote which appeared in TEC on
Thursday, February 27, 1997.1 know
everyone has an opinion, but to be as
misguided and uneducated as he is a
shame. Now, I am guessing when I
say that Mr. White is Caucasian, but
am not guessing when I say he knows
nothing about ebonies. Instead of
criticizing articles, he should read up
on the topics and be educated when
he dares to bash it or call it ridiculous.
Just to touch briefly on the homo-
sexual topk, Mr. White, are you say-
ing that we Christians should hate
people who choose to date their same
sex? If this is so, let us put the shoe
on the other foot. Let's say you were
the "sinner wouldn't you coo be ral-
lying for the rights of homosexuals?
I'm sure you would be. As for the part
where Mr. Gabriel Johnson says that
"we all have homosexual tenden-
cies I just don't read that far
between the lines to see this.
I find your information untrust-
worthy and biased. It is because of
people like yourself that hate begins.
People like you, Mr. White, can justi-
fy why Rodney King was beaten half
to death. What kind of world are you
living in when you think that beating
an unarmed black man is "the police
doing their job?" No, that is the Klan
doing their job. I do, however, think
that you are right about one thing and
one thing onfy, most black people do
think that whites are racist. I bet you
don't even know why.
You probably just think that it is
all made up. Please allow me to tell
you � hy we feel this way. Look on our
very own East Carolina University
campus and the situation with the
ECU Housekeepers Association. Can
V ou justify a supervisor call a worker a
nigger? I bet that is OK, huh? Well,
let me make it plain for you, no
human being should be treated like
trash, no matter what job they do.
Blacks arc always looked upon as
being "evil" and wrong The only rea-
son I think Nicky Nichols said this to
this black person was because she
thought she wculd get away with it
just like most white people do with
any other wrong-doing to a black per-
son. I, as an African-American female.
will not sec that happen. I think the
worker should receive a public apolo-
gy from Ms. Nichols.
Vfe were taught to feel ashamed
because we aren't white. If you do
nor feel this is so, please look at the
news. All there ever is on the news
about black people is the negative
aspects, not very often the positive.
Why is that, you ask? This nation
could not stand for .African-
Americans to rise so they keep us
divided, the poor, the middle class
and the upper middle class. The
media does not come to our neigh-
borhood unless there is a crime or a
drug bust. If that does not convince
you, Mr. White, nothing will.
In closing, I would like to ask the
people that agree with Mr. White to
please put aside some of the things
you were taught about black people
and our history and see things as they
are and not what someone dresses it
up to be. I would also like to add sup-
port the ECU Housekeeper!7
Association, you owe it to them.
Aerian Heath
Sophomore I
Occupational Therapy
��
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Everyday Life
By Michael Litwin
PRACTIC
rttsmchts
BY ATfDRf GERT1AI1
Place:
Tryouts:
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Coach Corbett
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B A i T
CAROLINA
1 9
Summer
ACROSS
1 Laugh r�earffly
5 Crocks
10 Helper: abbr.
14 inter �
15Bete �
16 Very emeu
amount
17 Rests
18 Nautical tracer
19 Disparaging
remark
20 Racetrack
period
22 Stars have it
24 Sisters
25 Strike out
26 Ok) stately
dance
29 Pronoun
33 Andean beast
34 Before now
36 Scratch, e.g.
37 Competent
39 Artiet Magrrtte
40 Of course
41 Gooey stuff
42 Therefore
43 Was furious
45 Caught
46 Judicial wear
47 Trading place
48 imperturbable
51 -Bojangtos
Robinson's forte
55 Author Waugh
56 Details
58 Drop In
59 Only
60 Osprey's nest
61 Particle
62 � for (summon)
83 Noslrls
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ANSWERS
FROM THURSDAY
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1 Fastener
2 Mixture
3 Ingenuity
4 Bergen, to
Candies, a.g.
5 internet access
6 Comet into view
7 Italian money
8 Coach
Parseghtan
9 Court Judgment
10 Passageways
11 Foot bottom
12 Daze
13 Pietet
21 Salad fish
23 To shelter
25 "No man is an
island" poet
26 Gambols
27 Tiny Alice"
playwright
28Trlste"
30 Change for the
better
31 Jousting
weapon
32 Released
34 Playground
feature
35"� a Camera"
38 Common
39 Auto agency
41 Used a gun
42 Difficult
44 Copied, in a way
45 Runs out
47 An Eisenhower
48 Some missiles,
for short
49 Gen. Robert �
50 Bruce or Laura
51 Land: abbr.
52 Alliance
acronym
53 Boor
54 Trees
57 Oolong
Opportunities for 1st and 2"� Sum
College of Arts & Sciences to COS
(Unrversidad Nacional de Costa Rica, Heredia, Costa
Anthropology 2020 Biology 3400 Geology
Spanish 1040 Spanish 2108
Independent Study Courses: By arrangement
Program Director: Professor John Bort, 328-6136
College of Arts & Sciences to ENGLAND
(2nd Summer Session only)
English 4510
Program Director: Professor Richard Taylor, 328-6687
International 2400
Program Director: Professor Juhang Shi, 328-1064
Colleye of Arts & Sciences to BELIZE and GUATEMALA
(Central American opportunities for 2nd Summer Session)
A focus on African Culture in the Americas
Program Director Professor Gay Wilentz, 328-6678
School of Art to FINLAND. ESTONIA. RUSSIA. POLAND
Ceramics - Graduate & Undergraduate courses, all levels
Sculpture � Graduate & Undergraduate courses, all levels
Drawing - 3561, 3563, 5560 & 5561
Art History - 4970
Art Appreciation -1910, open to General College
Hypermedia - 3070
Independent Study - 3500 & 5500 by arrangement
Program Director: Professor Carl Billingsley, 328-6270
School of Business to GLASGOW. SCOTLAND
(University of Strathclyde)
International Management 3352
International Management 6322
Strategic Management 4842
Strategic Management 6722
Program Director: Professor Roy Simerty, 328-6632
School of Nursing to FINLAND. ESTONIA, and RUSSIA
(Ouhi Polytechnic University)
International Health Care 5620
Program Director. Professor Mary Kirkpatrick, 328-4311
The Division of Continuing Studies, 328-6324
An equal opportunity'idnrmive action univeraity. which accommodate! the needs of individual with d�fril�H�





