The East Carolinian, February 11, 1997







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EAST CAROUNA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROUNA
Roommates devastated by fire
Student victims left with
little
BECKY ALLEY
GKNMAL COLLEGI 0HI1NTATI0N ISSUBS
STAFF WRITS
anuary 24,1997 was an ordinary day for most
2CU students, but for Tom Bedash and Eric
tailings it was a day they will never forget.
They had only been in their Wedgewood
tans apartment for three months. Things
rcre getting comfortable, settled, relaxed.
Jfc was good for the two friends. Thencvery-
hing came to a mind-shattering halt.
Around 3:30 a.nv, redash awoke to the
creech of their smoke detector. Herandown-
tairs to find an entire wall and part of their
�uchonfire.
A friend was sleeping on the couch
fedash said, "first I tried to wake him up then
tried to put the fire out by throwing water on
t. When I saw that wasn't working, I called
HI and got my friend out of there
Stallings was not home at the time of the
ire but was notified shortly after it occurred.
"Tom called me and said there had been a
ire, but I did not think it was a big deal. I got
here just after the police left. Everything was
ather gone or covered in soot Stallings said.
The fire is believed to have been started by
i faulty electrical outlet or an extension cord.
Stallings likened the fire to a nightmare.
He said that besides losing furniture, they lost
a large CD collection, all their clothing, a
Si500 painting and their television and
radiosystems. They also remarked that some
of the worst things lost were sentimental
items, like photo albums and souvenirs from
spring break.
"I did not think we had lost so much. The
fire department is just down the road and they
got there within three minutes. When they
finally let me go in, I was in total shock
Fedash said.
Fortunately no one was injured in the fire
but Stallings lost his pet cat of seven years.
Wedgewood Arms management provided
them with a new apartment the same day of
the fire.
Both Fedash and Stallings credit much of
what happened in the following days to their
friends. Their friends, relatives and neighbors
helped dean up and have provided them with
many replacements for things they lost.
"There were times when me and Eric were
just standing there lost, not knowing what to
do. We really want to thank all our friends for
their help Fedash said, " We couldn't have
done it without them
The roommates, who are joining the
National Guard in April, both currently work
at Wal-Mart. When Wal-Mart found out about
the fire many of the employees donated
household items to them. Also, the home
office donated $450 to Stallings and Fedash.
"Our friends thought that was enough
money to replace a lot of what we lost
Stallings said, "But when you have to start
buying everything from shower curtains to
toothpaste, it barely covered the necessities
They not only suffered financial stress but
also emotional stress from the fire.
"A. few nights ago, I was home alone and left
a light on downstairs when I went to bed. I
had to get up and go turn it off Stallings said.
"You're always thinking if you arc going to
wake up in the middle of the night and have to
worry about this, i guess it's like being
mugged. You are always expecting it to hap-
pen again and waiting for it
Fedash said he now has problems with
sleeping upstairs due to the fire.
"Usually I sleep downstairs till like 4 a.m
Fedash said, "Then I get up and go to bed just
so my alarm will wake me up for work in the
morning
Fedash also said that when Stallings was
testing their new smoke detector a few days
after the fire it really "freaked" him out.
Stallings said the reality of the fire hits him
everyday.
"It's like, I'll go to get something or some-
one will ask for something and I go to get it.
Then it hits me, I can't because it burned up
in the fire Stallings said.
Parking and Traffic Services is accepting
donations of household goods and anything
else people are willing to donate to the two
students.
"Anyone who wants to donate can leave the
items with us. We'll make sure it gets to Tom
and Eric said James Midgette, director of
transportation services
Fire department offers safety tips
Than safety sites are often by-passed without
notice. If a fire does erupt in a residence halt or
classroom building, emergency exits are marked,
and fire announciators (left) and
extinguishws(right) are within reach.
PHOTO SY PATRICK iHElAN
Simple guidlines may
savelifes
ERIKA SWARTS
HOUSINGCONSUMATOKY SF.HVICES
Students need not wait until they or someone
they know is a victim of a fire to review fire
saftey.
On campus, fire inspections are given in
the fall and spring to each residence hall.
During these inspections, inspectors are look-
ing for bask fire hazards, such as paper around
light fixtures, clutter around windows and
doors, and candles.
During holiday seasons officials look for
potential hazards such as Christmas lights
around beds. According to Inez Fridley, asso-
ciate director of facility management, the
safety inspections are more for education than
anything else. The inspections make stu-
dents think about fire hazards; they also let
residents know what is and is not considered
hazardous.
According to Bill Coke, director of environ-
mental health and safety, the first thing to do
If there is a fire is dial 911. Dialing 911, stu-
dents will reach the ECU Police Department
who will in turn contact the Greenville Fire
Department. It is also important to sound the
alarm system so that other residents are aware
that there is a fire.
"The main point to take care of is to evac-
uate the building, pull the fire alarm and do
not worry about fighting fires Coke said.
"We are more worried about saving lives. Let
the people who are trained save the building
even if it is as simple as a trash can fire
All residence halls have fire alarms that are
hooked up to smoke detectors. Some of the
taller building have sprinklers and hose hook-
ups for the fire department.
Other fire safety tips include closing doors
as you leave a fire area, leaving the area by the
nearest stairway, and never re-entering the
building without the fire department's per-
mission. Do not exit the room or building
until you have physically felt the top and bot-
tom of the door. If the door is hot, do not exit
through that door. Do not use elevators or
congregate in the stairways.
Coke also said that should anyone be
trapped inside a burning building, the best
action is to place a wet blanket or similar item
under the door opening This will keep toxic
smoke from entering the room. Open a win-
dow and hang brightly colored clothing or a
sheet outside the window to signal that there
is someone stil! inside. If your clothing catch-
es on fire, remember do not run� stop, drop
and roll.
FIRE SAFETY TIPS
� At the first sign of fire dial 911
� Close doors in areas where there may be fire
� Exit by the nearest staircase (never use elevators)
� Test doorknobs and avoid hot doors
� If trapped inside, place a wet blanket across door jam,
and hang bright cloth from window
Wait for fire department's permission to reenter building
Students encouraged to love safely
Condom Day promotes awareness
ANGELA K0EN1G
HEALTtMINVIkONMENTAL ISSUES
STAFP WHITE
The American Social Health Association (ASHA) is sponsoring National
Condom Day on Valentine's Day as a way to promote condom use.
"As a romantic occasion, Valentine's Day is an appropriate time to
focus on the importance of safer sex said ASHA President Peggy
Clarke.
Although ASHA sponsors the day, they do not plan events in con-
junction with this topic.
"We encourage organizations around the country to recognize and
promote this day said ASHA's Director of Public Relations Sharon
Broom. "We provide information and encourage others to participate in
events
According to the American College Health Association, there are
several advantages to using condoms.
One advantage is that latex condoms containing a spermicide with
nonoxynol-9 provide the best protection against the transmission of
STDs.
Abo they are easy to buy and convenient to keep close by because
they do not require a medical exam or prescription to purchase and are
available in many locations. The Student Health Center sells a box of
15 condoms for $2.12. Condoms are also located on the vending
machines in residence halls and cost $1 for three.
Other advantages are they arc only used when needed, they have no
serious side effects or impact on future fertility and they may protect
against cervical cb-t.
The association ai. rcports disadvantages which include ineffec-
Organization target of prejudice
tiveness if used incorrectly or if they break. In rare instances one or both
parties may have an allergic reaction to either the latex, spermicide or
lubricant used with the condom. Some men report decreased sensation.
It is especia"v important for students to learn about STDs and con-
traception because of the growing rate of STD occurrences.
"Look at the past five years said Student Health Center Health
Educator Heather Zophy. "The rates are growing among college stu-
dents
Zophy estimated that STD occurrences in 1988 were one in six, m
1992 one in five, and one in four in 1994.
"The CDC (Center for Disease Control) reported in Aug. 1995
North Carolina as first in gonorrhea incidences and second in syphilis
occurrences Zophy said.
The Student Health Center can test for all STDs except HIV
According to Zophy, students should be tested any time they have been
involved in a sexual relationship and when they have a new partner.
"If (students have been sexually active before, they should be test-
ed before getting involved again Zophy said.
Although there are no counseling services available at the health cen-
ter for students diagnosed with a STD, they can talk to Zophy to get
information about the disease and how to prevent spreading it as well
as other service numbers to call for more information.
Condoms are effective in preventing STDs and pregnancy but only
if they are used properly
"They (condoms) can be effective if used property every time and
with every sexual activity Zophy said. "If they fail it's usually because
they weren't handled properly
According to Zophy, they are most effective when used with a sper-
micide containing nonoxynol-9. It is suggested that consumers buy
American or Japanese made condoms because these countries require
testing of the products.
Students should also remember to be careful when putting the con-
Stt LOVE. PAGE 3
B-Glad office vandalized
Marina Henry
SPECIAL POPULATIONS ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
The student organization, Bisexuals, Gays,
Lesbians and Allies for Diversity (B-Glad), has
recently been the target of several negative
actions.
Established at ECU in the '80s, B-Glad
seeks to provide an educational and supportive
background for people living alternate
lifestyles. In the late '80s the organization col-
lapsed, but was re-chartered in April of 1994.
Approximately 50 students arc currently
members of the organization which has recent-
ly been a target for vandals.
"We have had several things happen to us
adviser Jeff Gersh said. "We have been very
fortunate in that the actions have not been
violent. All of our officers have had their share
of 'hate calls My office has been vandalized.
As soon as our flyers get put up, they are torn
down or vandalized
The group meets in Mendenhall every
other Tuesday of the month. Guest speakers
talk about important topics in the gay and les-
bian community, and members often enjoy
games, icebreakers and parties.
"We don't hide or meet in secret, so the
potential for a dangerous situation is there
Gersh said.
The organization has advisers and a profes-
sional staff to help counsel any students who
may need someone to talk to. Conferences
can be arranged privately with any of the advis-
ers or officers, by setting up an appointment.
B-Glad operates in the same manner as any
other campus organization.
"Our society is not set up for gaylesbian
people to feel good about themselves Gersh
said. "Everyone has to fit into a certain catego-
ry or something is wrong what them. Some
people just don't fit into a fixed category. We
can do things to help those people feel good
about themselves
Aside from actual incidents of vandalism,
members of B-Glad face more common acts of
prejudice which Gersh said are more hurtful.
"People say many negative, hateful, evil
things Gersh said. "A Letter to the Editor in
TEC said that the two hurricanes that had
recently ravaged our coastline were results of
gays living in North Carolina. Statements like
these are due to ighorance, the ignorance that
we have to deal with every single day
No one has been apprehended for any of
the hate crimes committed against the organi-
zation yet.
"If someone were to get caught vandalizing
a flyer, making a harassing phone call or what-
ever, I am sure that the school would react pos-
itively Gersh said. "After all, it is hard to be a
good student when you are scared for your
life
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Tennis swings into
TUESDAY:
putty sunny
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WEDNESDAY:
partly cloudy
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Joyner's books remain in storage
Materials accessible but
slow
the east Carolinian
STUOCNT PU8LICAT10H 8LDG.
GKENVME. NC 27856
across from Joyner library
Shone
28-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
e-mail
uutecSecuvrn.cisecu.edu
Jacqueline D. Kellum
ARTS AND STUDIES
STAFF WRITER
While the new addition to Joyner Library is
now complete and in use, the construction of
the library is still ongoing. Students need to
be aware that until the entire project is fin-
ished, a small portion of Joyner's collection is
not in Joyner at all, and it may take a little
time to obtain certain materials.
However, they can be obtained, and with-
out much delay, assures Dr. (jail Munde, asso-
ciate director of academic library services.
"It hasn't gone to the ends of the earth
Munde said. "We go over every day to the
remote storage location to get things that
people have asked us to bring back for them
Putting some materials in remote storage
was a necessity, both to adhere to certain
guidelines and to accommodate the limited
space available.
"One of the requirements for the building
and renovation program was that the building
could not be closed Munde said. "Until wc
get the whole building completed, we would
not have at any one time Though space to
hold all the material in the collection. So
some of it had to go to remote storage loca-
tion, and it's going to come back at the end of
rhe hnilHinc nroiecr
the building project.
The books currently in remote storage are
those that the administration hopes will be
requested least. They also tried to choose a
group of materials in one category that would
be easy to define to the students.
"We had a long discussion about what
material was most appropriate to go to remote
storage Munde said. "And what we decided
was, works in series published prior to 1980
By works in series, the library administra-
tion means bound journal volumes, or maga-
zines, collected works published in multiple
volumes, encyclopedia sets, and books pub-
lished annually. Certain maps are also in
remote storage.
But all of the remote storage collection is
here in Greenville, and trips are made dairy to
here in Greenville, and trips are made dairy to
retrieve whatever materials have been
requested.
