The East Carolinian, February 4, 1997







TUESDAY
FEBRUARY 4.1997
the 1 � �
eastcaroliman
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Transit struggles to solve overcrowding
Students have experienced delays in the shuttle departing from Christenbury Gym.
PHOTO BYHEATHf R BUR6ESS
Manager introduces plans
to end overflow, safety
violations
Jeff Gentry
SAFETY AND TRANSPORTATION ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
ECU students who take the shuttle buses to
class will soon have some relief from the over-
crowding that has been plaguing some of the
routes.
The problem has been evident on the bus
routes from the commuter parking lots as well
as the routes in residential areas. Students
have had complaints ranging from nowhere to
sit on the bus to having to ride on the steps of
the bus, a violation of traffic safety laws.
"V are looking to add another commuter
shuttle bus during peak times and we already
have an alternate bus running on the Purple
route, " Transit Director Karl Grunden said.
"But it looks like we will have to start doing
that on the Brown route as well
The addition of these bus routes could
raise the problem of finding people to drive
them.
"We are always hiring drivers, but our
biggest problem is the amount they are paid
for the responsibility they have Grunden
said. "It's sad because we have qualified bus
drivers who go somewhere else because of the
pay that they are offered here
Currently, the pay for a bus driver on cam-
pus is $5 an hour, with a 25 cent raise every
year. All of the drivers currently arc students.
One of the problems that is currently
being dealt with is the loss of the Mendenhall
shuttle due to recent construction in the area
on both the newly opened Rec Center, as well
as the current remodeling of Joyner Library.
"Basically, the shuttle was started because
of the parking problems that the new Rec
Center was going to create Grunden said.
"What these shuttles were going to do was
help some of the people that used to park
SEETRAUSIT PAGE
Survivor dispels breast cancer myths
ECU professor shares story to
educate others
Amena Hassan
RIF.NTATIONC.ENERAI. COLLEGE ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
Editor's Note: This article is the conclusion of a two part
series on detecting, preventing anddealing with breast cancer.
Part one, in last Tuesday's edition, teas entitled: "Breast can-
cer: Age not a factor
One ECU professor confirms that while women with
breast cancer face fear of the disease as well as the
negative perceptions of the disease, her battle with
breast cancer has made her a stronger person.
Cynthia Ryan, who has been a faculty member for
over two years teaching professional writing and
women studies classes at ECU, has been active in
promoting awareness in the college and the commu-
nity. In addition to guest speaking and attending
seminars at
Pitt
Memorial
Hospital,
Ryan has also
worked on a
research pro-
ject of her
own.
"Most of my
research
deals with
the juncture
between
breast cancer
discourse and
image dis-
course Ryan
said. "In
other words, we need to get women to view it as a
health issue rather than a beauty issue.With
increased education, you realize that they are two
totally separate things
Ryans said the line between image and health is
important for women to distinguish. She also said
women are particularly vulnerable to conforming to
social pressure concerning their looks. The need to
"look good" can override the need to have surgery or
other important medical procedures.
"Women should break down what stereotypes
they have and bring about a positive way of framing
the issue she commented. "I find most college age
women are really interested in knowing more about
breast cancer
Ryan feels that it is crucial for breast cancer sur-
vivors to be vocal and active in spreading more
knowledge about the illness.
"I feel pretty strongly that people with breast
cancer should share their story, although I do respect
their privacy. It's vital to put a face on the disease
since it is not as abstract anymore when we know
someone such as a colleague or a church member who
is going through it
According to Ryan, there is still much ignorance
surrounding the topic, which is largely due to the
media presenting cancer as an illness lacking levels.
Many people tend to become complacent when they
assume they aren't classified under the high risk
cases.
"I was shocked to find out, when I got breast can-
cer, that the risk factors such as alcohol and a high fat
diet, were such an insignificant part of the big pic-
ture Ryan said. "Other claims that are supposed to
make women more susceptible to cancer are a histo-
ry of cancer on the mother's side and none of my
mothers relatives had it. After all this time and
money, we still don't know what causes it
Ryan said getting involved with charities that are
active in research versus associations that only work
with treating cancer is important.
Anyone can get involved in the fight against
breast cancer. Traditional involvement includes the
Relay for Life fund-raiser, buying pink ribbons during
Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October and, for
women, receiving regular mammograms. This last
measure is extremely important for all women and
Ryan suggests that women should go together if they
feel uncomfortable being alone.
"A lot of people just fall through the holes
because they haven't been pushed enough Ryan
said. "It's more encouraging to go with a friend or a
family member
Self exams arc also crucial for all women and
should be the minimum a woman should do in order
to protect herself.
"Most women young and old do not think they
know what they're doing with the breast self exam,
but neither did I and I found a lump Ryan said.
"The main reason for the exam is getting familiar
with the shape of your breast so that you can notice
any changes, since you know your body better than
any doctor and are the best judge of what's happen-
ing
Ryan said that if a woman is diagnosed with breast
cancer, finding the right support group and linking on
to a person that believes in your welfare and will be
present in the time of need.
"You want to be in a support group where people
are actively seeking treatment rather than those that
are simply sitting around, looking at each other say-
ing 'Gee, how long do you think it's going to be until
you die? Ryan said. "I feel Bruce, my husband, was
really my support system, so find someone who
believes in you and knows you can get through this
After being diagnosed with breast cancer, Ryan
feels her outlook on life has taken a change towards
the positive.
"There's really no more chance of me dying next
year than you dying next year Ryan said. "In a ter-
minal disease, you can visualize the end, making it
much more real and immediate, but it doesn't make
me different because, overall, we're all in the same
boat. It does set you apart but not necessarily in a
negative way. One shouldn't say someone is dying of
breast cancer rather than living with it. The bottom
line is that many breast cancer survivors go on to live
very productive lives
Professor Cynthia Ryan teaches a writing course in the General Classroom Bui'iing
PHOTOS BY OAVID FINCH
Disabilities Support Services
continues to expand
Returning student com-
pares today with 1970's
Marina Henry
SPECIAL POPULATIONS ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
Note: Tkis is the final article in a two
part series concerning handicapped accessibility on
campus.
ECU's Department for Disability Support
Services (DSS) has done many things to assist
the handicapped since its origin in the 1970's.
"I was here in the 70's when the depart-
ment first started physically handicapped
student Willie M. Bell TV said. "There were
six of us who got the project off the ground.
Wfc put Leo Jenkins in a wheelchair and
instructed him to get into certain buildings.
He couldn't
Bell holds degrees in social work and com-
TUESDAY
lifestyle 7
R2D2 lives again!
opinion5
Good times on
campus?
sports12
Swimmers end with
a splash!
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLOG.
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
across from Joyner library
TUESDAY:
partly cloudy
high 62
low 40
WEEKEND:
partly cloudy
high 65
low 43
hone
28-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
e-mail
uutec�Bcuvm.cis.scu.edu
puter science from ECU and is now pursuing
a third degree.
"I worked on the Governor's Council for
Handicapped Employment, the ECU School
of Medicine, I transported freight and worked
with the Greenville Police Department.
Nothing can stand in my way but an inaccessi-
ble door Bell said.
Several buildings on campus still prove to
be inaccessible. The Wright Place and the
Croatan have no automatic handicapped doors.
While Todd Dining Hall has handicapped
bathrooms and phones, it has no accessible
doors. Recently, the Rawl building got an
accessible door.
According to so.ne handicapped students
the bathroom stalls in the Spot are hard to
maneuver around in, and the lifts on the new
buses had to be fixed because they weren't
working originally.
"Just because a place has a handicapped
access sticker on the door doesn't mean that it
is Bell said.
Doors and transportation are not the only
problems encountered on campus. Classes and
social life can also be difficult.
"The elevator light in Flannagan was out
for a while. It was a pitch black ride between
floors until it was fixed. The elevator in
Brewster is slow and the classrooms are so full
SEE SERVICE PAGE 4
PIRATESmiHil
How much money do you
spend unneccesarily a month?
PHOTOS BY PATRICK IREIAN
Resolution threatens SGA tuition
Willie
Bell graduated from ECU in 1978 and 1982. He is working
on his third degree, photos by Patrick inelan
AMY L. ROYSTER
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
HEATHER BURGESS
WIRE EDITOR
A resolution denouncing a bill, passed
last spring, allowing for the tuition of
SGA's executive council members to be
paid from student fees will be discussed
and voted on soon.
The bill allowing for the payment of
the executive council's fall and spring
tuition was passed in the spring of 1996.
Sophomore class president Cliff Webster
said he had heard of a petition circulat-
ing among students objecting to the bill
and knew that controversy surrounding
the bill still existed.
Webster and his vice president James
Kaltenschnec worked on the resolution
together and introduced it to the legisla-
ture last Monday.
"This is something we wanted to do,
not just for the sophomore class but for
the whole student body Webster said.
Although the resolution has been
presented to the legislature already, it
must be discussed by the Student
Welfare Committee, chaired by Mary
Paige Early. After the Student Welfare
Committee discusses the resolution it
will be voted on by the entire legislative
body.
The resolution needs a two thirds
vote to pass. If the resolution passes it
will immediately be presented in the
form of a bill and the executive council's
tuition will no longer be funded with
student fees.
In the resolution entitled, "The ECU
SGA denouncement of the SGA
Executive Council's tuition payment for
the Rill and Spring Semester three rea-
sons were cited for abolishing tuition
payments.
First, the resolution stated the
monthly salary the Executive Council
receives is adequate payment for their
position.
Second, the resolution stated that
paying tuition in addition to monthly
stipends was an unprecedented practice
in the University of North Carolina
System.
Finally, Webster and Kaltenschnee
stated that student fees used to fund the
executive council's tuition could be used
for other purposes.
Webster said he felt encouraged that
the resolution w' I -ass.
"I think ther- - a very good chance it
will pass Weber said. "I think if those
legislators are working for the students
of this university they will pass it
SGA's next nvting of the legislators
7 spend about $100 a month
Natatera Heggie
freshman
2Vt:M
'Too much unneccesarily
dowitovm Greenville
David Finch
senior
SEE SGA PAGE 4
7 only unneccesarily spend
about $20 a month because Igo
home on the weekends
Nichole Browder
freshman
'At least $50 a month, and a
little more on a good month
Jay Cochran
freshman





news
The East Carolinian
.riQW,s
Student Health shows concern for eating disorders
Restaurant plan draws flak but lengthy process
may eat up proposals
HIGH POINT, N.C. (AP) - Restaurants should not be graded with the cur-
rent letter system but rather with a pass-fail system and inspections should
be done less frequently, a report of recommendations by the N.C. Restaurant
Rules Review Committee said. ��'�� �r u-oUK
The committee sent the report to the N.C. Commission of Health
Services in December but the changes may take years to be approved and
might not be approved at all because of the complexity of the approval
Pr�OnSFeb. 19, the committee will give its oral report to the commission,
according to Johanna Reese, public information officer with the N.C.
Division of Environmental Health. It then gets published in the state regis-
ter before heading through a public comment period, she said.
Sentencing for former lieutenant governor Green today
WILMINGTON (AP) - former Lt. Gov. Jimmy Green faces up to three years
in prison and a fine of up to 1250,000 at his sentencing hearing today on tax
evasion charges. IQO-
Green, 75. was North Carolina's lieutenant pOTorftoml977 t0. �;
He pleaded guilty in September to evading taxes on $90,000 from illegal
tobacco sales. .
Before becoming lieutenant governor, Green served as a state senator and
speaker of the state House. ��
The charge against Green came as part of a large-scale federal investiga-
tion into tobacco sales fraud.
Since 1990, 30 people have been convicted as part of the probe. Two
warehouse owners also were expected to enter okas in charges related to the
probe, according to the VS. Attorney's Office.
ANGELA KOENIC
HEALTHENVIIIONMENTAL ISSUES
STAFF WRITE
This week is National Eating
Disorder Awareness Week and
although ECU has no planned
events, Student Health wants stu-
dents to be aware of these disorders.
"Eating disorders have a long
term health impact Most people
with eating disorders have some
underlying emotional issues or rea-
sons which cause them Dr. Jane
Ross, a psychologist at the Student
Health Center said.
"We live in a society where
appearance is most important, and in
a desire tr match public appearance,
women are putting their lives in
jeopardy Ross said.
More than five million Americans
j suffer from eating disorders and this
I is not restricted to females. One in
10 people with eating disorders is
male.
The three most common eating
disorders are anorexia ncrvosa,
bulimia ncrvosa and compulsive eat-
Anorexia ncrvosa involves a pre-
occupation with dieting and thin-
ness, which leads to excessive
weight loss. According to the
American AnorexiaBulimia
Association, Inc one percent of
teenage girls will get anorexia ncr-
vosa and up to 10 percent may die as
a result of this.
The association also reports that
five percent of college females in
this country are bulimic. Bulimia
ncrvosa involves frequent episodes
of excessive consumption of food
almost always followed by purging
this food.
Compulsive overeating is similar
to bulimia. It is characterized as
mass consumption of food which is
often followed by feelings of guilt
and remorse.
Other eating disorders are binge
eating disorder, sleep eating disorder
and night eating syndrome.
The Student Health Center is
organizing an eating disorder therapy
group for students with diagnosable
eating disorders.
"The group will be dealing most-
ly with people who have an eating
disorder, have acknowledged that
they have one and want to receive
group help for it Dr. Nancy Badger
of the Counseling Center said.
Students must go through an
intake process to participate which
involves meeting with Ross, who will
decide whether the student would
be a good candidate for the group.
Ross would like the group to have
seven to 12 people, but it can be
started with as few as five partici-
pants.
"It is our expectation that they
will attend the weekly meetings.
Ideally the sessions will be held on
Thursdays from 3:30 to 5 p.m. This
will also be the intake time for now
for students to see me about the
group Ross said.
In addition to this group there are
a number of other services for stu-
dents to get help and information
about eating disorders. They coordi-
nate so that students will be sent to
the place which best fits their needs.
Student Health Center has a
health educator: the Office of
Health Promotion and Well-Being
has pamphlets and peer group facili-
tators who are trained to facilitate
programs. The Student Recreation
Center has computerized nutritional
assessment; Dining Services has a
nutritionist and the Counseling
Center is available for individual
consultations.
