The East Carolinian, March 6, 1997







THURSDAY
MARCH 6. 1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Med school ranks in US News and World Report
ECU among nation s best
for primary care
NOEL.A KOENIG
HEAI I II ENVIIIONMENTAI. ISSI F.S
STAFF WRITER
BCtTs School of Medicine has once again been
nationally recognized in U.S. NtmaUd'World'Report.
ECU ranked 10th in the field of primary care
and fourth in the specialty area of family medicine.
"I think it's really rewarding to have others rec-
ognize the strength of our program and recognize
how we are educating our students said Senior
Associate Dean of the School of Medicine Dr. Ann
Jobe. "It really shows us we are accomplishing our
goal as a medical school
The article, which will appear in the March 10
issue, ranked the schools in the divisions of
research-oriented and primary care. The criteria
Groups
encourage
safe Spring
Break
Safetv packets available
from HPWB
ANGELA KOK NIG
HEA1.THJENV1KONMENTA1. issl ES
sHFf WIN T f. K
There are only a few days left until the two
most coveted words in a college student's life:
Spring Break This is a time for students to
relieve the stress of school and replenish
themselves tor the rest of the semester.
The office of Health Promotion and Well-
Being (HPWR)and Campus Ministries have
joined together to encourage students to have
a safe Spring Break.
"What we want to do is encourage people
to have a safe Spring Break and increase
awareness said Director of HPWB Donna
Walsh.
For the past two weeks the organizations
have published tips in TEC which remind
students that although this is a time to relax
there are safety practices to remember.
"Spring Break is a very important time
said Reverend I )an Earnhardt, campus minis-
ter for the Wesley Foundation and coordinator
for Campus Ministries. "Students need to
step away and realize they can get through
the rest of the semester. I think it is an impor-
tant time
Beginning Wednesday the first 100 stu-
dents who bring three tips to the HPWB have
received a "Safe Spring Break" packet. Items
in the packet range from sunscreen and con-
doms to reminders about weanng seatbelts
and safe highway driving.
Also in the packet are two pledges for stu-
dents to sign and commit to. One is a SADD
contract and the other is a Spring Break
pledge for people to promise not to drink and
drive, let friends drink and drive, or ride with
someone who has been and to watch out for
friends.
If students bring the signed pledges back
to HPWB after Spring Break, the office will
submit their cards for a drawing for a
Plymouth Neon or a Jeep Wrangler. This
event is nationally sponsored by BACCHI S
and GAMMA which are organizations that
promote drunk driving awareness.
On Fridav any remaining packages will be
distributed from a table outside of the Wright
Place from 10:30 a.m. to 11:36 a.m.
This is the first year KOI' has sponsored
an event like this.
"If this succeeds we will do what we can to
continue it on a larger scale next vear Wilsh
said.
For more information call HPWB at 328-
6793 or stop bv their office in 210 Whichard
to pick up a packet.
THURSDAY
lifestyle 6 THURSDAY
Flying Karamazov jMMly sunny
Brother; uqqle h.qh 0
WrightInw S6
opinion 5
, lie durinqWEEKEND
Spring Break
sports 9�
Pirate baseball k �
9 4
the east narolinianphone
SIUOfNl PiiBllCATlONBIDG.328 63BB newsroom
Nr RSH328 2000 advertising
across Irtw loyneim Bbf8 fax
e mail
used for judging were student selectivity faculty
resources, reputation, research activity and prima-
ry care rate.
Student selectivity combined the academic
components of the class entering each school in
the fall of 1996. The undergraduate grade point
average, average score on the Medical (lollcge
Admission Test (MCAT) and proportion of appli-
cants accepted comprised this category.
The faculty resources was the ratio of the med-
ical school full-time science and clinical faculty to
full-time students.
The reputation category was the product of two
surveys. One survey was completed by medical
school deans and senior faculty members who
rated the reputations of the medical schools and
another survey done by the directors of intern-res-
idencv programs who were asked to choose either
the best 25 medical or primarv care schools.
The research activity was based on the total
amount of money awarded in research grants to the
medical school and its affiliated hospitals last year
The primary care rate used was the average per-
cent of doctors who went into the primary care res-
idencies from 1994 to 1996.
In addition to these rankings a reputations sur-
vey was used to determine the top five medical
schools in eight medical specialties. The specialty
areas ranked were AIDS research, drug and alcohol
abuse, family medicine, geriatrics, internal medi-
cine, pediatrics, rural and women's health.
This is the third year EOF has been ranked in
this report and last year the primary care division
ranked 13th.
"Wc are proud to be recognized nationally but
we realize that we still have a task ahead of us
Jobe said.
The medical school is trying to encourage stu-
dents to practice medicine in rural areas where
there may not be medical professionals now.
Through such services as telcmedicine the med-
ical students will be able to get help they may need
while practicing.
"It's not enough just to have out residents grad-
uate. We want to encourage them to go to the
places where they ate needed Jobe said.
TOP 15 MEDICAL SCHOOLS IN THE CATEGORY OF PRIMARY CARE
1. University of Washington
2. Oregon Health Sciences University
3. University of New Mexico
4. University of Massachusetts-Worcester
5. University of California-San Francisco
6. University of Missouri-Columbia
7. Medical College of Wisconsin
8. University of Iowa
9. University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
10. East Carolina University
11. University of Colorado Health Science Center
12. Southern Illinois University-Springfield
13. University of California-Davis
14. Michigan State University
15. Ohio State University
TAKE A BITE OUT OF WRIGHT
To celebrate the dedication of the newly-renovated Wright Place and the student mall, a cake shaped like the Wright Building was served on
Tuesday The event was sponsored by Student Government
PHOTO BV WRICK IREUN
ECU Officials
explore medical
ethics of animal
cloning
amf.nu Hassan
IIRIKN rVriON'CI Sjl.K M INM ISSI IS
STAFF �m rm
Cloning is not a fictitious concept anymore.
With the recent cloning of Dolly the sheep in
Edinburgh. Scotland and another cloning of a
monkey in the IV many are wondering just
how long it will be before humans begin repli-
cating their DNA without natural reproduc-
tion.
The ethics concerning cloning have been
addressed in iooks such as Future SAotk and
the movie RlaJe liunrwr. This week. President
Clinton has announced a proposed ban on all
federal funding on cloning research and is
even attempting to extend the ban into the
private sector. So, are the recent crackdowns
another instance of trying to steer scientists
away from the inevitable?
"This is not something that will happen
tomorrow, although it is definitely feasible
said Professor Kenneth De Vllle of the
Department of Medical Humanities and
Bioethics. "That's why it's so vital to have a
reasoned debate about cloning now, while we
have time to do so. Because it has commercial
potential, a funding decision by the govern-
ment might slow it down, but there's plenty
of commercial money to allow it happening
De Vllle says the ethical questions that
have surfaced deal with individual liberties
versus the advantages of the community on a
large scale. Arguments for cloning are that it
creates a potential source of organ donors,
more freedom in animal research, diagnosis of
diseases and freedom for manipulating genes
in order to change physical characteristics.
However, there are harms, such as controver-
sy over the ownership of genetic material,
crossing the firewalls of some religious doc-
trines and confusion between the relationship
of the cloned with the human source from
which it was created.
"It raises such issues as. is the clone your
child or sibling and how should you relate to
him or her?" De Ville said. "Also, there are the
potential scenarios of having identical twins
born either five or 20 years apart, as well as
the concern that when you buy and choose
traits for babies, is it turning them into com-
modities
Many students feel the cloning issue has
to be controlled. "I think science is going too
far in trying to reinvent man student Hollv
Hagey said.
"I can see it having good and bad possibil-
ities, such as sending clones to fight a war
said student Harold Nolley. "But it still
seems unethical, because each clone becomes
a living person
Some feel a little apprehension in visualiz-
ing clones of themselves.
"They could say, "hey, you're a good
teacher, let's make three of you student
SEE CLONING PAGE 3
Annual MajorsMinor fair offers info to undergrads
j QI II
n 1' s ISI
,11) Km
bi i; edu
'Ml tt H I I I M
I he annual m.iorsitmiors fair will be held
Wednesday, Mar. P�. From noon to I p.ni on
the first Hoof nt the icnerilla.sroom build-
ing.
This event otters students who have not
vet decided their major, or who m.iv be think
ing of changing one. the opportunity to t.ilk to
many different l partnn ni s it the tame pi n e
:mcl tune
"Wc expo ' to have most, it not all, ot the
departments in the College of rts and
Sciences participating, and one or more
departments from eight professional schools
attending. Basically, we're going from aero-
space studies to women's studies, and lots ot
things in between said Melissa Nasea, ch.nr
of the Career Education (lonmriitcc
Ml the departments attending will be rep-
resented by facuitv members, and some m.iv
also have current students of the discipline
assisting.
"In ail cases we should have faculty mem-
bers, bin m in.mv cases we'll abo have upper-
i lass students Nasea said, "who m.iv he able
to give an idea of what kind oft lasses and what
! ind i i skills you'll be learning, things like
that N.isea s.ud.
Nasea said students shouldn't rhink of the
fair .is anything they need to prepare heavily
for. but rather come to the fair open minded
and reach to explore ideas. And unlike Career
Day or other similar events, students are not
expected to dress up.
It's planned iliat this event in; very infor-
mal, so it's not necessarily a dress up in vour
best clothes tvpe of thing rather, a chance to
meet a lot of people, kind of a smorgasbord ot
departments Nasea said.
This fair was prcviouslv held in
Mendcnh.ill. but Nasea said the committee
decided to hold it in the GenerJ Classroom
Building this vear in hopes ot increasing atten-
dance. The date has also changed from previ-
ous years.
The last one was held in November of "95,
and we decided instead of having the next one
in November of wc would tr to have it in
the spring because we were hoping that would
increase the number of people attending.
Nasea said.
Nasea said she felt that students who arc-
unsure what they plan to register tor next
semester should make a special ettort to
attend. The opportunity to talk with manv dif-
ferent deparrments mav help answer potential
questions about the upcoming registration
period.





news
The East Carolinian
Thespians of Diversity to present
historical play
COREY ALCOOD
MINOHITY STUDENT ISSUES
CONTHiaUTIHO WRITE
For four years the ECU Thespians of Diversity have
been a voice for the under-represented number of
minority actors on campus and in the surrounding com-
The group was originally formed in 1993 by ECU
English professor Reginald Watson, with the intentions
of educating people through entertainment about the
noted and unsung achievements of African Americans.
" The group is open for everybody, and I encourage
all people with different backgrounds to join" said
Watson.
Furthermore, particular encouragement is given to
African Americans to participate because it not only
gives them the chance to learn about their ancestors ,but
also the opportunity to represent and express their inner
talents.
Two of their plays have been reenactments of the life
Of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr called Tve Sten The
Mountain Top and It Don't Look So Good and a play about
Kwanzaa called The Kwama Story-
On March 19 at 7 p.m in Mendenhall room 244,
The Thespians Of Diversity are scheduled to perform
Dr. Wfctson's black history play, Black Voices From The Past:
A Celebration of Wman's History Month.
The play will focus on the achievements of black
women like Nvigha the great African queen and warrior,
and Zora Neale Hurston, a famous writer. Since March
is dedicated to celebrating the accomplishments of all
women, Watson feels that this play is well-suited for this
month and will help to build a strong recognition of
African American Mfomen achievements.
"The play shows how important we are and how
strong we are and it will portrays black women very
well said freshman Kendra Robinson-
Tickets will be sold at the door for $3 and all pro-
ceeds will go to the organization because of a lack of
Student Government Associattio funding, Witson said.
Fbturc engagements set by the Thespians promise to
be "both educational and entertaining" says senior
Darrell Armstcad, a psychology major.