"Generally, if we get a request in the
morning, the courier goes over in the after-
noon, grabs the books, brings them back, and
the patron can have it the next day Munde
said.
There were 332 requests in January, a
higher number than the average month,
which Munde says was probably due to facul-
SEE JOYNER. PAGE 3





-no
3IK!
2 Tuesday. February It. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
UNC-CH lands three top scholars
.en
flip
1UU
� J
Case tests legality of state's drug tax
RALEIGH (AP) - A lawyer says a judge was incorrect in ruling that the state law
levying taxes on illegal drugs constitutes criminal punishment for drug offens-
es- ,���
Franklin Ballenger was caught with two pounds of manjuana in his car in
1994. The trooper contacted agents from the state Department of Revenue,
who handed Ballenger a bill for $3,837.24 in taxes for the marijuana under the
Controlled Substance Tax Act.
Ballenger paid the taxes and when he got to court in Greensboro, was
after the trial judge said Ballenger had already been punished by the
On Tuesday, the stare Supreme Court will hear legal arguments on whether
Eagles was correct in her ruling.
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) - The
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill has scored an academic
�up by landing three top scholars in
he field of black literature.
Trudier Harris, William Andrews
md Mae Henderson arrived last fall,
moving UNC-CH's English depart-
ment to national prominence ftr the
study of black literature.
"They are three outstanding
people said Nellie McKay, profes-
sor of African-American literature at
the University of Wisconsin. "It
made for a lot of talk that all three
were hired at the same time. It's
very unusual for an institution to
have the resources and the will to do
that
Harris and Andrews are two of
the editors of the new Norton
Anthology of African-American
Literature and the soon-to-be-
released Oxford Companion to
African-American Literature.
UNC-CH already had two pro-
fessors teaching black literature,
Lee Greene and Fred Hobson. And
retired English professor Blyden
Jackson, the grandson of slaves and
the first black to become a full pro-
fessor at UNC, led the way years ago
for today's scholars.
Laurence Avery, then depart-
ment chairman, led the move to hire
more scholars in black literature
three years ago.
"Any time you try to hire senior
people with national standing, it's
difficult Avery said. "When you
find the ones who can help you, you
do what you can to make it impossi-
ble for them to say no
He started with Harris, who left
Chape! Hill in 1993 after Emory
University offered her a 35 percent
pay raise and a sabbatical her first
year.
Back at UNC-CH, Harris was
given her old position as J. Carlyle
Sitterson professor of English and
now earns $140,000 annually. Two of
her students from Emory followed
her.
She is on leave this year at the
National Humanities Center for a
project on the strength of black
female characters in American litera-
ture.
At the same she was being
recruited, UNC-CH was trying to
hire William Andrews, a professor at
the University of Kansas who earned
his master's and doctoral degrees at
UNC-CH in the 1970s.
"We really do have a critical mass
here Andrews said. "Clearly the
university wants African-American
literary study to be an important
part of the curriculum here
Mae Henderson, a Fayetteville
native who taught at the University
of Illinois at Chicago, is working on
two books, one on black women
writers and one on expatriate
authors in Europe.
"UNC is now poised to become
one of the top five centers of
African-American literature studies
in this country she said.
� n i
Former college president mires politics friendship
.3
liUI.
�t i
Woman sprays roommate with gasoline
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - A woman angry because her roommate was intoxicat-
ed and refused to drive her own car doused her friend with gasoline and set her
ablaze, police said.
Nicole Dicken, 22, was dead on arrival Sunday at Wishard Hospital with
third-degree bums over 98 percent of her body, hospital spokesman Joe DiLaura
said. . .
Her roommate, Sherrell Russell, 26, was arrested and held on suspicion of
murder, Marion County Sheriffs Col. Scott Miniersaid.
About 4 a.m Ms. Russell asked a clerk at the southside gas station to call a
cab for Ms. Dicken because she didn't want to drive her back to their apart-
ment, Minier said.
But minutes later, as Ms. Russell filled up the car's gas tank, she aimed the
pump at her roommate and ignited the stream of gas with a lighter, Minier said.
ELON COLLEGE, N.C. (AP) - The
late Speaker of the U.S. House of
Representatives Tip O'Neill crafted
the familiar phrase, "all politics is
local
For Earl Danicley, who just com-
pleted his 50th year at Eton College,
that axiom would have to change to
"all politics is personal
The 72-year-old Danicley knows
that the power of persuasion is based
on friendship. As president of Eton, a
post he held for 16 years, he marched
alongside student protesters. As a
UNC lobbyist, he sent birthday cards
to legislators. And as a fund-raiser for
Eton, his alma mater, he traveled
thousands of miles to sit with poten-
tial donors.
Recently, Danieley finished his
latest challenge. For two years, he
accidentally used radioactive bullets
TOKYO (AP) - US. Marine Corps jets accidentally fired 1320 radioactive bul-
lets during a training exercise near Okinawa, but the rounds pose no danger to
human health or the environment, the U.S. military said today.
The United States said it didn't notify the Japanese government of the gun-
fire, which occurred in late 1995 and carry 1996, until last month. News of the
gunfire, first reported in Monday's editions of The Washington Times ahead of
the military's planned announcement, comes in the face of growing anti-US.
military sentiment on Okinawa, Japan's southernmost island where approxi-
mately 28,000 U.S. troops arc stationed.
Under a U.SJapan agreement, no nuclear weapons can be stored on
Okinawa during peacetime. The bullets arc classified as regular weapons
because they use depleted uranium, from which most dangerous variants of the
radioactive metal have been removed.
DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
walked the halls of the state Capitol,
lobbying on behalf of the UNC sys-
tem. As an active Republican and for-
mer member of the UNC Board of
Governors, Danieley knew many of
the state's politicians, and those
friendships proved valuable when his
party gained control of the N.C.
General Assembly in 1994.
Sitting in his small Eton College
office, the stocky, 6-foot-2 professor
laughs as he tells the story of one of
his first get-to-know-you meetings
with state Rep. Robert Grady, R-
Onslow, chairman of the House edu-
cation appropriations committee.
After Danieley introduced himself
as a UNC representative, Grady eyed
him coolly and said, "This is the first
time in five years anyone from the
university system has come to my
office
Danieley broke into a grin. "Well
he said. "I'm glad I came then
That, as they say, was the begin-
ning of a beautiful friendship, one of
dozens Danieley forged in trie legisla-
ture these past two years. Grady
explains that Danieley arrived at a
time when Republicans had been
feeling neglected by UNC officials
who, in turn, were not accustomed to
being probed about the way they han-
dled their budgets.
"Dr. Danieley could sort of step
up between this gulf of mistrust and,
with instant credibility, say, 'You
know I'm not going to lead you
astray " says Grady, who recalls
Danieley as being more than willing
to track down answers to whatever
questions legislators had.
That personable style and his
longtime dedication to higher educa-
tion earned Danieley the 19 Hugh
McEniry Award from the North
Carolina Association of Colleges and
Universities. Past recipients of this
lifetime achievement award include
former governor and US. Senator
Terry Sanford and former UNC
President William Friday. m'
"He represents so much that
we're trying to recognize with this
award says Alamance Community
College President Ron McCarter,
who chaired the committee that
chose Danieley. McCarter cites
Danieley's ability to move easily
among Democrats and Republicans,
public and private colleges, as exam-
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3 Tuesday. February 11. 1997
news
The East Carolinian
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continued from page 2
pies of his enormous political skill.
"He moves easily and confidently
and with a great deal of credibility in
all of those circles McCarter says.
Danieley began his career with
much simpler ambitions. The son of
a Burlington tobacco farmer, he was
so poor he could not pay the $82 bill
for his first semester at Eton until he
sold a load of tobacco midway
through the semester. The school
was much smaller then, with fewer
than 500 students, most of whom
trained to become cither teachers or
preachers.
Danieley was in the first camp.
He planned to become an elemen-
tary school science teacher, but the
war intervened. He was exempted
from military service for health rea-
sons, but after graduating in 1946, he
received a panicked call from Eton.
The recently passed Gl Bill had
flooded colleges across the country
with new students, Wfould he be will-
ing to come back to Eton to teach
chemistry?
He never looked back. Danieley
has taught chemistry on and off for
the last 50 years. After receiving his
master's and doctorate from UNC-
Chapel Hill, Danieley left Eton in
1956 to do post-doctoral research at
Johns Hopkins University. The fol-
lowing year, he got another out-of-
the-blue phone call from Eton. The
board of trustees had just named him
as the college's next president.
He was 32 years old.
Danieley says he was unfazed by
the responsibilities heaped on him at
so young as age. Having been dean of
the college, he explains, prepared
him for the presidency. Moreover, he
had a clear idea of where to lead Elon.
He wanted it to earn the respect
of other North Carolina colleges.
Danieley recai.ls che stinging
embarrassment he felt shortly after
graduating from Eton, where he ran
into a dean at the UNC-Chapel Hill
graduate school he wanted to attend.
"You know the dean said, "that
Eton is not accredited
Danieley did not know that, and
felt ashamed by the way in which
that dean implied that his alma
mater was not a legitimate college.
His admission to Chapel Hill was
conditional upon Eton's accredita-
tion, which it received that fall. But
he never forgot that feeling of shame.
"I had in the back of my mind that
the day would come when other pri-
vate colleges in North Carolina
would look to Elon as one of the
best he says.
When he got the chance ten years
later, Danieley set out to make that
happen. He raised faculty salaries,
expanded the campus, strengthened
the college's finances and added sev-
eral new degree programs. Today,
Eton's enrollment stands at 3,500 and
U.S. News & World Report has
placed it in the top tier of Southern
colleges and universities.
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During his presidency, Danieley
kept a tight reign on the campus. His
strict, fatherly approach, he believes,
helped Elon avoid much of the tur-
bulence found on other campuses in
the 1960s.
"In order to have the really angry
protests, you need anonymity
Danieley says. "If I know you, and I
know your daddy, you're not going to
misbehave in front of me
Case in point: one night in 1962,
Danieley got word that a group of
students, upset that he arranged to
attend a conference instead of the
homecoming parade, planned a
protest outside his home. That night,
Danieley hid in the bushes and when
the students arrived, he joined in
their march to the campus auditori-
um, where he found an effigy of him-
self hanging from the entrance.
Embarrassed, the students quickly
took it down and Danieley agreed to
preside over homecoming.
Danieley retired in 1973, at the
ripe old age of 48, to return to his first
love: teaching. A decade later, he was
named to sit on the UNC Board of
Governors.
UNC President CD. Spangler
remembers Danieley's influence
well.
"He was always the voice of calm
experience Spangler says. "No mat-
ter what the issue was, he was there
to add wisdom and grace
During this time, Danieley also
became heavily involved in fund rais-
ing for Eton. for his assistant, he
tapped a former students of his, Ray
Covington.
Like many of Danieley's associ-
ates, Covington, now head of fund
raising for Greensboro College, con-
tinues to be amazed at Danieley vast
network of friends. One day, he
recalls, the two were driving back to
Elon from a trip to Richmond, Vfc. As
they sped past a car along Interstate
40, Danieley turned to him and said:
Why that was the first black student
to attend Elon.
Danieley insisted Covington slow
down so he could signal the other car
to pull over. Danieley and his former
student, whom he hadn't seen in
years, hugged and held an impromp-
tu reunion on the side of the highway.
D.G. Martin, UNC's vice presi-
dent for public affairs, says Danieley's
warmth is genuine, but it doesn't
interfere with his strong convictions.
"The thing I've seen in him is
that being nice and being gentle and
considerate is not inconsistent with
being very strong in advocating your
position and dealing with strength
says Martin, who worked as a lobbyist
alongside Danieley.
"He's tough but it's not accompa-
nied by a lot of bravado
NOTICE: There will be an A.B.LE
meeting for general members
tomorrow evening at 6 p.m. at
the Ledonia Wright African
American Cultural Center
(Bloxton House).
2M97
Krispy Kremc Doughnuts Co.
300 E. Tenth Street
830-1528
Open 24 Hours
Love
continued from page 1
doms on and taking them off.
ASHA began sponsoring National
Condom Day in 1992.
"We encourage sex partners to
talk openly about the sensitive sub-
ject of sexual health and to use con-
doms to protect one another from
Joyner
continued from page 1
ty trying to do research while
school was not in session.
Those books currently in remote
storage arc the previously mentioned
works published prior to 1980, letters
A-N of the alphabet. The letter P will
sexually transmitted diseases
Clarke said. "By using condoms you
may avoid transmitting an infection
that you don't even know you have
Free, confidential information
about STDs is available through the
National STD Hotline, which is
operated by ASHA, at 1-800-227-
8922. Students with questions or
who need more information may
contact Heather Zophy at 328-6794.
be moved throughout the Spring
semester, and Q-Z will be moved
during the first summer session.