"If a student is debating about
whether they have one (eating disor-
der), we (Counseling Center) would
be happy to talk to them individual-
ly Badger said.
Fw more information on the eat-
ing disorder therapy group, contact
Dr. Jane Ross at the Student Health
Center at 328-6841.
ftople Act Theater revives oral storytelling tradition
Apple Computer Inc. cuts costs
NEW YORK (AP) - Apple Computer Inc. may soon sell key assets, includ-
ing the Newton division, in a major effort to cut com that may include lay-
ing off as many as 20 percent of its employee, The mil Street Journal
reported today. .
The struggling maker of personal computers has been forced to consider
the sell-offs because of slow sales of its flagship Apple Computers. The reor-
ganization moves arc expected to be announced today or Tuesday, the report
Apple is expecting revenue to fall 20 percent to $8 billion in its current
fiscal year from the previous yen forcing a similar reduction of costs, the
report said.
Apple declined to comment in the report.
Former judge claims chef fondled
busboy at restaurant
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - TVs "Frugal Gourmet" Jeff Smith fondled and
kissed a high school-age busboy in his restaurant in the early 1970s, a former
administrative law judge said in an affidavit.
William Metcalf of Orvmpia, Wash said he saw the incident in 1972 or
1973 at Chaplain's Pantry, a Tacoma, Wish restaurant and catering store
owned and operated by Smith, who also faces a lawsuit by a man claiming he
was molested.
At the time, Metcalf was an administrative law judge in Washington state,
an appointed post that involves settling disputes within the government.
Metcalf said he was walking to the dining area, took a wrong turn and
walked into the kitchen.
JACQUELINE D. KELLUM
ARTS AND STUDIES
STAFF WHITER
Thanks to grants from various
sources, PeopleAct Community
Theater is developing a unique play
based on several 'conversation
groups' held last year.
The conversation groups,
according to Artistic Director
Deborah Morrison, consisted of a
variety of Pitt County citizens of all
ages, backgrounds and ethnic
groups.
"We found them by word of
mouth, by asking people 'Who do
you know that would be good for
this and would be interested?"
Morrison said.
The conversation groups were
videotaped and are currently being
reviewed and adapted into a script.
"It's a collage of stories, and the
idea is that it's a series of stories
about different characters with a
central theme Morrison said.
That theme is "What Does
America Mean to Me?" and was
originally the topic designated by
the National Endowment for the
Humanities in a contest to give a
grant to an organization which
would develop the theme with the
conversation groups. PeopleAct
submitted a proposal for that grant,
but was denied.
They later applied for and
received a grant from the NC
Humanities Council, then also
received grants from the Z. Smith
Reynolds Foundation and ECU.
Those grants enabled them to con-
tinue developing their idea, which
they had first developed to fit the
specifications of the National
Endowment for the Humanities
grant.
The three conversation groups
met for three two-hour sessions each
to discuss the theme of what
America meant to them. According
to Morrison, all the groups were
eager to talk to each other and share
their unique perspectives, whether
they were immigrants, high school
students, children of Holocaust sur-
vivors, or college graduates working
corporate jobs.
"It was really interesting to see
what they thought of the American
dream Morrison said.
These conversation groups and
the theme of this developing play fit
right in with PeopleAct's stated pur-
pose, which not only involves the-
atrical entertainment, but concern
for the local community.
"It's a community theater group I
founded two years ago. The focus is
on community projects that bring
the community together Morrison
said.
Not all of the conversations were
lightheartcd and positive. Morrison
said there was a surprising amount of
cynicism from the conversation
group made up of high school stu-
dents; there was optimism from
immigrants who felt America pre-
sented great opportunities, and con-
versation on weightier topics.
"We've had a lot of dialogue
about racism, especially the African-
Americans, who have experienced
incidents of racism, some of them
violently Morrison said.
The conversation groups provid-
ed a wealth of material for the script
which is being developed by
Morrison and the others involved in
this project, who include: Dr. Gay
Wilentz of the ECU English deptart-
ment, project director; Janice
Periquet, managing director, Carl
Campbell, assistant theatrical direc-
tor, and Todd Lovett, also an ECU
English department faculty member,
multimedia designer.
There will be open auditionsin
April for eight parts and the play will
be performed in Greenville in
September. It will also be performed
ir. Wilson, Pembroke, New Bern and
Elizabeth City.
The project was designed to be
entertaining as well as thought-pro
yoking.
"The crux of the project is that
we need to establish a dialogue. We.
need to open lines of dialogue where
there is none right now, among peo-
ple of different ethnic backgrounds,
different class backgrounds. We
Eat Carolina Pkiyhou
East Carolina Dance Theatre
DANCE '97
February 6, 7, 8, 10, and 11, 1997 at 8:00 p.m.
February 9, 1997 at 2:00 p.m.
General Public: 9.008.00 ECU FacultyStaff: 8.007.00
Children 12 & under: 6.005.00 ECU Students: 6.005.00
Call328-6829
McGinnis Theatre�ECU Main Campus�Corner of Fifth and Eastern Streets
China, U.S. reach agreement on textile trade
BEIJING (AP) - Averting millions of dollars in sanctions, China and the
United States reached a trade agreement Sunday that heralded a warming in
relations and could mean a doubling of U.S. textile sales in China.
Beijing had threatened levies on imports of U.S. fruit, beverages and other
goods in retaliation for $19 million in penalties imposed by Washington last
year after China exceeded VS. textile import quotas.
The pact signed Sunday extends for four years a 1994 treaty that expired
at the end of last year. It will reduce some Chinese tariffs, keep others at cur-
rent rates and eliminate some non-tariff barriers for VS. products.
Police use cranes to clear chained
anti-nuclear protesters
GEESTHACHT, Germany (AP) - Police used a crane today to remove a steel
container with anti-nuclear activists inside that had been blocking railroad
tracks at a nuclear power plant for a week.
Eighteen Greenpeace activists, who had been protesting the planned
transport of spent fuel rods from the Kruemmel plant in northern Germany,
were taken into custody, police said.
Police said there were no incidents, but Greenpeace accused the police of
unnecessary roughness.
The material is to be transported by rail to the Netherlands and from
there by ship to a reprocessing plant in Sellafield, England. Authorities said
the transport would begin today.
The Ledonia Wright
African American Culture
Center, the Department of
Communications and the
Department of Psychology
present Dr. Michael Eric
Dyson, UNC Processor of
Communications, Director
of the Institute for African
American Studies and
author of "Between God
and Gangsta Rap" and
"Race Rules" in a lecture
presentation on Monday,
February 3, 1997 at 6 p.m.
in Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student
Center. This program is
free and the ECU commu-
nity and the general public
is invited.
I is in
L
�ui�is
N'SBOAfflWiDIRECTORS
UNION C0MMI
URAL AWARENESS, FILM
ENTERTAINMENT, SPECIAL EVl
ARKETING AND VISUAL ARTS.
rested Applicants Should Have At Least
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Elty Entertainment To Their Fellow Students
, OR TO PICK UP AN APPLICATH
MENDENHALL STUDENT "
EWUfflOUEHeEAT
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February 3 - 7
(Mon - Fri)
9:00am - 4:00pm
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Special Payment Plan. Available StUQCIIt StOFCS





news
The East Carolinian
Alcohol-related accidents leave UNC
officials searching for answers
RALEIGH (AP) - Officials at some
North Carolina universities are tak-
ing a renewed interest in excessive
drinking as incidents related to
alcohol become more frequent.
At the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, a sub-
stance abuse task force has been
formed to find ways to reduce
excessive drinking on campus.
Counselors at UNC-CH give edu-
cational sessions to students arrest-
ed for underage drinking downtown
or caught violating the campus
alcohol rules.
Duke began instituting tougher
rules - such as banning kegs on
campus - three years ago. A sub-
stance abuse specialist there calls
the school's infirmary every
Monday to check on alcohol
injuries and overdoses from the
weekend. Officials also recently
began an amnesty policy - that says
students won't be punished, only
treated - worrying that students
otherwise wouldn't call for help if
they needed it.
But still, alcohol-related acci-
dents keep happening.
In the last month alone:
-A 23-year-old Duke law student
was killed after smashing his car
into a tree. His blood-alcohol level
was nearly twice the legal limit,
police said.
-An 18-year-old North Carolina
freshman fell five stories down an
elevator shaft. Witnesses said the
woman and the man who pushed
her into the elevator doors, which
opened, had been drinking.
-Four people were injured at
Duke after the basketball team's
win over North Carolina, including
one who was burned after jumping
through a bonfire. Police said the
situation was "a near riot" and alco-
hol was factor.
Naive parents may not realize
what's ahead when they get a col-
lege acceptance letter in the mail,
said Ken McGee, whose daughter
Jamie died after a fall on the UNC-
CH campus after drinking.
'The parents are just taking it
for granted that it's safe to send
their child there he said.
"They're just excited for their child
to be accepted to Carolina
Those who work with students
say it's no surprise that in a culture
in which about half of the accidents
are fueled by alcohol, college cam-
puses have become dangerous
places for some.
William Jordan, a UNC-CH
trustee, father of two and chairman
of the substance abuse task force,
has described the university of the
past few decades as a bad parent,
letting'rules go unenforced.
"Anti-social behavior, whether it
be physical violence, drunken dri-
ving or destruction of property,
whatever manifestation it takes, is
not going to be accepted on this
campus, and we don't want it
accepted in this town he said.
"College is a great time for experi-
mentation and testing things -
within the confines of certain rules
and regulations
Students say they don't know
how universities can take more
responsibility for the actions of
thousands of young adults.
"Alcohol is a problem on this
campus said Ruth Reid, a junior
at Carolina, who applauds the uni-
versity for its shuttle buses that
discourage drinking and driving.
"But I'm not sure what else the
university can do to stop it
In the foil of 1994, 34 students
ended up in the emergency room
with alcohol-related injuries. In the
fall of 1995, the number was 24. By
last fall, it was 14.
Duke students who visit the
emergency room are referred to the
office of substance abuse counselor
Jeanine Atkinson's office for coun-
seling, but they're not punished.
Atkinson tracks alcohol abuse
through the year with her "alcohol
calendar Then she tailors educa-
tion programs before heavy drink-
ing times, such as spring break, big
football weekends and Mardi Gras.
Last week, she served hot
chocolate to students camping out
for basketball tickets in freezing
temperatures. She also handed out
fliers about the dangers of alcohol
and hypothermia.
Matt Sullivan, a substance-
abuse counselor at UNC-CH, hears
plenty of anecdotes about what can
happen to a student after too much
drinking. But a UNC-CH study last
year quantified the negative out-
comes. Twenty-six percent admit-
ted driving while impaired during
the year before the study. Thirteen
percent said they had been injured
while drinking, and 9 percent had
been sexually compromised.
Study, married people more likely to cut back on drinking, drugs
DETROIT (AP) - A study released
today confirms the old adage that
people settle down after marriage.
People reporting marijuana use
and heavy drinking dropped by one-
third during a two-year period when
they went from single to married,
according to a University of Michigan
study of 33,000 young adults from
1976 to 1994.
'If you feel a responsibility to and
for another person, then you are more
apt to control your own behavior and
play a role in controlling the partner's
behavior said Jerald Bachman, one
of the study's five authors at the Ann
Arbor-based university's Institute for
Social Research.
Couples who lived together but
were not engaged or married showed
no such drop in drug use. Bachman
said such couples apparently had less
commitment to one another, which
meant fewer changes in their drug
habits.
Those who stayed single contin-
ued to be a high proportion of drug
and alcohol users, the study showed.
Drug use also increased for people
when they divorce, only to decline
once again if they remarry.
The data is based on a question-
naire given to graduating high school
seniors across the country. The par-
ticipants were questioned every two
years, tracing their use of alcohol,
tobacco and drugs up to 14 years
beyond graduation.
Bachman said he was hardly sur-
prised by many of the results, such as
young, unmarried adults usually
increasing their alcohol, marijuana
and cocaine use when they left
home, often to attend college.
Trie results are published in book
released today titled "Smoking,
Drinking, and Drug Use in Young
Adulthood
Bachman added that the "mar-
riage effect so helpful for reducing
drug and alcohol use brought only a
slight reduction in cigarette smoking
habits.
Typical young adult smokers were
regular users before they left high
school. Of those who smoked a half-
pack or more when they were high
school seniors, three-quarters contin-
ued smoking at age 22 and two-thirds
at 30.
out of ECU!
YOUR RESUME!

I

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ECU Student Leadership Development Programs
Applications are now being accepted for the
two newest student leadership development programs
at ECU:
The identified student leader program is a six
session, twelve hour program for freshmen
and sophomores who wish to develop their
bask leadership skills and understanding.
Saturdays - 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
The experienced student leader track is
a six session, twelve hour program geared
toward those students who have leadership
experience at the college level and who are
looking to further develop their skiUs in
preparation for professional careers.
Tuesdays - 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
These are interactive, activity based programs
designed to improve your skills while having fun!
(Yes, it can be done!)
To apply, stop by the
Student Leadership Development Programs Office,
109 Mendenhall Student Center
by 5:00 p.m. Monday, February 10, 1997.
Space is limited!
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A Brief Introduction
Brent Zimmer joined the ECU
Student Stores team in August
1996. Prior to coming on board as
the Computer Sales Manager, Brent
was the Campus Stores Coordina-
tor for Craven Community College.
Brent has an interesting back-
ground including spending four
years as a Naval Sonar Technician.
He has an MBA from Boston
University and an undergraduate
degree in Political Science and
Sociology from University of the
State of New York.
of oar
Fail ft Spring Semester Hours:
Monday � Friday: 7.30 am - 7:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Student Stores
Where your dollars support scholars!
Wright luHdhts311-4731





4 Tuesday. February 4, 1997
news
The East Carolinian
Bomb damages American dormitory on Paris university campus
SGA
PARIS (AP) - A bomb exploded
outside a dormitory for American
students early this morning, shat-
tering the glass entrance and win-
dows but causing no injuries, police
said.
Explosives in a gas canister,
weighing 28 pounds, exploded at
4:25 a.m. outside the American
Pavilion at the Cite Universitaire in
southern Paris, a police spokesman
said.