7 Thursday. Mtrch 20. 1997
The East Carolinian
Paul Taylor's company
dances into Wright Auditorium
ANDY Tl'RNER
SFNIOH WKITFH
Dance deity ftiul Taylor will bring
his celebrated dance company,
Taylor 2, to campus on Saturday.
Fwr anyone interested in modern
dance, Taylor 2 offers a great
chance to see the work of the man
many consider the king of modern
dance.
The event, part of the S.
Rudolph Alexander Performing
Arts Series, is scheduled to begin at
8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Advance tickets for the show are
$12 for ECU faculty and staff, $7
for ECU students and youths, and
$15 for the general public. All tick-
ets are $15 at the door.
Taylor 2 has received consider-
able praise from critics and audi-
ences since its inception in 1993.
The company was formed to bring
modern dance to smaller venues
that could not accommodate
Taylor's main dance company,
which has played to audiences for
more than 40 years.
Reaching audiences that have
not had much exposure to the
modem dance "experience" is part
of the company's goals. In accor-
dance with this goal, the company
completed a tour of six African
nations in 1994 and taught 80 mas-
ter classes throughout the New
York City Public School System
during the 1995- school year.
Thirteen dancers make up
Taylor 2. Linda Hodes, director
of the Paul Taylor School, also
serves as director of Taylor 2.
Hodes has worked with Taylor for
more than 30 years.
Hodes has attempted to offer
a wide array of Taylor's choreog-
raphy. The company's repertoire
comes from a number of Taylor's
more popular works: Aureole,
Duet, 3 Epitaph, Junction and
Profiles, as well as Airs, Arden
Court and Company B.
Taylor has been a key figure in
dance for four decades, racking
up countless awards and praise.
Newsweek calls him "the world's
greatest living choreographer
Taylor's awards include three
Guggenheim Fellowships, a Mac-
Arthur Foundation Fellowship
and a National Medal of Arts.
He's even been recognized as
royalty; the French government
elected Taylor to knighthood,
giving him a "Chevalier de
I'Ordrc des Arts et des Lettres"
in 1969. Since then, the French
government has promoted Taylor
to the ranks of Officier and
Commandeur.
The wonderful work of this
knight and dancer will be on dis-
play Saturday night for your view-
ing and listening pleasure.
For additional information,
call the Central Ticket Office at
328-4788 or at 328-4735 for hear-
ing or speech impaired access.
The Central Ticket Office is
open Monday through Friday,
8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
The Taylor 2 dance company will be appearing on campus
in Wright Auditorium at 8 p.m. Saturday night
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE S RUDOLPH ALEXANDER PERFORMING ARTS ERIES
review
Stern crushes all competition with his Private Parts
JAY MYERS
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
��
I
if you don't know who Howard Stern
B by now, you must have been living
inder a rock for the last 15 years.
$tern refers to himself as the "King
of All Media" and that title is truly
Mot far off the mark. Besides being
America's number one radio person-
ality, Stern also conquered the
Rational best-seller lists with not
One, but two outrageous autobiogra-
phies. Private Parts and Miss America.
Those two feats would be amaz-
ing accomplishments for most indi-
viduals, but not for Stern. After the
nationwide release of his new film.
Private Parts (based on his first
book), on March 7, Stern conquered
yet another area of pop culture when
the movie went to number one at
the box office. As if that wasn't
enough, 'he soundtrack to Private
Parts went to number one on the
record charts as well. Stern is having
his cake and eating it, too.
And the funniest thing about all
of this is he deserves it. Stern is the
quintessential American performer.
He began his meteoric rise to the top
by deciding to go against convention
and just be himself. Along the way,
good or bad, he has stayed true to
that conviction. He has pulled no
punches, has made no apologies, has
hidden nothing about who he is.
This unabashedly truthful point
of view seems to work. Stern's explo-
rations into lesbianism, his obsession
about penis size and his painfully
honest retellings of his personal life
with his wife Alison have won him
more fans than enemies in his long,
illustrious career. There seems to be
no stopping Stern, especially if he
continues his exploration of self in
greater and greater terms.
That is what makes the new film
so exciting and vibrant. Private Parts
shows a Stern that few have known
up to this point. To discuss the plot
of the film is somewhat of a self-
defeating process, so I'll try to sum
up the premise and leave it at that.
Stern meets a woman on an airplane
who obviously is turned off by what
little she knows of his public per-
sona. During the course of the flight,
Stern tells the woman (and, by
default, the audience) his life story.
In fact, my only complaint with
the film is that the narrative ends in
1985. More than likely. Stern is sav-
ing the next 12 years for a sequel.
Finally, we all end up with a much
greater understanding of (and I
would say respect for) Stern and his
genius.
Although I can't tell you anything
else about the plot without ruining
'the story for you, what I can tell you
is that the performances in this film
arc astounding. Stern handles his
acting debut with aplomb, never
causing that loss of belief that can
often leave an audience bewildered.
In fact. Stern is so compelling that
it's a wonder that he never tried his
"King of all Media" Howard Stern wows the world by sharing his most private part -
his heart. Stern stars as himself with Mary McCormack playing his wife Alison.
PHOTO COURTESY OF PARAMOUNT PICTURES
The ECU Student Media Boatd
invites applications for the position of
General Manager, WZMB
General Manager, Expressions
Editor, The East Carolinian
Editor, Rebel
for the 1997-98 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
FRIDAY, MARCH 28 AT 4 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
hand ar acting before. Two of Stern's
cronies, Fred Norris and Robin
Quivers, also turn in strikingly hon-
est performances, with Norris often
acting as a comedic scene-stealer.
However, all of this pales in compari-
son to what is truly the most astound
aspect of this film.
It is a love story.
No, really.
In fact, it's a great love story.
I can't go into details, but suffice
to say that Stern's disclosure of his
private iife with his wife Alison (won-
derfully portrayed by Mary
McCormack), is often brutally hon-
est and the Sterns have had to
weather some really bad times during
their stormy but passionate relation-
ship. Despite the many exploitative
moments in which Stern talks about
sex, drugs, sex, rock n' roll and sex, it
is the on-screen passion between
Stern and McCormack, the story of
Stern's relationship with Alison, that
truly lights up the screen.
For those of you who love Howard
Stern, if you haven't already gone to
see Private Parts - go now.
For those of you who haven't
made up your mind whether you hate
Stern or not, and even for those of
you who have, I would encourage you
to give this film a shot.
You may be as surprised as I was to
find out that Stern's most private
part is not his genitalia, but instead
his heart.
CD
reviews
Medeski, Martin andU2
Wood Shack-manPOP
John Davis STU'K WK1TKR
Derek T. Halle
SF.NIOR WRITER
"What's on the menu for this evening,
sir?" A little of the old play-by-play
perhaps. Let's see, track one starts off
with a little jazz bass accompanied by
some sort of fusion. The drums are a
sheer complement.
Oh, did I mention that we're lis-
tening to Medeski, Martin and Wood,
which is probably one of the fastest
growing movements on the alterna-
tive radio chart today? It's very hard to
go into detail about the meanings to
these tracks because there aren't any
vocals. It's all one big phat jam. Enjoy
the groove.
The second song on Shack-man is
called "Think It sounds like some-
thing Phish would do, but due to the
area of musical instruments that
they're working with, it sounds a bit
more concentrated.
The band is composed of drums,
upright bass and keyboards. It's hard
to believe how huge the sound is with
such a closely knit organization. 1
guess it all works out before the end.
The third track on the record is
the most impressive. "Dracula to be
precise, is the name and the sound.
Not spooky, but seductive to the
extreme. It opens with a breath from
the upright bass. A lonely breath
indeed. Thank you Chris Wood.
The next track is a bit upbeat. It's
called "Bubblehouse" and has a
groove, like the rest, which shows just
the right amount of repetition.
However, when the music gets
tighter, it gets faster and faster, and
the band just runs away.
One of the most exciting aspects
of MMW is how well the notes are
accented. This is due to the impecca-
ble timing of drummer Billy Martin.
This kid knows his high-hat well
enough to cut time rather than split
it. You wouldn't believe the array of
percussion that surrounds his drum-
set. We're talking pots and pans, peo-
ple.
After researching the Web while
listening to the album, I got stuck on
another song, "Spy Kiss 1 don't know-
exactly where this one is coming from
(or any of them for that matter), but
what I do know is that it's infectious,
addictive, and powerful. The rhythm
and soul will leave you checking the
album cover for skin color. White boys
with soul?
In every band, there usually comes
a leader, someone who shines above
the rest in songwriting glory. Not in
this band, baby. Each member has his
own style and becomes the music
himself.
However, when you're talking
melody, you're talking about John
Medeski, a freakshow keyboard player
who found his groove in this New
York band. His ability to overplay in
some spots is amazing. Only his
streaks of silence are better. For
instance, when the other two seem to
be doing their thing, he refrains with
a hush of musical sustain. This, in
SEE MMW. PAGE !0
Shortly after the release of Battle and
Hum, U2's tribute to rock n' roll, the
band was crucified by the American
media for being "pretentious The
sincerity and activism which had won
them their large fan base in the '80s
was the same sincerity and activism
that had led the ever-fickle music
media to denigrate them. Realizing
that they were at a philosophical and
musical crossroads, the band retreated
from the public eye for three years.
During that time they began to
explore the "dark side" of rock n' roll -
the lifestyle of toxic rock stars, the plas-
ticity of electronic music. .After spend-
ing over a year in Berlin, the band pre-
sented the music world with Achtung
Baby, the first album in their new musi-
cal journey to become adventurers in
the fast-paced arena of electronic
music. Trie album garnered much crit-
ical acclaim and five singles from that
album dominated both European and
American charts.
The band embarked on a mam-
moth, three-year-long world tour in
which they explored and exploited
their new image and sound. They
recorded their follow-up to Athtung Baby
while on tour, and influenced by the
music and moods of central Europe at
the time, they named it Zooropa. This
record was not nearly as popular as
Achtung Baby (it sold a measly seven mil-
lion copies), but it furthered V2 in
their exploration of electronic music.
Now, four years after the release of
Zooropa, U2 are back, with the latest
chapter in their bizarre odyssey.
Although the album is called POP,
don't let it fool you. There is very little
bubblegum on the record, with the
possible exception of the album's first
single, "Discotheque Rather, the
album has more rock n' roll on it than
anything since liar, and despite their
claims to rock star insincerity, they're
actually still the same sincere, earnest
U2. (They're being insincere about the
fact that they are insincere. Isn't it iron-
ic? Don't you think?)
While most bands were exploring
and riding the coattails of the grunge
movement, 112 have been reaching into
their inner computers and finding
techno-coated treats for themselves
and their fans. But the music here more
truly deserves the label "alternative"
than any second-rate copy of punk
(Green Day) or ska (No Doubt).
Unlike most, U2 are daring to make
music that is either all or none of the
above - not quite rock, not quite pop,
not quite techno.
The album opens with
"Discotheque a faux-techno dance
number that resembles David Bowie's
"John I'm only Dancing" in theme.
This is actually a fairly strong track, but
it is the weakest song on the album.
The energy and emotion that U2 are so
good at expressing don't show up until
the second song, "Do You reel Loved
a screaming industrial-pop song that
sets up the mood and theme of the
album. Edge's guitar wizardry is evi-
dent and powerful. Rather than rely on
the classic echo sound he made a trade-
SEE 1)2 PAGE 10
h. �
s3�5r i 2
Run Away
Set it for Free Rent it on Video See a Matinee Pay Full Price
Run Away Can't even hum along Tape it from a friend Buy it Used Pay Full Price
Sue Standing closes out Writers Reading Series
1) ME Will i wison
ASSISTANT I IFESTYLE EDITOR
The 1996-97 Writers Reading Series
has enjoyed a fruitful year filled with
inspiring writing from some of the
best poets working today. The past
year brought us such literary talents as
jay Wright. Rafael Campo. Margaret
Randall. Michael Collier and Allan
Curganus.
I 'nfortunately, all good things must
come to an end (at least temporarily).
On Monday, March 24, the Writers
Reading Series closes out its year with
one final talent - Sue Standing.
Standing is a scholar in African lit-
erature and contemporary American
poetry Her poetry weaves a multicul-
tural slant by incorporating her many
travels to Africa and India, and she is
noted for her collaboration with other
artists. These collaborations have
resulted in the natural combination of
poetry with music and the visual arts.
For example. Standing performed a
poetry reading with a piano accompa-
niment by David Froom at Columbia
University in New York City and at
the Coracoran Gallery of Art in
Washington, DC. She has done such
performances w ith several other musi-
cians in a ariet of venues, proving
that poetry can indeed be musical.
When simply glancing at her
accomplishments, her energy is evi-
dent. She is currently the Director of
the Creative Writing Program at
Wheaton College in Norton, Mass
served on the advisory board for the
literary magazine. Agttr, and published
several articles and books. Her most
recent col-
lection of
poetry,
entitled
Gravida,
was chosen
as the win-
ner of the
1993 Four
Way Books
award.
Standing's
efforts have
not gone
unnoticed by her colleagues. She has
earned many other awards and recog-
nitions, including a Whiting
Foundation Travel Grant to West
.Africa, a Hewlett-Mellon Grant and a
Fulbright Grant for travel and study in
India.
As for the critical community, it has
Sue Standing
repeatedly praised Standing's writing
abilities. The Boston Globe cites
Standing's work as being filled with
"precision of image and rhythm and
Publishers li'eetly praised Standing for
her skills in writing "metaphorical
poems that are lovely and original
Now the Greenville communitv
has the opportunity to meet and hear
Standing in person. There will be a
Meet the Writer event at 3 p.m. in the
Greenviile Museum of Art. located at
802 South Evans Street. The reading
will be at 7 p.m. in the Willis Building
on 300 East 1st Street. A reception
and book sale is to follow.
Standing's appearance marks the
final event for the Writers Reading
Series until the next academic year, so
don't miss out.
For further information, contact
Julie Fay at 328-6578.