Students doing intensive research
projects which may require some of
these materials should keep these
limitations in mind when beginning
their research, and altow the library
staff adequate time to retrieve mate-
rials.
:
?5!�l Kill S KlfciHS Mlfcif 5 Wf mil 5
m
g to Mendenhall Student Center
P
���
YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY -
Lighting the �ffk:
HetloaUng a? Retaining " Hembets
Leadership Seminar featuring
Dr. Martha Wisby, Dean of Student Life Development
Wednesday, Feb. 19 from 5-6 p.m. in Great Room 3

s
Mtumina '97
M
Student Art Exhibit in the Mendenhall Gallery through Feb. 28.
Closing Reception and Awards Presentation:
Tuesday, Feb. 18,7-9 p.m.
-
5

Coming Soon
Romeo & Juliet (R) Feb. 13-15 in Hendrix Theatre.
Free admission with ECU ID. One guest permitted per I.D.
oiui�w
K
5.
ALL-U-CAN-BOWL
Bowl the night away every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month
from 8-11 p.m. $5 admission includes shoe rental and all the
games you can bowl, plus pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS
Bowl for 50 cents a game every Monday 1-6 p.m. (Shoe rental
included!)
MIDDAY BREAK SPECIAL
Take a break from your hectic class schedule with 10 frames of
discounted bowling. Every Wednesday and Friday from 1 p.m.
until 6 p.m. Only $1 per game (shoe rental included)
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Valentine's Sale runs February 11-15
Look for our
RED HEART RACKS
featuring
25 to 50
off the regular
price of select
Apparel!
Spring Semester Hours:
Monday - Friday: 7:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Saturday: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
SERVICE Mtindy Space. Central Ticket Office � Bowling � Billiards .Video Games M
.Student Locator Service" AlMs . Food � Computer Lab � TV Lounge . R-desR.ders Board N
. Art Gallery � Mali Services � Lockers � Newsstand
HOURS:Mon-Thurs.8a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat. 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.m.
As always, IREE
GIFTWRAPPIHG of
Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support Scholars!
your purchase!
Wright Building V 388-6731 wwwstudentstores,ecu,edu
V V





4 Tuesday, February 11, 1997
comics
The East Carolinian
Sparc Time
By Parkas
BIOL 3221
By Rebekah Phillips
Peer Health Educators are available
to do one hour programs for any class,
organization, or residence hall. We
offer programs that are informal
and non-threatening on topics such as
weight a.i body image, STD's, alcohol,
date rape and safer tanning. To request
a program call Health Promotion and
Well Being at 328-6793 or stop by
210 Whichard.
BMte:xr zh rove MrcxostoPB-
Snowman's Land
How Would you
LlKi To Bt Rich!
WouldX oue
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By Rob Chapman
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Such SofetoW
T THltJK X WILL 4TOP V0E.LL,
AWSt TO�l�OReoW.
HEY! THAT'S CtRCAT You SrtuU GT
n PUBLISHED.
Y? Volleyball At Hour Apartments?
HAH&& CLUB CAN HBlft
PLAYER CLUB
APARTMENTS
O 1997 Tnbuns Media S�tvk�i, Inc
All limits reservad
ACROSS
1 Use a towel
5 Intone
10 Tin
13 Yemen capital
14 Beer
15 Ashen
16 Page
17 Speak
pompously
18 Nora's pet
19 Act of assuming
control
21 Moor
23 Kind of school
abbr.
24 Willow rod
25 Solemn
28 Washes
31 Gems
32 TNT part
33 Slugger's need
34 Baseball team
35 Dike
36 Spouse
37 Collection of
anecdotes
38 Lid
39 Venerated
symbol
40 Considered
42 Slivers
43 Mideast ruler:
var.
44 Drink
45 Military forces
47 Steeds
51 Performs
52 Holland flower
54 Location
55 Motels
56 Burning
57 Group of hoods
58 Make lace
59 Lassoed
60 Major ending
DOWN
1 A Disney
2 Thought
3 Top
4 Weaken
5 in�(living a
carefree life)
6 Part of a Muslim
household
7 Lab gel
8 Clear, as profit
9 Stored wealth
10 Shopper's
delight
11 Choir member
12 Not far away
15 Walked back
and forth
20 Spanish cheers
22 Spanish boy
24 Western
25 Detecting device
26 Think
27 Higher-ups
28 Dwelled
29 Ranked
ANSWERS
PROM THURSDAY
30 Rower parts
32 At no time
35 Polaris
36 House debt
38 American Indian
39 God of thunder
41 Awry
42 Formed
44 Actress Talia
45 Mine entrance
46 � Barrett
47 Rim extract
48 QED word
49 Lease
50 Herb
53 Sky sight?
WHO: Tom Younce
Assistant Chief of Police
tVHAl: "ntroduction To Scuba Diving
WH:il: Tuesday, February 25,1997
WHERt: Mendenhall Underground
WHY: To Feed Your Brain
Bring Your Lunch
FREE Drinks and Gourmet Dessert
H
bomb1c1 TE DM 1 L D
OMARAN OD e D E A
5IIEIsT Ro pfls LAY
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REAP1 1 iACUT E m 1 R A E
A R T ET ONE rn A U f
PEERE WJER sHeIi l s
BATTLE
OFTHE
RANDS'97
THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 1997, 7PM
ON THE MALL
FIRST PRIZE $500,
AND OPENING BAND AT BAREFOOT
SECOND PRIZE $100
DEADLINE! FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21,1997 AT 4PM
TO AUDITION, PLEASE SUBMIT A DEMO TAPE
CONTAINING THREE SONGS, A PRESS-KIT, PLUS
OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM TO THE STUDENT UNION
OFFICE, ROOM 236, MENDENHALL STUDENT
CENTER OR MAIL TO:
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
236 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 328-4715
,V)DE�vr
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For More Information, Call
the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004, or Check Out Our Web S.te!
www.ecu.eduyStudentUnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html





5 Tussdsy, Fsbrairy 11. 1997
opinion
The East Carolinian
eastlfarolinian
Brandon waddelli
MATT HECE MftRWiQ DHiCtvr
Marguerite benjamin imf�a
AMY L ROYSTER Mm Nmi dm
jay Myers utaqtoMw
Dale Williamson Anonm Wmi tw
Amanda Ross StomE�
Patrick ikelan nmEfm
celeste Wilson fntucm
Carole Mbhle mitmtew
andy Parkas Son
heather Burgess mtttm
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In the news today; assuming you're in the habit of reading more than the classifieds,
you read about two students who were the victims of an apartment fire. Though the two
were lucky enough to escape the blaze without physical harm, they lost most of their
material possessions.
Many times news stories are presented in such a way that readers feel like they were
given good information but there's really nothing anyone can do about it. Today is dif-
ferent. Even though TEC brought you this news after the fact, the events and healing
process surrounding this tragedy are far from over.
Getting the fire out and assessing the damage was just the beginning. These room-
mates, Tom Fedash and Eric Stallings, are now in the process of putting their lives back
together. Fortunately, the two have been receiving help from various places, including
their employer, Wal Mart, who realized the struggle involved with recovering form an
apartment fire. Well, you read the story.
Like we said, that was just the beginning. Now there is an opportunity for you, the stu-
dent, who understands the plight of the student better than any corporate conglomer-
ate, to step in and offer assistance. We know there is universal truth to the fact that, with
few exceptions, college students don't know the meaning of "extra" money. However,
when there's a concert in or near town, suddenly we can all spare that precious fifteen
bucks.
Don't get us wrong We're not preaching or telling you to hurry down to forking and
Traffic Services to donate your last fifty cents when you know you need to do laundry.
What we are saying is look around and think of something you can give. If you can't
donate money, then donate food, or time. We're sure there are a lot of things you could
do to help that will cost you little if any.
Look at it this way, it could very well be you next time, or it could be your best friend.
The tragedy these two roommates suffered can serve as an example of how fragile our
everyday lives are, how they can be changed drastically or wiped away in an instant. You
know how frustrated you get when you can't find your favorite jeans. Imagine the frus-
tration of knowing your entire wardrobe just went up in smoke. Think about that, and
be grateful for your fortune. Then look around and see who else can benefit from it.
Breaking in new shoes
Wfe have all heard the old edict
about new shoes having to be "bro-
ken in
If you have to "break in" your new
shoes, you have just spent your
money on clothing that does not fit
you. You are paying t0 hurt yourself
- your feet.
Would you buy a hat, or any other
item of clothing that is too tight, too
short, pinches you, or causes your
skin to blister? Why, of course not.
So should it be with your shoes.
I have never bought a pair of
shoes that hurt me or irritated my
skin when I wore them.
Shoes should fit well and be com-
fortable the very first moment they
touch your feet.
!LETTtRSrQ THE EDITOR
A proper fitting pair of shoes, or
sneakers, should not slide up and
down on the back ankle as you walk.
Blisters can result from shoes that
slide up and down.
The shoes should not be so tight
they pinch your skin or leaves marks
on your feet when you take them off.
Tight shoes leave marks on your feet
when you take them off. Tight
shoes interrupt the flow of blood in
your feet. A good rule to go by is.
snug, not tight.
Your foot should slide easily into
the shoe, just as your hand slides
into a glove.
Adults should have about 12 inch
space in the front of the shoe,
between the toes and the footwear.
Children should have about one
inch. This allows room for growth.
The footwear should have a good
arch, especially for growing children.
Imagine putting a shoe on a horse
that hurts him. That horse would
not be able to walk or run without
pain.
So, the next time, a shoe sales
person tells you, "They need to be
"broken in don't listen.
It is completely unnecessary to
go through a period of pain to get
the shoes to fit right.
You may have to try on lots of
shoes. I do.
The extra time spent looking for
that perfect fit is well worth it.
SGA executives deserve
� I
THE wHnfc HOW&? I
�mi 0m m
To the Editor:
I am writing regarding the pro-
posed realignment of the Greenville
City Districts. My generation is often
criticized for its low levels of voter par-
ticipation. These proposed changes
are a good example of exactly why
many younger Americans feel their
vote does not count. I feel the pro-
posed changes reflect the political
wishes of some incumbents on the
council. Why should the younger gen-
eration participate at ail when politi-
cians craftily manipulate the system to
their own advantage, instead of being
fair and impartial with their con-
situents?
The proposed city district change
that clearly displays this form of cor-
ruption in politics is the change in city
District 3. The supposed purpose of
the redistricting was to make our city
districts more equal in size. District 3
is the smallest district in the city. Why
then is the council planning to remove
a substantial section of this district
that contains over 1500 registered vot-
ers? Is it a coincidence that Inez
Fridley, the 12-year incumbent in this
district, is removing the area that
voted strongly against her last year
from her district? Is it a coincidence
that over 80 percent of these voters
arc under the age of 25? In 1995, Inez
Fridley came within 38 votes of losing
her seat. Now her constituents who-
chose to support antoher candidate
are being exported. How convenient it
must be for a politician to change the
rules tosui t their excessive incumben-
cy-
It is simply not fair to allow a redis-
tricting plan that is supposed to make
city elections more fair to be manipu-
lated in this way. Please join me in say-
ing "No to this prosed change on
February 13th by attending the City
Council meeting at 7:00 p.m. across
from the Greenville Utility Building
downtown. Vfe need to speak out on
this issue.
Lucy J. Goodwin
Senior
Biology
The East Carolonian is now accepting
applications for Opinion Columnists.
Apply at our office on the second
floor of the Student Pubs. bldg.
Guest columnist application
for Campus View
1
I
f
I
This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TBC
I
I
what you think about a certain topic. Please return this
form The East Carolinian office in the Student Pubs.
Building. Please print
Name
Fr SophQ Ji-n SrQ
Phone number
Topic(s) about which I would like to write.
Please consider me for a postjon as guest columnist for TEC. I agree to allow TEC's staff to edit my sub- I
mission for grammar, punctuation and libelous content Other than those changes I will be notified of any '
changes that may affect the length or content I understand TEC reserves the right to reject my submis-
sion. If I am selected, TEC will notify me two weeks in advance of publication; at that time a deadline for!
submission will be assigned by the editor.





8 TuMdiy, Februery 11. 1887
lifestyle
Series features North Carolina author
Dale Williamson
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
American society will be explored and
examined in an invigorating manner on
Feb. 13 when the Writers Reading
Series of Eastern North Carolina
invites master storyteller Allan
Gurganus to share his published works
to the Greenville community.
Best known for his successful books
Oldest Living Confederate Widow Ms All
(1989) and White People (1991),
Gurganus is one North Carolinian who
sees great artistic value in the little sto-
ries of small communities. Many of his
stories are set in N.C and they delve
into such Southern issues as racism,
family values and community.