No one immediately claimed
responsibility for the attack, the
spokesman said, speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity. Police were
Services
continued from page 1
of chairs that maneuvering is diffi-
cult at times said freshman Chris
Mackey.
College Hill is difficult to navi-
gate for those students in manual
wheelchairs.
" I have friends up there on the
Hill and I would really like to go and
visit them any time I wanted to, but
it's just not accessible Mackey said.
Many changes have occurred
since DSS was first established.
"The DSS used to take us to doc-
tor's appointments and classes in
buildings off the main campus, but it
investigating what explosive mater-
ial was inside the canister.
"It was a big noise, a strong
explosion said Joseph Seka, a
receptionist at the dormitory. He
said the building houses 200 stu-
dents, about 60 percent of them
American.
Officials at the pavilion declined
immediate comment.
"Everybody's worried about
what's going to happen
Clementina Spinosa, a 20-year-old
international relations student from
Red Hill, Pa said after being awak-
ened by the blast.
doesn't any longer. However, we had
to get our own tutors, hire our own
aids and our own classmates to take
notes for us. They do that for us
now Bell said.
DSS makes many changes on
campus to assist the handicapped.
" Compared to other college cam-
puses, here it is superb Bell said.
"Especially the new rec center. I
have been in rehabilitation centers
that weren't as accessible
Students commented that the
dining hall staff was helpful and
courteous.
"If you need anything, the staff
will help you. I have a little problem
with reaching things on the back of
the buffets, but usually the staff
realizes that and helps me Mackey
Still, she said she knew of no
students planning to leave the
dorm. "I'm not going anywhere
she said.
Bombings in France recent
months have been linked to
Algerian Muslim militants as well as
Basque and Corsican nationalists.
A subway bombing in December
that killed four people and a wave of
bombings in 1995 were linked to the
Algerian militants, who oppose
Western links with Algeria's military-
backed government. The bombs in
those attacks were usually gas canis-
ters loaded with explosives.
said.
Some of the problems are caused
not by the school, but the students
and visitors.
"People park in my space illegally
more than I would like them to.
Sometimes I have to park in the
Umstead lot. It is very inconve-
nient Mackey said.
Students realize DSS does much
to help them, but say that many
things still need work.
"The ECU DSS had come a long
way, but it has a long way to go. Vk
are tired of being treated like a sec-
ond class group of people on campus
here. The things we ask for, like
automatic doors in all the buildings,
aren't just what we want; it is what
we deserve Bell said.
continued from page 1
will be Monday, Feb. 10 at 5 p.m. in
room 221 Mendenhall. The resolu-
tion will be discussed during this
meeting and may be voted on.
Students interested in speaking for
or against the resolution at the
meeting may contact any legislator
Transit
continued from page 1
close to Mendenhall in those com-
muter parking lots be able to get to
Mendenhall faster from some of the
limited parking lots they were using
after construction began
The parking lot Grunden is refer-
ring to is the limited parking lot at
Minges Coliseum. Due to construc-
tion on the road behind Mendenhall.
this route had to be postponed. As a
result, the Gold route now runs
twice as many times through the
limited lot to help ease some of the
additional traffic flow.
Driver training is also an issue on
campus. Grunden believes there is
no doubt his drivers have had the
proper training. This is because he
trains students and gives them the
road test.
"We train our drivers here at
ECU Grunden said.
Grunden has been licensed by
the department of Motor Vehicles to
do all road testing of prospective
new applicants for a Coach Motor
Vehicle license. These licenses are
required to operate a bus in NC.
Grunden also said the accident
rate for campus buses is low here at
ECU.
"We have had three incidents
involving buses since I have been
here, most of which involved parked
cars, and the reason I call them inci-
dents is because of the amount of
damage that was involved in each
one Grunden said.
Grunden said that none of the
accidents had caused any more than
$1000 in damage. Grunden also said
- � - tfft A- ft A . M iw W. 9' � C ' f- ' Fk P- i - Jk ' � W
pANAMA CITY BEACH, HORfCA
$129 PER PERSON PER WEEK
that a drug test was mandatory after
any type incident, and the driver was
placed on probation for an unspeci-
fied amount of time.
The condition of the buses has
also been questioned.
"Most of the buses are newer
models Grunden said.
Grunden also said they didn't
have any more problems than one
would expect, but the biggest two
problems encountered were getting
the buses repaired and the brakes.
"The majority of the problems
we run into are brakes. The buses
we use are pretty much designed for
rural riding, and all the stopping and
going tends to wear the brakes out
pretty quick Grunden said.
However, over-sized brake assem-
blies were used to help combat this
problem.
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Classes begin on Feb. 5
Register until Feb. 12
Classes meet Wednesday nights at 9:15 p.m.
in SRC 240.
Cost is $10 studentmember; $20 non members
BASKETBALL
SHOOTING
CHALLENGE
February 4
4:00-6:00 p.m.
&
February 5
8:00-11:00 p.m.
SRC Sports Forum.
�Three Point Shootout
� Hot Shots
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� Half Time Shootout
Natural Life Events
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COME MEET YOUR CHALLENGE!
February 13 at 4:00 p.m. in the SRC
Pre-register in SRC Main Office by February 10.
formation on these events contact Recreational Services at 328-6387. ,
1
:
J
For more in





Have you ever waited 20 minutes in the freezing cold for a late bus, just to get on and realize
there are no warm seats left?
Instead you are forced to stand in a crowded aisle, crammed in like a tomato on a sandwich.
In ease you have not noticed, many of the buses have been dangerously overcrowded and some
are not running any more. Either too many students are allowed on the bus at one time or they
are being left to wait for a bus that is never coming.
Wc think the student body is being short-changed by the Transit Department.
fcarl Granden, the transit director, probably felt like a captain taking over a sinking ship when
hekook the helm last year. Transit had management problems last spring when officials discov-
ered the previous director was spending our student fees in questionable ways. Exact details are
�rjjf sketchy, but general excessive spending was the finding made by Student Life when they
rettewed the situation. Naturally Grunden's decisions will be more closely scrutinized than pre-
viifts directors, but he needs to patch the holes in the ship raster.
$lfhy would you change the bus route and not tell anyone, just leaving them there to wait? Why
wflild you pile students in the seat and in the aisle to the point where they are hot, sweaty and
stptt of breath? This is a disaster waiting to happen. Never mind the fact that it makes the ride
extremely uncomfortable. It is imperative that students catch the right bus at the right time, but
isjft worth risking your life? We at TEC think not.
$bo many students' lives are placed in jeopardy each day as they are crammed onto these
bates or left behind. It is not right and we do not have to take it. Considering the fact that too
majiy students are on the bus, being left at bus stops, and breaking bus fire codes, we think
acjfion should be taken.
'Vfe are tharMul Transit is finally addressed these issues. We just hope these are not empty
ptjpniaes or plans never put into action. We haven't seen any of the changes yet. We do have faith,
tgh.
3ffc hope that soon they no longer have trouble finding student-employees, update run-down
bujes and maybe add some more routes. We know that money is always an issue, but if so many
st&tents' lives are being put in danger, then there should be something done about it. As many
students as are brought to the university by bus, you would think that the university would put
forth some money to make sure they're safe. There's no excuse for putting someone else's life
in danger: We need to find a solution.
Gtt a little closer tien you get on tht bus-Overcrowded conditions on the buses is the took of "Our'
PHOTO IT HEATHER BUMESS
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Guest columnist application for Campus View
This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEC what you
think about a certain topic. Please return this form The Bast Carolinian
office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print
Name
Fr Sophn Jr Sr ?
Phone number.
Topic(s) about which I would like to write.
Please consfaJar me for a portion aa uest columnist for TEC. Iagree to allow TEC't staff to edit my sub-
missk), � for grammar, punctuation and libelous content Other than those changes I will be notified of any
changes that may affect tht leng h or content I understand TEC reserves the right to reject my submis-
sion. If I am selected, TEC will notify me two weeks in advance of publication; at that time a deadline for
submission will be assigned by the editor.
4-Wnt �
I
rtfc)m)
we tK�
(Jt�rf �
U.TTFRS TO THt EDITOR
Where's the good beef ?
lb the Editor,
Once again, another misleading ad
from our "friends" at University
Housing Services (UHS). Come on
now, we have all seen the sly adver-
tisements ana received their annoying
junk mail. You know, the ones that
attempt to condemn and place guilt
on a student if you decide for a better
life, oops, I mean living off campus.
OK, before I really begin, let me warn
the reader that I will commence rant-
ing and raving (or fighting injustice)
after this period. Anyhow, the UHS
(our friends, remember) now carry a
catchy little jingle, "good times, good
food, great friends I would like to
examine the most controversial two
words of their jingle: good food.
Good food, where?
Of my two years at ECU, I can only
muster up about three ARAMARK
created foods that were worth my
money as well as my tastebuds:
Croatan mac 'n cheese, Wight Place
pizza and vegi-sticks. Three is not
very much at all.
just the other day, I desired to
order some mozzarella sticks from the
Spot. After a rather rude and seeming-
ly unmotivated-to-work clerk gath-
ered the energy to take my order, I
was to wait an unjust amount of time
(15 minutes) for my food. Yes, for my
five burnt cheese sticks at an insane
price.
Next, I endured what many have
with ARAMARK manufactured, Spot
prepared cheese sticks biting into
practically nothing but fried ait Most
of the cheese was melted to the bot-
tom of the box. I felt cheated and
angered, but what can you do?
I'm real sure that a refund would
be obliged by one of the clerks with-
out a hassle (much sarcasm). I was the
victim, once again, of the UHSARA-
MARK food scam. Cheese sticks may
not be much, but it is the principle of
the whole thing.
ror all of us at ECU who have ever
overpaid for a dried hamburger, mushy
fries, cold spaghetti or bruised fruit,
and indirectly, terrible service from
any of the six dining locations, we arc
the losers. The real losers that deserve
to be on the UHS ads, with censor
blocks over our eyes, because we have
been mislead and tricked by the UHS
and ARAMARK relationship.
RS. lb at least attempt to
offer a solution Let's let the man-
agers know how we feel; write to The
East Caro&mat, demand the withdraw-
al of mandatory freshman meal plans;
and learn to cook our own food or eat
out a bit more, at least until campus
food improves. Haw I struck a nerve?
Chris Newton
Sophomore
CommunicationsPolitical Science
Rculty has right to be fit too
To the Editor,
Everyone will agree that physical fit-
ness is an important part of anyone's
life. Having an outlet available makes
it easier to achieve their fitness goals.
Not only is fitness a valuable pat of
life, it also provides emotional fitness
as well. The sense of competition,
self-worth, and self esteem are all
components of total fitness. While the
addition of the new student recre-
ation center has increased the access
for students, it has made things more
difficult for everyone else
Since the founding of ECU, all
members of the ECU community
were invited to participate in activi-
ties surrounding the campus. These
activities included things like the use
of the library, concerts, movies, speak-
ers, intramural activities, use of uni-
versity facilities, etc. This was the
true meaning of a campus community
and it was thriving.
Since the opening of the new stu-
dent recreation center, faculty and
staff employed by the university can
no longer use any recreation facility or
participate in intramural events with-
out paying a large fee. The public rea-
sons that have been heard are that
student fees paid for the center and
therefore should be only for their use.
I'll buy that excuse if the university
did not use any state moneys, paid for
by my taxes, to build or maintain the
facility. If the building was totally
financed through increased student
fees over the past several years, then
why can't the fees that you are still
charging the students be put toward a
parking deck, since the student recre-
ation center is finished? If the univer-
sity can raise student fees enough to
build a SI 1 million building, why not a
deck?
Okay, maybe the university will
stop charging the increased fees now
that the recreation center is finished.
Maybe it was just for rhe new project.
We won't charge people for things that
are already being paid for and have
been in existence for sometime. If
this is the case, which I doubt, why
must the facility and staff now pay to
play intramural?
I know that you might be saying
they all have jobs, why can't they pay
several hundred dollars each year?
ECU faculty and staff are some of the
lowest paid in the university system.
Taking away the small things that can
make faculty and staff happy and
increase job satisfaction will hurt the
campus community The old facilities
have been closed and cannot be used
by anyone. I used to enjoy being able
to interact with the students through
the intramural system. Showing the
students that we are people too, is
very important. Making us pay to do
this is an enormous mistake that can
and should be corrected.
If this trend continues, the ECU
community will continue to be divid-
ed. What's next-library fees?
Jim Bazluki
LccturerfTrainer
1
!






6 Tmiday, febrmry 4,1997
SPARE TIME
comics
The East Carolinian
BY ANDY FARKAS
WHAT po you Su'POSt it TXKtS 7 (xt-T '�"�
JiAts AwoMyMoM, fw� v?fotr SKou? Fo liars?
you KHov, i Sony fi-yvK. ���; �, m iiA
��EV�5 8 SUCH A 3At ACo. (�l Af V,�
BIOL 3221
By Rebekah Phillips
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lessen ko.
sere TtteLess
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or nxgatt6UM.
Mrsroier
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Snowman's Land
By Rob Chapman
IF I E.VE.R HWE A Sew, X Thimk
I'M (3�MMA WAMt HIM HAPRISow
SO If HE. �AR OEilDtS TO OPtNA Uj�.LL I�D HAVE. TO CmAM&C
CAR D&AUS�lP JHE� CALL T J � T�) jg, ,N
Primitlv Man
By Karl Trolenberg
EI.P
THE CROSSWORD PUZZLE
53'61f�� 1hi1213
141516
i1610
�sT
Ir
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�36
36
39Bi
43
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Si53
5S1r
w46t
�a63�r
DOWN
1 Inclined way
2 Indigo
3 Indian of Peru
4 Tough, as the
skin
5 Impede
6 Run � of the
law
7 Clears
8 Poet's "before"
9 Tunes
10 System of gov-
ernment
11 Chester �
Arthur
12 Long river
13 Liquid mea-
sures: abbr.