8 Thursday. March 20. 1997
M
March
20 Thursday
Premiere Performances of Wwks
by ECU Composers, Mark Taggart,
director, at 8 p.m. in A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
Art exhibition featuring winners
nfrom the 6th Annual Juried Visual
,Arts Competition, through March 30
in the Commons Gallery at the
�Greenville Museum of An.
in
Melanie Sparks at Courtyard
.Javern.
r�
Level at Wrong Way Corrigan's.
21 Friday
Emma Gibbs Band with Nimbus
at the Brewery in Raleigh.
q Servotron, Pansy Division and Fly
JBitches at the Cat's Cradle in
$arrboro.
lb
1n Softies at the Lizard 8c Snake
.Cafe in Chapel Hill.
g The Gain and Innocent Nixon at
.Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
:
no
y
Jazz at Night: Carroll V Dashiell,
Jr director, at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
'Great Room.
HI
- Melanie Sparks at Subs Pius in
Wilson.
Kelly Smith Band at Kress Cafe in
New Bern.
Resin with Nothing Face &
Stickiaw at Alive nightclub in
Weigh.
I Shudder To Think with ferbena
$ the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
!
� Soma and Glass at the Lizard &
Snake Care in Chapel Hill.

i
I Honky-Tonk-A-Rama featuring
�ne Burnley Brothers, the Johnsons,
Slercury Dime, Cashmere Junde
Cords and Julie Brown at I r -
i
i
22 Saturday
4th Annual Native American pow-
wow presented by the ECU Native
American Organization at the bottom
of College Hill at 9:30 a.m.
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing
Arts Series: Taylor 2 Dance Company
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Thomas Brothers at Wrong Way
Corrigan's.
Human Race sponsored by the
Pitt folunteer Action Center, Inc.
Registration is from 9-10:30 a.m. For
further information, call 830-6271.
Scrub at Alive nightclub in
Raleigh.
Edwin McCain and Gibb Droll at
the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Mark Robinson at the Lizard &
Snake Care in Chapel Hill.
Honky-Tonk-A-Rama featuring
Trailer Bride, Ruthie 8c the Wranglers,
the Tremblers and W&kc at Local 506
in Chapel Hill.
24 Monday
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
J Church, Pipe and Pee at the
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Plastic Applicator and Samana at
the Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chapel
Hill.
25 Tuesday
23 Sunday
Superchunk with Rock-A-Teens
and The Soft Drink at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro.
Big Heifer at the Lizard 8c Snake
Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Mayflies USA and the Omegans at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
Beck with The Cardigans & Atari
Teenage Riot at 7:30 p.m. at Reynolds
Coliseum in Raleigh.
Benefit with Dayroom, Collapsis,
Bus Stop and More at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrbofo.
Kid Sister and Dash at the Lizard
& Snake Cafe in Chape! Hill.
Galaxy Girl and the Julie Ribbon at
Local 506 in Chapel Hill.
26 Wednesday
School of Art Undergraduate
Exhibition Awards Ceremony and
reception, at 7 p.m. in Speight
Auditorium. The exhibition will run
through April 19 in Gray Gallery.
Concert choir, Brett Watson, con-
ductor, at 8 p.m. in 244 Mendenhall.
Hipbone with One Point Five at
the Brewery in Raleigh.
Jackopierce with Guster at the
Cat's Cradle in Carrboro.
Screw 32 and Hellbender at the
Lizard & Snake Cafe in Chapel Hill.
Grail Park and Take at Local 506 in
Chapel Hill.
RT5S30Hank's Homemade Ice Cream 316 East loth Street QTithin malking distance from ECO
758-0000 BUY ONE GET ONE FREE
I7ia8!iw!iuil Item Blend-In coupon expires 32797 Limit 1 per customer Not Valid with any other purchase
An Evening With
New Artist Showcase
Alison Brown
Quartet
Along With Special Guests
FARMER NOT SO JOHN
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2.1997
8:00PM � Hendrix Theatre
Tickets Go On Sale Monday, March 3,1997.
Tickets - StudentsFacultyStaff $8,
General Public $12, At the Door $15
'Available from the Central Ticket Office Monday-Friday
8:30 AM - 6:00 PM in Mendenhall Student Center, ECU.
Mastercard� and Visa� accepted. All tickets
are General Admission. Doors open at 7:30 PM.
For more information, call Central Ticket Office at 919 328-4778 or Toil-Free at 1 800 ECU ARTS.
taMMl with oboMHws who require ottommodafiminwiWtoporlidiKiteinanywartafECUafeentowagedtoton
tht Department for Gisabfey Support Senrias at 919-328-4802 (VokeTDD) forty-tight hours prior to the start of the program.
Sponsored by the Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee
Aquatic Science Club
Meeting
Thursday. March 20 at 5:00pm
Biology North 109
Everyone Welcome
l
DO YOU THINK YOU'RE GOOD
ENOUGH?
YOU
Be The
Judge
Honor Board Selection
Information Sessions
Tuesday, March 18, 6:00 - 7:00 PM
Wednesday, March 19, 6:00 - 7:00 PM
In Mendenhall Room 212
Applications available at
Dean of Students Office
Call 328-6824
Information booth in front of the student store
Thursday Afternoon, March 20, 11:00- 2:00
CAFFEINE REE DIET COKE, SPRUE,
Plot Coke or
Coca Cola Classl
2-Uter Bottle
Four 2-Uters Per Customer At This Price Mease
Large 12 Size, Ope & Ready To eat
Sugar Sweet
Cantaloupes
Each

LaY'S
Potato Chips, .z
1&OZ. CORN FLAKES. COMPLETE
BRAN FLAKES OR
Kellogg s
Raisin Bran
.72-15-0.
Ml

IN THE DEUPASTRY SHOPPE � B JA
Delicious variety TS
Cookies2. m
KROGER FROZEN
Crinkle Cut
Potatoes
tut
54b. fc�
r
ASSORTED VARIETIES FROZEN
Jenos Crisp N'
Tasty Pizza
THORN APPLE VALLEY m J4b
Sliced Turkey or 29
Sliced Ham �
5
ALL VARIETIES
Serve N' Save
Bologna
Ub. Pkg.
10
6
ii i i.iawniiit





9 Thursday. March 20. 1997
uu
EAST
CAROLINA
w
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
health
minute
Are you alcohol dependent?
The Division of Continuing Studies, 328-6324
Ad equal opportunity affirmative action university,
which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities.
eeeeeatat�ee
200 E. S st.
reenville, NC
7r�? 7103
???
Brilliance
in
featuring DJ QoHc
$1.50 �oftfed Mar � $1.50 Hi �alls
Steve Johnson
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
Alcohol, which is a depressant or
downer, is the major drug of choice
used on many university campuses. As
a result of alcohol's use and abuse on
campuses throughout the nation, it has
been responsible for, or related to:
� 70 percent of violent behavior on
campuses;
� 41 percent of academic problems;
and
� 28 percent of students who drop
out of school.
With this in mind, it is important to
address a tew misconceptions people
have concerning the use and abuse of
alcohol
� Alcohol improves my mood, which
alters my mental state.
It is true that small amounts of
alcohol reduce "self-focused attention"
in some people. However, heavy drink-
ing typically leads ro unpredictable
and uncontrollable emotions. If some-
one is very angry and drinks to relax, a
more likely outcome will be increased
anger and all of the undesirable behav-
iors which typically follow.
Alcohol allows me to perform better.
It may seem that you are perform-
ing better. Yet for most people, heavy
drinking has a detrimental effect on
judgment, coordination and reaction
time. Any amount of alcohol in your
blood leads to impairment in driving.
As testimony to this, the use and abuse
of alcohol is related to approximately
half of all traffic fatalities.
Alcohol makes me feel peat.
The short term effects of alcohol
are often remembered at the expense
of long term effects. Short term
effects, like the euphoria that is often
experienced, are usually pleasurable.
Long term effects, such as hangovers,
dangerous behavior or impulsive sexu-
al behavior, are mostly negative, how-
ever. The implications concerning the
long term effects are significant since,
for example, alcohol has been related
to 60 percent of all sexually transmit-
ted diseases.
If I eat something or drink coffee, it
will sober me up.
Once alcohol is in your bloodstream
there is nothing that can be eaten or
taken to speed up the body's ability to
metabolize it. What chemicals like caf-
feine do instead is help to create wide-
awake drunk people.
The use and abuse of alcohol for
many people progresses into alco-
holism (recently termed "alcohol
dependency" because of its classifica-
tion as a disease. Alcohol dependency
is a disease which is generally charac-
terized in the following ways:
Loss of control- At times a person
has no control over how much they
drink after they start. Often people
who are alcohol dependent go to par-
ties intending to have a few drinks and
end up drinking quite a bit more.
� Continued use despite negative
consequences - For example, someone
who is alcohol dependent might con-
tinue abusing alcohol after they had
received a ticket for driving while
impaired.
Distortion in thinking, especially
denial - Many times those with alcohol
dependency think that their alcohol
consumption is OK and deny that they
have a problem.
� High tolerance - People who have
a dependency on alcohol usually have
to drink several beers or drinks in order
to get a buzz.
People who have any or all of the
previous characteristics may have an
alcohol use and abuse problem. Since
one of the characteristics is distorted
thinking, it is much more difficult to
take an introspective look at one's self.
Often times the best way to address
this question is to simply ask a friend.
A real friend will be honest about
something this serious.
Often the family and friends of an
alcohol dependent person are affected
by this problem, too. It is estimated
that one out of every eight adolescents
under the age of 18 is growing up in a
family with parental alcoholisrn.
Everyone has the potential to become
dependent on alcohol, but children of
alcoholics are four times more likely to
have the disease. Family members are
often perplexed at how to deal with
the problems of an alcohol dependent
relative. It is important that those fam-
ily members get help for themselves
also. Alcoholics Anonymous (1-800-
333-2294) sponsors Al-Anon, a free-ef-
charge program that can benefit those
affected by a relative's dependency on
alcohol, whether or not the family
member who actually has the depen-
dency seeks help from the program
For more information on any of
these topics, please call the Student
Health Service at 328-6784. The local
number for AA is 758-0787. tg
ii
Brown & Brown
TJTitflEquatty,
VI TOKYlYs VI I V
123 W.3-ST
Greenville
'Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Drug Charges
�All Criminal Matters
�Free Consultation
752-0952
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I. ����





10 Thursday. March 20. 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
U2
continued from page 7
mark of, he instead turns his guitar into
a source for all sorts of beeps and
whines and fuzzy chainsaw sounds.
"Mofo is one of U2's best songs
ever, and even though it sports a techno
facade that makes the Prodigy seem
like wet blankets, it is classic V2. The
lyrics set the tone for the whole album,
and the tone is classic Bono: "Lookin'
for to save my soul Lookin in the place
srhere no flowers grow Lookin' for to
fill that God shaped hole
Bono has never been shy about
depressing his Christianity in his lyrics,
but here it comes out in full force, like
never before. While this album is not as
reverent or worshipful as 1982's Ortofxr.
it is more focused on Christianity and
matters of the soul. In "Mofo Bono
describes it as "Looking for the baby
Jesus under the trash It seems that.
after ten years, he still hasn't found
what he's looking for.
"If God Will Send His Angels
Down is a ballad reminiscent to
t)ne and is sure to get heavy airplay.
Here Bono combines his search for faith
with another of his favorite themes,the
broken relationship: "What's that you
say to me Does love light up your
Christmas tree? The next minute
vou're blowing a fuse And the C artoon
Network turns into the news
This is followed by three of the
most rocking songs IJ2 ever wrote,
"Staring at the Sun "Last Night on
Earth and "Gone "Staring at the
Sun" explores the intentional blindness
of denial, while "Ust Night on Earth"
is another love song in the "l-ove is
Blindness" stvle with a very catchy cho-
rus. "Gone" is a screaming protest
against all of this rock star stuff that
Bono has been pretending to like for
the past seven years: "Goodbye you can
keep this suit of lights I'll be up with
the sun
"Miami" is a very trip-hop critique
of Florida's own mecca of bourgeois
excess. "The Playboy Mansion" has U2
turning gospel music into political
satire, in which they take a stab at
American pop culture of recent years:
"If Coke is a mystery And Michael
Jackson history If O.J. is more than
a drink And a Big Mac is bigger than
you think
The album's final three tracks arc all
gems. "If You Wear That Vfervet Dress"
is a gorgeous serenade to a forbidden
love: "We've been here before last
time you scratched at my door The
moon was naked and cold I was like a
two year old Who just wanted more
Bono must have had Frank Sinatra in
his CD player while the band was
recording this one; his voice is seven
ways smooth.
"Please" is almost like the morning
after, with its drunken drum pattern
and hangover guitars. Or perhaps Bono
is singing to himself here: "Your catholic
blues Your convent shoes Your stick
on tattoos Now they're making the
news Your sermon on the mount
From the boot of your car
"Wake Up Dead Man" is actually a
leftover from jooropa, but its inclusion
on the end of POP is very appropriate.
Here the band segues into a solid rock
song that evokes more confusion and
frustration than Kurt Cobain could have
dreamed about. Bono's frustration is
more with God, though. "Wake Up" is
simultaneously a cry for help and a Job-
like protest.
In the end, Bono's beleaguered dis-
cotheque character finds himself in the
same palace he started, but with possi-
bly a prayer and a hope of some kind of
resurrection. The band members
themselves have definitely enacted a
resurrection of their own, proving once
again that they can produce quality
material and still remain relevant to the
culture of the dav.
And POP Well, yes. it really is a
deep, moving, inspiring record, a tour-
dc-force for the band. But don't let that
discourage you. It still sounds good
played loud at a party.
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turn, leaves a constant hum under mind. If you haven't heard of them.
everything else that is played by
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I haven't seen a band complement
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"�"