Gurganus, who was bom not far from
Greenville in Rocky Mount, NC, still
resides in North Carolina, but his
career as a writer has taken him down
many roads outside the Tarheel state.
He earned his education at the
University of Pennsylvania, the
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and
Harvard University; served as a profes-
sor of fiction at such schools as the
University of Iowa and Stanford
University; and co-founded a series of
nationwide readings entitled "Writers
for Harvey Gantt? On top of all of
these achievements, he has also won
several notable honors and awards,
including the Sir Walter Raleigh Cup
for Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells
All and the Los Angles Times Book Prize
for the best work of American fiction in
1991 for White People.
Despite his national success,
Gurganus has not forsaken his Southern
heritage. In an interview with Publishers
Weekly, Gurganus explained his connec-
tion to the South: "I couldn't write
about the South while I lived in it.
When I left, I realized how much a part
of the South I was - and am
As a result of his own personal his-
torical connection to the South,
Gurganus developed a deep interest for
history in general, an interest which
would play large roles in his fictional
efforts. For example, one incentive for
his writing Oldest Living Confederate
Widow Tells All revolved around a star-
tling discovery concerning his family's
past. While serving with the U.S. Navy
in California, he uncovered through old
census records that his great-grandpar-
ents were slave owners. This shocking
realization forced Gurganus to ask him-
self, as he told Publishers Weekly, "Now
what can I learn about myself from
this?"
This not-so-simple question has, in
many ways, been the driving force
behind Gurganus' writing. He explores
American society and Southern history
in an effort to explore himself.
Gurganus was quoted in Contemporary
Literary Criticism as explaining that his
stories are "about a kind of struggle
against a puritan ethic, even when
they're comical an attempt at honest
and ruthless self-examination in the
face of these expectations of ourselves
we're all strapped with - expectations
we often fall short of
Gurganus' fiction has succeeded
beyond his own expectations, with the
commercial world as well as the critical.
Many distinguished scholars have com-
mended Gurganus on his narrative
skills, including Henry Louis Gates, Jr
another man renowned for exploring
one's past through writing. In
Contemporary Literary Criticism, Gates
praises Gurganus for his ability to write
"without a safety net; no precautions
are taken against pathos, bathos, autho-
rial indignity. As a result, his best sto-
ries command a sort of sublimity of the
mundane; they locate the dangerous
glamour in ordinariness
As for Gurganus himself, he strives
for a sense of balance within his writing;
he walks the tight rope between comi-
cal relief and harsh reality. As Gurganus
told the San Francisco Review, "There are
as many kinds of pain as fiction, and
because I find being in trouble comic,
my ambition has been to write the fun-
niest things possible about the worst
things that can happen to you as a
human being. A sense of music, a sense
of history, and a sense of justice are all
necessary for the fiction writer
Come share these sensations with
Allan Gurganus on Thursday, Feb. 13
and experience the South like you've
never experienced it before. You may
learn something about yourself. There
will be a Meet the Writer session at the
Greenville Museum of Art, 802 South
Evans St at 3 p.m. The reading itself
will be held at the Willis Building, 300
E. 1st St at 7 p.m. A reception and
book sale will follow the reading.
Stay glued to TEC for a notice on
Sue Standing, who will join the Writers
Reading Series on March 24.
For more information about the
readings or the Writers Reading Series
in general, contact Julie Fay at 328-
6578.
Author Allan Gurganus will explore Southern
as part of the Writers Reading Series.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WRITERS READING SERIES
Dance '91 is poetry in motion
Jennifer Coleman
Senior Writer
Clmi:Jtmm-
Htm: triliiiiajUJi. NC
Dance equates to poetry without words. I can't write poetry, and
I can barely understand it, but I love to read it.
The same goes for dance. I love to watch it being performed.
I love the music and the way the dancers have such control over
their bodies, but there is nothing on this earth short of a major
act of God that would give me the talent to be able to perform
it. I think that is why I was so impressed by Dance '91.
The first piece in the show was entitled "Opus 9, 24" and
was choreographed by Joseph Carow. It was a traditional ballet
piece and was, as is all ballet in my opinion, absolutely beauti-
ful. If I had to pick my favorite form of dance, I would have to
say classical ballet. The dancers in this piece exemplified what
I consider to be the classic ballerina. Even without tu-tus, the
pink, purple and green costumes gave me a feeling of total ele-
gance and style. I especially enjoyed Rebecca Revkin's scarf-
dance in the third variation.
The second piece was entitled "Avatar" and was a dance
improv piece choreographed by Dr. Dawn Clark. It started off in
a sea of fog, with the dancers wrapped like mummies inside a
white, box-car like cage. As the dancers began to move, I was
incredibly impressed by the unity of their movement. The
music was described as "The Future Sounds of London" and
was equally as eerie as the setting.
The third piece, titled "Interplay Two was choreographed
by Patricia Fertalion. This was a really fun piece. There were
two dancers, Richard A. Sith and Paula Chrismon. They were
dressed in white, with vests made of brightly colored square- or
diamond-shaped sections. There was also a trunk on stage,
which was painted to match their vests. Inside the trunk were
props which the dancers used throughout the piece. My
favorites were the "flapper sequence which reminded me of
the Roaring 70s, and the masks. The dancers pulled these
masks out of the trunk and put them on the back of their heads.
I swear, from where I was sitting, it looked like their heads were
on backwards.
The fourth piece, "Tides was choreographed by Rodger
Belman of New York City. The costumes had really neat colors,
but I felt that they made the dancers appear shapeless. The
thing I liked best about this piece was how the dancers changed
places in silence while still dancing. It was a really interesting
and innovative way to bring the new set of dancers onstage. One
dancer in particular caught my eye during this piece, LoisMarie
Familar. She was in front quite often, and her smile lit up the
stage. She was absolutely radiant.
After intermission, there were three more pieces. The first,
choreographed by Patricia Weeks, was called "Confessions It
had a really interesting theme concerning women's issues and
stories. My favorite part was the section about a woman with
breast cancer, danced by Kathryn Noel Templeton. She revealed
at the end that, without her consent or a biopsy, the doctors had
removed her breast and it was the wrong one.
The next piece was a solo titled "The Wfeakhess in Me
choreographed by Alan Arnett. There was a single light sus-
pended in the air which gave the impression of someone danc-
ing in their living room. It was a powerful piece, and dancer
Sandra B. Tillctt's performance was flawless.
My favorite piece of the show was "Rhapsody in Blue also
choreographed by Alan Arnett. This piece was just total fun. A
combination of ballet, tap and modern, the piece took the form
of a kind of competition between the dancers. The modern
dancers had a character all their own - especially Barbra
Michelle King, who exuded sensuality. This piece gave me faith
in my ability to understand dance; it was almost iike acting, and
it spoke volumes to me.
If you haven't had a chance to sec Dance '91 yet, I suggest you
run over to the McGinnis Box Office and beg for tickets. This
show is a fun-filled evening of beautiful movement that you
don't want to miss. It runs through Tuesday, Feb. 11.
ECU alumnus is
Scream-writer
review
Scream undercuts
the horror genre
ANDY TURNER
SENIOR WRITER
Do you remember that monster called
the '80s? New Wive music bopped on
the radio, parachute pants clung to
your hips, Reaganomics ruled the
world, and Jamie Lee Curtis spent the
carry part of the decade screaming her
ass off in countless teen slasher flicks.
Alas, the '80s are no more, but would-
n't you like to scream again? Jamie
Lee's prom night has long passed, but
the scream is back in Scream, directed
by W;s Craven and written by ECU
grad Kevin Williamson.
This past summer, I watched Prom
Night on my porch with some friends,
knocking back Pabst Blue Ribbon and
swatting flies. I thought about getting
in my car and shining the lights up on
the porch for my own version of
Redneck Drive-In Theater, but my car
was situated wrong on the cin-
derblocks. As fun as that would have
been, it doesn't compare to the fun
Scream delivers.
Scream makes the horror film fun
again by assigning audience members
junior slasher detective badges. How
much horror trivia do you know? What
docs the killer look like? Who are the
likely victims? The characters of
Scream think they know and think
they can identify the killer by using
their knowledge of the slasher canon:
Prom Night, Friday the 13th, Nightmare on
Elm Street, etc.
The plot revolves around Sidney
Prescott (Neve Campbell), who is
harassed over the phone by the
masked killer who has already killed
Paul Lauter leads Tag lecture
for English department
Attention literature fans and all those concerned with the humanities!
The ECU English department will present its Tag Lecture on Monday,
Feb. 17, featuring Paul Lauter as the speaker.
Lauter (who is the Smith Professor of Literature at Trinity College,
General Editor of the Heath Anthology of American Literature , author of
Canons and Contexts, and co-author of The Impact of Women's Studies on the
Campus and the Disciplines)wll present a talk entitled "Dinosaur Culture:
English Studies from Mansfield Park to Jurassic Park The Tag Lecture will
be held at 1031 General Classroom Building at 4 p.m.
Lauter's visit will carry over to the next day when he presents a work-
chop entitled "Designing and Teaching a Multi-Cultural and Feminist
American Literature" on Tuesday, Feb. 18 at 1 p.m. The workshop will be
sponsored by the English Department and the Women's Studies Program.
Receptions will follow both events in the English Faculty Lounge.
For more information on either event, contact Dr. Lillian S. Robinson
at 328-6681.
Andy Turner
SENIOR WRITER
Editor's note: This is the first of a two-
part series. Thursday's edition will have
the conclusion of our interview with ECU
alumnus Kevin Williamson.
At the end of three manic days of
writing the screenplay for what
would become Scream, Kevin
Williamson didn't even have enough
money to print it out.
Last week, Scream climbed back
up the box office Top 10 chart to the
number three spot, putting the 31-
year-old ECU graduate right behind Star Wirs and Jerry Magutre (it s tough to
beat nostalgia or Tom Cniise). �. . . j
The movie, an intelligent rcvitalization of the teen horror flick, has earned
more than $70 million since its release in late December. Somehow, I tWAk
Williamson has paid back the friend who lent him enough money to buy that
printer cartridge.
Williamson was back at ECU last week doing research for a Scream sequel
and visiting his old friends and instructors in the theatre department, where he
spent his undergraduate days training for a career in acting. As he sat in the
theatre department lounge before our interview, he pointed to a half dozen
posters of productions he was involved in during his ECU days. He had the
lead role his senior year in Children of a Lesser God, whose cast list featured
another famous former Pirate, Sandra Bullock. �S
But his acting career never took off.
After graduating in 1987, he went to New York City in search of that career.
He went at it for four years, winning bit parts in soaps and theatre productions.
"That was the extent of my acting career Williamson related. "It was not
successful at all
Williamson traded the east coast for the west coast after he met a music
video director who offered to take him on as an assistant if he was willing to
relocate to Los Angeles. Williamson went, but his success depended on the
director's success, and the director didn't have any. At the time, Williamson was
reading a lot of scripts, which led to a decision to try his hand at screenwriting.
He enrolled in a screenwriting class at UCLA; the class gave him confidence
in his writing abilities. ; .
"I thought, i really can do this Williamson said. "I was finishing the pro-
fessor's sentences in my head
So, he wrote and wrote and came up with Killing Mrs. Tingle, a black come-
dy similar in spirit to Heathers. The storyline revolved around a student who
will do anything to be valedictorian of her class, including killing her English
teacher. Williamson sold the script for a enough money to buy a car and pay off
his debts. However, Killing Mrs. Tingle became lost in the pits of hell - develop-
ment hell - and never resurfaced. Right back where he started from, broke and
hungry, Williamson was a little on edge.
SEE KEVIN. PAGE 7
7H!?(deU
two of her classmates. Sidney's moth-
er was murdered exactly one year ear-
lier. Since her mother's unfortunate

Ran Awty
Sm it tor fr
til






7 Tuesday. February 11, 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
i;
rjp
East Carolina Playhouse
East Carolina Dance Theatre
DANCE '97
February 6, 7, 8, 10, and 11, 1997 at 8:00 p.m.
February 9, 1997 at 2:00 p.m.
feaffa- rszszsz
Call�328-6829
McGinnis Theatre-ECU Main Campus-Corner of Fifth and Eastern Streets
CD
review
GIRLS
fit
r?
Spice Girls
Spice
JOHN DAVIS
STAFF WRITER
The thing about spice is, it's no gpod
on its own. All spice and no food makes
for a lame meal, and with their first
album, this European quintet proves
that they too, have no brains. If you can,
imagine the worst parts of disco - the
campy lyrics, the played out beats, and
the total lack of thought whatsoever.
There hasn't been something this hor-
rible in several years. Milli Vanilli had
more pop savvy at least. Debbie Gibson
had the handicap of being 17 years old,
and the Village People well let's just
say the drugs probably didn't help
them.