21 Affirmative votes
23 Cushion
25 Makes more
regular
ANSWERS
PROM THUR ���
26 Equipped with
wings
27 Blanches
28 Tablets
29 Western Indians
30 Hospital worker
31 Item for packing
32 Enrol
34 Domesticated
37 Where trotters
trot
38 Shoeless
41 Hospital area
43 Wandering
44 Recent pref.
45 Food factory
worker
47 Slice
48 Gym pads
49 City on the Oka
50 Nevada city
51 Earsplitting
52 � mater
53 Ananias
54 Traditional
knowledge
57 Deer
O i�7 Tribur. Mtodw SwviOM. Inc.
20 Australian
animal
Alingrttt
ACROSS
1 Marsh bird
5 Seraglio
10 Resounded
14 Baxter or
Bancroft
15 In flames
16 Mr. Kazan
17 Isinglass
18 Cover girl
19 Irritate
22 Expresses a
belief
24 Shoe part
25 A cheese
26 Seem
29 Outward sign
33 Dens
34 Shoe or family
end
35 Coffee-filled ves- 48 Next day
set cally
36 Friendly nation
37 Drizzles
38 Unruly child
39 �Avtv
40 Singer Ed
41 Squander
42 Perfumes
45 Life work
51 Act of alighting
55 Field
56 Decorate
58 Potpourri
59 A state: abbr.
60 Common con-
traction
61 Sharif
46 Orchestra instru- 62 Narrow opening
ment 63 Passover meal
47 Concern 64 Biblical weed
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(one guest allowed) with valid'F.CU ID
A GRIPPING STORY
AflMPKILL
IKU in Hit i : IF '
ILLUMINAW
ILLUMINA'97 EXHIBITION
Through February 23,1997
Mendenhall Gallery
CLOSING RECEPTION AND AWARDS PRESENTATION
Tuesday, February 18,1997
7PM - 9PM in Mendenhall Gallery
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RATTLE
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DEADLINE! FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 21. 1997 AT 4PM
TO AUDITION. PLEASE SUBMIT A DEMO TAPE
CONTAINING THREE SONGS. A PRESS-KIT, PLUS
OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM TO THE STUDENT UNION
OFFICE. ROOM 236, MENDENHALL STUDENT
CENTER OR MAIL TO:
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
236 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
GREENVILLE. NC 27358
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 328-4715
s�f re-
presented by the ECU Student Union. For More Information, Call
the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004, or Check Out Our Web Site!
www.ecu.eduStudentUnionTHEHOMEPAGE.html





Join us for
the experience j
of a lifetime.
-1
The East Carolinian
has an immediate opening for an
Advertising account executive
for the spring semester.
Come by our office
to complete an application or
call 328-6366 for more information.
It's experience
you'll never forget.
���
���
���
� to Mendenhall Student Center
k. YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY St
29
Haibl tftas
Don't miss ECU'S annual Mardis Gras party. Video Karaoke,
BowlingBilliards, Bourbon Street Bingo, DJ Dance, Lady Luck
Casino, a Spade Tournament and more.
Top it off with a delectable Cajan Buffet.
Friday, Feb. 7 from 9 p.m. until 2 a.m.
Students may attend by presenting their current, valid ECU ID at the door.
One guest permitted with a student Guest passes available beginning Jan. 31
at the Central Ticket Office from 8:30 am. until 6 p.m. and the the Community
Service Desks from 8 a.m. until midnight On Feb. 7, guest passes are avail-
able at the Central Ticket Office until 6 p.m Community Service Desks until
9 p.m and Student Recreation Center 6-9 p.m.
3liumlna '$7
Student Art Exhibit in the Menaenhall Gallery through Feb. 28. Closing
Reception and Awards Presentation: Tuesday, Feb. 18,7-9 p.m.
a
s
trtrK
A Time To Kill (R) Feb. 6-8 in Hendrix Theatre.
Free admission with F ZU ID
fteti a www
ALL-U-CAN-BOWL
Bowl the night away every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each month
from 8-11 p.m. $5 admission includes shoe rental and all the
games you can bowl, plus pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
�5 Bowl for 50 cents a game every Monday 1-6 p.m. (Shoe rental included!)
MIDDAY BREAK SPECIAL
Take a break from your hectic class schedule with 10 frames of
discounted bowling. Every Wednesday and Friday from 1 p.m.
until 6 p.m. Only $1 per game (shoe rental included)
3
SI
���
��
3
si
HOURS: Mon - Thurs. 8 a.m11 p.m Fri. 8 a.m12 a.m Sat 12 p.m12 a.m Sun. 1 p.m11 p.ra i
.
LoveLines
ur key to the
perfect Valentine's
��
COMPLETE THIS FORM
AND BRING IT TO THE
MCNOENHALL STUDENT
CENTER INFORMATION
DESKORTHEEA$T
CAROLINIAN OFFICE
BEFORE MONDAY'S
DEADLINE IN ORDER TO
BE ELIGIBLE TO WIN!
You can win a "Perfect Valentine's Day" when you buy a LoveLines ad.
Just send your Valentine's Day greeting through The East Carolinian and
you're automatically entered to win the grand prize:
� Roses from Jefferson's Florist
� Dinner for two at Christine's in the Greenville
Hilton
� Two passes to a movie at Carmike Cinemas
� Coffee and dessert at Barnes & Noble Cafe
Or win one of two additional Valentine's Day
packages being given away. And it's all FREE
compliments of The East Carolinian and our
participating sponsors. We'll contact
the winner by phone on Tuesday, Feb. 11.
Christine's
Jefferson's Florist
Carmike Cinemas
Barnes & Noble
Complete an entry form by aiming to lie East
Carolinian office. Ho purchase is necessary.
; only
tenl
COMPLETE T118roRMJUtt BRIM IT TO re
PAVBrlNfKOroDIHr-MroXATra
Name.
.Phone.
.ID.
Address.
$2 for 25
words or
fewer
5 each
for each
word
over 25
All ads
must be
prepaid
O N l Y FIRST NAMES OR
I N I T I A I S MAY BE USED
13
19
25
14
20
15
21
7
10
16
22
11
17
23
28
12
18
24
1
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Messages may be rejectededited on basis of decency. Only first names or initials may be used.
The paper reserves me right to edit or omit any ad which is deemed objectionable, inappropriate,
obscene or misleading. No purchase is necessary to enter the contest.
DEADLINE
.J





8 ' Tuesday, February 4,1997
classifieds
The Eait Carolinian
III II
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
STUDIO�APARTMENT AT
RINGGOLD Towers available for sub-
lease, $310month, fully furnished. Call
(919) 552-9293 or call Ringgold Towers
Mgmt, - 752-2865.
PKRK VILLAGE ADAMS BLVU:
one bedroom apts. range, refrigerator,
wd hookup. Free water and sewer.
ECU bus route. Wainright Property
Management 756-6209.
CMS COTTAGE NEAR HOSPI-
TAL large one bedroom with gas &
elec. heat Hardwood and carpeted
floors, fireplace, chandeliers, on wooded
lot. Very nice, very quiet $415.00 mo.
Available Feb. 1st. Call 757-9387.
fEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
Own bedroom $177.50 month. 14 utili-
ties 14 phone. WasherDryer. Tar
River. Call 757-0406.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: TWObcd-
room apt. at Whyndam Court $202.50
plus 12 of the utilities. Please call 413-
0514.
FEMALE ROOMMATE TO SHARE
two bedroom duplex, wd with neat,
serious anthropology student. $275 1
2 utilities. Please call Virginia at 756-
5340 or 758-9437.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments. Washer
Dryer, use of all amenities, split cable,
phone and utilities 4 ways. Call Today!
321-7613. Very Affordable.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
PLAYERS Club Apartments. Washer
Dryer, use of all amenities, split cable,
phone and utilities 4 ways. Call Today
321-7613. Very Affordable!
NAGS HEAD, NC- GET your group
together early. Two houses in excellent
condition; fully furnished; washer &
dryer; dishwasher, central AC; available
May 1 through August 31; sleeps 6 -
$1600.00 per month; sleeps 8 -$2200.00
per month (75V)850-1532.
COLLEGE VIEW APARTMENTS
TWO bedrooms, stove, refrigerator,
basic cable, washer dryer hook-ups, cen-
tral heat and air. All apartments on
ground level. Call 931-0790.
ROOMMATE WANTED ASAP.
Should be quiet & neat person. $192.50
plus utilities (no more than $35.00 to-
tal) Please call Eleftheria at 752-8004.
4 BEDROOM HOUSE ON Lews
Street needs subleasers for summer!
Cute, spacious and close to campus!
Call 758-2154 - leave a message!
LARGE ROOM -3 BLoCKslrolnlti:
dium -private entrance, bath, driveway
parking -microwave oven, fridge -wired
for phone and cable -prefer senior or
grad. student. $275mo. -call Max after
6:00 pm -321-7211.�
I AND 3 BEDROOM HOUSE on the
corner of 5th and Lewis. Call Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
FOR SALE KITCHEN TABLE with
chairs, $25 and patio furniture, table,
1 chairs, and end table $20 or best of-
fer. Call 758-7531.
JASMINE GARDENS 2 bedroom 1 bath
Stove, Refrigorttor, wd hookups,
�Che to campus �2moo
'?� I� IS
11 Off SECURITY DEPOSfT
WITH PRESENTATION OF
THIS COUPON
I Mdl�a4roomftana,RaM4fnior.
WWW, Oryr Hookup. Dodo and fk�
m moit units. L�un7 H&tf.
SandVbfeyM Court.
LocKad 5 btoota from campus.
FME WATER. SEWM
2 BEDROOMS
Su�wfl� Uf� mm roWwmntr
WMhar. Dryor Hookupi
PatkH on Fir floor
Uxsod 5 Mods from Campw
d�nftm PutA
THESE AND OTH� FtMrtefWriB
MANAGED BY
IMABtDVmUADWVE
7S�-III Ofcr Bojirol WI-�7
For Sale
MOUNTAIN BIKE FOR SALE. Gi-
ant sedona good condition has trek
shock wave shocks. Asking $200 obo.
Call 413-0660. Leave message.
-fe GIBSON N1GHTHAVVK CUS-
TOM guitar $700.00 Roland Jazz - 77
amplifier contact John � 919-638-3484
FOR SALE! QUEEN SIZE waterbed with
cherry headboard $250.00 for the waterbed
or have it set up for $75.00 more. Prices are
negotiable. Call Emily at 561-7808.
TOYOTA TRECEL 1990 4SP 133,000
miles accass $2,200. sony receiver dolby
prologtc 180 watts $250, sony cd 5 disc $130.
5 piece speaker system $300. Call David
328-7706.
If
Help
Wanted
NEED CASH NOW?
CALL CRAZY DAVE!
HE'LL BUY ANYTHING!
PAYING TOP DOLLAR!
754-0468 ANYTIME!
RESEARCH REPORTS
LstqkI Library of Intorntatton In U.S.
1S.27B TOfKS � Ml SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today wiffi Visa MC of COD
800-3510222
Or, rush $2.00 to
11322 Idaho Aw 1206-RR. Los Angeles. CA 90026
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
If
Help
Wanted
ONLINE INFORMATION SER-
VICES, INC is currently seeking in-
dividuals interested in part-time com-
puter programming employment on a
three-to six-month project. Applicants
should possess a working knowledge of
C and C under UNIX and Win32.
Telecommunications experience is a
plus. Please fax resumes, or deliver in
person, to: Online Information Ser-
vices, Inc 1206 Charles Blvd Green-
ville, NC 27834, Fax 919-757-2115
Voice 919-758-4141.
NOW HIRING PLAYMATES MUST
be 18 years old. Earn great money while
you learn playmates massage. Snow
Hill, NC 747-7686.
flK Services
Offered
ADULT TOY PARTY - FOR women
only! Earn free products just for j
hostessing a party. Call a romance spe-
cialist today! 752-5533 and ask for Jenn.
FREE FOR ECU STUDENTS!
Would you like to put your resume or a
classified ad on the internet for free?
We offer services including resume de-
signing and internet access. If you are
interested in any of these, visit our
Website at HTTP:
WWW.NCGALLERIA.COM or call
754-2171 for more information.
TYPING SERVICES AVAILABLE,
$2.00 per typed page, fast and accurate.
Call Debra Rhodes, 757-0495.
For Sale
10ME GROWN 2 - SMOKIN' Jams
D now available at CD Alley! Fea-
uring: Percy Hill, yep Ekoostik Hoo-
;ah, Grinch, Schleigho, Pondering &
nany more. Music for the head.
�)NLY USED ONCE. 175 Kneissel
kis, Salomon bindings, Galbello boots,
ize 8 women, and poles. Asking for
.200. Call 561-8178.
iURTON TWIN 47 SNOWBOARD
or sale. Only used half a season. Ask-
ng $300 or best offer. Call 754-8154.
Vsk for Shay.
JTN BIKE GARY FISHER with
nariton front suspension. Comes with
ock and pump. $450 Call Jon 758-3477
.r 758-2860.
HEAD LIFEGUARD NEEDED.
EXPERIENCE necessary. Lifeguard
needed. Experience preferred. See
Janinc Jones at the Greenville Country
Club.
IF YOU ARE SEEKING part-time em-
ploymcnt with an established company,
then look no further. ONLINE Col-
lections has just landed several collec-
tion accounts and has an immediate
need for telephone collectors. Appli-
cant must be aggressive, self motivated,
and poses excellent communication
skills. If interested, please contact
Chris Murphy at 754-1615 after 12 pm
or Craig Jackson at 757-2134 after 5 pm.
Only serious applicants need to apply.
THE GREENVILLE RECRE-
ATION & PARKS Department is re-
cruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth soc-
cer coaches for the spring indoor soccer
program. Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18 in soccer fun-
damentals. Hours are from 3 pm to 7
pm with some night and weekend
coaching. Flexible with hours accord-
ing to class schedules. This program
will run from the first of March to the
first of May. Salary rates start at $4.75
per hour. For more information, please
call Ben James or Michael Daly at 830-
4550.
VALENTINE HELP NEEDED IN
store and delivery. Apply in person.
Cynthia's Flowers 1318 East 10th
Street.
H500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL
MAILING our circulars. For info call
301-429-1326,
ATTENTION STUDENTS: EARN
EXTRA cash stuffing envelopes at
home. All materials provided. Send
SASE to Midwest Distributors, P.O.
Box 624, Olathc, KS 66051. Immediate
response.