TIm East Caraimaa
Player enjoys success during senior season
Amaker hired as Seton Haft coach
SOUTH CHANGE, NJ. (AP) - The search that led to the hiring of Tommy
Amaker as Seton Hall's basketball coach didn't last long.
Just hours after firing George Kaney last-week, university president
Monsignor tofeert Sheeran had already targeted Amaker, 31, as the man to
restore Seton Hal i�hajiBB�bi� prominence.
"You are the onry pewort we've talked to and there are no other candidates
right now ShWMW told Amaker tot Wslnesday at a meeting in Durham, N.C
sources at Duke wW The Associated Press. .
Amafcet, a parr of Duke's �ffl of sewn Rnal Four appearances in nine years
at Jji.iJiiim� coach, rowed the Seton Hall campus on Monday, and
a tentative contract aettrmt was reached. The announcement of his hiring
was made Tuesday. He was to be introduced as coach today.
-He was at the top of the list from the start Lisa Grider, Seton Hall; direc-
tor of public retarions, said. "A few other people were talked to, but Tommy
Amalier was dw first choke. From the get-go, he was the No 1 guy.
Amaker, who received a muhiyear contract, was not immediately available
for comment. . , j
Amaker takes over a team that has posted two straight losing seasons ana
that went 38-48 in three seasons under Wane who was find eight days asp.
Cat coach says team won't be in awe of Tar Heels
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) - Sen Btmm attaches no teal significance to his
coaching matchup wrth Dean Smith on Friday in the NCAA tournament - other
than its timing. .� .
"It's always an honor to coach against his teams, especially in tournament
play because that means you've done something to get there because his teams
ate always here said Braun, who leads California against North Carolina in the
Fast Regional semifinals.
Bum said Tuesday his Golden Bears, who have put together a rather
remarkable season despite several key wum�, won't be in awe of trie streaking
-to Heels (26), who have won 14 straight and aw seeking their 11th Rnal
Four trip under Smith. . M
"I think when you use the word 'awe that's a pretty big word and you are
not going to be successful if you walk around in awe of something Braun said.
-What you want to do and what our team has done is give people proper respect,
and we have a deep respect for North Carolina and I have a deep respect for
Dean Smith and his teams.
Tm dtmkywiawew (have respect) against those ��bewJh5J
are and whinW dene, and they've earned that he added. But weVe
through � lot, mm losing a scorer like Ed Gray I don t know, maybe a lot
ims wouldn't have come back with that type of thing, but our team ha bat-
tled through that"
TRACY LAUEACH
SENIOR WHITE
Rhonda Rost picked up a softbali and
found herself out on the softbali field
for the first time when she was in the
eighth grade. For nine years, she has
lived the sport day in and day out to
become one of the Lady Rrates' most
valuable players in her senior year at
ECU.
Rost played four years of varsity
softbali for her high school before
walking on to the Lady Pirate team as
a college freshman. She said playing
sports at a Division I level has been
the highlight of her college career.
"I have really benefited from
being an athlete at ECU Rost said.
"1 have enjoyed die discipline and
good work ethic that I have devel-
oped through such a strict lifestyle
Rost is especially excited about
this season. Under the direction of
new Head Coach Tracey Kee and in
having the opporruniry to work with
an "extremely enthusiastic team
Rost has been able to enjoy the sport
in a whole new way
"This season is a tot different, but
it is a positive different. Coach Kee is
young, so she is able to relate to us
weW. She's got what it takes to win,
and she is passing that on to us Rost
said.
Rost said that on the field, Kee is
all business, but off the field, she is a
good friend.
"I am so excited to end play for
Coach Kee because I have the ulti-
mate respect for her as not only a
coach, but also a former player Rost
said.
Rost said that in her opinion, this
reason marks the start of a turning
point in the history of Lady Pirate
Softball. The team has focused most-
ly on pulling together and making the
adjustments necessary to combine
ths veterans and the rookies into one
talented group. Already 29 games into
the season, the Lady Pirates eminent-
ly hold an 18-11 record overall and a
4-0 Big South Conference record.
Coming to ECU from Richmond,
Rost will be graduating in May with a
degree in marketing. She will return
home after graduation and is thinking
of going into sales.
Rost has two older sisters who also
played softbali in high school. With
one sister studying at Virginia Tech
and the other pursuing a degree at
Radford University, Rost chose to
come to ECU so she could go some-
where different and sail be a part of a
Division! softbali team.
Rost has played third base
throughout her entire career as a
Lady Pirate. In 199$, she was named
to the AU-Toumament Team in the
Lady Pirate Classic and was also the
recipient of the Golden Gtove in the
1995 East Carolina Round Robin.
The highlight of Boat's career
came about tot year at the Big South
Conferer�eChsmpionship.ECUhsd
just entered the conference and had
yet co make a statement about the
strength of the program. In beating
almost all of the teams at the tourna-
ment and finishing as the runner up,
the Ladv Pirates were able to gain the
respect thst they deserved.
As for this season, the team's ulti-
mate goal is to win the conference
SEE
PAGE 13
chtriime looks to regroup after fwrtechnioai loss Qq jf team places eighth in Fripp Island tournament;
PORT MILL, S.C. (AP) - Now that theyve put themselves in position for the
winningest season in franchise history, the Charlotte Hornets dont want to
undo it with foul tempers. .
7 The Homers tot weekend began a stretch in which they play 11 of their last
If games against teams with losing records. On paper at least, it looked like a
perfect scenario for a club that is gpHing under first-year coach Dave Cowens
attd has already surpassed last season's victory total.
7 But Charlotte has begun the sesson-ending stretch by losing two of three,
its worst span in more than a month, and the Hornets punctuated cheir latest
tot by bem called fof27 personat fours and five technicals.
� "I'm mx discouraged Cowens said. "I thmk it's goodjrhe guys got upset.
But I want them to quit talking and get back to the game
i The Hornets built a 16-point lead against Utah earty in the second quarter
Monday night before spending much of the restof the nightbickenng withthe
dffcrts and trying tooutmusde the Jstz. tfe matched Chssfotre's physical
rjkw and rallied for I MJvfctory.
I "We don't want that to become a norm Anthony Mason said Tuesday after
me Hornets held a nearly two-hour workout at their practice complex.
The Hornets (42-24 hew won 27of38, putting them on course to surpass
the Sfrvictory mark for the first time in the franchise'snine years and moving
them into sixth place in the Eastern Conference playoff race.
Rule changes keen coming in Winston Cup series
DARLINGTON, SJC (AP) - That slippery advantage Thunderbirds had for a
couple of weeks on NASCAR tracks turned out to be just dust in the wind tun-
nel
After running competing models through its annual wind-tunnel tests,
NASCAR has taken away the aerodynamic change it gave the Fords two weeks
ago. .
The latest alteration raises the front air dam on the Thunderbird by the one-
eighth inch - the same amount NASCAR allowed Ford to lower the dam prior
to the March 9 race at Atlanta Motor Speedway
The sanctioning body also told the Ford teams to tower the rear spoiler by a
quarter-inch, beginning with Sunday's TranSouth Financial 400 at Darlington
Rflccwttv
The change was announced five days after Dale Jarrett overpowered the
fteld in a Thunderbird during the Primestar 500 at Atlanta. The victory was the
second straight for Ford. Chevrolet Monte Cartes, driven by Jeff Gordon, won
the first two races of 1997.
"I'm surprised because when they (NASCAR) had cars in the tunnel before,
they sat down and really worked through things and looked at all the numbers
and looked at the impact of them, and it took them several weeks to make a
decision said Don Miller, co-owner and general manager of Penskc South
Racing which fields Fords for Rusty Wallace.
"Now, three days later, theyVe made another rule change, Milter said.
"When they were dealing with the Chevrotets, it took three or four weeks to
reach a decision . , . ,
NASCAR impounded three cars after the Atlanta race, including Jarrett s
Ford, the Monte Carlo of defending series champion and current runnerup
Terry Labonte and the Fbntiac Grand Prix of Morgan Shepherd, who was third
ac Atlanta.
ANTHONY STANFILL
STAFf WHITES
White most students packed then-
bags and headed out of town for
spring break, ECU's golf team had
business to take care of The Pirates
spent the first three days of their
break, Mar. 7-9, in Fripp Island, S.C.
They were just one of the 19 teams
participating in the Ben HoganFripp
Island Intercoitegftte Tournament.
The Pirates placed eighth overall
in the tournament. At one time the
Pirates were three shots away from
first, but some high scores on the last
day sent the Pirates down to eighth.
Toledo University eventually rook top
honors, winning the tournament.
Marc Miller was the Pirates' best
finisher, placing sixth overall individu-
ally Milter shot a 73, 72 and 73 over
the three days.
Head Coach Kevin Williams says
Miller continues to play well.
"Marc Milter has been his consis-
tent serf all year Williams said.
Kevin MBter was another Pirate
who played wett at Fripp Island. Milter
shot a 73,72 and 75, and finished 12th
overall, individually.
"Kevin Miller really stepped it up
Williams said. "He had his best tour-
nament of the year, which 1 was glad
to see. I think well continue to see
good things our of rum
Thes�r�C�thl1irares who mate
the trig we RSstfe Creech, St?s�
Satterry and Daniel Griffis.
"What's hurting us right now is
that Creech, our best player coming
into the spring, is in a slump right
now Williams said. "We're just not
deep enough to cover him. We just
need more consistency out of our
three to five man. That is what's real-
ly hurting us
However, the Pirates are very opti-
mistic about thek next match. It's the
PepsiBradford Creek Classic played
on the Pirates' home turf at Bradford
Creek Golf Course, in Greenvine.
"I'm looking forward to playing at
home because Bradford Creek is a dif-
ferent style of golf course. This works
to our obvious advantage, since we
play here so often Wfflissns said.
There aw 24 very competitive
teams playing in the tournament,
including tot year's winner, USC
Aiken. The players who will take to
the green for the Phwes will be M.
Nfiller, K. Miller, Sarteriy, Shane
Robinson and Daniel Griffis. Even
though Williams is starting three
freshmen for the first time, he stSI �
thinks they have a good chance of J
winning. I
"If Marc and Kevin continue to do �
well and we get more consistency out ,
ofrhe three ami roirscorewe have a J
good chance of winning Wiraams J
said. J
The tournament at Bradford
Creek Golf Course is this Friday ana
Saturday, Mac 21 and 22. They p"
36 holes on Friday, and the final IB
PIRATES BEAT YAIE IN EXTRA INNINGS
1997 ECU FOOTBA
SCHEDULE
Sept. 13
Sept. 20
Oct. 4
Oct. 11
Oct. 18
Oct. 25
Nov. 1
Nov. 8
Nov. 15
Nov. 22
at West Virginia
WAKE FOREST
SOUTH CAROLINA
at Syracuse
SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
at Tuiarte
MEMPHIS
at Louisville
at Houston
CINCINNATI
at North Carolina State
Site
Morgantown,
W.Va.
GREENVILLE, N.C. ��
GREENVILLE. N.C.�
Syracuse, N.Y.
GREENVILLE. N.C.
New Orleans. La.
GREENVILLE. N.C. 3
Louisville. Ky. 35
Houston, Texas Z
GREENVILLE.NC.S
Raleigh, N.C.
TRIVIAtime
How many of the sweet 16 teams in this
year's NCAA Tournament were in the
sweet 16 this time last year?
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r






The Sweet 16
Here's a look at tonight and Friday's games in
the NCAA Tournament.
THURSDAY S 6AMES
FRIDAYGAMES
EAST REGIONAL
MY.
ftgg afcsaaaaea
went MfJIUHIU
Minnesota (29-3) vs. Clemson (22-9), 7:55 p.m. Texas (18- 11) vs. Louisville (25-8), 7:39 p.m.
UCLA (23-7) vs. Iowa St. (22-8), 30 minutes after North Carolina (28-6) vs. California (23-8), 30
first game minutes after first game
WEST REGIONAL
&8H ����, CCfff.
Utah (28-3) vs. Stanford (22-7), 7:40 p.m.
Kentucky (324) vs. St. Joseph's (26-6), 30
mintues after first game
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL
Birmingham, Ala.
Kansas (34-1) vs. Arizona (21-9), 7:55 p.m.
Providence (23-11) vs. TennChattanooga (24-10),
30 minutes after first game
�jHJ
' ,
i

8
J
� O a

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MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
� NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense 752-7529
� 24-Hour Message Service
VnwitaEWT. 5
Bfe
A
DOORS OPEN AT 9:00 PM
ADMoCSSZOtf:
GREEKS ff OK- GREEKS
3.00 H.00
Family Health Medical
Alternative Medicine
Workshops
-
it
Atow medical approaches
to physical rehabilitation
An advanced practice for:
Nmek and low bacfc pain: It effects 90 of the population, 5 simple exercises,
S postural shifts, what causes it; relief, conventional and alternative methods.
StraaL Simple releases and trigger points to relieve chemical, physical,
and emotional stress.
Homeopathy: How to use minute amounts of natural herbs and medicines to
make major changes in assessing chronic and acute ailments.
Nutrition: You are what you eat! What works, making it simple.
Acupunctuf: Basic introduction to this ancient and modern healing art
FJbromyalola: A condition of chronic muscular and ligament soreness, which may
lead to a wide array of complications. What does research suggest? Treatment
options: Trigger point therapy? Myofacial releese therapy? Pood allergies?
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Very common in middle-aged women, inflammation in
the wrists causing a compression of the nerves leading to a tingling sensation in
the hands. Basic exercise supplementation and conservative treatment.
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A feeling of constantly being tired or sleepy. Put the
life back in you, using herbs, nutrition, acupuncture, and life force.
Dioeatlon ad Bowel Problem: Indigestion, constipation, and ulcers, looking at
the digestive system as a basis to long term vitality and how to handle it better.
Depreeaion; Natural and conventional approaches to a most common condition.
laLGbi; Movement to increase your energy, flexibility and vitality.
Yjogj; Basic yoga postures to relieve stress, low back ad respiratory problems
and double your energy.
Weight to�: Alternative and conventional approaches to weight loss that work.
Phen Phen? Chromium? Redux? And more.
Race Walking: Learn art and sport of race walking. Proper form for maximum
aerobic workout. Ifs low-impact and fun.
Wednesdays, 6:30 PM @ 3100 S Memorial Dr.
Call for reservations: 919-355-5115
Discover the Spirit of our Practice:
Teamwork, A Personal Touch and Healing
go beyond relief!
-