The Thespians plan on producing more plays and to
begin tutoring in local schools. As a result, the
Thespians will need more members to achieve their
goals, thus anyone who is interested can call Letitia
Lisane at 328-8783 of Reginald Wuson at 328-6684.
The Thespians invite all to come and celebrate a
continuation of black history.
Avis faces new claims of discrimination from employees statements
RALEIGH N C (AP) - Avis Rent-A-Car told telephone sales agents to refuse business from ultra-orthodox Jews
bv listening for their accents and noting regions were they lived, a former employee says in a sworn statement.
' In the statement, filed here Monday in support of a lawsuit filed last year by black customers, former employee
Elaine Rodgers said the company developed a policy to deny corporate accounts to bus.nesses owned by Hasidic
Telephone sales agents at Avis' world reservation center in Tulsa, Okla used the term "Yeshivas" to refer to
Hasidic Jews said Rodgers, who said she worked in the company's account services department until July
John Carley, chief counsel for Avis, told USA Today the rental-car company has never had a policy to discrimi-
nate against Jews. But he said that around 1990 there was a concern that callers to the Tulsa center claiming to be
associated with "yeshivas a Hebrew word for school, were setting up corporate accounts, allowing people under
25 years of age to drive the cars and bringing them back damaged.
Greenville bail-bondsman convicted
of assaulting former Pirates
JEFF GENTRY
SAFETY AND TRANSPORTATION ISSUES
STAEE WRITE
A Greenville bail-bondsman has
pleaded guilty to misdemeanor
assault charges on three former
ECU football players, including for-
mer standouts Marcus Crandell and
Mitch Galloway, in exchange for no
jail time and community service.
Howard Staton, a 26-year-old
bail-bondsman who lives on 200 N.
Summit St wa3 found guilty of two
counts of misdemeanor assault with
a deadly weapon. He was sentenced
to 60 days suspended for two years.
a $100 fine, and is required to do 72
hours of community service.
"Howard had no prior convic-
tions. It was an incident that
occurred one night at the Players
Club said Keith Williams, Staton's
attorney in the case. "There were
some words exchanged and Howard
was charged with two felonies and a
misdemeanor, but we were able to
work out a plea to two misde-
meanors and no jail time with the
district attorney.
"It was an unfortunate incident
and I think this was an appropriate
way to handle it. It was an unfortu-
nate late night incident Staton
added.
The incident happened around
T. equ�l oppoflwutyiffiimmv tenon uivvemty
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3 a.m. at Players Club Apartments.
Crandell, Galloway and Sean
Richardson, also a former ECU foot-
ball player, said Staton approached
them at a party and mumbled some-
thing about ending Crandell's
career. He then hit him on the head
with a handgun.
Galloway was also assaulted and
showed the court a scar on the back
of his head from where Staton also
hit him with the gun. He then
pointed the gun at Richardson. A
third charge of pointing the gun at
Richardson had been dropped.
Staton had denied the charges
until Friday, when he changed his
plea. Crandell had expressed his
wish to end the matter quickly and
quietly and explained that this was
the reason he and Galloway agreed
to the lesser charges.
Crandell was a record-breaking
quarterback for ECU, and set over
30 records including career marks in
total offense, passing yardage and
touchdown passes. Galloway is the
all-time reception leader at ECU,
and aiso holds the record for career
reception yardage. Both players fin-
ished their final season at ECU last
year.
"American Gladiators" champion slain by husband, police say
OAKLAND PARK, Fla (AP) - A former champion of the "American Gladiators" athletic competition show was
stabbed and beaten to death by her husband as their 3 12-year-old daughter watched police said.
Minelli was charged with murder Tuesday and held without bond in the death of Cheryl Wilson-Minelli, 31, the
1993 erand champion of the popular syndicated TV show.
Minelli, 34, a former pro boxer, told police he became enraged Monday night when his wife had come home late.
He said she had been at the home of a woman he believed was her lover. i
Minelli is accused of knocking his wife to the floor, then choking and stabbing her repeatedly with kitchen
knives. Police said she escaped outside, but he dragged her back into the house and beat her in the head with a
steel hammer. .
The couple's daughter, Brittany, witnessed her mother s slaying, police said.
Ms. Wilson-Minelli met her husband in Los Angeles in 1992 while she was a contestant on American
Gladiators in which contestants match muscle against the show's regulars on obstacle courses and other unusual
forms of competition.
Nuclear waste reaching its destination
DANNENBERG, Germanv (AP) - Police broke up a sit-in by anti-nuclear activists and battled protesters throwing
firi-homhs and stones today, clearing the way for the last leg of a nuclear waste shipment. -
Iwd Sy thoCsandTof protested along the route, six flatbed trucks finally reached their dest.nat.on, a storage
site at Gorieben in northern Germany, after a 10-mile trip from the Dannenberg -rain station
HmSSof police in riot gear secured the convoy as it rolled through the countryside. Officers charged into
fields swiping; bSoS and using water cannons to keep away protesters, who threw stones and bottles and set straw
�n Tm-ST gates of � Gorieben compjex to a chorus of whis-
ties from protesters, who had been forced back into the trees lining the nal stretch of road.
easlcarolinian
find your pot of gold in
tho east Carolinian, Lad.
MARK A. WARD
To advortif with
usi cali us at
328-2000
ATTORNEY AT LAW
NC Bar certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
752-7529
DWI, Traffic and Felony Defense
24-Hour Message Service
You'll Save
if you goto mexico
FOR SPRING BREAK!
a�j Housing Ooortgnrry-
355-2198
1510 Bridle Circle
Brilliance
"prograssiva cmiks"
$1.50 laHted t�r � $1.50 Hi Boll
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fltaiiule Soul
Door opon at 10 p.m.
.25 DRAFT $5 adm.
oil night long for members
NAMELESS?
.25 DRAFT $5 adm.
all night long for mambari
March 17'
St. Patrick's
Day Party
featuring
Acoustic Bus
"Purple School Bus
unplugged
W
18 price �eWU efeeese �priee
$i.50 �angrias
12 frice pitchers of Draft
18 price gSacfcos ��raiwte
ggojrtg &V 0o� �ppetfeer
cget one ?ree
$8.50 Le fftargaritas
qgpd�jfltt 18 price pfew cgraode
$1.50 imports
18 price �Wi�$
$1.00 9i-S�U�
Jtftar t m. &a4m ��&
See, You Don't Have To Go Far To Get A Break!
i
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La
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
ALL ABC PERMITS - 757-1666





3 Thursday. March 6. 1997
news
The Eatt Carolinian
it
CNA executives resign after inquiry
CHICAGO (AP) - The president of CNA Financial Corps life insurance unit resigned after he was accused of mak-
ing offensive comments to two women employees. His chief deputy' also resigned. ,
"The emphasis for us is that they created a work environment that was uncomfortable and inappropriate, iima
spokesman David Thomson said today. ( j�u;�.f ��
The Chicago-based company announced the resignations of Jack Kettler, president of CNA Life, and chief admin-
istrative officer Robert Teske on Tuesday. CNA said the resignations followed allegations by two employees at CNA
Life's Nashville, Tenn office. �
"Mr. Kettler used language that was offensive and made inappropriate comments, and Mr. Teske failed to address
the employees' complaints CNA spokesman Roger Morris.said. A( rlvli k,��m�, �
The executives' actions "clearly violated our policy on harassment, he said. Any kind of verbal harassment is
strictly prohibited
Morris said race was not an issue. , -
The New York Times reported today that sources said Kettler made sexual comments about the bodies ot two
CnTheremwa7noScomment from the executives. Neither Kettler nor Teske returned messages left on their home
ThTwempbyees did not ask for any compensation but were given time off with pay during a company inves-
tigation and have since returned to work, Morris said.
"They did absolutely nothing wrong - they did everything right and shouldnt have been subjected to it rfl the
first place Morris said. , , , ,
CNA Life ranks 24th in the industry and CNAs property-casualty business ranks No. 3. The company had rev-
enues of $17 billion last year.
ECU professor organizes national safety conference
Dr. Mark F-iend, the director of ECU's Center for Applied Technology, is organizing the first national confer-
ence for occupational safetv and health educators to discuss on-the-job safety.
The conference will be held Mar. 13-14 in Us Vegas. Friend, also a professor in the ECU School of Industry and
Technology, organized the event to bring together the best ideas in safety education from around the country and
to discuss the major safety issues faced by industry.
For information about attending the conference, call Friend at 328-6708 or Dr. Jim Kohn at 3Z8-4Z4V.
Free tax service offered
The Student Government Association and Beta Alpha Psi National Accounting Fraternity are providing rax ser-
vices to students and members of the ECU community. Services apply to standard tax forms (1040, 1040EZ and
1040A).
ittsl'carolinian
news department is hiring
A staff writer position &
A special assignment writer position are available.
Special assignment writer must be available Mondays from 44p.m
Apply in person Wed. March, 19 ot The East Carolinian from noon until 5p.m.
Keep Your
Cash j9
in your hand!
Wilson Acres Charges
No Application Fee.
We'll even discount your Security deposit and
rent if you begin your lease in May.
2 and 3 Bedroom Townhouses
l Baths
Pool
Basketball
Tennis
Water Sewer and Cable included
Small Pets o.k. with Fee
Wilson Acres Apartments
752-0277
1806 f- 1st St
Greenville N C 27858-0772
S BLOCKS FROM
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY.
WITH BUS SERVICE
AVAILABLE
Services will be offered at the following times:
Thursday, Mar. 20 3 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Friday, Mar. 21 2 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Wednesday, Mar. 26 3 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Thursday Apr. 3 3:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room
Mendenhall Social Room
Mendenhall Social Room
GCB3007
SGA funding workshops
The Student Government Association (SGA), Student Leadership Development Office and Student Rind
Accounting are sponsoring workshops for student organizations to learn how to receive funding from the SGA for
the next academic year. The last workshop will be Monday, Mar. 17 from 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. in Room 221,
Mendenhall Student Center. SGA is changing to a semi-annual funding process. Rr further information please call
328-4726.
Cloning
continued from page 1
Jennifer Dougherty said.
"Cloning is a bogus attempt for
scientists and doctors to 'play' God
student Forrest Rogers said. "It is
immoral and unnatural, because
you're born for a reason, so leave it
alone
"I'd probably take it as a compli-
ment if someone cloned me stu-
dent Wayne Yount said. "But there
is no real purpose for cloning in soci-
ety
"I think the possibility of cloning
is amazing and I'm anxious to see its
progress in the future said Rob
Fannon, one student who had a
more positive perspective.
Others feel cloning should be
exclusively limited to animals.
"Right now it may be okay for
animal research, but we shouldn't
even start thinking about transfer-
ring the research to humans stu-
dent Shiwanah Welch explained.
Whether it is concern over reli-
gion, DNA ownership or the rights
of an embryo, cloning is an issue the
nation is still coming to grips with.
According to De Ville, timely discus-
sion may make the uncertainty of
cloning more controllable.
"Dr. Ian Wilmut, the scientist
that first cloned the sheep, failed to
turn out a successful clone until his
efforts proved successful after about
300 attempts De Ville said. "But a
lot of people are intrinsically
opposed to the abuses that might
occur when cloning is performed on
human beings. The ideas that dom-
inate the discussion today, will
determine where the issue will end
up
Tips for Safe Spring Break
Don't walk on the beach at night alone.
Brought to you by Campus Ministries and
Health Promotion and Well Being
-S
East Carolina University
Recreational Services
Look at what we have planned for you
after SPRING
Fitness Programs
Aerobic Session II Registration
Now until March 28.
Classes run March 17-May 8 m
Register & pick up a schedule in
the SRC Main Office.
Cost is only $20!
Relaxation Classes
Registration is until March 26
Program Dates are April 2-30
from 5:15-6:15 p.m.
in the SRC Exercise Studios.