QUICK CASH! THE SCHOOL 57
Business, Office of Professional Pro-
grams, is looking for a photographer to
take photos of our events. Must have
own camera. If interested, call 328-
6377.
EXCELLENT PAY!
I3E
Travel
Spring Break'97
Jamaica $399
Cancun $399
Bahamas $379
Panama City129 �
7Nights with Air,
Daily Free Drink Parties.
No Cover at Best Bars.
Group Discounts Available!
Endless Summer Tours
1-800-234-7007
VMCDhtcAMEX
Spring Break '97
Panama City
Beach
from $129
7nights Beachfront
-Daily Free Drink Parties
�Walk To Best Bars
-Group Discounts Available!
Endless Summer Tours
1-800-234-7007
VMCDiscAMEX
Travel P Greek
EASY WORK!
��r 9klT Mi'F.i B?Jj Assemble products at home! Call now!
1-919-243-4507 24 hours ext. NC121.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN IS now
hiring a Production Asst. Please apply
at our office on the second floor of the
Student Pubs. Bldg. across from Joyner.
THE EAST CAROLINA BANK is
looking for a part-time (20-25 hours
weekly) person who likes to work in a
fast-paced, sales-oriented environment
for our in-store location in the Green-
ville Super Walmart. Great opportunity
for college students. We offer a com-
petitive salary and commission pro-
gram. Please send resume along with
cover letter and salary history to: Doug
Hudson, The East Carolina Bank, 210
Greenville Blvd S.W Greenville, NC
27834.
BUSINESSMARKETING s'l'U-
DENTS: NATIONAL Communica-
tions Company is coming to Greenville.
Part-time job opportunities. Get paid
for excellent experience in your field
while attending East Carolina Univer-
sity. Call 888-605-0906.
Personals
SPRING BREAK
-2
3 Days 3Nights
Includes lodging,
Air Fare from Raleigh
Starts at $329
Diving & Snorkeling
Package Available
UB
THE SISTERS OF DELTA Zeta
would like to welcome our Spring 1997
new member class! Congrats, to: Holly
Clagen, Natalie Everheart, Randi
Fishbane, Amy Gerring, Shellie Harris,
Brook Owens, Marguita Valentine,
Kelly Woodell, and Kim Woodside!
KATIE WALDMAN: CONCRATU-
LATIONS ON your engagement! We
are so happy for you! We love you.
Love, your Gamma Sigma Sigma Sis-
ters.
KAPPA SIGMA, THANKS FOR the
social on Sat. night. As always we had a
blast. And Randy, we enjoyed your
musical performance. Love, Chi
Omca
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(9X9)
Wake 'n Bake for
Spring Break 1997
�Jamaica Panama aty
�Cancun De. on
?Padre �Bahanu
Call for Free
info Packet I 1-800-426-7710
trh Other
ITS NO LONGER NECESSARY to
borrow money for college. We can help
you obtain funding. Thousands of
awards available to all students. Imme-
diate qualification 1-800-651-3393.
TELECOMMUNICATION REPS
WANTED! No experience needed!
No investment! $4,000month possible
working at home 2 hrswk! For free lit-
erature write: Netcl Telecommunica-
tions, Dept. NC121, PO Box 3573, Wil-
son, NC 27893. Include $1.00 postage
handling.
ELEM ED CLUB IS HOSTING a
scholastic book fair Feb. 3rd through
7th, 9 am to 4pm in Speight room 202.
Come check it out!
DRUG RAID SEIZURES! BUY din
cheap! Houses, cars, computers, fur-
niture. Free details: Seizures, Dept.
NC121, Box 3573, Wilson, NC 27893
Enclose $100 for postagehandling.
�j Lost and
Found
arge
"SPRING BREAK 9? - DON'T be
left out, space limited Panama City
and Daytona Beach, Florida from $129.
Call STS @ 1-800-6481849 for more
info.
"SPRING BREAK 97 - DON'T be
left out, space limited Cancun and
Jamaica from $429. Call STS @ 1 -800-
648-4849 for more info.
SPRING BREAK '97. PANAMA
City Boardwalk Beach Resort $129
7nights beachfront, daily free drink
parties, walk to best bars Group dis-
counts Endless Summer Tours 1-800-
234-7007.
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
Beach "Summit" luxury a mdos next to
Spinnaker. Owner discount rates
(404)355-9637.
AAAA! SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS
party Cruise! 6 days $279! Includes all
meals, parties & taxes! Great Beaches
& Nightlife! Leaves from Ft. Lauder-
dale! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
SPRING BREAK'97. CANCUN, Ja-
maica, & Bahamas 7nights wair
from $399. Enjoy daily free drink par-
ties, no cover� best bars, & group dis-
counts Endless Summer Tours 1-800-
234-7007.
AAAA! CANCUN S JAMAICA
SPRING break specials! 7 nights air &
hotel from $429! Save $150 on food,
drinks & free parties! 111 lowest
price guarantee! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
BEST HOTELS & LOWEST
PRICES for spring-break beach desti-
nations. Florida, Cancun, Jamaica, etc.
Call now for rooms or sign-up as Inter-
Campus Repr. 800-327-6013 http:
www.icpt.com
AAAA! FLORIDA SPRING BREAK!
panama City! room with kitchen near
bars $119! Daytona-Best Location
$139! Florida's new hotspot-Cocoa
Beach Hilton $169!
springhreaktravel.com 1 -800-678-6386
rr� Personals
m
Greek
Personals
ALPHA DELTA PI. THANKSforlct-
ting us use your house during Rush.
Also, we would like to thank Carolyn
and Tracy for helping us deliver bids.
Love, Delta Chi
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA SERVICE
sorority is holding spring Rush Febru-
ary 3-6 in Rawl 105 5:30 pm till 6:30 pm.
ESA is affiliated with St. Jude Childrens
Hospital. Questions 321-0307. Hope
to see you there!
GOLD BRACELET LOST ON cam-
pus. Last seen Friday, January 24th.
If found, please call Amy at 758-9790.
There is a large reward.
LOST RING IN STUDENT REC
Center, Ladies locker room l28th.
Gold with green stones. If found
please call Mary Valand, 816-5223
(days). REWARD.
CHI OMEGA THANKS FOR a great
time last Thursday night. We look for-
ward to getting together with you all
again soon. Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
CONGRATS TO LIZ GRENO for
participating in the National Intramu-
ral Flag Football Championships. We
are proud of you! Love your Pi Delta
Sisters.
PHI TALI. KAPPA ALPHA and Alpha
Delta Pi, as always Friday night was
lots of fun. Looking forward to next
time. Love, Chi Omega.
'cga.
-pm
: yo
LAMBDA CHI, PI KAPPA, Alpha
Delta Pi, We had a great time with you
guys on Wed. night- Let's do it again
soon. Love, Chi Omeg
aLPHA PHI, THANKS SO much For
allowing us to use your house for Rush.
We truly appreciate it. It was a great
success. Thanks, Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
:igma
JETA"
PI DELTA HOPES ALL fraternities
had a successful Rush. Good luck with
your new members.
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE to wcl-
come: Janet Sharpe, Chandrea Triplett,
Kristen Keeley, Jamee' Lyons, Jennifer
Noe, Kaki Winstead, and Brooke
McKeery. Congratulations Love, the
Sisters of Alpha Phi!
I WISH SHE WOULD come back to
my place, but that would seem to for-
ward, maybe desperate. I'll ask her
back here tomorrow for a mocha at The
Beanbag Cafe on 3rd & Jarvis.
IT NEVER FAILS PHI Tau, you al-
ways show us a great time. Can't wait
to do it again! Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
KAPPA ALPHA, THANKS FOR the
pre- downtown on Thurs. night. We
had a blast. Love, Chi Omega.
KAPPA ALPHA. THANKS FOR a
great pre-downtown Saturday night.
We had fun! Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
t Alph;
ToTT
GREAT JOB ALPHA DELTA Pi at
the intermural basketball game against
Chi Omega last Wed! Keep it up!
Announcements
Announcements
THE LADIES OF SIGMA Gamma
Rho presents the "King and Queen of
Hearts Pageant Thurs. Feb. 13 at 7
pm. Male and Female contestants will
be modeling in categories of casual,
evening and after hour wear. For ev-
ery other person that shows their sup-
port, Sigma Gamma Rho will donate a
dollar to the American Heart Associa-
tion. Admission is free. For more info,
please contact, Jessica Mabry 321-3261.
-
pleas
WTO
WT TO MAKE A difference?
campus student position is now avail-
able on the ECU Student Transit Board
of Directors. Applications in Mcnden-
hall until February 6, call 328-0254.
ary 6, call 3ZJH
I SERVICES
THANKS TO A WONDERFUL stu-
dent staff who are serving students, fac-
ulty and staff in the greatest Student
Recreation Center in the nation. You
are the best! Carol Ann Tucker
WED FEB. 5 -GRADUATE Recital,
Rciko ishii, piano, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7:00 pm Sun Feb. 9 - Sunday at
the Gallery Concert: Vocal Music,
Louise Toppin and Sharon Munden,
Directors, Greenville Museum of Art,
802 South Evans St Greenville, 2:00
pm Sun Feb. 9 - Graduate Recital,
Amy Giammattci, trombone, AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 4:00 pm Mon
Feb. 10 -Faculty Recital, Britcon
Theurer, trumpet, flugelhorn, Christine
Gustafson, flute, Jeffrey Jarvis. tuba
with Alisa Wetherington-Gilliam, piano,
AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm.
SAM WILL BE HAVING Mr. Boldt,
Assistant Director of Graduate Pro-
grams, give an information session on
the MBAMSA programs at ECU. The
meeting will be held in GCB 1011 at
3:30 pm on February 4. AH students
are welcome to attend. Food and re-
freshments will be served after the
meeting.
BISEXUALS, GAYS, LESBIANS
AND allies for diversity will meet on
February 6. 1997 at 7:30 pm at Men-
denhall room 244. Valentine Dance
tickets on sale at the meeting $5.00 per
person. Come and learn more about B-
GLAD! Bring a friend! Hope to see
you there!
THE CAREER SERVICES STAFF
will present the following workshops to
help students prepare for campus or off-
campus interviews for career positions
or for internships and co-op experi-
ences: Resume writing - Wed. Feb. 5
at 3:00 pm and Thur. Feb. 13 at 4:00
pm. Interviewing Skills - Thur. Feb. 6
at 4:00 pm and Tue. Feb. 11 at 3:00 pm.
These workshops will be held in the
Career Services Center, Room 103.
THE ECU POETRY FORUM will
meet on Wednesday, February 5th in
Mendenhall Student Center, Room
248, at 8 pm. Open to the general pub-
lic, the Forum is a free workshop.
Those planning to attend and wanting
critical feedback on their work should
bring 8 or 10 copies of each poem. Lis-
teners welcome.
THEGREENVILLE-PITT
COUNTY Special Olympics will be
conducting an Athletics (Track & Field)
Coaches Training School on Saturday,
February 1st from 9am - 4pm for all in-
dividuals interested in volunteering to
coach Track & Field. We are also look-
ing for volunteer coaches in the follow-
ing sports: Swimming, Bowling, Gym-
nastics, Roilerskating, Powerlifting, Vol-
leyball, and Equestrian. No experience
is necessary. For more information
please contact Dwain Cooper at 830-
4844 or Dean Fov at 830-4541.
IN CELEBRATION OF BLACK hSs-
tory month, the distinguish sisterhood
of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.
would like to give you the opportunity
to exhibit your special talents. We wel-
come all singers, dancers, poets, artists,
models, etc. to celebrate their achieve
ments on Feb. 20. For more info about
participating, please contact Cassandra
Brown 758-9531.
GAMMA BETA PHI THERE will be
a meeting for all officers on Tuesday,
February 4 at 5:00 pm in room 242 in
Mendenhall.
ECU INVESTMENT CLUB WILL
meet Tues Feb. 4th, at 3:30, in GCB
1010. It's not too late to come out. Our
featured guest speaker will be Donna
Whitely, Financial Educator. Refresh-
ments to be provided. All majors wel-
come.
PHYSICAL THERAPY MASSAGE
CLINIC, Thursday, Feb. 13,1997 5pm
- 9pm. Belk Allidd Health Bldg cor-
ner of Greenville 'Blvd: Charles Blvd.
Purchase tickets from Physical Therapy
students or call the PT department �
328-4450. Cost: $3.00 for 10 min in ad-
vance. $3.50 for 10 min purchased at
the door.
THE MONTHLY MEETING OF
the adult Student Association will be
held on Wednesday, Feb. 5 1997 at 4:00
in Room 208 Whichard. All adult stu-
dents age 24 and older are invited to
attend. Call 328-6881 for more infor-
mation.
JUST RECEIVED YOUR W-2
FORM? SGA and Beta Alpha Psi (ac-
counting) organizations arc providing
FREE tax services to students and
members of the university community.
Coming soon!
The East Carolinian
25 words or fewer
Students$2
Non-students$3
Each word over
25, add5
For bold, add$1
For ALL CAPS,
add$1
DEADLINES
4p.m. FRIDAY for next
Tuesday's
edition
4p.m.
MONDAY for
next
Thursday's
edition
�l
u
1
- -I





9 Tuesday. February 4. 1997
The East Carolinian
Russia's oldest orchestra returns to ECU
CD
review
I) W. !� Wll. 1.1 1so
tSSISTAN1 LI FESTYLf EDITOR
A slice of history will soon be experi-
enced again at ECU in the guise of
music. On Feb. 6, the Bolshoi
Svmphony Orchestra. Russia's oldest
group of professional musicians, will
return to Greenville, offering a sound
that dates back to 1776 and is still
going strong into the new millenni-
um.
Although the Bolshoi Orchestra is
now touring solo, such has not always
been the case. By the time the
Bolshoi Theatre earned the distinc-
tion of becoming a state institution in
1806. the Orchestra had made a name
for itself by playing for ballet produc-
tions. Still, the Orchestra was up to
this time simply a background ele-
ment for the on-srage drama.
However, thanks largely to the
inspiration and determination of
composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky, the
Orchestra soon became a more
focused component of the drama in
Russian theater. As a result, the
Orchestra's significance expanded
and ir began to include pieces by
Glinka, Mussorgksy, Borodin and
Rimsky-Koraskov.