13 Thursday. March 20. 1997
sports
The East Carolinian
STUDENT SPECIAL
Only $37
with presentation of valid student ID
And This Coupon
Federal andor State
Tax Preparation
-EXPRE$$ TAX RETURNS
655 S. Memorial Drive
(Beside Advance Auto Parts)
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 756-4323
OOE
DEAR SPORTS WRITERS,
WE WILL MEET TODAY AT 5 P.M. AT MY
DESK. PLEASE MAKE EVERY EFFORT TO BE
THERE. IF YOU CANT PLEASE CALL
THE OFFICE AND LEAVE A MESSAGE.
YOUR LOVING SPORTS EDITOR,
AMANDA
The women's tennis team will host
Barton College today at 2:30 at the
Minges tennis courts. This week-
end, starting Saturday, the golf
team will host the PepsiBradford
Creek Intercollegiate tournament
at Bradford Creek Golf Club. On
Sunday, the women's tennis team
will be in action again as they host
George Mason. The baseball team
will host Citadel Monday at 7 p.m.
a; Harrington Field.
10
sodium nitrite
20
cholesterol
30
animal fat
8
you don't want
to know
1-800-COLLECT
M4
SAVINGS
lial 1-800-COLLECT aid sate ip to 44
�Fir M-llitmi hIIi. Iniifi tint li I 3-iiutt HIT intn-lili� Iitintlll call.
Skaters
compete
for title
� LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP)
- By their jumping alone, it was
nearly impossible to distinguish
world champion Jbdd Eldredge
from European champion Alexei
Urmanov from Russian national
champion Itya Kulik.
What made the difference in the
short program Wednesday at the
World Figure Skating
Championships - the most highly
technical display in figure skating
history - was, quite simply, ele-
gance.
Urmanov, Eldredge and Kulik, 1-
2-3 in the short, all landed the diffi-
cult triple axel-triple toe combina-
tions with ease. But then, so did at
least six other skaters. This is how
far men's skating has progressed in
just one year, only two men hit the
jump in the 19 worlds.
But Urmanov's classical lines,
unshakable even in a rock music
program, and easily flowing move-
ments defied by the slightest hint
of hip-gyrating playfulness in the
step sequence gave him the edge.
The decision was close.
Urmanov had four first-place marks,
Eldredge three and Kulik two. The
edge went to artistry: eight 5.9s for
Urmanov's presentation. Eldredge,
in second place, scored eight 5.8s.
This may prove to be artistry's
last stand as the men pile jumps
into their arsenals in figure skating's
equivalent of the arms race.
Clean routine after clean rou-
tine, skaters ranked as low as ninth
in the short program affirmed they
would attempt the quad in the long
program Thursday. Urmanov, Kulik
and Canadian champion Elvis
Stojko all hit them in competition
earlier this month and another half
dozen skaters have been practicing
them.
Only Eldredge will enter the
battle of the quads unarmed.
"I'll flat out say it right now. No
Eldredge said.
Eldredge of Bloomfield Hills,
Mich is counting on high-rotating
triple jumps, style and dizzying
fixed-axis spins to stay in con-
tention for the title.
Spins never looked so good as in
Eldredge's short program. Rotating
fast, faster, Eldredge dissolved into
a whirling haze that in a cartoon
world would have certainly have
drilled through the ice and out of
view.
"Performance-wise, he was
excellent. But technically, that's the
best program I've seen him do said
coach Richard Callaghan.
The short program is worth just
one-third the total score, leaving
the game wide open for at least the
top three skaters.
"I'm going to come out fighting
for the gold medal. And of course
there will be quad in the program
Urmanov said.
Kulik, fourth in Europeans,
rebounded with an arm swinging
depiction of Faust that included a
difficult compass-spinning step
sequence that sprang directly into a
double axel, two required elements
fused into one.
"If my quad is good of course I
will try the combination Kulik
said.
But unless one of the top three
makes a major mistake, even fourth-
ranked Stojko will have a tough
time breaking the ceiling even with
his technical superiority. He is the
only skater to hit a quad-triple in
competition, and plans to try it on
Thursday.
His jumps were spot-on in the
short, and he knew it, practically
inviting the audience to applaud
with broad grin and wide-armed
gesture after each jump nailed. But
he was clearly disappointed by his
artistic marks in the short, which
included two 5.6s for his program
depicting the super comic book
hero Rocketeer.
"I was kind of wondering where
they were coming from he said.
"My spins were on, artistry was on,
and jumpwisc I was on
Softball
continued from page 11
tournament and advance to the
NCAA Championships, which will
be held in early May.
"It's going to take all 17 of us to
win and reach our goals Rost said.
Rost has raised her batting aver-
age to .360 and is currently on a hit-
ting streak with two homers, two
doubles, and a triple in the last nine
games. As she put it, "this year has
been one of her better ones
Rost said that as she graduates,
she sees the program gaining more
respect and moving on to the next
level to possibly being a top 25 team
in the near future.
"What I will miss the most about
playing softball is playing on a team
with 17 other athletes Rost said.
"Great friendships have been built
in the past four years, and saving
good-bye is going to be a hard thing
to do