This class will be instructed
by Debi Niswander
Cost is only $10 for student or
member and $20 for nonmembers
St. Pat's FREE Aerobic Bash
March 17 from 4:00-6:30 p.m.
in the SRC Sports Forum
� HighLow masterclass
� St Patrick's style treats and
drawings for free prizes!
� Aerobic passes for sale
Aerobics Instructor Training Program
Classes: April 4,5,6
Register until March 28
� f8 hour course on skills for teaching
group exercise classes.
� Classes taught by nationally certified
instructors.
� Cost: $60 studentmember
$90 nonmember
For more information on any of our programs contact us at 328-6387.
Adventure Programs
Bear Island Weekend:
Hammocks Beach State Park, NC
Dates: March 22-23
Register by March 17
Pre-Trip Meeting: March 19 at
6:00 p.m. at the
Adventure Program Area.
White Water Canoe:
James River, VA
Dates: April 11-13
Register by March 28
Cost is onfy $65 for students &
members and $70 for nonmembers!
This is a fun and economical trip!
Swimming ability is required.
Intramural Sports
NCAA Basketball Tourney
Pick'em Entry
Entries will be available on Monday,
March 17in SRC 128. Deadline for
turning them in is noon on Thursday,
March 20.
1-on-1 Basketball Entry Deadline
Wednesday, March 26 at 5:00 p.m.
in SRC 128. (Men's and Women's Divisions)
j�





4 Thursday, March 6. 1997
The East Carolinian
Lake Imp U.S.A.
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Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. "A Touch Of Class"
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m. Tfi ROTft
TUESDAY:
WEDNESDAY:
THURSDAY:
FRI. & SAT:
Lingerie Night
Amateur Night and Silver
Bullet Dancers
Country & Western Night
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers
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Times:
Place:
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ership Development office are hosting workshops
ding for student organizations. Please come to
mation and ask questions.
Monday March 3, 1997
Monday Match 17,1997
2:10- h W
Mendenhall Student Center (Room 221)
ppropriations due April 1, 1997 for 97-98 academic
ters from Student Fund Accounting will he available.





5 Thvraday. Mirch 6. 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
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BRANDON WAOOKI.I. ttim
AMANDA ROSS Sports Editor
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Spring break fever is heading your way. Yes, students all over the country arc gearing up for
what has traditionally been seen as a time for partying, being wild, indulging in earthly pleasures
and just having fun.
VWs at TEC are just as young, energetic and fun as the next person, but we want to play par-
ent for just a moment. When you, the student, leave your textbooks behind as you head off to
Che land of sun and fun, don't also leave your brains and common sense behind.
While spring break is the student's time to cut loose, it is also a dangerous time when need-
less and careless accidents happen. Many young students will go off to such party spots as
Florida and California, and they will be taken in with the freedom and urge to overindulge in
everything from sunbathing to drinking. Without fail, a large number of students are injured or
killed every spring break simply because they were reckless.
This may sound like stiff advice coming from a bunch of old farts, but as a voice for campus,
the staff at TEC just want to offer some simple, common-sense advice.
� Race yourself. Don't exhaust yourself in an effort to prove that you are young and full of
energy. Take the time to rest and relax. Read a book, take afternoon naps, listen to some music,
do whatever eases your mind, body and soul.
� If you do drink, don't over do it. Overindulging in alcohol can lead to anything from alochol
poisoning to physical injuries. And no matter how sober you may feel, don't drink and drive.
� If you travel, do so with people you can trust. Don't walk around unfamiliar areas alone,
even the beach. Many muggings happen on moon-lit beaches, so be careful.
� Try to eat at least one healthy meal a day. Beaches and holidays may be associated with hot
dogs, hamburgers and pizza, but take the effort to eat a decent meal with fruits and vegetables.
It'll help keep your energy level up.
� While such teenage movies as Spring Break glamorize casual sex, be smart. If you do go out
on the town and have a one-night stand, use protection. As any moron knows, one night of plea-
sure can lead to a life-time of trouble.
� Don't show off. Don't try to be the wild one at a party by performing stupid acts like dri-
j ving recklessly or climbing tall objects. We all have been at parties where someone got silly and
got hurt.
� Be civil. Don't start Pghts or be publicly offensive. When alcohol is involved, the worse
.comes out in people. Remember to treat others with the same respect you deserve.
We are not trying to sound all-knowing and all-mighty by telling what yoy should and should-
; ;n't do. All of us here at TEC just want every ECU student to have a safe, and fun, break.
Have a happy spring break, and come back healthy and happy.
FfTFRS TO TUF EDITOR
Manager responds to critic
�if i
lb the Editor,
Please allow me to introduce
myself. I'm the idiot who books the
bands at Peasants and I'm also the
manager of Purple Schoolbus.
Recently I've been reading in The East
Cmrohman that a person named Jay
Myers thinks that everything about
downtown and its music scene
"sucks I sent a response to him after
rhe first commentary pointing out
that his small-minded and unin-
formed musical opinion was just that:
his opinion. I dearly stated that I did-
n't begrudge him his opinion and that
if, as he stated, he needed to go to
Raleigh or Chapel Hill every weekend
to hear good music that it would prob-
ably be cheaper for him to just move
to that area. I backed up my own
favorable opinion of Greenville by
naming several bands that have been
in our market over the past four years
that have gone on to appear on shows
such as Letterman, Conan O'Brien,
and Jay Leno. Not that this means a
band is great or anything, but it is a
measure of success beyond say, whin-
ing constantly about things you don't
understand.
What dumbfounds me is that Jay
wouldn't let it lie. I replied to the
gentleman and, from what I under-
stand, the article never arrived to The
East Carofotim.
Somehow Mr. Myers thinks that
his comments were so profound in
the first article that they must be
heard again. This time he has decided
to further exhibit his writing prowess
by personally attacking an organiza-
tion of musicians under the guise of
journalism. The best word for this
journalism is mean-spirited cow-
ardice. The second best word is not
exactly fit for print but it has more
syllables than sucks, which is Jay's pri-
mary verb. Jay, if you want to be a
writer, 1 suggest you find a way to pre-
sent your opinions beyond simpleton
expressions such as "sucks Perhaps
you will try out some other short
words such as "fries With your
apparent expertise for communica-
tion, I see you asking the question
and me answering, "Yes I would like
some fries with that burgee"
Now, for the worst, and most
unforgivable, part of Mr. Myers sec-
ond article. He refers to a national
touring act from Greenville called
Purple Schoolbus as a show that
"sucks The band can't respond to
you, jay, at this time because they are
on a 28-day tour across the US that
includes 24 different cities. This is
the fifth time they have gone across
the country. One of the biggest kicks
for the band is when every night they
get a big introduction: "From
Greenville, NC please welcome
Purple Schoolbus They are
extremely proud to not be just anoth-
er band. They are Purple Schoolbus,
playing PSB music and doing it their
own way. With over 300 articles writ-
ten about the band and several of
them in national magazines, they
don't deserve the kind of attack that
you are perpetuating You obviously
think you can say or write anything
without regard to the situation or for
the feelings of others. Furthermore,
you state that because they have been
playing in Greenville for four years
that they suck. Hey, Skippy, let me
enlighten you. The reason they play
Greenville is because this is where
they are from. They not only love the
people of Greenville and the Attic,
they hope that, by example, other
bands will develop here and make this
the thriving music scene that it has
the potential to be. Purple Schoolbus
keeps drawing people because they
keep growing. They work very hard to
make every Greenville show as enter-
taining as possible. As a band they are
constantly writing new and original
material and trying to keep the total
show fresh.
You mention the Cats Cradle.
Guess what!1 Purple Schoolbus has
been a weekend headliner for the last
two and half years. Raleigh?
Headliner for as long as they have
been playing in Greenville. Jay, you
don't deserve to be in the same room
with a group of working musicians,
much less critiquing them. As for
your articles, I'm forwarding them to
PSB on the road. I'm sure they'll be
thrilled to have their hometown
newspaper referring to them as "suck-
ing while they are out there working
hard and spreading the word about
themselves and Greenville. Perhaps
your articles can get the proper atten-
tion they deserve out on the road. You
- know the food on the road can be hell
on a band's stomach and there never
seems to be enough toilet paper to go
around.
As for what is good music and what
is not, I'd be glad to publicly debate
you. Say perhaps, on WZMB, where
you could expand on your travel theo-
ries and tell us all some more about
how the world would be better if we
all just thought like you.
One last thing. Last year PSB per-
formed 214 shows in 34 different
states. What did you do for the
Greenville music scene last year?
Paul Edwards
Sunshine Management Group
Peasants Cafe
"I hardly think putting some sort of limits on excessive violence in
film is a threat to the First Amendment
Michael Keaton, actor, 1994
OPINION
Columnist
Gabriel
JOHNSON
Don't take privileges for granted
Aren't we lucky? We are the offspring
of a generation with power, and there-
fore, we have power. We have a kind
of privilege. I mean, we live in
America, we are obviously well off
enough to go to college. Many of us
have cars and other expensive luxu-
ries. And what do we do? Vfell, noth-
ing really. We just take these things
for granted. We just forget that they
are there, but for some people, it's not
that easy.
W� are bom and raised in a white
society that makes it easy for us to for-
get that this country was built with
the ideals of slavery and oppression.
We forget that there are those people
out there who donit have the chance
to go to college, or people who donit
even have the chance to have a family.
We just sit back and forget, even
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
though we could help, even though
we could make a difference. We are
the most powerful people in the
world. We are white upper-middle
class Americans. We have the privi-
lege of being able to attend college,
and having our voices heard and lis-
tened to. But not everyone has that
privilege. Many people cannot speak
out against oppression, against unfair-
ness, against racism or sexism or
homophobia.
We cannot choose our heritage and
background, and it was only chance
that we wound up as who we arc But
we are privileged, and it is our respon-
sibility to use that white power to
help those people who do not have
the same chance as us. We need not
to work with them, but to work for
them. Why do we allow racism and
sexism to continue? We all know it's
wrong, so why are we so complacent?
Generation X, the spawn of the
Hippie Generation, what are we doing
with our lives? We are being selfish
and cold. Generation X isnit motivac-
ed by pain or suffering, we are moti-
vated by money! We canit get enough
of it, and we seem to be saying that
we will do whatever it takes to ensure
that we have enough money, even if
that means denying that there are
people suffering because of our greed.
If you believe that racism is wrong,
or that sexism is wrong, than speak
out about it when you have the
chance. Recognize your own privi-
leges and use them to help other peo-
ple who need your help. If we arenit
going to do it, then no one will.
Support make week a success
To the Editor,
I would like to write and thank
The East Carolinian and WZMB for
their wonderful coverage during
Sexual Assault Awareness Week. The
support and participation of many
campus organizations helped to high-
light the activities, and served to unite
the campus on this important issue.
In addition to the Student Life
Committee members involved in the
program, three other groups on the
campus made a strong commitment of
support during the week. The
Athletic Department, along with the
coaches and varsity team members,
came on Wednesday evening to hear
Jackson Katz discuss, "Football,
Feminism and other Contemporary
Contradictions Without their pres-
ence, the evening wouldn't have been
as effective. It is extremely critical
that we work closely with out student-
athletes to gain their support and
leadership in changing campus norms
regarding sexual assault.
On Thursday evening, the sorori-
ties came out to show their support for
the "Take Back the Night March In
addition, Delta Pi Sorority assisted
throughout the week. Sorority support
and respect for outreach programming
is very powerful in changing campus
attitudes about sexual assault.
And finally, a special thank to the
Director of the ECU Police, Teresa
Crocker and the officers who came to
all of the events offered during the
week. The presence of police person-
nel at these activities reflects their
commitment towards sexual assault
education on campus.
Martha E. Wisbey, Chair
Sexual Assault Education
Committee ;
Thanks for improving parking conditions
To the Editor,
Thank you, thank you, thank you.