This increased significance
attracted some of Russia's best musi-
cians by the 1920s and '30s. a move
that eventually distinguished the
Bolshoi Orchestra as one of the most
popular symphony orchestras in rhe
Soviet Union. Naturally, composers
from all over the Soviet wanted to
work with such an orchestra. Since its
increased popularity, such notable
conductors as Svetlanov. Rozhdest-
venskv and Samosud have worked
with the Orchestra. The Orchestra's
famed reputation has even attracted
composers from other countries.
(Currently, about 300 musicians are
in the Bolshoi Orchestra, and wirh
their talents the Orchestra has toured
across Europe and Japan with the
Bolshoi Opera and recorded several
acclaimed albums, including Swan
hike, The Sleeping Beauty. The Sutmuker
and Great Russian Opera Choruses
(which also featured rhe Bolshoi
Opera Chorus),
In 1993. Maestro Lazarev lead the
Orchestra on its first tour of the US
which was received with open arms
and wide critical praise. This tour car-
ried the group everywhere from the
John F. Kennedy Center for
Performing Arts in Washington D.C.
to New York Citv's Carnegie Hall.
As the Orchestra's music director
and chief conductor, Lazarev has
proven to be a worthy leader. He
began his musical education at an
earlv age and received the intense
instruction reserved only for the best
talents the Soviet I'nion has to offer.
After learning his craft from such
schools as the Central Music School
and the Leningrad Conservatory,
I-azarev has gone on to win first prize
SEE BOLSHOI "Kl 11
Hp4o W�f
�. n�. wTx M 5KH.
The Wallflowers Rodeo Bfjy
Bringing Down The And The Streets Did
Horse shrink
On Thursday night at 8 p.m the Bolshoi Symphony Orchestra will perform in Wright.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE S RUOOtPH ALEXANDER PERFORMING ARTS SERIES
Family Fare Series offers youthful fun
J E N NIF E R C 0 L E M A N
sEMOR VVRITF.R
The mind of a child is truly an amaz-
ing thing. Children attach a very spe-
cific sense of wonder to everything
they do. Life is new and exciting, and
trw v have the energy to explore it all,
making the world their own.
What happens to this enthusiasm
for life? At what point do children
stop pretending: And why Who
decides when it is time to "put away
our childish things?"
I've tried verv hard to maintain my
innocence about the world. Maybe
there are a lot of things out there that
should weigh me down and turn me
into a depressed, exhausted cynic,
but I only get one shot at this life, and
pctsonally I'd rather not spend it with
a permanently bad attitude.
One of the ways I manage to
rerain my childhood is bv spending as
much time with children as I can.
Kids are a never-ending fountain of
youth - the more time I spend with
them, the younger I feel. And the
more time I spend with kids, the
more I realize the harm that adults
SEE FARE PAGE il
few(left). Black Journey (top right) and Dinosaur Mountain (bottom right) finish out this years Family Fare Series
PHiiTn rniiBTfsv nf rm FaMiir fare.serifs .
Derek t. Halle
SENIOR WRITF.R
"As I listen to the cemetery trees is
one of Jakob Dylan's favorite lyrics on
The Wallflower's sophomore release,
Bringing Down The Horse. Although the
album has been out for a little while,
it has recently received some
renewed interest.
.And it's easy to see why. Besides
the lyrics, there are other good things
to look for on Bringing Down The Horse.
like the band's sound, backing vocals,
personality, etc. It's all there.
The band is composed of five
members: Jakob Dylan (vocals, gui-
tars), Rami Jaffee (pianos, B3, upright
piano, vox continental), Greg
Richling (bass), Michael Ward (gui-
tar), and Mario Calire (drums). They
started a few years ago, apparently
because of their lead singer's roots.
You see, Jakob is the son of Bob
Dylan, the incredible folk singer who
spoke tunes through one of the most
difficult times in .American history,
the Vietnam War.
After hearing the record, it is
apparent that genetics are a useful
tool which Jakob latches onto. I can
definitely sense the similarity in vocal
tone and structure. Not only does
Jakob sound like his father, but he
composes his music in a respectful
way as well.
The album opens with a song
called "One Headlight the band's
newest single. First off, the sound
quality is amazing. Each track was laid
down carefully so that each instru-
ment is isolated; therefore, there is no
clutter in the vibe. Nothing gets lost
in the mesh.
Of course, the album does have a
crowd pleaser, "6th Avenue
SEE WALLFLOWERS PAGE 11
fi
Run Away
JAY MYERS
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Picking up an album by a local band is
always a crap shoot. I'm not just talk-
ing about eastern North Carolina,
either. Every local music scene across
the nation has its share of sub-par tal-
ent. Finding a band worthy of praise
and attention is usually a hard and
thankless job. More often than not, if
you criticize a local band or a local
music scene, the objects of your criti-
cism will find you. They live in the
neighborhood, for God's sake.
But every once in a while, a local
band appears that leaves critics and
fans begging for more. We critics live
for these acts. Not only because the
band's music is great, but also
because our job is that much easier.
Music critics are fans of music too,
and we usually only want the best for
our local' scene. But when it comes
down to it. we have to tell it like it is,
good or bad.
Which is why I take great pleasure
in bringing Rodeo Boy to your atten-
tion. These three guys from
Wilmington, Charles Brookshire
(bass) and brothers James Reardon
(guitar, vocals) and Jeff Reardon
(drums), are simply fantastic.
I first heard Rodeo Boy when I
picked up their self-produced cas-
sette at a local record store. It was
cheap and looked cool, so I thought
I'd give it a try. Little did I know how-
taken I would be with their sound.
Rodeo Boy's sound is sorta like
brandy, it's warm enough to make you
feel comfortable and relaxed, but
strong enough to keep you happy and
enthused, too.
.Although the tape has been in cir-
culation for a while, their first full-
SEE R00E0. PAGE II
Can't even hum along
Tape il from a tnend
f US
Buy it Used
Pay Full Pnce
Focus on Film: Sankofa
mOlFISre v i ew
Star Wars succeeds again
"Ssgj�
��d
Filmmaker Haile Gerima spent almost a
decade financing and filming Sankofa,
the epic tale of a modern-day model
who offends the spirits of a castle in
Ghana that once served as port fnr the
slave trade She is transported by the
spirits back in time and becomes a
slave on an American sugar plantation
Gerima, who was horn in Ethiopia, is
now hailed as the father of a new
black film movement in America
Sankofa will be shown at 7 p m
tonight in Hendnx Theatre and is spon-
sored by the Ledonia Wright African
American Cultural Center
PHOTOS COUATfS OF MfPHEOUH FIIMS
J Mills
LIFESTYLE I I I I ' k
)AL I WILLIAMSON
SSSISTANT 1.1F F.STYL1 F I I I 11R
Slot Wars, nothing but Star Wars
sang Bill Murray during his younger,
funnier vears as a Saturday Sight Iji?
cast member. Well, this past week-
end. Bill's comical lyrics carried a cer-
tain potency at movie theaters across
the nation. Lines formed and tickets
sold as an older generation joined
wirh a newer one to share a cultural
event that first began 20 vears ago.
Yes, Star Wars, George Lucas' mas-
terpiece of science fiction fantasy,
blasted irs way back to the big screen
last Friday, dec imating .ill competition
at the bos office.
Ir wus nor unheard of for audi-
tn ivait in line three hours or
more to uci tickets for the Friday
night showings, lnsr theaters in
;h and Durham began selling
. n rhe carh morning, and by
norning they were completely
.niil out After rh.it. tickets could onlv
be had ai those few select theaters
who refused to begin selling them
This computer-generated Ronto is just one of the added attractions in the new film.
PHOTO COURTESY OF 20TH CENTURY FOX
until an hour before the show started.
.All of this difficulty and excitement
was all too familiar for those Star Wars
fans who stood in almost identical
lines 20 years ago.
But wait! This is not exactly the
Star Wars you may have idolized as a
child Countless articles have been
written discussing how George Lucas
"improved" his classic film by adding
four minutes of new footage, revamp-
ing the special effects and touching
up the actual print of the film (see
last Tuesday's issue of TEC for our
article on that topic).
While much of the added footage
h 3K ti
Run Away
See it for Free
Rent it on Video
See a Matinee
and up-to-date, state-of-the-art spe-
cial effects are (for the most part)
impressive, they are not an improve-
ment on a film that had already
proved itself once. After vou get past
all the mind-boggling explosions, the
bizarre creatures ?nd the detailed
space ships, the big selling point of
Star liars is the story, one that bases
itself on such classic narrative genres
as mvthology and the adventure ser-
ial.
For anyone who doesn't know the
SEE STAR WARS PAGE 10
Pay Full Price





10 TuMdny, Fabruary 4, 1997
lifestyle
Ths East Carolinian
STDs are STupiD
(AP) - Sexually transmitted diseases
(STDs) account for almost 90 percent
of the most frequently reported infec-
tious diseases in the United States,
according to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC). More
than 12 million Americans, 25 percent
of whom are teenagers, are infected
with STDs each year.
Even after recent significant
declines in reported rates of some
STDs, the United States still leads the
industrialized world with STD rates
that are as much as 50 to 100 times
those of other nations. STDs add an
estimated $17 billion annually to health
care costs in this country.
The consequences of STDs are
extremely costly, dangerous and some-
times deadly, particularly for women.
Most Americans are aware of H1Y the
most deadly of all diseases that can be
sexually transmitted. But, for much of
society, the other serious risks related
to unsafe sexual behavior may have
been forgotten. STDs frequently cause
life-threatening complications, includ-
ing potentially fatal ectopic pregnancy
and cervical and liver cancers, as well as
infertility and severe health problems
for newborn babies.
In addition, research has estab-
SEE STO. PAGE 11
Star Wars
continued from page 9
story of Star Wars (where have you
been?), it's simple enough. A young
boy joins an old, wise warrior and a
reckless, wise-cracking smuggler in an
adventure to rescue a princess from
the evil clutches of a dastardly villain.
Oh yeah, we almost forgot. Along the
way, our heroic team also saves the uni-
verse.
Ultimately, it is this classic story
that has allowed the film to remain as
popular as it has been these last two
decades, not the special effects.
Audiences love a well-told tale, and
George Lucas (serving as writer, direc-
tor and creator of Star Wars) is a won-
derful storyteller.
While several marketing analysts
have warned about the financial risks
of re-releasing and strongly merchan-
dising a film that is not only 20 years
old but also available on video, the
response from the public was so posi-
tive this past weekend that we can lay
those critics' worries to rest. Putting
Star (tars on the big screen again is as
good as putting money in the bank for
Lucas.
But (like mentioned earlier) this is
not exactly the Star Wars released in
1977. Possibly as an effort to improve
the flaws he saw in the original film or
possibly just to add incentive to see
Star Wars again, Lucas has made some
alterations to his child.
We talked last time about some of
the changes that were planned for the
re-release. As it turns out, the scene
between Han and Greedo was one of
the biggest and messiest changes.
Ignoring the thematic problems with
such a change, the scene simply looks
awful on screen. If anything, this deci-
sion takes away from the original.
On the other hand, while there has
been much controversy among fans
about whether or not the scene
between Jabba the Hutt and Han Solo
should have been reinstated, it sur-
prisingly works. Solo and Jabba actual-
ly interact with one another here
(unlike their encounter in Return ofthe
Jedi, the third part to the Star Wars tril-
ogy). Jabba has character and personal-
ity, and Ford plays Solo in such a slick,
conniving, kiss-ass manner that the
scene actually adds a little to the
SoloJabba relationship seen later.
But this still does not make the
new edition of Star Wars any better
than the original. Flaws, even within
the Jabba sequence, abound. But
these flaws are technical. Jabba, who
appears in the new addition thanks to
computer special effects, still suffers
from flaws inherent in his original
design, created for Return of the Jedi. No
amount of technology can change the
fact that Jabba is a difficult and time-
consuming creature to create and
make teal.
Furthermore, some of the added
special effects border on being
overkill. Lucas and his team at
Industrial Lights and Magic have been
laboring to get the computer technol-
ogy where it needs to be in order to
begin filming a new trilogy. In an
effort to experiment with this technol-
ogy, Lucas has added a lot of back-
ground material that was not originally
there.
Now, Stormtroopers ride huge,
hulking lizards known as Dewbacks
across the desert wasteland and thun-
derous dinosaur-like beings known as
Rontos walk through the streets of
Mos Eislcy spaceport. As astonishing
as these creatures appear, and as
impressive as this computer technolo-
gy may be, much of it is unnecessary.
On the flip side, some of these
additions are effective. The space city
of Mos Eisley, for instance, is now a
bustling metropolis, filled with bizarre
robots, aliens and space rats; added
sound effects enhance the experience
of the film; and a dialogue between
Luke and his friend Biggs (who had
some key scenes deleted from the
1977 version) adds significance to the
final space battle.
Overall, the new edition of Star
Wars is well worth the wait. Audiences
are probably going to be split on the
"improved" qualities of this new edi-
tion, but that won't thin out the lines.
Seeing a film like Star Wars on the big
screen is enough reason to fork out five
or six bucks. Anyone able to take a trip
to a suitable theater in Raleigh or else-
where should. Greenville theaters,
unfortunately, are not equipped with
the up-to-date screens or sound sys-
tems that this film demands, so skip
seeing it at the Plaza.
Be assured, once experiencing Star
Wars the way it was meant to be expe-
rienced, you'll follow Billy Murray's
lead and sing enthusiastically about
this true space epic. Who knows,
maybe Lucas' move will encourage
more filmmakers to widely re-release
other older films. Imagine A Clockwork
Orange at Jams on the big screen again.
Perhaps this will happen, but it's
doubtful. At least The Empire Stntes
Bach is coming Feb. 21.
it Fell 1
Cravin Melon
CD
Onfy $6 Advancmd
wtfTfcfca
Wodnesyny
Comedy lone
Kevin Hughes
(Th Sox Therapist)
Sorority Appreciation Week
A O - 7J5 p Tj . "Jp
���� kM omo" MT � JaV - MLJ
���
B
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A
bof-?ah
February 3-8,1997 TP
Sorority Members: -
IZ Wear Your Greek Letters jj
dta to the ECU Student Stores jr
and take 20 off P T
any one regular price item
in the store -A
vtptifea
k�r.