If you could compile all the pop and
hip hop cliches from the past five years
Kevin
continued from page 6
o
,sc�
M
Wednesday, February 12
Student Stores.
9:00 a.m.
"I was really, really nervous he
explained.
Williamson wrote mor and devel-
oped an idea about "a little scary
movie" with a B-movie type of sce-
and stir them around, you might come
out with something a little better than
Spice. The beats crafted mostly by
Richard Stannard, Matt Rowe and a DJ
known only as Absolute are predictable
and not even really danceable. The
melodies are without any draw, though
the hook to "Wannabe" is somewhat
catchy. But for the most pan, the music
seems the have been generated by res-
urrecting long-dead (and rightly so),
overused techniques and phrases.
Imagine En Vogue without soul.
Imagine a homy slut with a Casio key-
board and $100,000.
The Spice Girls can sing, but not
with any passion. They can carry a
tune, but they don't even attempt to
harmonize their five voices. (On sec-
ond thought, this is probably a good
thing.) They have little rhythm and no
skill for rapping, yet they insist on con-
tinually doing just that at the end of
nearly every song.
"Who Do You Think You Are?"
comes close to genuine disco, with the
funky guitars and the '70s string
arrangements, but ultimately it fails
due to the flaw that touches every
aspect of this album - all spice, no sub-
stance. The disco is, in the end, a bad
copy. "Mama" takes a stab at a gospel
tribute, but it flops on its face, mostly
due to the fact that the gospel choir
sounds awfully white. Never mind that
the lyrics are about as inspiring as pow-
nario. He had long held a love for the
horror flick dating back to the days of
Michael Myers and the Halloween
series. Williamson wanted to write
something that encouraged audience
participation, but audiences had
grown too sophisticated and knew all
the tricks of the slasher sourcebook.
But Williamson thought, if you play on
that, and concentrate on character
development, and throw in a little
twist, maybe
dered milk.
Thematically, the lyrics revolve
around sex, and how to get it from one
or any of the Spice Girls. Most of the
songs focus on how sexy the Spice
Girls are, and how much one might
want to have sex with them, as exem-
plified in "Last Time Lover" "Do you
think I'm really cool and sexy, and I
know you wanna get with me Some
bubblegum raps fill out the breaks in
the songs, asserting such wonders of
intelligence as "On and on with the
girls named Spice You wanna get with
us, then you'd better think twice
There seems to be a group sex
theme running throughout the album.
Aside from that last line, the chorus
from "Wannabe the first radio single,
declares "If you wanna be my lover, you
gotta get with my friends One pre-
sumes this is so that one's sexual
prowess can be evaluated
The most interesting aspect of the
album is the cover art. It features the
Spice Girls in various outfits and poses,
and it displays their philosophies on
the inside of the cover. Some of the
more eloquent phrases are:u The spice
squad are here "Riture is female
and "What are you looking at boy?"
With such powerful slogans as these,
and with such thought-provoking
songs, the Spice Girls may do the patri-
archy a favor and set the women's
movement back a couple of decades.
Maybe at the end of three days of
writing, you'll give your script to your
agent on a Friday, he'll shop it around
Hollywood, and on Monday, a bidding
war will ensue over your script. You'll
have Paramount, Morgan Creek,
Miramax and Oliver Stone fighting
over you. Miramax will win and give
you a three-picture deal.
Maybe became a reality for
Williamson.
Scream
continued from page 6
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Is an international exchange
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Hear ECU students talk about their
experiences and obtain information on such
opportunities
When: 4:00 Today (Feb. 11)
Where: GCB 3008
These opportunities often come at a small
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Sponsored by Phi Beta Delta (The
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demise, Sidney has been a bit frigid
with her boyfriend Billy (Skeet
Ulrich). Billy gets arrested as a sus-
pect in the murders, but is eventual-
ly released. The frightened town
imposes an early curfew as the killer
continues to run loose. Who done it?
The kids aren't scared. They throw a
party, drink lots of beer and watch
lots of horror movies. The killer
shows up at the party and all heck
breaks loose.
The actors do a superb job, playing
up the goofs and the spooks equally
well. Drew Barrymore, who doesn't
have time to get naked in this one, is
effective as the tease who gets it.
Campbell (Party of Five) is a great vir-
ginal heroine. "Friend" Courteney
Cox as a sleazy tabloid reporter and
Matthew Lillard as the smartass
Stuart are both hilarious. Most enjoy-
able to watch, however, are David
Arquette as the bumbling Deputy
Dewey Riley and Rose McGowan as
his younger and tormenting sister.
"Mom said you have to treat me like
an officer of the law when I'm wear-
ing this uniform Deputy Dewey
pleads, ail the while winning over tor-
mented siblings everywhere.
Wes Craven, who holds a Master's
degree in writing and philosophy
from Johns Hopkins University in
Baltimore, again adds to his horror
resume that includes such classics as
Nightmare on Elm Street, The Hills Have
Eyes and The Serpent and the Rainbow.
He has always managed to mix humor
and horror effectively, and Scream is
no exception.
As for Williamson, his wonderfully
twisted script should certainly
reserve him a spot in the horror
canon. His future appears bright as
there are plans for a Scream pan deux
in the works.
I wonder if I can still fit into my
parachute pants?
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Thursday. Februtry 6, 1997
� f?ftf L
Rice steals MVP from Jordan
CLEVELAND (AP) - Michael Jordan walked away from the All-Star game with
a smile, but no MVP trophy. On the way out, ever so tantalizingty, he left the
door open that this might have been his last All-Star appearance.
Jordan started the East's comeback from a 23-point deficit. Glen Rice fin-
ished it, and it was Rice who got the MVP hardware after the East's 132-120 vic-
tory Sunday night.
"I am the best player in the world - today said Rice, who had 26 points and
scorched the West with a barrage of 3-pointers. "I have the MVP"
Jordan spent much of the weekend assuring the world that he wants to
return to the Chicago Bulls next season. But after an incredible evening in front
of the greats of the sport, Jordan said this wouldn't be a bad All-Star finale.
"It could have been the last said Jordan, who had 14 points, 11 rebounds
and 11 assists for the first triple-double in All-Star history. "I think that is the
way that I want to leave - smiling and saying I had a great time competing
against some of the young talent, some of the best talent in the world
"I don't have a problem saying this could be my last Ali-Star game
Compagnoni finds gold again in Alps
SESTRIERE, Italy (AP) - With horns blowing and thousands of Italians sere-
nading her with chants, Deborah Compagnoni won the giant slalom Sunday for
her second gold medal of the World Alpine Ski Championships.
Italy's best woman skier in history, now a rival of slalom star Alberto Tomba
for national stardom, skied two excellent runs to finish in 2 minutes, 39.19 sec-
onds. She has now won five gold medals in the Olympics or world champi-
onships.
"This was the race I wanted most to win Compagnoni said. "This was my
race. Winning two world golds at the same championships as Alberto did last
year in Spain seemed like an impossible thing to do. But I did it
Switzerland's Karin Roten was second in 2:39.99 and Leila Piccard of France
was third in 2:40.95.
"The support of the fans here was fantastic Compagnoni said. "But at one
point I couldn't even hear them because I was concentrating so much
Compagnoni is only the fourth woman in the 60-year history of the champi-
onships to win consecutive titles in the same discipline. She won the giant
slalom a year ago in Spain and won the slalom title Wednesday.
Bickerstaff reaches tentative agreement with Bullets
DENVER (AP) - Denver Nuggets general manager Bernie Bickerstaff has
reached a tentative agreement to become head coach of the Washington Bullets,
according to reports today in two Denver newspapers.
Bullets general manager Wes Unseld, in Cleveland for the All-Star game, told
The Denver Post and the Rocky Mountain News that he examined a contract
from Bickerstaff's agent. Bill Pollak, on Sunday and agreed to the terms.
"We plan to announce something (today) Unseld said.
Bickerstaff, who will turn 53 on Tuesday, was an assistant coach with
Washington from 1973-1985, helping the Bullets win the 1978 NBA title. He
coached Seattle for five seasons before joining the Nuggets in 1990 as president
of basketball operations and general manager.
He took over as Denver's head coach near the end of the 1994-95 season.
The Nuggets went 35-47 in their only full season under Bickerstaff, and were 4-
9 when lie stepped down Nov. 26. Denver is 12-23 under Dick Motta.
Money man O'Meara makes it two straight
SAN DIEGO (AP) - Mark O'Meara could have faltered on the closing holes of
the Buick Invitational, like everyone else.
He told himself otherwise and walked away with another title, another
(270,000, another car and a nice dose of consistency
O'Meara shot a 1-under-par 71 Sunday on the tough Torrey Pines South
Course to finish two strokes better than a pack of seven golfers tied for second
place.
OMeara became the first player to win consecutive tournaments since Peter
Jacobsen also won at Pebble Beach and then the Buick Invitational in 1995.
O'Meara, who tops the money list, has collected a whopping 1710,460 in four
tournaments.
Feeling the toll of his one-stroke win over Tiger Woods at Pebble Beach and
struggling with his tee shots all weekend at Torrey Pines, his home away from
home, OMeara paused on the ninth fairway and told himself to dig deeper. His
goal was to play the back nine in 5-under, which he'd done on Thursday.
He did it in 3-under, good enough to win.
oUiJl Lo
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Player serves up victories
a

Mike Daniska
srrr WHITER
For the past nine seasons, Coach Bill
Moore has been working hard to build
a winning tennis tradition at ECU.
That hard work has begun to pay off,
due in part to the play of sophomore
Kenny Kirby.
"He is a good little fighter Moore
said. "And he has an impressive con-
ference record
For the Wilmington native, who
was ranked number 1 in the state as a
junior in high school, tennis is a fami-
ly affair.
"My brother played for his high
school and my mom and I would go to
watch him play Kirby said. "I started
hitting with him and developed from
there
Despite growing up near UNC-
Wilmington, Kirby chose to attend
their rival, ECU.
"UNC-Wilmington wasn't quite as
good Kirby said. "Plus, I wanted to
go somewhere new. And Coach Moore
treated me really well
Both Kirby and ECU have benefit-
ed from the choice. Overall, last sea-
son went well. The team finished fifth
in the competitive CAA, which
includes top 20 power, Virginia
Commonwealth, and even beat
despised rival, N.C. State.
"Virginia Commonwealth is
extremely good Kirby said. AII of
their players are from overseas, and
most play on the pro tour
Kirby also had winning singles and
doubles records last year.
This season has seen steady
improvement for the team, as well as
for Kirby.
"We are definitely getting better
Coach Moore said. "We are moving in
a positive direction
In the state tournament at the
beginning of the fall, Kirby reached
the quarterfinals, finishing with a 3-1
record. The player he lost to eventual-
ly won the state tournament.
This past weekend also saw Kirby
and teammates try to continue the
winning tradition. Friday, against
James Madison, Kirby played no. 2
singles and survived 7-5, 7-6. Later
that day against Georgetown, Kirby
won in doubles 6-2, 6-2. On Saturday,
Kirby suffered a setback to Wake
Forest's Mike Boyer, but rebounded
that afternoon to stop East Tennessee
State 7-5, (2-6), 7-5. This weekend
brings Kirby's record to 3-2 in singles
play and 2-0 in doubles for the season.
Next year, though, things could be
even better for the Pirates. The team
is really deep and talented, but has
only one senior this year. Such an
experienced team could be hard to
stop next year.
"The growing process is this year
Kirby said. "Next year should be fan-
tastic. But it also depends on what
other teams do
So what does the future hold for
this business finance major? Could
playing on the ATP tour be in the
cards?
"I would like to play satellite (chal-
lenge) tournaments Kirby said.
"Tennis has been such a great thing
for me. I will just see what happens
Kenny Kirby has provan to ba an aca for th man's tennis team.
PHOTO BY SIKfDJAISKDJ
Records set at track meet invitational
ZlNA BRILEY
STAFF WHITS
The ECU Men's Sprint Squad and
Women's Track and Held Team trav-
eled to Blacksburg, Vh and left their
mark at the Virginia Tech Invitational
on Friday and Saturday.
Both teams continued to shine as
they lit up the track. The Lady Pirates
rewrote the record books by setting
four new school records. Amanda
Johnson and Michelle Clayton took
another step up in each of their
events, Johnson in the women's 60-
meter dash and Clayton in the
women's 20 pound weight throw.
Johnson started the weekend by
setting a school record during Friday
night's trials running 7.77. On
Saturday, Johnson placed second in
the women's Ions jump, leaping 186"
and teammate Lave Wilson placed
"We had our best
effort yet"
Bill Carson
ECU Head Coach
fifth with a jump of 18
Clayton continued to show her
strength and skill in the field events
placing second in the women's weight
throw with a distance
of 50' 6" and Leigh
Branon stepped into
the spotlight placing
ninth in the women's
shot put. with her
throw of 389
The Lady Pirates
continued with out-
standing perfor-
mances starting with the women's
4x400 meter relay (Carmen Wfeldon.