It's about time the seemingly
sloth-like folks over at Parking and
Transportation Services recognized
the residential parking problems on
west campus. You don't know how
many nights I've had to park my
Tacoma off campus and brave the
thugs that lurk in the shadows near
off-campus parking, the move to
change the parking lot on Reade St.
between Third and Fourth Street
from Freshman to residential is long
overdue, but greatly appreciated (I'm
nearly in tears of ecstatic job just writ-
ing this).
I hope this is the beginning of a
trend to improve parking on this cafe-
swarmed campus. How about a park-
ing deck next? (I won't hold my
breath on that one)
At any rate, here's a warmest
thank-you from the bottom of my
heart.
William Stacey Cochran
Senior
Guest columnist application for Campus View
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topic. Please return this form The East Carolinian office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please
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.VjI I





lifestyle
The East Carolinian
Wacky Russian guys invade campus
JOHN DAVIS
STAFF WRITER
Russian author and philosopher fyodor
Dostoyevsky is most likely rolling over in his grave.
At any rate, he is most certainly not juggling to a
rhythm. But the Flying Karamazov Brothers, who
have named themselves after his novel. The Brothers
Karamazov, will juggle. They will also dance to hip-
hop ballet, play Japanese percussion on cardboard
boxes, and pretend to be Russians.
The Brothers (who are not really brothers, at
least, not each other's) are world-renowned and
famous, as well as being downright popular. All of
this acclaim is due to their comedic performances,
which have graced such wonderful cultural meccas
as the Kennedy Center and Public Television. In
spite of all that boring, grown-up stuff, they might
actually be funny.
They've also hung out and performed with gen-
uinely cool people like Robin Williams (remember
the guy from Mark and Mmdy), The Blues Brothers
(the real ones, I think, or the ghosts of the real ones
anyway), Kenny Rogers (but they walked away when
they should have run) and even The Grateful Dead
(but there, the audience didn't laugh; they were too
stoned).
They've been guests on Seinfeld, which at least
proves they are weird, if not hilarious. They've won
an Emmy for their PBS special and even been in a
motion picture. (Remember them from The Jem of
the Nik? Didn't think so.)
They have actual musical talent and will perform
such classics as Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" (on their
own heads, via electronic samples), Mozart's
Bassoon Concerto on the baritone horn (which had-
n't been invented when Mozart wrote the piece),
and probably some other stuff too because they have
to fill up two hours. They can juggle and dance, and
they have Russian beards.
The Frying Karamazov Brothers will be perform-
ing at Wright Auditorium tonight at 8 p.m. Yes, the
day before spring break, and therefore the day
before mid-terms. But that is no excuse not to go.
You will have mid-terms again, and if you fail
them, you can even take those same classes again.
But when will you get to see The Flying Karamazov
Brothers again? Probably never. And then when they
have gone on to rest with Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy,
Tchaikovsky, Groucho Marx and John Lennon, you
will despair because you had the chance to see them
as an ECU student and you went out drinking
instead.
Tickets are only $10, unless you procrastinate
and wait until the last minute. Then you have to
shell out $20. So be smart, be hip, be cool and take
a date to see The Flying Karamazov Brothers.
The Frying Karamazov Brothers juggle till they bleed tonight in Wright Auditorium.
CHCTO COURESTY OF S. RUDOLPH ALEXANDER PERFORMING ARTS SERIES
CDreviews Guild brings Greenville musicians together
Star 69
eating february
4
John Davis
STAFF WRITK.R
Ever since Nirvana broke through pop
music's bubble and infected hit radi-
oland with their brand of hook-driven
angst guitar grunge, the music indus-
try has been churning out copies (like
the always bubblegum Bush) and
musicians have been recoveririg from
the fact that anything can be mar-
ketable, even punk. All of this was
good for Cobain and Co. (though
Cobain didn't seem to realize it),
ftut, in a large way, it has been detri-
mental to newer rock outfits for the
simple fact that the people are getting
iired of grunge.
! Some bands, like The Prodigy,
Chemical Brothers and U2 have made
good from this by diving headlong into
the sea of trip-hop and techno, while
ethers, like Counting Crows, the
Wallflowers and even Hootie and the
Blowfish have reverted to an older
style of rock, reminiscent of the '70s.
Star 69's sound is definitely a child
of grunge, but the flavor of it is more
European, as if the Sundays had
turned on their distortion and rocked
out a little. Unfortunately, it is very
difficult to listen to this disc, hear the
angry passions of singer Julie Daniels,
and not think of the late shotgun-
wielding anger king himself, or worse,
one of his glitzy wannabes like Gavin
Rossdale (of Bush) or Alanis
Morissette.
Which is too bad because, in all
truth. Star 69 is a tight band with
catchy tunes, strong songwriting and a
compelling sound. Where Bush,
Morissette and others clearly swiped
what was marketable from Nirvana
and the whole "indie rock" scene, it
seems that Star 69 came to these
devices in their music all on their own.
In the end, however, to the average
listener, it just sounds like all that
stuff we've been hearing for the past
Six Ways To Sunday
Shades Of Gray
DEREK T. HALLE.
SF.NIOR WRITER
It seems lately that getting a gig in the
Greenville area is only a phone call
away. Thanks to the Greenville
Musicians Guild, all of Greenville's
locals have come together with bene-
fit concerts. Not only are the concerts
exciting, but so is the enthusiasm
coming from president Melanie
Sparks and the Bivans Brothers, active
members of the guild.
Not long ago, the Bivans Brothers
made their way to 106.5 WSFL and
the Walnut Creek Amphitheatre, an
important achievement for a local
Greenville band. With these two not-
so-small accomplishments, the Bivans
Brothers proved that local talent can.
SEE STAB 69 PAGE 7
PAT REID
STAFF WRITF.R
I
Atlanta has produced many great
musical acts in its time. Six Ways To
Sunday is not one of them. Six Ways
To Sunday seems to be held as one of
Centennial Records' best acts which
makes me wonder about the future of
Centennial Records. Extremely
melancholy and whiny, Six Ways To
Sunday does very little to impress on
their CD, Shades Of Gray.
"Shades of Gray" is also the first
song on the CD. Dark organ melodies
and guitar rhythms set a serene back-
ground that is quickly shattered by
lead singer Rob Cash. If he's any rela-
tion to Johnny Cash it would be best
for Johnny to not admit it. Rob Cash
sings like he looks - pretty bad. His
high-pitch whine reflects back on
glam rock bands like Firehousc and
Slaughter.
Speaking of glam bands, this
brings us to the second track, "Always
Running Away Rom Me A power
ballad that would make Warrant
proud, "Always Running" actually isn't
bad at first. Cash's vocals arc more
low-key and tolerable. Of course, as
the song builds, Cash feels his vocals
should too, and soon any hope of a
good song is trashed.
Now don't get me wrong. Six Ways
To Sunday are not a hair band bom
ten years too late. It's just that some
of their styles and vocais tend to
resemble the bands of that genre.
The lyrics, however, are totally writ-
ten in a Generation-X-meets-roman-
ticism type style. What does that
mean in layman terms? The words are
whiny and depressing.
One thing Six Ways has going for
them is their urge to experiment.
The songs on Shades of Gray contain
saxophones, string arrangements, and
strong organ and keyboard arrange-
ments. "Tell Me Why" has a light
SEE SIX WAYS PAGE 7
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Run Awy
Can't �vtn hum (long Tape it from i fmmt Bay it Uaad
Pi� Fo9 Plica
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" i.
En
BAST
CAttOLINA
UNIVERSITY
VA "1
ummer
School
Abroad
i
la
Opportunities for international study
from Cost� Stfcso to tho Baltic one!
destinations in between.
Everyone's welcome to
attend on info session
March 18, 7 pm
Jenkins Fine Arts Center
Contact your qaVisW
or call Itw
Division of Continuing Studio
328-6129
An equal opportunity affirmative action university,
which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities
with effort and ability, progress to larg-
er, more publicized musical scenes.
That's what we all want - a better
tomorrow, something to keep striving
for.
The only way to establish a scene
in a community is to get heard. Now,
it seems, every other week the guild is
putting on another concert. No doubt,
with determination like this, the
scene is sure to take off.
By taking time to call a few of
Greenville's bands, the guild was com-
plete. For every group that is in the
guild, a letter is sent every month.
This way, groups can check out other
groups before they decide on an open-
ing act or a headliner.
The most interesting aspect of the
guild is that it has a huge respect for
its colleagues. In a way, it's free adver-
tising for most bands. Although there
are no dues as of yet to join, the word
is that there will be in the future.
Hopefully my band will fall. into a
grandfather clause of some sorts. Only
kidding, guys.
The guild itself has already
announced gigs in March, April, July
and September. The guild's schedule
is booked all the way into the new
year practically. This is hard work.
The hardest date to fill will be "The
Gathering a 3-day weekend in
September that will be composed of
over 20 guild bands and one semi-
major recording act which is soon to
be announced. Camping, food, beer
and crafts will be on hand for the
weekend. The only problem is that a
site has not been found for the activi-
ty. If you happen to know of a large
area that could host such a gathering,
call the guild at 746-8639.
With aspiring goals in mind, we,
the Greenville music scene, keep
playing, just like a few lost souls did in
Seatde in yesteryears. I believe it was
1991. All these bands stuck together,
arid the world heard their scream -
loud and clear.
My advice to any newcomer in the
Greenville area who is looking to play
would be to contact the guild as soon
as possible. This way if you're looking
for gigs or musicians to play with, they
can help you out.
So there you have it, 20 to 30
bands in Greenville have joined the
Guild and are now working together.
The ideas and goals may seem tough
right now, but you have to make a
starting point. There is no doubt that
Melanie Sparks and The Bivans
Brothers have done just that.
book
review
Berlin breaks comic book conventions
JAV MYERS
LIFESTYLE F.DtTOH
Often people think that comic books,
funny books, are for pre-pubescent
boys who have dreams of wearing
spandex and beating up bad guys all
day long. This crass, but common,
stereotype of comic books and their
readers has been challenged and
defeated umpteen million times, but
it still seems to hold weight in the
mass mindset.
Jason Lutes is out to prove every-
one who believes that comics arc for
kids wrong. And he is succeeding in a
big way.
Lutes first gained popular atten-
tion with his black and white comic
book Jar of Fools. In that tale, Lutes
introduced us to Ernie Weiss, a down-
and-out magician whose life fell apart
after his brother, an escape artist,
committed suicide. Because of his
inability to cope with his problems,
Weiss lost his job, lost his girlfriend
Esther and lost his faith in magic. In
the course of Jar of Fools' story, Lutes
takes Weiss on a journey of redemp-
tion filled with colorful characters like
Al Flosso, Weiss' mentor in magic;
Nathan and Claire Lender, a con man
and his young (but extremely clever)
daughter; and, of course, Esther
Cdea, the aforementioned cx-girl-
friend who has quite a bit to work on
her own.
The greatest thing about Jar of
Foois was Lutes' ability to weave all of
these disparate characters, motiva-
tions and conflicts into a seamless and
engrossing whole. Lutes has now
taken his talent in a different direc-
tion with the historical narrative,
Berlin.
Berlin is set in the year 1928, a time
between the World Wars when that
German city was known as "second
only to Paris as the cultural center of
Europe So far in the series, which is
up to its third issue, Lutes has intro-
duced another panoply of unique and
compelling characters. There's Kurt
Severing, a jaded, chain-smoking jour-
nalist bent on finding out what illegal-
ities the German army might be up to.
We also meet Marthe Muller, a new-
comer to Berlin who hopes to broaden
her horizons in the big city, as well as
further her artistic education.