'Excludes tcxlbookt, computer mrdware,
�t supplies, and special order items.
Oder not valid with my other discount
n
o
Student Stores a
,siofc Where your dollars support scholars!
tVTVtl-i-CrOA
Wright Buildino, . 358-6731
http www studcntslorc ecu cdu
jmW w�a a a�t� aumn r�m iih �� a
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h �a ataw far aaeenl �� �1� 7MU
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National Co-Ed Fraternity
Informational Meetings:
Tuesday, February 4
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 221 2nd Floor
8:00 pm
Wednesday, February 5
Methodist Center on 5th Street
Dinner Social beginning at 6:30 pm
followed by an informational meeting
Leadership, Friendship, and Service
Winner of the 1996 Governor's Volunteer Award
For more information, please call Lisa Klein at 353-3483
Stanton Square Shopping Center
757-7756
Mon-Thurs 11:00 am - 10:00 pm
Fri&Sat 11:00 am-11:00 pm
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32.50 Frozen Daiquiris
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Golden Key
National Honor Society
Induction Ceremony
Planning Meeting
Inductees and
Current Members
Welcome
February 4, 1997
General Classroom
Building
Room 1005
5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
iil
i �





11 Tuesday. February 4. 1997
Bolshoi
continued from page 9
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
and the gold medal in the Karajan
Competition in Berlin in 1972, work
tyith such orchestras as the Berlin
Philharmonic and the Orchestra de
France, and eventually earn the
appointment as Chief Conductor of
the Bolshoi Theatre in 1987.
With Lazarev leading the way, the
Bolshoi Orchestra promises a tour wor-
thy of its 220-year history. The concert
will be held at Wright Auditorium on
Thursday, Feb. 6 at 8 p.m. Advance
rickets are $30 for the public, $25 for
ECU faculty and staff, and $15 for
ECU students and youths. Tickets at
the door are $30. Group rates are avail-
able.
For further information, contact the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall
Student Center, at 328-4788 or 1-800-
ECU-ARTS. For DeafSpeech-
Impaired Access call 3284736. Ticket
Office hours arc 8:30 a.m6 p.m
Monday-Friday
Fare
continued from page 9
can do when they force their children
to "grow up
I'm not talking about abuse in the
conventional sense. I'm talking about
killing the imagination - rendering it
utterly and completely useless - by
telling kids that "make-believe" and
"pretend" are no longer acceptable
forms of behavior, by saying, "Act your
age when in reality imagination and
creativity are assets at any age.
It's time to fight back. Encourage
children to strengthen their imagina-
tions, not stifle them. And one of the
best ways to do this is through chil-
dren's theatre.
The Family Fare Series of ECU
seems to agree with me, and to close
out their 1996-97 season they are
bringing three delightful children's
musicals to Wright Auditorium.
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.OPEL!
Monday - Saturday
10:00am - 8:00pm
Black Journey, a tribute to the
.African-American experience through
the evolution of music, is the first
Family Fare event this semester. The
performance will incorporate music
from the 15th century to the present
and will include traditional African
chants, gospel, jazz, blues, rag-time,
swing, and the rock-n-roll and rap
music of today. The show will be per-
formed on Saturday, Feb. 8, at 2 p.m.
The next show, Dinosaur Mountain,
is a guaranteed thriller for all. Every
child is fascinated by dinosaurs.
They're gigantic monsters with hard
to pronounce names which most chil-
dren can rattle off as if they were list-
ing what they ate for breakfast.
Children will join in a search effort for
the missing Dr. Wells, resulting in a
trip through time to the Mesozoic era
complete with a time machine, flying
pterodactyls, and a 14-foot-long,
museum-quality dinosaur with com-
puter-generated movements and
sound. The show will be performed
on Saturday, March 1, at 2 p.m.
To conclude the season, the Family
Fare Series brings us the inspiring tale
of the orphan Heidi and her search for
a loving home. Set in both the Swiss
Alps and the big city of Frankfurt,
Heidi teaches us an important lesson
about the power of family love. Heidi
is left with her estranged grandfather
by her Aunt Dete and must use her
wit and charm to break through his
defenses and teach him to love again.
No sooner is the battle won than Aunt
Dete returns to bring Heidi home
with her. But, of course, Heidi already
has a home. The show will be per-
formed on Saturday, April 19, at 2
p.m.
For more information, study guide
materials, or to order tickets, contact
the ECU Central Ticket Office at
328-4788 or toll free 1-800-ECU-
ARTS.
Wallflowers
continued from page 9
Heartache It's actually a good
song. No matter how many times I
hear the tune, I always respect it. It
shows an excellent rhyme scheme,
compatible lyrics and the setting is
perfect. The slide guitar is the most
important aspect because it cues
you into a big change. People can
really follow this song because it is
written so well.
The album carries on with songs
that seem to be of a common
theme. They don't sound the same,
but you can tell that they come
from the same place.
That is, until you get to the
sixth track, called "Invisible City
It's a slow folk song and it makes
me think of the relationship that
Jakob and his father might have. I
can hear how he's developed a
sound all his own, though.
Jakob is the premiere writer for
the band. It's not a personality
ching, however. His music has
something to say, and the rest of the
band join him in making his sound
and message something more than
it could have been by itself. I
haven't seen such a young band
complement each other so well
since the early days of R.E.M.
If you want to take your listening
to another level, check out The
Wallflowers. They have a patient
sound, a sound that you can get into
with a glass of wine, a smoke, and
some time to yourself. They're a
fast dream whose time has yet to
come.
DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
Accrossrom the Courthouse
on the corner o Evans and Third Street
Smiit) jrmwlle 5inff instf
Begin your day with breakfast at courtside Cafe
feaUiflno
Egg plates, served with hashbrowns or grits;
bacon, ham or sausage; toast or homemade biscuits
until t.Ct
French toast Pancakes. Breakfast sandwiches.
under S2.CC
Lunch is served from 10.30 - 5:00 Monday - Friday
757-1716 � 300 Evans Street � 757-1716
Rodeo
continued from page 9
length album, and the streets did shrink,
was recently released on the new
Wilmington record label, Sit & Spin
Records. From the impressionistic
Norman Rockwell meets Vincent Van
Gogh painting of a small town on the
album cover, to the crisp, clear pro-
duction, to the price (which is still
pretty cheap), this record has a lot
going for it right off the bat. Add that
to the fact that music sounds so good,
and vou've got an unbeatable pack-
age.
Rodeo Boy do their best to defy-
genre classification. Most labels (rock,
country, alternative, etc.) just don't
cover everything they can play. On the
opening track, "Monumental
Occasion their sound is a bit like
Frank Black's solo stuff - jangly and
fun, but also focused. On "Too Bad
It's Not Summer they switch over to
an approximation of the Rolling
Stones' countrified hits "HonkvTonk
Woman" and "It's Onlv Rock N' Roll,
But I Like It
But even describing their music
this way denigrates the band's abili-
ties, because it makes them sound
like a cover band. They are so much
more than that. Rodeo Boy have the
ability to travel from soft ballads
("North Stars") to chunga-chunga
guitar rock ("Drink Small") to multi-
layered pop ("700 ft. Excuse") on
their new album, all in the space of 42
minutes.
However, the best thing about
Rodeo Boy is the fact that they're
from right here in our backyard. They
play regularlv in this area, the new
album was recorded at Raleigh's Wave
Castle Studios and Chapel Hill's
Kitchen studio, and it was released on
a Wilmington record label. Sure, '
they'd be a great band no matter
where they came from, but the fact
that they're diehard North
Carolinians makes it that much bet-
ter.
Do yourself a favor and check
Rodeo Boy out. Their new album is
definitely worth the price you'll pay.
And if you want an added bonus, you
can also check them out on Saturday,
Feb. 8 when they stop by to play at
our verv own Peasant's Cafe.
STD
continued from page 10
lished a clear link between STDs and
HIV infection. STDs make people
both more likely to become infected
with HIV and more likely to transmit
the disease to their sex partner.
"More than half of all .Americans
don't know that other STDs greatly
increase their risk for HIV" said Judith
N. Wasserheit, M.D M.RH Director
of CDC's Division of STD Prevention.
Abstaining from sexual activity is
the most effective way to prevent
STDs. For those who are sexually
active, the consistent and correct use of
latex condoms has proven to be highly
effective in preventing HIV and other
STDs. CDC also encourages those who
are sexually active to be tested for
STDs so they can begin immediate
treatment, if necessary.
"Approximately 70 percent of
women infected with chlamydia and 50
percent of women infected with gonor-
rhea have no svmptoms said Helene
Gayle, M.D M.RH Director of
CDC's National Center for HIV STD,
and TB Prevention. "Many women
assume their doctors check for STDs
during their annual pelvic exam. But
the pap smear does not screen for these
or other common STDs and most
physicians aren't raising the issue.
Physicians should routinely offer
screening for these diseases and coun-
sel about prevention. But if a doctor
doesn't bring it up, women must be
willing to do so
For more information, call the CDC
National STD Hotline at 1-800-227-
8922.
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Swim season ends with victory
AFC defeats NFC in All-Pro Bowl
HONOLULU (AP) - Lance Alstodt kicked like an All-Pro. Cary
Bknchard and John Kasay kicked like investment bankers.
With Alstodt stealing the show by making a 35-yard field goal to win
$1 million at halftime, the AFC's Bhnchard and NFC's Kasay kept the
Pro Bowl going by missing.
Bhnchard, who was off from 41 yards moments earlier, finally hit a
37-ytrder 8:15 into overtime Sunchy to give the AFC a 26-23 victory
over die NFC
Kasay missed a 39-yarder with 11 seconds remaining in regulation,
malting the overtime necessary.
"I know there were some guys that were a little upset that it went
so long because they needed to catch their flights noted Mark Brunei
the Jacksonville quarterback who was a fill-in for the injured John Ehvay
and won the Pro Bowl's MVP Award.
Ironically, Kasay gave Alstodt, an investment banker in New York,
some tips on making his one kick to win the "Hershey's $1 Million Pro
Bowl Kick
Ahtedt, 26, who played soccer as a youth, coolly boomed home his
kick at halftime to win ll million. While he went l-for-1, the all-star
tuckers went a combined 3-tbr-8.
Investment banker drills millkHHtollar kick
HONOLULU (AP) - No big deal. Stick the ball on the tee, take a cou-
ple of quick steps to the side, run up and kick the ball.
And make a million dollars.
Lance Ahtedt, looking like he'd made tons of high-pressure field
eds before, calmly drilled a 35-yarder straight through the uprights
With a crowd of 50,031 at Aloha Stadium and a national TV audience
watching, the 26-year-old investment banker was calm as he took
advantage of his only chance during halftime at the Pro Bowl, cashing in
on theHershey's 11 Million Pro Bowl Kick
His fiancee, Deborah Zimmerman, said, "I don't think he was ner-
vous at all. I was
Alstodt, who said he had rhyed soccer "since 1 could walk but did-
n't phy football, was thinking positively as he teed the ball up.
CMetra holds off Woods at Pebble Beach
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. (AP) - Mark OMeara stood on the 16th fair-
way and watched hh lead in the Pebble Beach National PnAm slip to
a single stroke when Tiger Woods knocked in a 4-foot birdie putt.
7Mem could have been on the other side of the Monterey
Peninsula and he would have known that Vibods made a birdie. The roar
was that loud.
But OMeara had been in situations like this before in his 17 years as
The times I've had a chance to win on the PGA Tour, I've got the
job done OMeara said Sunday after he matehedtwo of Woods'three
dosing birdies for the 40-yaar-okfs 13th career victory, this time by one
stroke over the 21-year-old sensation and David Duval.
"I was pretty jacked. He's the hottest phyer in golf right now
Woods aho is OMeara's neighbor in Florida and the matchup they
had in the final round was just like the ones they've talked about while
playing for fun- and a few bucks -or while out fishing.
Bobsled World Championships end in chaos
ST. MOWT2,Switaerhtid(AP)- A glorious Swiss medal sweep at the
four-man bobsled World Championships degenerated into chaos
Sunday when the top three teams were disqualified.
The race jury ruled that the front axles of the Swiss sleds violated
international technical rates.
The Swiss immediately appealed, maintaining they had been using
the sleds for the past year with no objections. . ,
Organisers awarded victory to Germany - which finished fourth - but
then relented and said She Swiss would remain atop the finish list
pending s final decision.
The International Bobsled federation will review the evidence in
two weeks at its meeting in Nagano, Japan, and decide whether the
Swiss or Germans should be world champions.
"There it no world champion at the moment. There's nothing,
Fforian Bhimer, one of the organizers, said.
Reto Goetschi, who won test week's two-man event, piloted
Switzerland II down the course in 4 minutes, 8.94 seconds. He was fol-
lowed by Christian Reich and
Dyson finally pets 2Vhour win
DAYFONA BEACH, Fh. (AP) - Rirtunately for Rob Dyson, rhis was
the year he decided to scan two cars in the Rotex 24-Hours sports car
endurance race.
Dyson, a wealthy businessman from upstate New Tfork, finally got
the victory that has eluded him in frustrating fashion since 1986.
Twice before, he has finished third overall, and another time second
in class. And, after taking the lead with eight hours remaining, it
appeared that this one, too, might slip away as the Rrd-powered Riley
6c Scott MK ttl began to smoke during the final hour.
"The problem actually started a couple of hours before when Andy
Wallace was in the car said Butch Leitzinger, who drove the last hour
for Dyson Racing. "It was overheating
"I figured they were giving me the car so I could lose the race for
them
Instead, Leitzinger dropped to a somewhat slower pace and babied
it home.
They were telling me it was smoking, but the mirrors were shaking
so much that I couldn't see it Leitzinger said. "It was probably for the
best because if I could have seen it, I'd have probably turned to jelly"
He wasn't alone in his appre' nsion.
TRACY LAUBACH
SENIOR WRITE
The ECU Swim team closed out
their season on Saturday with a win
over
Virginia Tech. The men and
women each finish with records of
9-1 and 4-1 in the CAA.
The men turned in six first place
performances that helped them
claim a 135-99 victory over the
Hokies, while the ladies came out
on top with a final score of 130-105.