Keisha Johnson, Rasheca Barrow and
Shauntae Hilt). These ladies stepped
up and set a new record when they
placed fourth with a time of 3:56.26,
just missing ECAC qualifying time.
ECU set their fourth and final record
in the women's distance medley relay
(Robin Bates, Weldon, Erin Cottos
of 13.01.
Other Lady Pirate top five finish-
ers included Barrow and Weldon in
the women's 200- meter dash. Barrow
and Weldon finished
fourth and fifth, respec-
tively. Barrow also finished
sixth in the 60-meter dash,
7.84.
On the men's side, ECU's
Titus Haygood took home
top honors by capturing
first place in the men's 60-
meter dash on Saturday
while fellow Pirates filled in the other
top spots. Haygood took first in 6.87,
Bevan Foster placed second, his time
6.92 and Marcus Gladden rounded out
the top spots coming in fourth with a
time of 6.95.
In the men's 4x400 meter relay
(Darrick Ingram, Mike Miller, James
Alexander and Damon Davis) ECU
was knocked out of the top spot by
and Karen Reinhard) with their time Clemson for a second place finish.
The Tigers won the event in 3:12.39. .
while the Pirates finished in 3:12.72.
" We had our best effort vet ECU
Head Coach Bill Carson said. "The
race was actually closer than the time.
Overall we had great performances
Haygood missed taking home
other honors when he was disqua' �, :
in the men's 200 meters for stepping
out of his lane.
Other finishers for the Pirates -vere
Gladden (22.57), Foster (22.59) and
Rey (22.73) in the men's 200 meter
dash, and Termayne Nunley in the
60-meter hurdles (8.69). In the dis-
tance events, ECU's Jamie Mance fin-
ished 28th in the 3,000-meters
(8:46.05), while fellow running mates
Brian Beil and Rod Reeves finished
35th and 59th, respectively. In the
mile run, David Baton finished 31st in
4:39.22.
Next stop for the Pirates is the
George Mason Collegiate Invitational
on Saturday, Feb. 16, in Fairfax, Va.
rg
Reggie Hamphill - TB, 6-2, 215,
Jamestown, NC (Ragsdale HS)
Selected as USA Today Honorable
Mention All AmericanMid
Piedmont 3-A Conference Offensive
Player of the Yeara two time all-con-
ference selectionselected Offensive
Player of the Game in the 3-A state
championship, where Ragsdale fin-
ished runner upselected All-State
by NC Prep magazinean All-
Guilford County selection by
Greensboro Dairy News Record and
All-Northwest by the Winston -Salem
Journalrushed for 2,173 yards as a
senior on 356 carries and scored 29
TD's.
Leonard Henry - RB, 6-1.195.
Clinton, NC (Clinton HS)
Regarded as one of the top running
backs in the statenamed to the 1996
AP all-state teamran for over 1,900
yards and scored 22 touchdowns
senior yearaveraged seven and one-
half tackles a game on
defense�scored six TD's in a playoff
game versus Plymouth as
juniorplayed in 17 playoffteam
advanced to the NC 2-a champi-
onship game three times during
careerwon the title as senior with
25-14 victory over Bandys. .2-A
champ, game Offensive MVP as
senior as he rushed for 103 yards a
touchdown on 18 carrieswon the
Offensive MVP in title game as a
juniorthree year All-East Central
Conference selectionnamed to the
Fayctteville Observer Times all-
region teamalso named all-state at
linebacker.
Delayo Dodd - WR, 6-5. 225,
Winston-Salem, NC (Carver HS)
In just one season of high school
football, registered 40 receptions for
nearly 950 yards and 11 TDstabbed
honorable mention all-sate by
APnamed first team all-North
Piedmont Conferencefirst team all
citycounty by Winston-Salem
Journal, .selected to participate in the
Shrine Bowlruns a 4.4 in the 40-yard
dashwent to same high school as for-
mer Pirates' David and Daren Hart.
SEE SISNEf S. PAGE 9
SPOR'IS INFORMATION DEPARTMENT
The University of Richmond Lady Spiders shot 65 percent from the floor in the
first half, then held off a second-half run by East Carolina to take a 62-55 vic-
tory against the ECU women's basketball team on Sunday in Williams Arena.
Richmond hit 17 of 26 shots in the first half while the Hrates were just 9 of
33 (27.3) to carry a 38-23 lead into half-time.
"Richmond shot the ball extremely well in the first half and they were able
to jump out on us early said Head Coach Anne Donovan.
In the second half, the Pirates had an 18-2 run to start the half and took its
only lead at the 10:31 mark after Justine Allpress hit two free throws (41-40).
An Amy Dorsett layup gave the Spiders the lead back at 10:19 and from
there ECU could pull oniy within one on three occasions.
"We are struggling offensively Donovan said. "We are playing hard but we
have to do it for 40 minutes. In the second half, the trench was too big for us
to get out. At the en d of the game, we needed pose and composure, but
Justine (Allpress) was sitting on the bench having fouled out. Hopefully, we
will be able to avoid that situation next time
Allpress, who scored nine of her 12 points in the second half, fouled out of
the game with three minutes remaining and the Pirates down 54-51.
"We are feeling discouraged as we lose to some of the better teams in the
conference by close margins, but we are confident we can get it done in the
future said Donovan.
For the Lady Pirates, Tracey Kclley recorded her 11th career "double-dou-
ble" game, scoring 11 points and grabbing a season-high 16 boards.
The win improved Richmond to 14-7 on the season and 8-3 in the CAA
while ECU dropped its third straight and fell to 8-13 overall and 3-8 in the
league.
Richmond hosts George Mason on Tuesday while ECU will host the Ritriots
on Friday, Feb. 14.
REMINDER
The men's basketball team will host
Virginia Commonwealth tomorrow night
(Wed Feb. 12) at 7 p.m. This is only
one of two home games left for the
Pirates this season, so show your sup-
port and pack the stands.
IMO I I III )N I HI A I I I' 1
�K v, � t4p�
UnfrtfMiii.iii m .mm,





9 Tuesday. February, 1997
s
ports
The East Carolinian
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
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LKNT ISKUINS;
special asm m;i)m;sdav masses and
DISTKIiUTIO! ()l ASMIIS
WlDMSim. MK N 12
H am al Nrwiuaii Calholir C.riitrr
I2iiim�ii in Crral Kooin ol M inlciiliall Slmlrnl Trutrr
t0 inn al llic Wwiiuiii Catholic Student Center
I III IIMirc lllll'llll.ll KHI lll.Mll !�� ml .11II- -JMIII-IU'l-ll l fllC l
Sue We Build Amazing Tlieme Pads,
But We Also Build Amazing Resumes.
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Signees
continued fiom page 8
Corey Floyd - TE, 6-3, 235,
Trenton, NJ (Lawrenceville Prep
School)
A starter at both
and tight endhad
T)s despite being
injuries following a s
seasonreturned pai
tions for 25-yard
defensive player of t
Delaware Valley by
Timesselected to
prep team.
defensive end
four offensive
hampered by
tandout junior
r of intercep-
TDs named
he year in the
the Trenton
the state all-
David Garrard - QB. 6-3. 240,
Durham, NC (Southern Durham
High)
Regarded as top rated QB in NC
by most observersa Prep Stars All-
America choicestarted 40 games at
Southern Durhamamassed 9,023
total yards and has 113 career
TDslisted among state of NC's
top 25 prospects following senior
season by Charlotte Observerwas
named by Raleigh Nam Observer as
one of the "The Dazzling Dozen
the best of the best in the Raleigh-
Durham areathrew or ran for 31
TDs as a seniornamed in 1996
Athlon (lollege Football as one of the
prep QBs in the Atlantic Coast
regionas a junior threw 1,800 vards
with 32 TDs and ran for 1,400 yards
with 24 scorcsthrev for 1,082 and
ran for 1.282 vards a senior runs a
4.8 40 yard dash.
Chris Howell - DL, 6-3, 266.
Greenville, NC (J.H. Rose High)
Selected to the '96 AP all-state
teamnamed All-Big East
Conference, all-area and All-East in
his junior and senior seasonselect-
ed for the NC East-West All-Star
Gameaveraged 3.5 tackles in his
senior yearrecovered four fumbles
and deflected three passesrecord-
ed four sacks as a seniorselected to
play in the Shrine Bowl
Came ranked as one of the top line-
men in the state by NC Prep Football
News.
Ty Hunt - DETE, 6-6, 220
Hickory, NC (Hickory HS)
Recognized rmong the state's
top prospectslisted by Charlotte
Observer to be among the top five
recruits in NCnamed Western
Piedmont 3-A Conference Player of
the Yearparticipated in the Shrine
Bowlnamed to the Shelby Observer's
All-Piedmont Team and selected
All-State by NC Prep magazineled
Hickory to the 1996 3-A State tile
and an undefeated 16-0
recordrecorded 109 tackles. 12
sacks and four fumble
recoveriesthree year starter and
plaved both DE and TE for two sea-
sonsruns a 4.7 40-yard dash.
Ryan Luckadoo - WRSN, 6-3,
195, Anderson, S.C. (Westside
HS)
A wide receiver prospect who also
is regarded as outstanding long snap-
per-caught 34 passes for 699 yards
and nine TDs as seniorparticipat-
ed in NorthSouth All-Star
gamestarted for two-plus sea-
sonteam captainAnderson TD
Club Scholar-Athlete
recipientnamed as top 100
prospects in South Carolina by
Sports Reportattends same high
school as current Pirate player Perez
Mattison.
Marco McGee - DTTE, 6-5, 275,
Raleigh, NC (Ravenscroft High)
Played both sides of the
ballnamed to the Raleigh News &
Observer 2-A "Old Reliable" All-Star
teamselected All-Wake County in
junior and senior seasonalso named
all-state for past three yearsoffen-
sively caught 16 passes for 146 yards
in 96team leader in tackles and
QB sackshelped led team to state
finals in '94 and '95state title in
'94also performed some kicking
duties.
TRIVIAtime
Who won the Hart Trophy in the NHL
last season for Most Valuable Player?
i3jnqswj fo xrutuwj ouvjy jjjtvj
T
r
As part of
the Walt Disney
World College Program,
you can do some pretty amazing things.
� Learn from some of the top managers in the hospitality and entertainment industry.
� Work behind the scenes at the world's number one vacation destination
� Live with people from all over the world.
The opportunities are priceless! And so is the experience. You must attend our
Casting Session to be considered. Start building up that resume now.
Ask our Representative about special opportunities for those students who speak Portuguese.
INFO SESSION DATE: Monday, February 17 TIME: 6 pm
LOCATION: Menden Hall Student Center
FOR MORE INFO, CONTACT: Mary Cauley (919) 328-6979
Also visit us at www careermosaic comcmwdwwdw1 html
(iqr$1sWorld Co.
E 0E � Drawing Creativity from Diversity
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FOLLOW YOUR HEART
Mexican Restaurant
VALENTINE'S DAY, FRIDAY FEB. 14TH
SAMPLE PLATTER
FOR TWO
only $17.99
(CHICKEN FLAUTA, BEEF CHIMI,
ENCHILADA ZACATECANA, POLIO
VUCATECA, WINGS, RICE, BEANS,
AND A SURPRISE DESSERT!)
PITCHER OF
STRAWBERRY
MARGARITAS
$ 14.95
AU ABC PERMITS 757-1666
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
Ey3Pvr��w�rt� �sw�r-3�w�rf� �w�ve�w�re� �w-��w�p� �
CKYST7IL
Tilt MlPPtST
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SHOP IN GflKNVlUE
CfiY.STAl-CONNKNON'
A AhuMf mn fli-urv
.lUINOlUUNlMAl-HOUSL
��5-82SO '
fiUY PAID Of UOCINCS
.STUHUIftDPAIQISWEE,
Of tOUAL 00 lESSiO VAIUI.
40 Oft AU SUiCttD ClOTUINC.
CflAIKUlDMDMIBCMANDrSt,
LAVALlTtS & TAPCSTCItS
Afuotui.v; 'aj'jS S ,rut�.