Although the story seems to
revolve around Severing and Muller,
Lutes also provides a number of sup-
porting characters as well, including
Seyering's co-
workers at the
newspaper, a
disgruntled
traffic cop, a
poet who is
also a delivery
boy, an intimi-
dating land-
lord and his
Italian wife,
the other stu-
dents in
Mulier's art
class, a
cabaret star
turned nude
model, a kind
generous mother who cams a sec-
ondary income for her family working
at a textile factory, a young Jewish boy
who sells a weekly Communist jour-
nal, a social climbing debutante, the
list goes on and on. And none of these
varied individuals are there for back-
ground filler. Every character in the
book is well-developed, believable
and interesting
Of course, one of the most inter-
esting characters in the book is the
city of Berlin itself. Through Muller,
who is just arriving in Berlin for the
first time, Lutes introduces the city to
the reader. Mulier's diary has this to
say about the metropolis: "I am anx-
ious and excited as we emerge from
the station, unable to recall the last
time I felt this way. Perhaps never. It
is, after ail, a completely new experi-
ence. Into the flow of it as a river.
Through warring currents of flesh and
smell, cigars and sausage, lavender
and roses, the sourness of neglect. I
cannot look and I cannot stop looking.
Through the rush of traffic I hear
music - is it Chopin? - as if being
played deep underwater. I am losing
myself
However, Lutes not only portrays
his characters elegantly through thc
words he uses, he is also able to depict;
this world of the past with striking
vividness in his detailed pencil and:
ink work. Never given to melodrama' ?
Lutes alternates between bustling,
busy panels that speed along and large
pages of silent breaks that emphasize
the emotional content of the story.
Berim is simply beautiful, both as a
story and as a piece of artwork. If you
ever wanted to know what the buzz
about comics was, Berlin is a wonderful
place to start. Be careful, though.
Once you start reading comics, you
may never be able to put them down.
At least Lutes hopes so.
Christinnes invites you to lunch at its
new Ironwood location!
� Spectacular lunch buffet -just $7.95. A la carte items also available.
� Enjoy the view of Lee Trevinos signature golf course.
� Savor the culinary creations of our Executive Chef.
Imagine! Christinnes extraordinary cuisine right at your fingertips,
Tuesday through Friday from 11:30 to 200
AT IROnWOOD
�830-2225
200 Golf Club Wynd, Greenville, NC 27834
Just four minutes from Pitt Courtly Manorial Hospital on Highway 43 North.
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications for the position of
General Manager, WZMB
General Manager, Expressions
Editor, The East Carolinian
Editor, Rebel
for the 1997-98 academic year.
Applications are available from the Media Board office on
the second floor of the Student Publications Building.
The deadline for submitting a completed application is
FRIDAY, MARCH 28 AT 4 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.







7 Thursday. March 6, 1997
EKVEWOTE
STUDENT SPECIAL
Only $37
with presentation of valid student ID
Federal andor State
Tax Preparation
�EXPRESS TAX RETURNS
655 S. Memorial Drive
(Beside Advance Auto Parts)
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 756-4323
a.n.a.n.nivflaaaiLanllngnl)n8l
Everything
sells fast in classifieds!
oasfjcarolinian
You hear what I'm
Six Ways
continued from page 6
i ; 'i��'��:
meets I
screaming
To advertise with usl
call us at
328-2000
rolling piano foundation that hints at
something upbeat, but then Cash
starts singing again. "Red a future
single for the band, has a saxophone
loop as the base of the song that in '
itself is annoying. This coupled with
weak songwriting makes "Red" one of
the weakest tracks on the entire CD.
"Horses another single, is proba-
bly the most upbeat song. It's also one
of the few with the guitar being the
forefront instrument. Again, a strong
musical vehicle for weak words. The
chorus is extremely repetitive and
Cash does nothing to vary his singing
so we get the same line, sung the
same way, over and over.
Shades Of Gray hits rock bottom
with the sixth track, "Wedding Song
This song has nothing good going for
it. The music is sappy, the lyrics are
terrible and, once again. Cash does
nothing to improve things. "Marking
Time" picks up the pace a bit, but it
comes too little, too late to have any
real saving grace.
"Lost A Friend" is the best song on
Shades of Gray. Upbeat guitar rhythms
and decent songwriting help make
this a song that even Cash can do lit-
tle harm to. But, any good feelings are
soon wiped out by "Everything We've
Wanted which is best summed up as
whine, whine, whine. Six Ways actual-
ly use distorted guitars and some cool
vocal effects to start "Everyrhing the
hardest rocking song, off on the right
foot. But Cash, acting more as a
wrecking ball than a singer, quickly
tears down any success the band
might have had with the song.
I actually hope the band never gets
to read this article. It's not that I feel
bad about anything I've said or that
I'm scared of backlash; I stand by my
opinion that this CD is terrible as a
whole. I just don't want to give Cash
anything else to whine about.
The East Carolinian
Star 69
continued from page 6
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
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Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St � - ftnft� Hours:
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EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Summer
School
Sit up and take notice
early registration for
ECU summer sessions
begins March 31!
five years.
The good thing is that eatingftbru-
ary is a debut album. So, as long as
Radioactive Records doesn't decide
to drop the band if it doesn't gener-
ate a minor hit, this band has poten-
tial. Star 69 are comprised of three
Brit-pop musicians and an American,
Julie Daniels. Daniels is the chief
songwriter and singer. It is her
American rock sensibility mixed with
the happier, glitzier British pop style
of guitarist Richard Corden that
makes the music on the album as
interesting as it gets. With time, this
group could endure the backlash
from coming in at the end of the
grunge fad and actually put out a few
good records.
The band is tight, and the songs
are catchy, albeit in that Nirvana way.
Still, there is a lot of material with
merit. "You Are Here the album's
opener, is filled with all of the sparkle
and tension that makes good noise-
pop songs. "Burning Down the
House" is not a cover of Talking
Heads song of the same name, but
it's a solid rocker with a nice crunchy
guitar riff. "Lay Me" is one of the few
songs that breaks out of the grunge-
pop sound, coming closer to the
power ballads of Stone Temple Pilots
than anything grungy. (Remember
"Plush?") "Scabs" has an unraveling
post-breakup lyric set against soar-
ing, squealing guitars and a stum-
bling beat. "I'm Not You a good old
rock stomp, closes out the album.
Daniels is a talented songwriter
and, at times, her syrupy voice can be
alluring, but at other points it con-
flicts with the sequined feel of the
noisy pop. This may be the fault of
producer Don Smith, whose work
with Cracker had similar results in
the vocal mixing. But one can get
past these moments of vocal incon-
gruity, provided the music is appeal-
ing, which it usually is.
In the end, Star 69 is quite tal-
ented, and quite good at what they
do, though they are young in their
career. Perhaps with a little more
time and better production, this
band might provide some solid rock
n' roll. Until that time, eatingfelmmry
can whet the appetite for better,
more fulfilling sustenance.
your
adviser.
The Division of Continuing Studies, 328-6324
An equal opportunity affirmative action university,
which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities.
.
FOOD & DRUG
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8 Thursday. March 6,1997
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
GLADIOLUS APAR . MENTS
AVAILABLE JULY 1.1997. One,
two, and-three, bedroom apartments
on 10th Street, Five blocks from ECU,
now prcleasing. Call Wainright Proper-
ty Management 756-6209.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED TO share 2 br townhouse
at Wedgewood Arms. Basic cable wd,
dishwasher, pool, safe & quiet area.
Rent S225 plus 12 utilities, deposit
negotiable. Call 355-2281. Please
leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED: PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today 321-7613. Very Affordable!
WANTED: ROOMMATE TO
SHARE townhouse. Access to swim-
ming pool and tennis court. Call 353-
4294. If not at home, please leave a
message,
M'ATrTRJOWHXTE"WffED"EB
TO share two bedroom condo in Wil-
lowby Park private roombath tennis
courts, pool $285 rent plus 12 utilities
12 phone. Call 355-5201.
ROOlffS"AVAlLXffCE"ATTHI
Methodist Student Center for Sum-
mer School and the Full Semester.
Please call 758-2030 for an application.
SHORT WALK TO CAMPUS &
new Rec. Center! 5th street Square -
Uptown - Above BW3 one 3 bedroom 2
12 bath. Sunken LR apt. $775 mo.
One 2 bedroom above Uppercrust
Bakery AVAILABLE NOW. (New car-
pet) for $475 mo. Luxury Apartments.
Will lease for May first with deposit
Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
NEEDED, FEMALE TO SHARE
2 bedroom, 1 12 bath townhouse
across from campus! Close to Rec.
Center and downtown! Rent is
$225.00 12 bills. Please call 757-
3789.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
SHARE 3 bedroom house with 2 girls.
Rent 13 utilities, phone 6c cable.
Near campus in nice neighborhood.
Gall Kim @ 758-2800 or 830-9036 af-
ter 6 pm.
CANNON COURT AND CE-
DAR Court two bedroom 1 12 bath
rownhouses. On ECU bus route $400-
$415. Call Wainright Property Man-
agement 756-6209 prcleasing for fall
also.
EL ROLANDO" ELEGANT,
SPACIOUS example of Frank Lloyd
Wright architecture. 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large dining room, kitchen, and
living room with fire place. With wash-
er, and dryer. Beautifully landscaped
with three fenced in yards. Conveni-
ent to campus and the hospital.
W.OOOmo deposit. 524-4111.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR
TWO bedroom townhouse near cam-
Bus. Bus goes to gym and campus.
$225month. Call 1-910-674-6489.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments.
WasherDryer, use of all amenities,
Split cable, phone and utilities 4 ways.
Call Today! 321-7613. Very Affordable.
GYPRESS GARDENS TWO
BEDROOM apartments on 10th
street. Free basic cable, water and sew-
er also prcleasing for the fall $415.00.
Call Wainright Property management
756-6209.
386 IBM COMPUTER WITH
color monitor. Includes windows 3.0
and MS works. Good computer for
school. Asking $350.00. Call 353-
7029.
AYDEN GARAGE SALE FURNI-
TURE, retro clothes, household &
children's items, etc 613 Montague
St Ayden between 6th & 7th St. at
8:00 am on Sat. Mar. 8.
SUNGL :?ES FOR SALE JUST
in time for spring break. Oakleys, and
arnettes e-wires, eye jackets, catfish,
ravens Hi d new most half price.
Call 757-32-5 for prices.
1994 HONDA NIGHTHAWK
CB250R red, like new, 1,316 miles,
with helmet XXS $3,000 566-4662 af-
ter 6 pm.
VACATION 5 DAY4NIGHTS
IN Cancun. Oceanfront accommoda-
tions for two. $300.00 Must Sell! Ne-
gotiable! Must have at least one per-
son 25 years old. Call 758-4140.
95 FLEETWOOD EDGEWOOD
14 x 76 3 br2bath garden tub, dish-
washer, shed & fence. Payoff $17,500.
Located in Birchwood Sands Esc,
Greenville. Call (919)465-8711 or
(919)778-4207 owner.
Ifl OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT
WITH PRESENTATION OF
iMtai
WmWi Dfyw Hookups. Docks sno pmJos
SatdVMarMI Court.
nux water, sewn
9(WesfieSMS Cheats
ScswAMrMfmnrl
Wfeshsr, vflt Hookups
PuJoi on flu floor
Locmd 5 Koda from Ctrnout
,tfflttefteeee Aaaaf
OJfllfUL NOW UWIMI ��)
THBE AND OTHtft fME MJftRTRS
MANAGED IT
"T
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
HAMAOaMaMT
I0SAIIIOWNUAOMVE
7SS-IWI OSbrfepfrMl-JI-W
classifieds
WET SUIT FOR SALE Billabong
2001 zipperless. Never been wet.
$175.00 orignaHy $295.00. Call 757-
3233.
MCAT REVIEW COURSE MA-
TERIAL - review binders, work-
books, practice tests, and software.
Call Lee at 353-4286.