Tht cMt Cwotaitfl
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
I NEED MONEY! CANNON-
DALE M700 bike for sale. Only six
months old barely used. OnhS150.00.
Call right away 758-6573. Ask for Lee.
386 IBM COMPUTER WITH
color monitor. Includes windows 3.0
and MS works. Good computer for
school. Asking $350.00. Call 353-
7029.
CYPRESS GARDENS TWO
BEDROOM apartments on 10th
street. Free basic cabjc, water and sew-
er also preleasing for the fall $415.00.
Call Wainright Property management
756-6209.
SHORT WALK TO CAMPUS &
new Rcc. Center! 5th street Square -
Uptown - Above BW3 one 3 bedroom 2
12 bath. Sunken LR apt. 1775 mo.
One 2 bedroom above Uppercrust
Bakery AVAILABLE NOW. (New car-
pet) for $475 mo. Luxury Apartments.
Will lease for May first with deposit
Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
GOLF CLUBS PALMER AXION
II 2-pw excellent shape. Only used 3-4
times. Price $100. Contact Karl 830-
0626.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR
TWO bedroom townhouse near cam-
pus. Bus goes to gym and campus.
$225month. Call 1-910-674-6489.
NEEDED, FEMALE TO SHARE
2 bedroom, 1 12 bath townhouse
across from campus! Close to Rec.
Center and downtown! Rent is
$225.0" 12 bills. Please call 757-
3789.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED FOR sublease over the summer,
in Players Club. Will not need to pay
deposit. Call anytime 353-0966.
SUBLEASE ONE BEDROOM
APT. at Kings Arms. $285 month.
May - August ac. Free basic cable.
Call Cindy 758-5473 leave message.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
APARTMENT AVAILABLE AT
INGGOLD Towers for summer
blease two bedroom, tease ends jury
1, May's rent will be paid foe Call
752-5304.
EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, targe dining room, kitchen, and
Irving room with fire place. With wash-
er, and dryer. Beautifully landscaped
with three fenced in yank Conveni-
ent m campus and the hospital.
$l,000mo deposit. 524-4111.
TAKE OVER LEASE: TWObed-
room two bath. Dogwood Hollow Apes,
on 10th Street. Washer, dryer, dish-
washer, disposal. $500month. Great
Apartments. Call 758-3323.
GLADIOLUS APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1,1997. One,
two, and three, bedroom apartments
on 10th Street, five blocks from ECU,
now preleasing. Call Wainright Proper-
ty Management 756-6209.
ROOMMATE WANTED QUIET
RESPONSIBLE female to share 2
bdrm 1 bath apt. Starting in May.
197.50month 12 utilities water
and sewer included Towerhill Apts. 2
mi. from campus. Call Becky @ 328-
3636.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED: PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
CANNON COURT AND CE-
DAR Court two bedroom 1 12 bath
townhouses. On ECU bus route $400-
$415. Call Wainright Property Man-
agement 756-6209 preleasing for fall
also.
ROOMS AVAILABLE AT THE
Methodist Student Center for Sum-
mer School and the Fall Semester.
Please call 758-2030 for an application.
PROFESSIONAL LAW FIRM IS
seeking an experienced paralegal with
bachelors degree and additional train-
ing at a recognized paralegal training
center. Experience in bankruptcy
andor litigation can substitute for the
educational requirement. Excellent
fringe benefits package included.
Please contact Lisa Willis at (919)355-
3030 for further information. All inqui-
ries will be handled in confidence.
SWIM COACHES, MANAGERS,
INSTRUCTORS, Lifeguards need-
ed for Raleigh & Winston-Salem pools
May-Sept. Contact David 1-888-246-
5755 for application or mail resume to
PPC, PO Box 5474 Winston-Salem,
NC27113.
BRODY'S IS ACCEPTING
PART time sales applications for la-
dies' and men's apparel. Flexible
scheduling options. For the "early
birds 10am-2pm or 12-6pm sched-
ules; and for the "nite owls 12-9pm or
6-9pm schedules. All retail positions
include weekend hours. In addition to
extra income, you'll also receive a
clothing discount for your new spring
wardrobe. Apply at Customer Service,
Wednesday-Friday, l-5pm, Brody's,
The Plan.
EARN $6,000 THIS SUMMER.
DYNAMIC COMPANY NOW IN-
TERVIEWINGHIRING AMBI-
TIOUS, ENTREPRENEURIAL
STUDENTS TO FILL SUM-
MER MANAGEMENT POSI-
TIONS IN YOUR HOME-
TOWN. FOR MORE INFORMA-
TION AND TO SCHEDULE AN
INTERVIEW CALL TUITION
PAINTERS 1 (800) 393 - 4521 .
STUDENTS NEEDED TO
CONDUCT surveys at the malls on
Saturdays. Flexible hours. Please call
Maurice at 355-3565 after 8 pm.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER
'97! Lifeguards, Head Lifeguards,
Pool Managers, Swim Lessons Instruc-
tors, Swim Coaches. Summer posi-
tions available in Charlotte, Greens-
boro, Raleigh, NC, Greenville, and
Columbia, SCI areas, call Carolina Pool
Management at (704) 541-9303. In
Atlanta, call SwimAtlanta Pool Man-
agement at (770)992-7765.
SZECHUAN GARDEN NEED
HART time or full time wait staff. No
phone calls. Come after 2:00 pm in
person only. 909 South Evans, Green-
ville, NC 27834. (10th & Evans)
KINSTON INDIANS ARE CUR-
RENTLY looking for gameday staff
for the 1997 season (411-830). Posi-
tions available are: ushers, concessions
workers, ticket takers, waitstaff, and
vendors. Apply at Grainger Stadium
M-F from 9am-5pm.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID
STUDENT FINANCIAL SERV-
ICES PROFILES OVER
200,000 INDIVIDUAL
SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS,
LOANS, AND FELLOW-
SHIPS�FROM PRIVATE &
GOVERNMENT FUNDING
SOURCES. A MUST FOR AN-
YONE SEEKING FREE MONEY
FOR COLLEGE! 1-800-263-
6495 EXT. F53621 (WE ARE A
RESEARCH & PUBLISHING
COMPANY)
NEED EXTRA MONEY? NT
TIO N A L Marketing Co. seeks money
motivated individuals to pest promo-
tional materials for fortune 500 com-
panies on your college campus. Call
Brenda (800)592-2121x383
95 FLEETWOOD EDGEWOOD
14 x 76 3 br2bath garden tub, dish-
washer, shed & fence. Payoff $17,500.
Located in Birchwood Sands Est
Greenville. Call (919)465-8711 or
(919)778-4207 owner.
MOUNTAIN BIKE! 1995 GT
Tempest, green. Excellent condition.
Has been kept inside apartment and
been taken care of. Asking $375.00
neg. Must see! 758-6444 Adam.
1994 HONDA N1GHTHAWK
CB250R red, like new, 1.316 miles,
with helmet XXS $3,000 566-4662 af-
ter 6 pm.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF
Counselors ft Instructors
for private co-ed you camp located in Rte
beautiful mountain of w�itern N.C.
Over 25 ocIMIIm including all sports, water
skiing, heated pool, tennii, art, hon�bock,
go- kam. 610 to 811torn $1250 -
1650 ptut room, meals, laundry & gnat fun
Non-smokers coll for brochureapplication
S0O-S32-5S39
PONCHOS
quality, all season
Clint Estwood style
19.00 each
check or money ;
order to
Lawson Wear
P.O. Box 12602
Raleigh, NC.
27605-2602
OCEAN LIFEGUARD
as a
SUMMER JOB
"On the Baach jn tha Sun"
Meat IoIb of people. Compete in
running and swirriming everts here
and out of the area, stay in top
shape, gel some great braining, and
get paid doing it?
? Internships are available ?
Lifeguard Beach Service, Inc.
In Kill Devil Hill and Dare Co.
Is hiring motivated people
for ocean lifeguard posi-
tions. Bonus and incentive
pay. To request application
Call: 919-441-4200
E-Maihibatraacheintfirpatri.cpm
Laavs your name, address, and pnona �
Ooaan Lifeguards � Ocean Rescua sine 1958
Mambar: United State LHeaaving Association
CRUISE & LAND-TOUR EM-
PLOYMENT INDUSTRY OFF-
ERS TRAVEL (HAWAII, MEXI-
CO, CARIBBEAN), INCOM-
PARABLE BENEFITS, & GOOD
PAY. FIND OUT HOW TO
START THE APPLICATION
PROCESS NOWl CRUISE EM-
PLOYMENT SERVICES PRO-
VIDES THE ANSWERS. CALL
800-276-4948 EXT. C53629.
(WE ARE A RESEARCH & PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
INQUIRE NOW FOR SUMMER
Internships in sales. SI,000
guaranteed plu3 commission.
Call Jeff Mahoney at Northwest-
ern Mutual. 355-7700.
HEALTHFITNESS INT'L CO.
SEEKS motivated positive individu-
als to meet expansion needs in Green-
ville area. Those with desire for ad-
vancement encouraged to apply. 321-
4864. No phone interviews please.
DESTINATION RESORT EM-
PLOYMENT WOULD YOU
LIKE WORKING AT 4-STAR
TROPICAL RESORTS IN THE
CARIBBEAN, MEXICO, OR TA-
HITI? OUR MATERIALS UN-
COVER NUMEROUS OPPOR-
TUNITIES WITH EXCEL-
LENT BENEFITS. FOR INFO:
1-800-807-5950 EXT.R53626
(WE ARE A RESEARCH flc PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
Entrepreneurs "Gnt?
WORK ON campus organizingman-
aging promotions for top us Cos. Work
as muchlittle as you want & reap the
financial rewards. Earnings can equal
$5O$250$500 "7wk. Post gradu-
ate positions also available for those
that succeed. Call Rose at 800-950-
8472, ext. 10
THE GREENVILLE RECREA-
TION 8c Parks Department is re-
cruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth soc-
cer coaches for the spring indoor soccer
program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills
and have the ability and patience to
work with outh. Applicant must be
able to coach young people ages 5-18 in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from 3
pm to 7 pm with some night and wee-
kend coaching. Flexible with hours ac-
cording to class schedules. This pro-
gram will run from the 17th of March
to the first of May. Salary rates start at
14.75 per hour. For more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly
at 830-4550.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
OFFICIALS some experience need-
ed some training. April thru June.
Pick up application Elm Street Gym
2:30 - 7:00 pm.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK
summer in Myrtle Beach, SC. Hiring
Lifeguards and Beach Concession
Workers. Earn good money while
working on the Beach! ItSalary plus
bonuses $$ Discounted Housing
To apply or for further information, call
North Myrtle Beach Lifeguards at
(803)272-4170.
1 RANKED FUNDRAISER.
YOUR group, club, fratVsor. can raise
up to $200 $500 $1000 in one
week. Minimal hrseffort required.
Call 800-925-5548, access code 22.
Participants receive free sport camera
just for calling.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
money while you learn playmates mas-
sage. Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
PROFESSIONAL LAW FIRM IS
seeking full-time messengers. Applic-
ants mast possess a valid driver's li-
cense and hove reliable transportation.
Excellent fringe benefits package in-
cluded. Please contact Lisa Willis at
(919)355-3030 for further information.
All inquiries will be handled in con-
fidence.
BRODY'S IS ACCEPTING
PART Time Customer Service appli-
cations. Assist customers with mer-
chandise returns and account inquires.
Organization skills a must in this fast
paced position. Office andor teller ex-
perience helpful. Morning or evening
schedules. Ail retail positions include
weekend hours. In addition to extra
income, you'll also receive a clothing
discount. Apply at Customer Service,
positions, l-5pm, Brody's, The Plaza.
PERSON TO WORK PART-time
for the next few weeks painting out-
side doors. Call Keith at 756-6209.
$20.K TO $30.K PER year earning
potential with the most respected
name in fitness. Send sales resume' to:
World Gym, CO Chris Farrell, 110 Pa-
trick Ct Rocky Mount, NC 27804.
ATTENTION HORSE LOVERS:
IF you need a place to keep your horse
or you are interested in getting into
barrel racing. Call Nicole 746-4068.
RESEARCNREPQRTS
Isnjsst Usury af nssnaMM si U.S.
njmnmcs-MisMjecn
Mn causa Tossy vei mc or coo
Mfl-3510222
Or rush $2.00 to:
'i3z; me a�m u� ngtm. ca 90025
GET BETTER GRADES
Let 7779 Wordsmiths edit your
term papers: $15 par hour
Phone: 321-7441
Pager: (BBS) 233-7395
(PIN) 191-4267
HOPE EVERYONE HAD A great
Spring Break, Welcome Back. Love
the Sigma Sisters.
THANKS ZETA FOR HOSTING
us at your house. We all enjoyed it.
Love the Sigma Sisters.
WELCOME KARLY BURNS!
THE SISTERS and new members of
Delta Zeta can't wait to meet with you
this week and look forward to having
you and the entire National Council
present at our House Dedication this
weekend)
ALPHA PHI. YOU ALL did a great
job in basketball. Thanks for being
such a great coach Stix. Love the
Sisters and new members of Alpha Phi.
SAE THANKS FOR THE pre-
downtown but Thurs. night. We all
had great time and hope to do it again
soon! Love Alpha Delta Pi.
WAY TO GO BILLY, our Sigma Al-
pha Epsiton sewer. Thanks for repre-
senting us in the sexy boxer contest!
Love, Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS, TRA-
CEY MAURER FOR receiving
Chapter Consultant position. Love
your Sigma Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
SHELLY MCCUTCHEON on
getting accepted to TR. We are proud
of you! Love your Pi Delta Sisters.
SIGMA PI: THANK YOU for bc-
ing our Spring Break tour guides. We
had a lot of fun going on vacation with
you guys and hope to get together
again really soon! Love the Pi Delta
Sisters and Pledges.
T"H ETA "C H HT RAT E RNlTY
WILL hold its annual See Saw Mania
on March 22 and 23 at Burger King on
the intersection of Greenville Blvd.
and Red Banks Rd. Proceeds will go to
the Greenville Pitt County Special
Olympics. Please come out and help
contribute.
EAST CAROLINA NATIVE
AMERICAN Organization will hold
its next meeting on March 20, 1997 in
Mendenhall room 8CDE at 7pm. This
meeting is important! We will be dis-
cussing our pow-wow and all members
are urged to attend. Any questions,
call Nikki at 754-8179.
IT WU ARE INTERESTED m
possibly saving a life or know of some-
one who is, there will be a "Bone Mar-
row Drive" on March 24, 1997 from
9:00-5:00 at the Mendenhall Student
Center at ECU. We especially need
African Americans to come out to get
tissued typed on that day. Minorities
are completely funded by a Federal
Grant and Caucasians' grants are low
but they can be tested for $19.00 as
opposed to $45.00. There are many
life threatening diseases that are af-
flicting so many people that a bone
marrow transplant could be a possible
cure. This drive is being given by the
National Marrow Donor Program and
sponsored by the Bone Marrow Foun-
dation, Inc. and the Dept. of Market-
ing at ECU. Please help us help some-
one else. For more information, please
call Marlene Anderson 328-6401 or Ro-
bert Lewis at 328-1185.
LOST ANTIQUE PIN WITH
purple stone. Sentimental value. Re-
ward offered! Call 328-4316.
HELP! LOST COCKER SPAN-
IEL last seen 13 Feb. light buff
wgrccn collar "Jordan" If you have
seen him, please call 756-6556 Andrew
or Julie. We love and miss him
very much!
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing info
800-662-2122.
Doctors Vision Center
is currently seeking a full-time front deskreceptionist for the
Greenville office. Individuals must be professional, outgoing, have
excellent people skills, be able to assist in patient needs, and have
strong multiple line telephone skills. Billing and insurance experience
a plus. Must be motivated and team oriented. Willing to train.
Send resume with salary requirementt to:

DoctorsVision Center
499 E. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27834
Attn: Shari James
ROY MATTHEWS HAIR OF
the 27th annual Grifton 'iad Festival
Parade, announces that persons and
groups wishing to partici i-ie in the Pa-
rade must fill out a registration form
before March 21 this year. The Parade
will be Saturday morning, April 12 and
applications are available from Mat-
thews (919-524-4549)
RESUMEINTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOPS - A work-
shop on writing a professional resume
for employment will be held in the Ca-
reer Services Bldg 701 E. Fifth St.
Wfed. March 19 at 2:00 and March 27 at
5:15 pm. Tips on professional inter-
viewing skills will be presented on
Thur. March 20 at 2:00 pm and Wed.
March 26 at 5:15 pm. Senior or gradu-
ate students who will soon enter the
job market or students seeking intern-
ships or co-op experiences are invited
to attend.
GENERAL COLLEGE STUD-
ENTS SHOULD contact their ad-
visers the week of March 24-27 to
make arrangements for academic ad-
vising for Summer Session and Fall Se-
mester 1997. Early registration week
is set for March 31 - April 4.
WED MARCH 19- ECU Horn En"
semble, Mary Burroughs, Director, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00pm Wed
March 19 - Graduate Recital, Kathleen
Burnesky, voice, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7:00pm Thurs. March 20 -Pre-
miere Performances of Works by ECU
Composers, Mark Taggart, Director, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm Firi
March 21 - Jazz at Night, Carroll V
Dashiell Jr Director, The Great Room,
Mendenhall Student Center, 8:00 pm
Fri March 21 - Senior Recital, Karen
Buck, flute, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
9:00 pm Sat March 22 - Junior Reci-
tal. Jonathan N. Bunag, trumpet, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 pm. Mon
March 24 - Graduate Recital Hyoung
Joo Song, organ, First Presbyterian
Church, 1400 S. Elm St Greenville,
7:00pm Mon March 24 - Junior Reci-
tal, Joey Ikner, guitar, AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 9:00pm Tues March 25 -
Junior Recital, Stephen Stelmasznek.
saxophone, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00pm Tues March 25 - Junior Reci-
tal, Jason Pkkard, guitar, AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall 9:00pm. Fbr additional in-
formation, call ECU-6851 or the 24-
hour hotline at ECU-4370.
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN be-
coming a pan of the judicial Branch of
Student Government? If so, please
stop by the table in front of the Stud-
ent Store on March 20 from 11 am to 2
pm for more information on becoming
an Honor Board Member! You may
also pick up an application from 201
Whichard or the SGA Office.
PSI CHI IS SPONSORING a
practice GRE test to be given by Ka-
plan Testing Services on Saturday,
March 22 from 10:00 am - 1:30 pm in
Rawl 130. Cost is $5 and is open to ail
majors.
THE INVESTMENT CLUB
WILL meet on March 20th at 3:30 in
room 1010. Dr. Below will speak about
Real Estate Investment Trusts. Dr.
Kiery will lead the Enrichment. Re-
freshments will be served. Anyone is
welcome to come.
NATIVE AMERICAN POW
WOW on March 22, 1997 from 12-6
pm at bottom of College Hill. Lots of
Native American dancing, singing,
drumming, and crafts. FREE to the
public. Anv questions contact Nikki at
754-8179. '
IT'S NOT TOOL LATE for sen-
iors and graduate students graduating
in May or the Summer to register with
Career Services for help in your job
search! Come to our Orientation on
Tue. March 18 at 3:00 or Mon. March
24 at 5:15pm. Learn how to use the
many services available to you such as
interviews on campus, resume referral
to employers, reference (credentials)
file, internet job searching; job listings
and much more!
APPLICATIONS ARE AVAIL-
ABLE NOW for the 27th annual
Grifton Shad Festival Craft Show, Flea
Market, Art Show and CanoeKayak
Races scheduled for the weekend of
April 12-13. Write to Grifton Shad Fes-
tival, Box 928, Grifton, NC 28530 or
call 919-524-4934 or 919-524-4356.
Applications are also available at the
Grifton Town Hall.
TE GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS who intend to major in
e Department of Communication
.sciences and Disorders and have Mr.
Robert Muzzarclli or Mrs. Men
Dowries as their advisor are to meet on
Wednesday, March 26 at 500 pm in �
Brewster C-103. Advising for carry:
registration will take place at that
time. Please prepare a tentative class -
schedule before the meeting. Fresh-
men, bring Taking Charge, Your Acade-
mic Planner, and use the worksheets to -
develop your schedule.
CONTRA DANCE PUT ON by:
the ECU Folk and Country Dancers. -
Sat March 22, 7:30-9:30. Beginner's -
instruction at 7:00. Bapr Student'
Center, 511 E. 10th St G. enville.
Come alone or bring a friend. Fbr more
information, 830-5403.
EASTER WEEKENLV MT
ROGERS, Va: come join a weekend
at the mountains Mar. 27-30. Be sun-
to register by Mar. 21 in the SRC main
office.
GAMMA BETA PHI WILL have a
meeting March 25 at 6:00 pm in
Speight Auditorium in Jenkins Art
Building to elect new officers. Any
question - contact Mike 752-4075.
PACK'EM IN THE POOL: come
join the FAN club on Mar. 21 for mu-
sic, food and swimming from 9:0tK
11:00pm at the SRC.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS FOR
STUDENTS graduating in
MaySummer, 1997 are available to
those who arc registered with Career
Services. Come by to get the details
on the following: April 2 - Unifi, Inc
Jefferson Pilot Insurance and NC Co-
operative Extension Service: April 3 -
Carter Wallace Labs, DcKalb County
Schools and Peebles Dept. Store; April
8 - Northwestern Mutual Insurance;
April 9 - Bureau of the Census, Pulte
Homes and Pleaaants Hardware; April:
10 - Champs Sports; April 11 - Keane,
Inc April 14 - Hughes Supply, April
15 - Nationwide Insurance and The
Boston Market; April 16 - MBF (AKC,
Dog Shows), Inc April 17 - US Navy
Officer Recruiting and Bright Horizons
Chi! dears.
FREE T-SHIRT $1000 Credit
Card fundraisers for fraternities, soror-
ities & groups. Any campus organiza-
tion can raise up to $1000 by earning a
whopping $5.00VlSA application. Call
1-800-932-0528 ext. 65 Qualified call-
ers receive Free T-Shirt.
IT'S NO LONGER NECESSARY
to borrow money for college. W- can
help you obtain funding. Thousands of
awards available to all students. Imme-
diate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
We Need TtotberUnd boots
and shoes! Good Jaana.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MEN'S SHIRTS. SHOES, PANTS. JEANS, ETC.
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVL GAP, ETC.
We also buy: GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry 4c Coins � Abo BtekfiC Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Koine, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 it SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door k ring buger.


Title
The East Carolinian, March 20, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 20, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1195
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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