M SMKUS AND Cah,V
NlWhflNSi 8 ioSNiSV
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. Oiads as: i;o �(Lf3. ;s
, Ni JSJOiilC'S "
wf ao(. Tut rooitsi sjoj �aoSj � '
EXPRESS DELIVERY
FREE
50c Delivery
coupon
expires 33X97
I Sic Minimum t
� Limited Delivery Are-
1 14 East
Fifth Street
758-9191
OR FAX
758-7885
Delivery Available
Mon - Sat
5 - 10:30pm
50 delivery charge
" 99c i4 lb.
burger with
purchase of
chips & drink
expires 33197

VALENTINES PARTY
Daiquiris $2.95 � Wine Specials � Miller Giveaways
"&
CWfflllfpR
LUOIIttf filf Ditino
Prizes
m
&&
13
2 Valentine's Day
Buffets
Carved Prime RB� Ao-jus
Baked Lemon Pecan Chicken
Fillet of Whiting in Tarragon Butter
Parslied Potatoes
Kahlua Glazed Carrots
Green Beans w Caramelized Pearl Onions
Mixed Greens w Basil Red Wine Vinaigrette Dressing
Cream of pimento & Onion Soup
Sweet Broccoli Slaw
Love Knot Rolls
Dessert Buffet Included
Chocolate Fondue w Fresh trurt & Pound Cake
Red Velvet Cake
Chocolate Sugar Cookies
Choice of Beverage
$6.95 per person
Reservations not required
but are encouraged.
Call ECU Catering at
328-4756
for more information.
'
Cash, Check and Declining Balance Accepted
Sweethearts is located in Todd Dining Hail's private dining room on College Hill.





Greek
Personals
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
roommate NEtytbAiAp for
2 BR, 1 BA, 7 blocks from campus, on
ECU bus line. Call Holly 5SI-1837.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. 2BR apt.
$175 plus utilities cable phone. No
pets. Clean person. Responsible 4
blocks from ECU. Near ECU bus route
PRIVAHOAVAlLABLblM-
MEDIATELY. Walking distance from
campus and downtown. Large room
(15x15) Private phone linecable in
room. Washerdryer included. $175 per
month utilities. Call Mike: 752-2879.
LOOKING FOR A RESPONSIBLE,
quiet, non-smoking female to share 2
bedroom 1 bath apartment beginning
in May. $185010. 12 utilities. Call
Missy @ 328-7175.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments. Washer
Dryer, use of all amenities, split cable,
phone and utilities 4 ways. Call Today!
321-7613. Very Affordable.
PARK VILLAGE ADAMS BLVD:
one bedroom apts. range, refrigerator,
wd hookup. Free water and sewer.
ECU bus route. Wainright Property
Management 756-6209.
STUDIO APARTMENT AT
RINGGOLD lowers available for sub-
lease, $310month, fulh furnished. Call
(919) 552-9293 or call Ringgold Towers
Mgmt - 752-2865.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP to share 2 br 1 12 bath
townhouse $225.00 monthly and 12
utilitiesphone on ECU bos route. Call
Laura at 756-7128-
UPSTAIRS FOR RENT 2 12 bed-
rooms, kitchen $600 a month utilities
included. No pets. Come by and take
a took 200 S. Library St. 754-8378.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: PHI
VATE 2 bedroom 1 bath living area 2
blocks from campus. Access to washer
dryer central HAC cable utilities in-
cluded $350.00 a month call S51-0S80.
ROOMMATE NEEDED MF $Z5oV
MONTH 12 utilities, wd, cable in-
12 SPEED RACING BIKE used. New
tires. Not a mountain bike. Light
weight. $80.00. Call 321-7956.
MAftl'mV 4 SUSPENSION FORK.
eiston steerer, ac brace, selling with
eftntrol tech stem and aluminum head-
set, worth $625 new, must sell $175, mi-
crowave $20, ski rack $10. Call 551-
6754
TOYOTA TRECEL199&4SP liW
miles accass $2,200, sony receiver
dolby prologic 180 watts $250, sony cd
5 disc $130, 5 piece speaker system
$300. Call David 328-7706.
LARGE DOG PEN $360 obo 321-
5892.
SPRING BREAK
eluded. Call 752-1211.
NA05HKAL
12 Off SIQJWTY DEPOSIT
WITH WESENTATION Of
THSCOUPON
I tnd 2 Msraovn Rtffo, Mttipmof,
VYMw, Drym- Moofapk- Dads mti PWm
Mm vUaBBajfBBBf ViflMri
Locate S Mm tan can.
FW8VWTSR.SSWtR
TWwmWr, LJrwr nOOUpal
Lacatatj S Itoefci from Cmtnmm
2 Moroont, sBfwmect, wmk, mbk cwi, S Moon from
TWESt AND UTWEfEn0FWKnei
MANAGED IY
tOIAWCrVVNUADIUVt
7$$-tm OHhirmhH-17
Iff
Help
Wtinted
5Ab, NO- get your group to-
gcther early. Two houses its excellent
condition; frilly famished; washer &
dryer, dish wisher, central AC; available
May ! through August 31; sleeps 6 -
$1600.00 per month; sleeps 8 -$2200.00
per month (757)850-1532.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments. Wisher
Dryer, use of all amenities, split cable,
phone and utilities 4 ways. Call Today
321-7613. Very Affordable!
COLLEGE VIEW APARTMENT
TWO bedrooms, stove, refrigerator,
basic cable, washer dryer hook-ups, cen-
tral heat and air. All apartments on
ground level. Call 931-0790.
TWO BEDROOM ONE BATH-
ROOM apartment up for sublease at
Wesley Commons. Lease is over in July
with opt. to renew. Call Kyle or Eric.
Leave message 758-8121.
SUBLEASE IWUBKUKUUM 1 12
bath townhouse wd hookup, fireplace,
dishwasher, disposal, free cable ECU
bus route lease runs through May 30th.
Deposit only $350 rent $415.00. Call
830 1469
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEU1-
ATELY, 3 blocks from campus, $250 a
month, 13 utilities central AC, washer
dryer, Garage, Plenty of Parking, Fire-
placc, MarkGene 752-9652
ti&
For Sale
SNOW SKIS BLIZZARDS lES TTT
185 tymlia bindings used twice $125
obo. Golf Club? graphite shafts 3-pw
3,5 woods exc.cond. $100 obo. Yakima
roof racks fits most cars many uses $80
obo. Call 413-0513.
SfW DAGGER TR1 COLORED
crossfire kayak for sale. Has been used
only once in calm water. Asking $700.
Isa$l,100value. Contact Robb at 754-
2637. Includes a paddle and skirt.
FREE SIX MONTH OLD kitten to a
good home. If interested, please con-
tact Tbnya or Amy for more informa-
tion at 328-3368. Only serious inquires,
please.
JASMINE GARDENS � 2 bedroom M hath
Store, Rtfrforitor, wd hookups,
Close to campus
���� IC sm.
355-1313
RESEARCH REPORTS
Urotrt Ubnry of Warmffcn In U.S.
t�.irtrorict-aii suufcrs
Ord Cmxj ToOty MM Visa IMC COO
RIVER PAR" NORTH, PARK Atten-
dant and Camp Counselor positions
available for summer employment.
Apply at Greenville City Hall, Person-
nel Department. For information call
830-4562
WAITSTAFF DAYTIME AND
NIGHT shifts available. Must be able
to work at least two weekday lunch
shifts. No Calm. Please apply in per-
son between 8am and 10am or 2pm and
4pm. Professor O'Cools Winn Dixie
Market Place.
PART-TIME TENNIS INSTRUC-
TORSATTENDANTS. River birch
tennis center. Afternoon, weekend
hours. 10-18 hoursweek $4.75hour.
Experience with children helpful. Call
830-4559
AEROBIC INSTRUCTOR tHIT
COUNTY MEMORIAL Hospital is
seeking qualified individuals to teach
aerobic classes through its Employee
Recreation and Wellness Department.
Persons will contract to teach on a part-
time basis. Interested csndidates
should contact Gilian Tyndall between
8anv4:30pm at (919)816-5590.
CHEEHLEADINO INSTRUC-
TORS NEEDED TO teach summer
camps in NC & SC. Great pay! Flex-
ible scheduling! Free weekends! Col-
lege experience not required. For a
great summer job, CALL ESPRIT!
CHEERLEADING 1-800-280-32231
fl5M WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326.
HEAD LIFEGUARD NEEDED.
EXPERIENCE necessary. Lifeguard
needed. Experience preferred. See
janine Jones at the Greenville Coun-
try Club.
EXCITING SUMMER JOB WITH
housing, first come, cooks position now
available. Kitty Hawk Pizza at Kitty
Hawk NO
ONLINE INFORMATION SEH-
VICES, INC is currently seeking in-
dividuals interested in part-time com-
puter programming employment on a
three-to six-month project. Applicants
should possess a working knowledge of
C and C under UNIX and Win32.
Telecommunications experience is a
plus. Please fax resumes, or deliver in
person, to: Online Information Ser-
vices, Inc 1206 Charles Blvd
Greenville, NC 27834, Fax 919-757-
2115 Voice 919-758-4141.
SOMEONE TO PICKUP AND take
care of two children after school nine
to twelve hours per week. References
required. Call 931-6904 arid leave a
message.
QUICK CASH! THE School of Busl-
ness. Office of Professional Programs,
is looking for a photographer to take
photos of our events. Must have own
camera. If interested, call 328-6377.
PART-TIME JOM AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's Cloth-
ing Store, is now filling part-time posi-
tions. Employees are needed for Sat-
urdays andor weekdays between lOrtW
am and 6:00 pm. The positions are for
between 7 and 20 hours per week, de-
pending on your schedule and on busi-
ness needs. The jobs are within walk-
ing distance of the university and the
hours are flexible. Pay is commensu-
rate with your experience and job per-
formance and is supplemented by an
employee discount. Apply in person
to Store Manager, Joan's Fashions, 423
S. Evans Street, Greenville (on the
Downtown Mall).
ATTENTION STUDENT: EARN
EXTRA cash stuffing envelopes at
home. All materials provided. Send
SASE to Midwest Distributors, P.O.
Box 624, Olathe, KS 66051. Immedi-
ate response.
NOW'HIRINC PLAYMATES
MUST be 18 years old. Earn great
money while you learn playmates mas-
sage. Snow Hill, NC 747-7686.
NOT GOING ANVWHERE VOk
spring break? Make your friends jeal-
ous by sending postcards from Hawaii,
Florida, Park City, Utah! You fill out
postcards, we have them postmarked
and sent from actual locations! Send
$3 each, 2 for $5, 5 for $10. Add $1.95
to total for P.H. Include desired
location(s). Bendor Novelty Services,
290G Applewood Center Place-321,
Seneca, SC 29678.
TYPING SERVICES AVAILABLE,
$2.00 per typed page, fast and accurate.
Call Debra Rhodes, 757-0495.
ADULT TOY PARTY - for women
only! Earn free products just for
hostessing a party. Call a romance spe-
cialist today! 752-5533 and ask for Jenn.
GOING TO D.C.N.Va. area on weelc-
end of Feb. 14th? I am desperately
searching for a ride. Will pay for gas.
Please call Sarah at 328-3641.
3 Days 3Nights
Includes lodging,
Air Fare from Raleigh
Starts at $329
Diving & Snorkeling
Package Available
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
(W)
m
Travel
Wake n Bake for
Spring Break 19Q7
Cad for rrw
info racket!
1-800-426-7710
SPRING
IIylI
It pays to Discovert Use your
Discover card and save up to $25!
To apply for a card, call
1-800-fT-PAYS-TO.
Bahamas Party
CRUISE $279
6 Dap � A� Me free Partle � Include? Tan
CANCUN $399
7NfcjMt Mr- Hotel Saw $150 on Food DHnks
JAMAICA $419
7 Nights Air Hotel Saw �1 SO on Food Drinks
FLORIDA $119
Panama City Dayttna - Cocoa Beach
Spring Break Travel
Our 10th Year
1-800-678-6386
anama
Beach
from $129
7rrijhts Beachfront
'Dally Fret Drink Parties
�Walk lb Best Bars
Group Discounts Available;
Endless Summer Tours
I-100-234-7007
VMCDiscAMEX
Other
Sprmg Brfal'97
Jamaica $399
Cancun $399
Bahamas $379
7Nrftits with Air.
Daily Free Drink Parties,
No Cover at Best Bars.
Group Discounts Available!
Endless Summer Tours
1400-214-7007
VMCDiscAMEX
FREE T-SHIRT$1666 Credit Card
fundraisers for fraternities, sororities &
groups. Any campus organization can
raise up to $1000 by earning a whop-
ping $5.00VISA application. Call 1-
800-932-0528 ext. 65 Qualified callers
receive Free T-Shirt.
COZY COTTAGE NEAR HOSPI-
TAL large one bedroom with gas &
elec. heat. Hardwood and carpeted
floors, fireplace, chandeliers, on wooded
lot. Very nice, very quiet. $415.00 mo.