I
AKC REGISTERED GERMAN
ROTTWEILER 12 wks. $250 $325
champion bloodline 353-7174.
VACATION - 5DAYS4NIGHTS
in Acapulco Oceanfront Accommoda-
tions for two. $300.00 Must sell! Ne-
gotiable! 'Must have at least one per-
son 25 years old. Call 758-4140.
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info
call 301-429-1326.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID
STUDENT FINANCIAL SERV-
ICES PROFILES OVER
200,000 INDIVIDUAL
SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS,
LOANS, AND FELLOW-
SHIPS�FROM PRIVATE &
GOVERNMENT FUNDING
SOURCES. A MUST FOR AN-
YONE SEEKING FREE MONEY
FOR COLLEGE! 1-800-263-
6495 EXT. F53621 (WE ARE A
RESEARCH & PUBLISHING
COMPANY)
WE ARE NOW SEEKING enthu-
siastic individuals with retail experi-
ence and strong management skills, 2
weeks paid vacation, paid holidays, 45
hours week. Must be available Mon-
Sat. 9-6. Also part-time positions avail-
able. Contact Melodie Wood at 756-
8483, Affordable Home Fashions and
Blinds, 3110-A S. Evans, Greenville.
EARN $6,000 THIS SUMMER.
DYNAMIC COMPANY NOW
INTERVIEWINGHIRING AM-
BITIOUS, ENTREPRENEURI-
AL STUDENTS TO FILL SUM-
MER MANAGEMENT POSI-
TIONS IN YOUR HOME-
TOWN. FOR MORE INFORMA-
TION AND TO SCHEDULE
AN INTERVIEW CALL TUI-
TION PAINTERS 1 (800) 393 -
4521 .
$7.00 PER HOUR PLUS $150 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call
Dona for application and housing info
800-662-2122.
DESTINATION RESORT EM-
PLOYMENT WOULD YOU
LIKE WORKING AT 4-STAR
TROPICAL RESORTS IN THE
CARIBBEAN, MEXICO, OR TA-
HITI? OUR MATERIALS UN-
COVER NUMEROUS OPPOR-
TUNITIES WITH EXCEL-
LENT BENEFITS. FOR INFO:
1-800-807-5950 EXT.R53626
(WE ARE A RESEARCH & PUB-
LISHING COMPANY)
INQUIRE NOW FOR SUMMER
Internships in sales. $1,000
guaranteed plus commission.
Call Jeff Mahoney at Northwest-
ern Mutual. 355-7700.
THE CITY OF RALEIGH Parks
and Recreation Department is seeking
enthusiastic individuals for summer
employment. Positions include pool
managers, lifeguards, camp counselors,
nature, athletic, arts, therapeutic and
lake personnel. EOE. Applications
available at 2401 Wade Avenue, Ra-
leigh, NC 27602 or call 890-3285.
PERSON TO WORK PART-timc
for the next few weeks painting out-
side doors. Call Keith at 756-6209.
THE GREENVILLE RECREA-
TION & Parks Department is re-
cruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth soc-
cer coaches for the spring indoor soccer
program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills
and have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be
able to coach young people ages 5-18
in soccer fundamentals. Hours are
from 3 pm to 7 pm with some night
and weekend coaching. Flexible with
hours according to class schedules.
This program will run from the 17th of
March to the first of May. Salary rates
start at $4.75 per hour. For more infor-
mation, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550.
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK
summer in Myrtle Beach, SC. Hiring
Lifeguards and Beach Concession
Workers. Earn good money while
working on the Beach! $$Salary plus
bonuses $$ Discounted Housing
To apply or for further information, call
North Myrtle Beach Lifeguards at
(803)272-4170.
SWIM COACHES, MANAGERS,
INSTRUCTORS, Lifeguards need-
ed for Raleigh & Winston-Salem pools
May-Sept. Contact David 1-888-246-
5755 for application or mail resume to
PPC, PO Box 5474 Winston-Salem,
NC27113.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
OFFICIALS some experience need-
ed some training. April thru June.
Pick up application Elm Street Gym
2:30 - 7:00 pm.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
money while you learn playmates mas-
sage. Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
CRUISE & LAND-TOUR EM-
PLOYMENT INDUSTRY OFF-
ERS TRAVEL (HAWAII, MEXI-
CO, CARIBBEAN). INCOM-
PARABLE BENEFITS, &
GOOD PAY. FIND OUT HOW
TO START THE APPLICA-
TION PROCESS NOW!
CRUISE EMPLOYMENT SERV-
ICES PROVIDES THE AN-
SWERS. CALL 800-276-4948
EXT. C53629. (WE ARE A RE-
SEARCH & PUBLISHING
COMPANY)
KINSTON INDIANS ARE CUR-
RENTLY looking for gameday staff
for the 1997 season (411-830). Posi-
tions available are: ushers, concessions
workers, ticket takers, waitstaff, and
vendors. Apply at Grainger Stadium
M-F from 9am-5pm.
OUTER BANKS BREW PUB,
Great money, summer help. Hiring all
positions. (919)480-0447 or 480-2832
PERFECT PART-TIME JOB
working 8-10 hours weekdays. Seeking
math tutor and a study buddy to work
with students on individualized basis.
Apply at Sylvan Learning Center 2428
S. Charles Blvd.
RIVER PARK NORTH, PARKAt-
tendant and Camp Counselor posi-
tions available for summer employ-
ment. Apply at Greenville City Hall,
Personnel Department. For informa-
tion call 830-4562.
NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER
'971 Lifeguards, Head Lifeguards,
Pool Managers, Swim Lessons Instruc-
tors, Swim Coaches. Summer posi-
tions available in Charlotte, Greens-
boro, Raleigh, NC, Greenville, and
Columbia, SC areas, call Carolina Pool
Management at (704) 541-9303. In
Atlanta, call SwimAtlanta Pool Man-
agement at (770)992-7765.
MASSAGE SOUND GOOD?
Kind musician gentleman wback prob-
lems will sharetrade backrubs for heal-
ing & fun. Send ph & problem de-
scription to: Donald, POB 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835.
OCEAN LIFEGUARD
asa
SUMMER JOB
"On ths Beach In the Sun"
Mast lots of people. Compete in
running and owimminQ events here
and out of Ihe area, stay in tap
shape, get some great liaining, and
get paid doing it?
? Internships are available ?
Lifeguard Beach Service, Inc.
In Kill Devil Hill and Dare Co.
Is hiring motivated people
for ccean lifeguard posi-
tions. Bonus and incentive
pay. To request application
Cell: 919-441-4200
E-MatilbabeachQinterpath.com
Leave your ram, address, and phona
Ooaan Uraguardi 4 Ooaan Raaeua tinea 1958
Mambar United Stales Lifeeeving Association
ALPHA OMICRON PI WILL be
hosting a hazing workshop March 25th
at 4 pm on the mall. For information
call Jude Nagle at 757-0769.
WAY TO GO ALPHA Omicron Pi
on your basketball victory over Chi
Omega! Thanks to all sisters and new
members who played or cheered.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA
OMICRON PI on a very successful
win over Alpha Phi 44-14. Everyone
did a great job. Love your sisters and
new members.
GAMMA SIG WOULD LIKE to
wish everyone a fun and safe Spring
Break!
THANKS TO KAPPA SIGMA,
Alpha Xi Delta, and Chi Phi from
UNC-W for the social on Saturday at
Hoorah Harry's. Love, Sisters and
New Members of Delta Zcta.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI. THANKS
for the great social Friday. We had a lot
of fun! Love, Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
THE DELTA Zeta new officers:
President - Lisa Watcrfield, VP Mem-
bership - Torri Forbes, VP New Mem-
ber Ed - Brandy Peal, Treasurer - Kelly
Pruitt, Secretary - Maggie Lewis,
House Manager - Jennifer Piron. Also
congratulations to all newly elected of-
fices. Love your sisters and new mem-
bers of Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA HOPE YOU have a
great Spring Break! Love your sister
sorority Alpha Delta Pi.
DELTA SIGMA PHI. LAST
night was the best! We had an awe-
some time. Let's do it again sometime
soon. Have a great Spring Break!
Love, Alpha Phi.
PI KAPPA PHI: THANKS for
helping us "entertain: our pledges. We
had a great time. Let's get together
again! Love, the sisters of Gamma Sig.
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL
DELTA Zeta Sisters for coming out
and bowling! You guys did great and
really deserved to win the Champion-
ships! Love your sisters and new
members of Delta Zcta.
ALPHA OMICRON PI WOULD
like to wish everyone a very fun and
safe Spring Break! Love the sisters
and new members of Alpha Omicron
Pi.
PPIKHWC
A
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RESEARCH REPORTS
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11322 ��ho Ave. �06-RR. Los Angstts. CA 90025J.
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The East Carolinian
I'M ALTHEA. ELEVEN
MONTH beautiful, playful golden
lab. Landlord gave me the boot. I
need a good home. I will hate the
shelter! Save me!
Everything
moves fast in
the classifieds!
THETA CHI FRATERNITY
WILL hold its annual See Saw Mania
on March 22 and 23 at Burger King on
the intersection of Greenville Blvd.
and Red Banks Rd. Proceeds will go to
the Greenville Pitt County Special
Olympics. Please come out and help
contribute.
LOST FEBRUARY 27 GOLD
rope bracelet. Sentimental value. If
found, please call 754-2436. Reward
offered!
HELP! LOST COCKER SPAN-
IEL last seen 13 Feb. light buff
wgreen collar "Jordan" If you have
seen him, please call 756-6556 Andrew
or Julie. We love and miss him
very much!
Wake 'n Bake for
Spring Break 199;
�Jamaica �Panama City
�Cascaa �Dayton
�Padre
Call for Free � �� �
info Packet I 1-800-426-7710
TUES MARCH 4 - Faculty Reci-
tal, "Chamber Music of Walter S. Har-
tley: A 70th Birthday Musical Celebra-
tion "Mark Taggart, Director, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm. Wed
March 5 - Senior Recital, Michael
Murphy, voice, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7:00 pm. Wed March 5 - Junior
Recital, Christopher Walter Ellis, vio-
lin, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 pm.
Thurs March 6 - Graduate Recital,
Mark Pacoe, organ, Douglas Black-
wood, organ, First Presbyterian
Church, 1400 South Elm Street,
Greenville, 7:00 pm Mon March 17 -
Senior Recital, Jonathan Brinson,
voice. Junior Recital, Jennifer Worley,
voice, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00
pm. For additional information, call
ECU-6851 or the 24-hour hotline at
ECU-4370.
ETsTCTrTFlTNA NATIVE
AMERICAN Organizations next
meetings will be Tuesday, March 4 in
Ledonia Wright Center at 7pm and
Thursday March 6 in Mcndenhall
Room 8CDE at 7pm. All members are
urged to attend! More info call Nikki
at 754-8179 or Patrice at 328-7649.
PACK'EM IN THE POOL: come
join the FAN club on Mar. 21 for mu-
sic, food and swimming from 9:00-
11:00pm at the SRC.
GREENVILLE NOW (NATION-
AL ORGANIZATION for Women)
will meet Wednesday, March 12, 5:30
pm at the Szechuan Garden Restau-
rant. ECU women and other Green-
ville area women are invited to attend.
For information, call 756-1811 or 756-
8973.
ROY MATTHEWS, CHAIR OF
the 27th annual Grifton Shad Festival
Parade, announces that persons and
groups wishing to participate in the Pa-
rade must fill out a registration form
before March 21 this year. The Parade
will be Saturday morning, April 12 and
applications are available from Mat-
thews (919-524-4549)
APPLICATIONS ARE AVAIL-
ABLE NOW for the 27th annual
Grifton Shad Festival Craft Show, Flea
Market, Art Show and CanoeKayak
Races scheduled for the weekend of
April 12-13. Write to Grifton Shad Fes-
tival, Box 928, Grifton, NC 28530 or
call 919-524-4934 or 919-524-4356.
Applications are also available at the
Grifton Town Hall.
SIaR ISLAND WEEKEND:
HAMMOCKS Beach, NC: come join
us for a weekend of canoeing, camping
and beach fun on Mar. 22-23. Be sure
to sign up by March 17 in the SRC
main office by 6:00pm.
SOFTBALL PLAYERS FOR IN-
TRAMURAL spring and summer at
ECU and can play City League and
Tournaments this summer. Only true
players. Call Mike at 931-0874.
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
We Need Ttmbeiland boots
and shoes! Good Jeans.
FOR USED MEN'S SHIRTS. SHOES. PANTS. JEANS. ETC.
TOMMY HILFIGER, NAUTICA, POLO, LEVI, GAP, ETC.
We also buy: COLD k SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Broken Gold Pieces
� Stereo's, (Systems, and Separates) � TV's, VCR's, CD Players � Home, Portable
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL 414 EVANS ST
HRS. THURS-FRI 10:00-12:00,2:00 -5:00 & SAT FROM 10:00-1:00
Come Into the parking lot in front of Wachovia downtown, drive to back door & ring buzzer.
INTRODUCTION TO MAP
AN D compass workshop: If you want
to learn more about maps and com-
passes, join us on Mar. 18 from 7-
8:30pm at the SRC. Be sure to register
on Mar. 15 by 6:00pm in the SRC main
office.
ADULT STUDENT ASSOCIA-
TION WILL hold its monthly meet-
ing on Thursday, March 6,1997 at 4:00
pm in 208 Whichard. All adult stud-
ents are invited to attend and learn
about the activities planned for adult
students and their families.
BISEXUALS, GAYS LESBIANS,
AND Allies for Diversity. Our next
meeting is Thursday March 6 in Mcn-
denhall Student Center, Room 244, at
7:30 pm. Hope to see you there.
PSI CHI IS SPONSORING adopt
a shelter for the Greenville Communi-
ty Shelters. There will be donation
boxes located in Rawl and other sites
on campus. Please donate toiletries,
cleaning products, batteries, etc.
OPEN REGISTRATION FOR
LIFEGUARD training: If you're
planning to be that "Baywatch" life-
guard, then be sure to register for life-
guard training from 9:00am - 6:00pm,
Mar. 5-14 in the SRC main office.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT AS-
SOCIATION NOW hiring an elec-
tions chairperson for the Spring '97
Election. Apply in 255 Mcndenhall
Student Center by March 17th. Must
be a full-time student with a 2.0 GPA
and in good standing with the Univers-
ity.
PRIORITY REGISTRATION-
CHILD SWIM lessons: sign your
child up for swim lessons Mar. 19-21
from 9:00-6:00pm in the SRC main of-
fice.
SOFTBALLPREVIEW REGIS-
TRATION MEETING: join us on
Mar. 18 for the softballpreview regis-
tration meeting at 5:00pm in MSC
244.
FREE STUFF STARTS WED-
NESDAY! Bring 3 safe Spring Break
Tips to the Office of Health Promotion .
and Well Being, 210 Whichard, and you
will be one of 100 people to get a free
safe Spring Break Package.
EASTER WEEKEND: MT
ROGERS, Va: come join a weekend
at the mountains Mar. 27-30. Be sure
to register by Mar. 21 in the SRC main
office.
NCAA BASKETBALL TOUR-
NEY PICK'EM entry: Get your en- '
try form in for the NCAA basketball
tourney pick'em by Mat. 17 by
10:00am in the SRC main office.
TWO PITCH SOFTBALL
TOURNEY entry deadline: Be sure
to register for the two pitch softbati
tourney by Mar. 19 in the SRC main of-
fice.
GENERAL COLLEGE STUD-
ENTS SHOULD contact their ad-
visers the week of March 24-27 to
make arrangements for academic ad-
vising for Summer Session and Fall Se-
mester 1997. Early registration week,
is set for March 31 - April 4.
SUMMER STUDY IN MOSCOW
- June 30 - Jury 25, all instruction in
English, pay ECU tuition, fees room
and board, credits count for ECU de-
gree, Moscow International University
is one of three Russian Universities
highlighted in the Chronicle of Higher
Education, housing in a new secure campus
call 328-6769 or 328-6347.
ST. PAT'S AEROBIC BASH-free
aerobics: come to aerobics for free on
Mar. 17 to celebrate St. Patrick's Day
from 4-5:30pm at the SRC.
ATTENTION IT5RSE ITS NO LONGER NECESSARY
LOVERS: IF you need a place to to borrow money for college. We can
keep your horse or you are interested help you obtain funding. Thousands
in getting into barrel racing. Call Ni- 0f awards available to all students. Im-
�maai. �� � q
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
advertising department
Tabi Graham Campus Sales Rep.
Stephen MoodySales Rep.
Chris DelamereSales Rep.
David PomillaSales Rep.
Jeremy LeeSales Rep.
Mary PoliokClassified Ad Manager
For Information Regarding Advertising
Please Call
328-2000





9 Thursday. March 6. 1997
The East Carolinian
ZINA BRILEY
STUF WRITER
The Lady Pirate track and field team
wrapped up one of the best indoor
seasons ever for ECU on Sunday at
ECAC competition held in
Darmouth, N.H
This season was one of the best
performances ever by the members of
the ECU women's track and field
team. At Sunday's championships,
two of the most outstanding Lady
Pirates helped close the season with
peak performances. Michelle
Clayton and Lave Wilson continued
to lead the way for the Lady Pirates
by placing among the top 10 in each
of their events. Clayton placed fourth
in the women's shot put with a dis-
tance of 46V and H)th in the
women's H) pound weight throw with
a mark of ,S2'4S. a new school record.
She set personal bests in each event,
IhjiIi in which she increased the dis-
tance of her throws bv a foot and a
half.
Wilson placed fifth in the triple
jump with the distance of 407.5
loth an ECU school record and a
NCAA provisional qualifying jump.
Teammate Amanda Johnson, took
on several roles over the weekend,
Golfer overcomes obstacles off course
Rodman hit Wolf in groin, sted elbowed
CHICAGO (AP) - Dennis Rodman head-butted a referee, used profanity on
live TV and kicked a cameraman. Now he's found yet another way to draw a
suspension - by hitting Milwaukee's Joe Wolf in the groin.
"We understand why the league did it. We also understand that Dennis goes
100 percent every game and gives all he has Chicago Bulls general manager
Jerry Krause said Tuesday. "He's just going to have to control himself in a bet-
ter way
Rodman's latest suspension, resulting from an incident in Monday night's
win over Milwaukee, is for one game. He must sit out tonight's meeting with
San Antonio and was also fined $7,500.
It's his fourth suspension - totaling 20 games - since joining the Bulls before
last season.
During Chicago's 108-90 victory over the Bucks, Rodman hit Wolf in the
groin with 2:10 left in the third quarter. Rodman appeared to following through
as he tried to block a pass Wolf had thrown.
"The league thinks the hit below the belt was not an accident, the league
thinks it was deliberate Krause said. "And that's something that happened.
There was contact below the belt and that's not supposed to happen
After the groin shot, Rodman followed with an errant punch toward Wolf's
head. On the next possession. Wolf got Rodman in a head lock and a double foul
was called. Rodman was then removed from the game by coach Phil Jackson.
Wolf was not punished.
Former NBA referee pleads innocent to
federal tax evasion charges
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) - A former NBA referee pleaded innocent today to fed-
eral tax evasion charges for allegedly failing to pay taxes on money saved by
downgrading his plane tickets.
Henry Armstrong was arraigned in U.S. District Court. Judge Tommy E.
Miller set a jury trial for June 12.
Armstrong and fellow referee George Toliver were indicted Feb. 12 by sep-
arate federal grand juries. Both men are from Virginia.
They allegedly downgraded first-class airline tickets provided for NBA trav-
el to cheaper coach-class tickets and pocketed the difference but failed to pay
taxes on the money.
The indictments were the first to stem from a two-year Internal Revenue
Service investigation, federal prosecutors indicated there could be more, and a
third referee was indicted Feb. 19.
Michael Mathis of Cincinnati was charged with tax fraud for allegedly
understating income by $69,000 from 1989 through 1992.
The judge originally said he could schedule Armstrong's trial for May. but
defense attorney Franklin Swartz asked for more time to prepare. Swartz said
the case is complex and will require travel around the United States to inter-
view witnesses.
Swartz declined to comment on the case after the hearing, saying only that
the evidence will vindicate his client.
Armstrong and U.S. attorney Jim Mctcalfc also declined to comment.
Armstrong faces a maximum of 18 years in prison and a fine of $1.4 million
if convicted. He is free on a personal recognizance bond. His initial court
appearance is set for Feb. 26.
Cremins blames himself for poor season
RALEIGH. N.C. (AP) - If there are any fingers to be pointed for Georgia
Tech's first-to-worst slide in the Atlantic Coast Conference coach Bobby
Cremins wants them aimed at him.
One year after winning the ACC regular-season title, the Yellow Jackets (9-
f7. 3-13 ACC) finished dead last in the league and will play North Carolina
State on Thursday night in the tournament play-in game at the Greensboro
Coliseum.
"We've been criticized strongly and sometimes that criticism wears on you
said Cremins, whose team has iost eight of nine heading into the ACC post-
season. "But this year, we deserve criticism. I have done a poor job. I consider
this the worst job I've done since I've been in coaching
The numbers back up Cremins' assessment. The 17 losses are the most in
his 16 seasons in Atlanta and his team's 39.8 shooting percentage is the worst
at the school since the 1961-62 season.
"I don't think this team has played up to its potential said Cremins. "I
know we're not a great team. I watch a lot of teams in our league on tape and
watching other teams I know where our deficiencies are. But, you can still get
� a lot out of a team that is undermanned sometimes.
I've done that at different times in my career and I enjoy doing that. I did
that at Appalachian State (1975-81) and I did that at Georgia Tech and some-
times I enjoy taking a team, that has lesser talent, and making them really, real-
ly competitive. I have been unable to do that with this team
The Yellow Jackets have been playing better the last few weeks, coming
within four points of home wins against No. 5 North Carolina and No. 13
Clemson.
Track and field team
wraps up indoor season
competing in three events. Her first
role was that of a Long Jumper, in
which she finished third overall. She
and fellow sprinter Rasheca Barrow
had personal bests in the women's 55
meters, and finally she teamed up
with Weldon, Johnson and Barrow
(replacing Hill because of a knee
injury) for the women's 4x400 meter
relay.
"This was one of the best indoor
meets we've ever had said Head
Coach Charles "Choo" Justice. "I was
proud of everyone
The Lady Pirates competed
among 60 colleges including the Big
East, the CAA. Ivy League Schools -
Harvard, Brown, Yale and Princeton,
the Atlantic Ten and the ACC. All of
their hard work paid off and the Lady
Pirates ended up scoring 15 points
tying with Syracuse for 16th place.
"The indoor season was very suc-
cessful 'Chixi' said. "Now we need
to regroup and net readv for the out-
door season
Justice hopes to have everyone
healtln and rested so he can add
other potential leaders like Saundra
Teel in the women's high jump and
women's hurdles along with Missy
Johnson to round out his list.
The Lady Pirates will begin their
outdoor season on Mar. 15 in a four
team meet at the University of South
Carolina in Columbia, S.C.
ANTHONY STAN FILL
STAFF WRITF.R
It seems like ever collegiate athletic
program has at least one player who
has overcome grear obstacles along the
way to get where they are now. The
ECU Golf Team is no exception to the
rule with Richie Creech, the lone
senior on the team, who is a transfer
student from Barton College.
Creech, in his freshman vear
(1992-1993) at Barton College, was
named all-conference (Carolinas
Virginias Athletic Conference�
CVAC) and all-district. But with one
visit in September of 1993, his luck
changed.