Available Feb. 1st. Call 757-9387
Jt'S NO LONGER NECESSARY to
borrow money for college. We can help
you obtain funding. Thousands of
awards available to all students. Imme-
diate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
CONGRATULATIONS TO CHI
OMEGA'S New exec. Jen Nolan ores
Lisa Smith V. pres Emma Thomas
sec Lindsay Perry treasurer Jen
Buckley pledge trainer, Lauren Gausey,
Panheltenic, Stacee Diener personnel,
Leslie Pulley rush. You guys are doing
a great job! Love your sisters.
SlCMXPl THANKS CHI Omega for
the great time Wednesday night.
THXNK VOU JP HALLandyHeathet
Newman for all your efforts during
Spring Rush! You did a great job! Love
your Alpha Omicron Pi sisters.
THANKS TO THE RUOBV team for
a wonderful time at the Elbo. You guys
worked hard for your money! Congrats
to Sabrina and Special, "King and
Queen It just goes to show a little
money can go a Long way! Love the
sisters and new members of Delta Zeta.
the new fraternity pledges. We're look-
ing forward to meeting you. We wish
you luck on the upcoming semester.
Love the sisters and new members of
Delta Zeta.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHAPH1
ON an outstanding year. We all worked
hard for the great honor of Panheltenk's
Chapter Excellence and Public Rela-
tions Awards. Keep up the excellent
work!
PI DELTA WOULD LlKtt to con-
gratulate all sororities on their awards
from the Panheltenic banquet. They
were all well deserved. We'd like to
extend a special congratulations to our
two sister sororities on their awards.
Good job Alpha Phi for winning Chap-
ter Excellence and Public Relations.
Way to go Chi Omega for being awarded
highest overall GPA. We are very proud
of you!
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA
OMICRON PI on a successful spring
rush. Thanks for everyone's support
and participation. Alpha Love, JD.
ALPHA XlDELTAl WE anTlooking
forward to a great semester as sister so-
rorities. Love the sisters of Alpha Omi-
cron Pi.
SIGMA P! CONGRATULATES
OUR new pledges: Brian Kaiser, Wilky
Biack, Collin Blalock, Jay Obrien, Rob
Jordan, Mark Anderson, Joe Main, Josh
Peters, Tanner Broughton, Jon Weaver,
Creighton Barrett, Justin Stafford, Sun
Belvin, Dan Haighc.
PI KAPPA PHITHANKS for alt the
crazy, upside-down fun. Let's do it
again soon. Love, Chi Omega.
LAMBDA CHI THANKSlSAIN for
letting us share your bid night As at-
Announcements
THE GREENVILLE-PITT
COUNTY Special Olympics will be
conducting an Athletics (Track & Field)
Coaches Training School on Saturday,
February 1st from 9am - 4pm for all in-
dividuals interested in volunteering to
coach Track & Field. We are also look-
ing for volunteer coaches in the follow-
ing sports: Swimming, Bowling, Gym-
nastics, Rollerskating, Powerlifting,
Volleyball, and Equestrian. No experi-
ence is necessary. For more informa-
tion please contact Dwain Cooper at
830-4844 or Dean Foy at 830-4541.
RESEARCH VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED LOOKING for runners
with runningrelated pain. Subjects
will receive Free orthotics and Gait
Analysis. Call Wanda 328-4688. '
COME LEARN ABOUT 5TUDY-
ING abroad! Hear fellow students
share their overseas experience. Spon-
sored by Phi Beta Delta and Phi Sigma
Iota. Tuesday, Feb. 11th 4:00 pm in
GCB3008. Frccpizant
CELTIC HPDLER- PAULA
TISDALE will head the musk for a
Contra Dance by ECU Folk and Coun-
try Dancers. Sat Feb. 15th, 7:30-9:30.
Beginner's instruction at 7:00
Student Center, 511 E. 10th St.
Greenville. Come alone or bring
friend. For information, 830-5403.
GREENVILLE NOW NATIONAL
ORGANIZATION for Women) will
meet Wednesday, February 12,5:30 pm
at the Szechuan Garden Restaurant.
ECU women and other Greenville area
women are invited to attend. For in-
formation, call 756-1811 or 756-8973.
FASCINATED BV INTERNA-
TIONAL ISSUES, become a
of the Model United Nations! For
information. Call 328-7890.
UNIVERSITY STUDENT MAR-
SHALS - STUDENTS interested in
serving as a University Marshal for the
1997 Spring commencement may ob-
tain an application from Room A-16
Minges. Student must be classified as
a junior by the end of Fall semester
1996 and have a 3.0 GPA to be eligible.
Return completed application to Carol-
Ann Tucker, Advisor, A-16 Minges by
February 21st. For more information
caW 328-4661
PEER HEALTH EDUCATORS
ARE available to do one hour programs
for any class, organization, or residence
hall. We offer programs that are infor-
mal and non-threatening on topics such
as weight and body image, STD's, al-
cohol, date rape and safer tanning. To
request a program call Health Promo-
tion and Well Being at 328-6793 or stop
8003510222
Or, rush I2.00H): WsaamU Miktines
AAAA! CANCUN & JAMAICA sprmg
break specials! 7 nights air 8c. hotel from
$429! Save $150 on food, drinks & free
parties! 111 lowest price guarantee!
springbreaktravel.com 1 -800-678-6386
STRING BREAK7W. CANCUN, Ja-
maica, & Bahamas 7nights wair
from $399. Enjoy daily free drink par-
ties, no cover @ best bars, & group dis-
counts Endless Summer Tours 1-800-
234-700T
SPRING BREAK '97. PANAMA
CITY Boardwalk Beach Resort $129
7nights beachfront, daily free drink
parties, walk to best bars Group dis-
counts Endless Summer Tours 1-800-
234-7007.
"SPRING BREAK 97 - Don't be left
out, space limited Cancun and Ja-
maica from $429. Call STS @ 1-800-
648-4849 for more info.
AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS
PARTY Cruise! 6 days $279! Includes
all meals, parties & taxes! Great
Beaches & Nightlife! Leaves from Ft.
Lauderdalet springbreaktravel.com 1-
800-678-6386
AAAA! FLORIDA SPRING URHAK1
PANAMA City! room with kitchen near
bars $119! Daytona-Best Location
$139! Florida's new hotspot-Cocoa
Beach Hilton $169!
springbreaktravel.com 1 -800-678-6386
BEST HOTELS & LOWES'I' pnecs
for spring-break beach destinations.
Florida, Cancun, Jamaica, etc. Call now
for rooms or sign-up as Intcr-Campus
Repr. 800-327-6013 http:
www.icpt.com
SPRINT, BREAK PANAMA CI'I'V
Beach "Summit" luxury condos next to
Spinnaker. Owner discount rates
(404)355-9637.
"SPRING BREAK 97 - DonTEc left
out, space limited Panama City and
Daytona Beach, Florida from $129. CaA
STS � 1-800-648-4849 for more info.
Advertise
witk us In
The East
Carolinian.
ways we had a great time. Love Chi
Omega. by 210 Whkhard.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON WOULD THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC JTITJ
like to congratulate our new Zeta
pledge class: Jay Alderson, Jay Barrett,
Adam Brown, John Foust, Jamie
Franklin, Dale Ham, Clint Knex, An-
drew Leliever, Lee Monsees, Dominic
Ortega, Ryan Reid, David Ronay, josh
Singleton, Brian Spence, Bradd Stoker,
and Billy Wege. Great job guys, Keep
CoftGRATULATIONS'mALLOl
the Delta Zeus that won awards at this
years Providence and Panhellenk Ban-
quet: Best New Member for Fall 1996
- Kelly Pruitt, Artemis - Jessica
Theobald, Outstanding Collegiate -
Julie Webb, Golden Crest - Stacey
Rodemer, Outstanding President -Jes-
sica Theobald, and to Jessica and Stacey
for being inducted into the Greek Hall
of Fame! You all deserved it! Love
Your Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS
DENT center wishes to announce spe-
cial Ash Wednesday (Feb. 12) Masses
with the distribution of ashes: 8 am at
the Newman Center, 12 noon in the
Great Room of the Mendenhall Student
Center and 5:30 pm at the Newman
Center. The Newman Center is located
at 953 E. 10th Street, 2 houses from the
Fletcher Musk Building.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS OR-
m
V
Lost and
Found
WANTED: OWNER Or' lost check-
book, wallet with driver's license.
Owner's name: Tabitha Johane Clark
from Raleigh. Call 328-3590 Monday
thru Thursday. Leave message on ma-
chine.
FOUND 21 ON LIBRARY Street.
Black rosary beads. Call 514-2827 ask
for Dave.
&
Greek
Personals
ANNE-
MARIE TROY and Neu Pettier on
your recent engagements. We are so
happy for you both! Love your Alpha
Omicron Pi sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS, ANGIE
NIX, JULIE Smith, Laurie Godfrey,
Pam Miller, Jen Mock, Jackie Kirby,
Carrie Peters, Wendi Hill, and Olivia
Plymale on your Panhellenk awards.
We are so proud of your achievements.
Good luck Mary Paige for the upcom-
ingyear. We know you'll do a great job!
Love your sisters of Alpha Phi.
ALPHA PHI AND PI fcelta we're
looking forward to great times this
spring. Love, your sister sorority Chi
alpBa omicron pi con-
GRATULATES our new members;
Lindsay Amdt, Courtney Brushwood,
Amy Hinnant, Tracey McLendon, and
Christina Abbott. We're looking for-
ward to a great semester!
WAY TOUO PI Delta on winning the
Panhellenk dedication award! Also
great job Amy McGrath for bringing
home the Woman Greek Leadership
GREEKS Or' THb W'KrJK Alpha
Delta Pi. Kelly Warfield , Lindsay
Peeler, Alpha Xi Delta: Rhonda
Hardee, Alicia Walden, Alpha Omicron
Pi: Heather Newman, JD Hall, Alpha
Phi: Jen Mock, Julie Smith, Delta Zeta:
Shannon Meek. Brandy Nichol, Zeta
Tau Alpha: Catherine Neil, Gina Her-
ring, Pi Delta: Carrie Barret, Kathleen
Meany, Sigma Sigma Sigma: Ann
Jennings, Missy Drake, Chi Omega:
Sara Matyiko Stacee Deincr, Laura
Partin.
Announcements
PI DELTA, ECU'S ONLY local soror-
ity is holding an informal spring RUSH
Feb. 17 -19 in the Mendenhall Student
Center. Come on out and bring a
friend. Join us for three days of fun and
excitement! For more info call Ami at
328-3751. Go Greek!
1
GANIZATION invites all honors stu-
dents, teaching fellows and students
with a 3.4 GPA to attend its next meet-
ing on Feb. 13th, 1997 at 5:00 pm in
GCB Room 1003
FRI FEB. 14- FACULTY DUO Re-
cital, Fritz Gearhart, violin, Paul Tardif,
piano, AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm
Sat Feb. 15- Senior Recital, Rebecca
Williams, clarinet, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 4:00 pm Sat Feb. 15 - Black His-
tory Month Concert, "Motown Carroll
V. Dashkll Jr Director, AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 8:00 pm Sun Feb. 16 - Fac-
ulty Recital, Charles Bath, piano and
Joanne Bath, violin, AJ Fletcher Recital'
Hall, 3:00 pm Sun Feb. 16 - Graduate
Recital, Jeremy Sandoval, percussion,
8:00 pmMon. Feb. 17-Faculty Recital,
John B. O'Brien, piano. Perry Smith,
tenor. AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 800 pm.
ALPHA EPSIL0N DELTA IN-
VITES you to attend ECU Medical
School and Telemedicine tour on Feb.
11th, 1997 at 7:00 pm. If you need a
ride, please meet behind Christenbury
Gym at 6:45 pm.
ATTENTION EXERCISE AND
SPORT Scknce intended majors. The
exercise and sport science health-re-
lated physical fitness competency test
is scheduled as follows: Friday, Febru-
ary 21, 1997 Minges Coliseum (Will-
iams Arena) 8:00 am. Any student with
a medical condition that would
contraindkate participation in the test-
ing should contact Mike McCammon
at 328-4688
ECU WOMEN'S LACROSSE CLUB
has started their spring season. Prac-
tices are held W TH F. If interested in
playing call Julie 754-6689.
THE 19 EASTERN CAROLINA
Semi Pro Champion Greenville Hurri-
canes will be holding open tryoua for
the 1997 Raleigh League Baseball Sea-
son tryouts will be at J.H. Rose
Highschool on Sunday Feb. 23, 11:00
am. For more info, contact Mike
Murphy 830-9431.
SAM WILL BE TAKING a plant tour
of Hatteras Hammocks on Tuesday,
February 11. The bus will be leaving
at 3:00 pm outside of GCB. To sign up
contact Mr. Childers in GCB 3015 be-
fore Tuesday.


Title
The East Carolinian, February 11, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 11, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1187
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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