"I was getting headaches and even-
tually came to find out I had a brain
tumor Creech said.
Creech went into surgery in
September to remove the tumor. After
the tumor was removed, he under-
went six weeks of radiation therapy.
"I eventually got better, but it took
a while Creech said.
The next scary question�was he
going to be able to play golf anymore
or was the end of his talented career
over?
"I knew I wanted to play Creech
said. "But I had to wear a patch for six
months because I still had double
vision. But one time I shot one or two
over while wearing the patch, so I
knew that there was a good chance
that I'd play again
Indeed Creech did play again,
going back to Barton and being
named, once again, to the CVAC all-
conference team and finishing fourth
overall in the conference. Creech
missed all-conference by one shot in
his junior year. Then, he transferred to
ECU for his senior year.
The 23-year-old Creech is current-
ly still living in his hometown of
Wilson. Creech has lived there ever
since he was 12 years old. which about
the same time that he began plaving
golf.
"I was 12 when I played my first
round of golf Creech recalls. "My
dad played golf, and I just wanted to
get good enough to beat him
Creech continued playing while
growing up, and played all four years
in high school. He played at Wilson
Hunt High School, winning all-confer-
ence honors three times and team
MVP honors twice.
After high school, Creech received
scholarship offers at many colleges,
including ECU. But, after further con-
sideration, Creech decided to stay in
his hometown and play golf for Barton
College.
"I was going to come here ECl
but I think that the transition would
have been too difficult for me at the
particular time Creech said. "I felt
that it would be better for me to start
at a smaller college, such as Barton
SMACK!
Nils Alomar returns a shot in a recent home match. Tuesday the men's tennis team
defeated West Virginia, 4-3. Currently the team holds a record of 7-5.
PHOTO BY CHRIS G4Y00SH
CAA UPDATE
There have been some coaching changes
around the CAA this week. Paul Westhead of
George Mason, who lost the play-in game to
the University of Richmond, has been fired for
the Patriots. On the same note, Richmond's
Head Coach Bill Dooley, whose team lost in the
quarterfinals to ODU, has been ousted from
coaching the Spiders next season. And finally,
JMU's Head Coach, Lefty Driesell, who has
been coaching collegiate basketball the past 35
seasons and got his team to the championship
game by beating ECU and UNCW, will retire
after next season.
L
TRIVIAtime
Name the conference that had the most
wins during the NCAA basketball tourna-
ment last season and the number of
teams represented from that conference.
jflil diifiim
-idiumiiwujim 'iji ouimiin xymjuy iJiv Oiunoj ij Xnun
itl JMflB imutufim i iji .ioifji i) sv'iu swuj juofjtus yjy n
Now after four years, Creech is
finally at ECU.
"It's a dream rhat I've pursued
since high school, to play Division I
golf Creech said. "I'm glad that I did
and I have no second doubts
So far Creech has had no trouble
fitting into the Pirates' golf program
either.
"He's worthy of scholarship money,
but I didn't have any to give him
Head Coach Kevin Williams said. "He
came out and walked-on the team,
earned a spot, traveled and has been
in every tournament this year. He's a
heck of a player
Ir :he fall, playing in the number
one spot, Creech participated in all
four of the pre-season tournaments. In
the last fall tournament, in
Summerville, S.C, he shot a 69, lead-
ing the tournament, but the next day
he shot a 76.
"I didn't win overall, but the team
ended up winning the tournament in
a playoff against Wilmington Creech
said.
In the first tournament of the sea-
son, the USFRon Smith
Intercollegiate, Creech didn't play as
well as he would have liked. He shot
an 80-82-78, and finished tied for
69th.
"I wasn't really on top of my game,
but I'm looking forward to the tourna-
ment at Fripp Island Creech said.
Fripp Island, S.C. is the location of
their next tournament. It is the Ben
Fl
1M
1
Richie Creech
H o g a n
Intercollegiate
and will be
played this
weekend. Mar.
7-9.
Creech said in
order to do
well, he is
going to have
to rely on his
course man-
age m e n t,
which he
feels is the strongest aspect of his
game. When Creech says 'course man-
agement he is referring to knowing
when, and what club to hit.
Creech also gave credit to his fel-
low Pirares. saying that they push him
to be better.
"At my previous college there was-
n't much pushing except at the num-
ber one and two spots, but here all ten
players are playing for a spot Creech
said. "If you're pushed you're going to
be your best, or fall flat on your face.
Creech will be graduating from
ECU, after the second session of sum-
mer school this year. He'll be receiving
a B.S. degree in communications and a
business administration minor. After
graduation Creech hopes to pursue a
career in golf, maybe even playing in a
mini tour in Florida.
"I just want to be in the golf
world Creech said.
Today the baseball team will host West Virginia
at 3 p.m. at Harrington Field and again tomorrow
on Friday, March 7, at 3 p.m.
Talent and heart carries
Lady Pirates far
Tracy lat bach
3F.ltIK WKITKK
Who ever thought the ECU Women's
Basketball team would advance all the
way to the finals of the 1997 CAA
Championship tournament? They
did. And perhaps the positive winning
attitude the Iady Pirates carried with
them from game to game is what got
them there.
With a good mixture of senior
experience and freshman talent, the
Lady Pirates played each of their
games this season with a lot of heart.
Some were won. others were lost; but
in the end, the team's main mission,
to make it to the final round of the
tournament, was accomplished.
What was it that made this season
so successful? Sophomore center Beth
Jaynes said the key to coming out on
top came from following the footsteps
of the seniors on the team.
"The seniors really pushed us to
work hard and give it our all Jaynes
said. "They really wanted to go out
with a bang. The seniors are going out
showing an incredible work ethic and
a lot of heart, which has been, and will
continue to be, an inspiration to our
team. We will miss them a lot
Jaynes said she is proud of the
team for getting it together and fight-
ing until the end. in the beginning of
the year, the girls suffered a few disap-
pointing losses to teams that they
knew they could beat, including
UNC- Wilmington.
"We started to build up oui confi-
dence and our consistency on the
court Jaynes said. "That's when our
season turned around and headed in
the right direction
Jaynes said that her personal high-
light of the season came from the
North Carolina A&T game. A number
of the ECU girls were on the bench
feeling down, and Jaynes was able to
step out as part of the starting lineup.
She scored her career high of 12 points
and walked away from the game feel-
ing great about her performance.
Teammate Jen Cox said in her
opinion, the highlight of the season
came when the team first beat James
Madison back in January.
"In beating JMU, we started to
realize what we could do Cox said.
"Once we were confident, we started
to really improve
Perhaps it was at that time that the
team got their chemistry flowing on
the court. In working together as a
unified team, the Lady Pirates began
beating those teams they knew they
could beat, and even some of those
that they weren't real sure about, to
end their regular season sixth in the
CAA.
Freshman Misty Home has learned
a lot from-this "good but tough year"
"The younger players on the team
know what it feels like to win now
Home said. "I feel that this season has
prepared me better for next year, and
I am really excited about the pro-
gram's future
Jaynes said although the freshmen
made some mistakes throughout the
season, they will be stronger next sea-
son because most of them got the play
time they needed to leam from those
mistakes this year.
"Next season should be just as
well, maybe even better than this year
because the players returning next
season will be coming back with a lot
of confidence and experience under
their belts Jaynes said.
When the girls first got to
Richmond last weekend, Head Coach
Anne Donovan called a meeting.
According to Home, Donovan com-
mented on all of the hard work the
team had put in since day one. "Now
she had said, "it was time to put it out
on the court
Donovan said the turning point of
the season was after the team took on
Richmond for the second time in early
February.
SEE IADV. PAGE 10
LOOKING FOR A STRIKE
Brooks Jernigan hurls a pitch in yesterday's 94 loss to the University of North
Carolina The Pirates have a home game today and tomorrow at 3 p.m.
PHOTO BY CHHIS GAYD0SH





Thi East Carolinian
tu niMiituay. wiircii o. aa'
Lady
continued fiom page 9
"We plavcd a great second half
in the Richmond game, and at that
time we realized that if we could
ptav all the time like we did for that
20 minutes, we would be unstop-
pable Donovan said. "The kry
was having a combination of confi-
dence and good chemistry on the
court. You have to have both to get
the job done
After beating Richmond in
round one and Virginia
Commonwealth in game two of the
tournament, the Lady Pirates were
in a position that many thought
there was no hope of seeing: they
were headed to finals!
"I was really excited that we had
made it so far Cox said. "Of course
we hoped to be the team to come
out and surprise everyone and
knock off Old Dominion, but we
were also out there to have fun.
Home said that her most mem-
orable moment of the season came
when the Lady Pirates beat VCU
for the third consecutive time at
the tournament.
"We knew what we had ahead ot
us was going to be tough, but we
did it Home said. "It was a great
way for the seniors to end because
no one deserves it more than
them ,
The CM tournament will be
remembered most by the seniors.
Justine Allprcss, Tracey Kelley and
Laurie AshenfeWer closed out their
careers as Lady Pirates the way
almost any collegiate athlete would
want: with a lot of class and a lot
pride. t ,
Kelley headed into her final
game as a Lady Pirate with her chin
held high and tears in her eyes-She
went into the game against ODU
confident that her team could make
a good showing and determined to
play with everything she had.
"We knew that it would take a
miracle to beat ODU, but our goal
was to play hard and represent ECU
very well Kelley said.
Kelley said that m her opinion,
the turning point of the season
came about in mid-January after the
Lady Pirates suffered a big loss to
American University. It was then the
team decided it was time to do
something different. One week later,
the Pirates took on JMU at home
and VCU on the road to bring in two
huge ECU wins. According to Kelley.
good wins gave the team the confi-
dence they needed to turn the sea-
son around the "right" way.
Kelley said that the best friend-
ships of her life have developed in
her four years as a Lady Pirate, not
only with her peers, but also her
coaches.
"Coach Donovan has brought the
best out of me Kelley said. "She
made me believe that with success
on the court, I could do anything 1
wanted in life. She loves basketball,
she loves us, she would do anything
for any of us, and it all shows
Kelley's biggest disappointment
is the lack of support from ECU's
student body. The Lady Pirates put
in just as much time and effort as the
men's team and every other sports
team on campus.
"When I put on my uniform, it
doesn't say Tracey Kelley it says East
Carolina Kelley said. "It's not to say
we deserve more recognition than
the other athletes;but we certainly
don't deserve less
It was more than devastating at
times to look up into the crowd and
see the faces of many family mem-
bers and friends, but hardly ever any
faithful Pirate fans.
"The women's program is not
supported as it deserves to be by the
students and the community alike,
Donovan said. "We want to see more
crowds like those that are seen at the
men's games. I am confident that
our success will attract morcstu-
dents to the gym in the future
Kelley said the amount of support
the team receives is the one and only
thing she wished could be changed
about the program.
"When 1 walk around campus,
people sec my face, and they know
who I am, but they have never seen
me play" Kelley said. "That is some-
thing that really hurts inside because
as an athlete at ECU, I am repre-
senting the school
This season will be one tor the
books in Lady Pirate history N.xt
season (along with recruits) will put
three returning seniors, one junior
and three sophomores on the court.
Also returning next year will be Shay
Hayes, who was actually part of the
senior program this year. Hayes
never left the bench this season due
to a back injury. As a senior, Hayes
has qualified for a medical red-shirt.
"I expect that Shay will come
back next year as one of the team s
biggest strengths Donovan said.
"Our seniors are leaving behind a
tremendous work ethic that willbe
brought back next season by her.
To predict the future of the pro-
gram may seem like a difficult task,
but in looking at those who will be
returning and the skills they will be
bringing with them, you can bet on
it that the Lady Pirates will be com-
ing back in the fall hungry for wins
that will once again put them on top.
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 6, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 06, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1194
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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