Finishing first for the Lady
Pirates in the 200 butterfly race was
Kim Field. Field finished with a
time of 2:10.09, and was followed
by teammates Cindy Clawson and
Erin Brauer, who finished in 2:10.34
and 2:14.48 respectively. Field, a
junior from Richmond, also swam in
the 200 breaststroke and 400 med-
ley relay.
Field, along with teammates
Amanda Atkinson, Kristen Olson
and Robyn Williford, placed second
in the 400 medley relay with a time
of 4:06.21, just four seconds behind
the first place winners from Tech.
As a third year veteran of the
team, Field is extremely pleased
with the performance put in by her
teammates, not only in the meet
against Tech, but throughout the
entire season.
"This was definitely our best
season ever Field said.
Also swimming with heart was
Casey Sloan, a freshman from
Jacksonville, Fla. Sloan finished
first in the 200 freestyle race with a
time of 1:57.17, and also in the 500
free with 5:07.26 on the clock.
In the 1000 free race, Hollic
Butler came out on top with a time
of 10:29.73. Coming in less than a
second later was Virginia Tech's
Katy Booth. Butler also finished
second in the 100 free behind
teammate Williford, who won the
race with a time of 54.06.
Butler and Williford were part of
the freshman 400 freestyle relay
team that not only came in first
place, but also set a new ECU
record with a time of 3:38.73. Also
part of the team were Adrienr.e
Cross and Teresa Hockman.
Niki Kreel, a sophomore from
Cary, N.C swam the 200 breast-
stroke in 2:25.98 to chim yet anoth-
er ECU first place score. Kreel also
swam in the 400 medley relay.
The men finished their season
just as strongly as the women did.
Brandon Tilley finished first in the
200 IM with 1:59.13 on the clock
and also came out on top in the 200
breaststroke with a time of 2:11.43.
Also leading the men with first
place points in the 1000 freestyle
race was Mike Julian from Stafford,
Va. Julian finished the race in
9:51.90 and was followed by team-
mate Daniel Fuller, who finished
rashsta Own winning the 200m buttsrfty.
MMT0 ST CHRIS 8AYMSH
just two seconds later with a time of
9:53.56.
Lee Huthcens won the 200
freestyle race in 1:44.87 while
teammate Richard Chen dominated
the 200 butterfly by coming in first
with a time of 1:55.07. According to
Head Coach Rick Kobe, the Tech
victory was a good one, but for now,
the focus is on the future.
"We swam very fast once again
today Kobe said. "Our goal now is
to win a championship
Members of the team agree that
the CAA championships, which are
just two weeks away, are bound to
be the most exciting pan of the sea-
son. The girls are heading into the
meet hungry for a victory that will
defend the title they have claimed
for the past two years.
By closing out the season against
Virginia Tech with some of the best
times of the year, the team is fully
prepared for the challenges that lie
ahead in the conference champi-
onship, which will be held in
Charlotte Feb. 19-22.
Basketball nets conference victories
Team
East Carolina7-3
James Madison6-3
Old Dominion6-4
UNC Wilmington64
Va. Commonwealth5-5
American4-5
Richmond3-6
William 8 Mary3-6
George Mason3-7
14-5
12-7
15-7
11-11
10-10
7-11
7-11
6-13
9-10
AMANDA ROSS
SPORTS EDITOR
The men's basketball team is on a
hot streak that has moved them
into sole possession of first place.
On Wednesday night, ECU
hosted ODU in Minges. The first
time these two teams played was
Jan. 11, and ODU handed ECU a
79-70 loss, their first conference
loss of the season. But on
Wednesday night, it was the
Pirates' night as they knocked off
ODU, 78-63.
SEE
Tim Basham netted 19 points
and pulled down nine rebounds to
lead ECU in scoring and rebound-
ing. Raphael Edwards scored. 14,
while Othello Meadows finished
with 13 points. Morris Grooms and
Jonathan Kerncr each contributed �:
10 points in the victory. ; �
The Pirates lead throughout tho t�
entire game and jumped out quick-
ly on the Monarchs.
"Ws came out with a lot oft
intensity tonight Basham said. "If
we come out like that every night
nobody would beat us
Coach Joe Dooley. who cele-f-
brated the win on hh 31st birthday;
PAGE13
Athlete pounds her way to the top
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MIKE DANISKA
STAFF WHIT
Many college athletes have dreams of greatness.
Making it to the pro's, playing in the Super Bowl,
even going to the Olympics. But for most of these
athletes, achieving that kind of greatness is just
that, a dream. But for ECU'S track and field stand-
out, Michelle Clayton, those dreams may be with
in reach.
Clayton, a junior, is arguably one of the best
women's track and field athletes ever at ECU.
That may sound like a bold statement until you
consider her accomplishments. She holds the
school record for the hammer throw, the shot put
and the 20 pound indoor weight.
"She is a hard worker Coach Charles "Choo"
Justice said. "Most of the success she has had, she
brought upon herself
Her success is do in large part because of her
intense workout schedule, which usually takes up
a lot of her time.
"I love ER but I never get to watch it because
of my schedule Clayton said.
Off the field, Clayton, an exercise and physiol-
ogy major, feels the best place after a meet is with
her family or teammates. She hails from
Portsmith, Ohio, near the Kentucky border. But
she can call any number of places home. As a
child, her family moved 11 times. They now reside
in Winston-Salem. Rw Clayton, one of the con-
stants in her life has always been athletics.
"Ever since I was little, I was in gymnastics,
which was for about 11 years Clayton said.
Clayton ran in middle and high school, but
turned her attention to field events in college.
"I was always the fastest in my class, so my
middle school coach asked me to try out for the
track and field team in seventh grade Clayton
said.
The decision to compete paid off. Last year,
Clayton qualified for the Eastern Collegiate
Athletic Conference (ECAC) in the discus and
the hammer throw. The ECAC is consideretTthe
second best tournament in the nation for college
athletes, behind the NCAA's. She was also among
the top eight hammer throwers in the East last
year.
Two weekends ago, Jan. 25-26 at the USAir
Invitational, Clayton broke her own school record
in the indoor shot put by half an inch. And this
past Saturday Clayton finished first in the 20
pound weight throw and third in the shot put.
Earlier in the season, Clayton qualified for the
indoor nationals in March, where the top track and
field athletes from across the country compete.
She chose however to attend the ECAC's again.
"I could have gone to the nationals Clayton
said. "But I thought that I could use the experi-
ence
With such experience and success at the
Division I-A level, are such lofty goals as the
Olympics that far behind?
"I would definitely like to go to the trials in
2000 or 2004 Clayton said.
If she is unable to make it to the
Olympics, a future in coaching is very possi-
ble.
"I have thought about it Clayton said.
"1 would definitely enjoy it. Right now I
help out with my old high school team,
which my mom coaches
Whatever the future holds, Clayton
should be amply prepared.
Anything is possible if she wants it bad
enough and sticks to it Justice said.
rf-
3
a
Hssthsr Clayton
Rugby team defeats Camp Lejeune, 36-20
STEVE LOSEY
STAFF WRITER
ECU'S rugby team got their season
off to a dynamite start with a 36-20
victory over Camp Lejeune on
Saturday. The Pirates were trailing
12-10 after the first half, but came
into the second half fired up and
took a dominating lead that secured
their first victory.
"Since it was our first game, we
were a bit out of shape Kendall
Jones said. "We had some rookies
and switched some players' posi-
tions, so they had to get used to
that
Jones mentioned Danny Lewis,
who was switched to wing this sea-
son. Once Lewis had become used
to his new position, he was able to
come back and score a tri in the sec-
ond half.
The Pirates played hard in the
first half, but weren't able to score
much. Camp Lejeune's defense
kept ECU from scoring more than
two tris. ECU defended their goal
just as well, and at the half, they
were only trailing by one point after
Camp Lejeune had scored.
The Pirates commanded the sec-
ond half. They were able to analyze
what was wrong with their game in
the first half and corrected it.
"We weren't covering the wing
and they kept getting around us
Jones said. "We also took the time to
set up plays
Outside center Eric Kunkel said
the second half of play was much
improved.
"We kicked a lot more in the sec-
ond half and didn't drop the ball as
much Kunkel said.
A key factor in the second half
was the rotation of players. ECU
sent in three new wings to replace
fatigued players. Camp Lejeune did-
n't substitute any fresh players,
which hurt their game severely.
ECU was able to score much
more in the second half. They skill-
fully avoided tackles by throwing
passes with pinpoint accuracy. The
"Pirates lucked the ball more often
and gained a good amount of ground
that way.
"All of us could be in better
shape Jones said. "By the end of
the game, we started running out of
gas
Stamina is especially important
in an iron man sport such as rugby.
Each half is 40 minutes of nonstop
running, without the luxury of time,
outs other games have.
SEE RUOBY PAGE 13





13 Tuesday, February 4. 1997
si
xjrts
The East Carolinian
Donald Stroud
! STROUD & STROUD
Attorneys At Law
311 S. Evans St. Mall
Greenville. NC 27858
Office 919-752-5475
Hone 919-946-5226
1987 ECU Graduate
Civil �Criminal
Traffic � DWI �
Personal Injury
SERVICES
The slime hit the fan at this year's
Double Dare. Recreational Services'
Natural Lite Program held the event
Thursday, Jan. 30 in Ihristenbury
Gym. It consisted of 2(1 teams.
Some of the wild and messy
events included a Slime Sundae, a
Whipped Cream Wheelbarrow Race
and a Blindfolded Football Game.
All participants were up to their
necks in slime, whipped cream,
foam halls and water.
The climax of the even! was the
obstacle course. The winning six
teams of four players had to sit on
and pop whipped cream balloons,
crawl under each other's legs, splat
cool whip on their next players
head, slide on their stomachs
through whipped cream while being
soaked by water balloons and finally,
each teammate had to grab two flags
out of a pool of slime, whipped
cream, green water, balloons and
bails and cross the finish line.
The winners were as follows:
First Place Curls, Dreads, 6k Straight
Hair Heads with a time of 00:50 sec-
onds through the obstacle course,
Fletcher World Order with a time of
00:37. and third place the Cotton
Crazies with a time of 1:00.
This year's Double Dare proved
to be another popular event with
1.(1 students. The Natural Life
Program is planning new and excit-
ing events for the future. Be on the
lookout for College Gladiators on
February 14. This is the Ultimate
Challenu
SID BRIEFS
ECU freshman Shaunte Hill set a
school record in track and field and
had an ECAC qualifying time in the
500 m at the Virginia Tech
Invitational. Hill finished sixth with a
time of 1:15:75. Hill also finished sec-
ond in the triple jump with a jump of
11.54 m (37'10.5").
Fellow Pirates freshman Carmen
Weidon also set a school record in the
300 m. Weidon finished second with a
time of 40.70.
In the distance events, sophomore
Kerri Hartiing finished second with a
time of 10:41.40. The 4x400 relay
team finished fourth behind Virginia
Tech, Duke and James Madison with
a time of 3:57.61.
In the field events, Michelle
Clayton finished first in the 20 pound
weight throw (15.24 m) and third in
the shot put (13.22 m). Another
Pirate, Leigh Brannon finished fifth in
the shotput (11.99 m).
In the long jump, senior Amanda
Johnson finished first with a jump of
5.77 m.
"We trained really hard this week
Coach "Choo" Justice said. "We
weren't really concerned about the
performance this week. I was more
concerned about training. We'll back
off on the training and hope to pop
some good times next week
The men's track and field team com-
peted at separate events on Saturday.
The distance runners competed at
the 45th Annual VMI Winter Relays
in Lexington, Va. The sprinters com-
peted in the Rod McCravy in
Lexington, Ky.
At the VMI meet, Jaime Mance
and Brian Beil tied for third place in
the mile run. Each finished the race in
a time of 4:35.00. Rod Reeves grabbed
third place in the 500 meter run with
a time of 16:21.60. The Pirates also
finished third in the 4x400 meter
relay (3:13.76) behind Kentucky and
Mississippi State.
The best overall finish for ECU for
the day came from Darrick Ingram.
Ingram placed second on the 200
meter dash with a time of 21.62. Also
finishing in the top 15 in the race
were Pirates Titus Haygood (22.15)
in 11th and Marcus Gladden (22.28)
in 14th.
Freshman Tramayne Nunley
placed in the top 10 in a finals com-
petition. He finished sixth in the 60
meter hurdles with a mark of 8.55, a
half second behind the leader. Lao
placing in the top 10 in the 400 meter
dash was Mike Millet Miller complet-
ed the race in a time of 48.39, good
enough for a ninth place finish.
Sophomore Damon Davis placed
12th in the 400 meters with a mark of
49.49.
The Pirates will next compete at
the Virginia Tech Invitational on
Saturday, Feb. 8.
Rugby
continued from page !2
"The whole pack played well
Kunkel said. "The game was really a
team effort. This was a great way to
start the season, and i'm happy with
the way the new guys played
The rugby team's next game is
Saturday at UNCW. Their next
home game is on Feb. 15, when the
Pirates host Wake Forest. The
Pirates have had phenomenal sea-
sons in the past, and judging from
the first game, this season will not
disappoint anybody.
Men
,a new collection
that captures
classic american style
0mSt
continued ttom page 12
said it was nice to maintain the
lead.
"It was nice to play with the lead
for once Dooley said. "It was a
nice job from the get go. I thought
Morris Grooms, Tim Basham and
Jonathan Kerner stepped up like we
needed them to
Meadows pointed out that if
they had lost the game, it would
have been a downer to begin the
second half of the season.
"At this point four losses in the
conference would have been a dent
in our plans Meadows said.
On Saturday the Pirates traveled
to George Mason to face the
Patriots. ECU had beaten GMU
earlier in the season 80-74, and
handed them another loss on
Saturday, 85-81. ECU did have as
much as a 22 point lead in the sec-
ond half, but hot shooting from
GMU got them back into the game.
But it wasn't enough and the Pirates
won and took scle possession of first
with the victory.
Edwards and Kerner split the
leading scoring duties with 17
points each, while Grooms pulled
down nine rebounds.
ECU now leads the CA with a
7-3 CAA record and an overall 14-5
record, also the best among the
CA teams.
ECU was at American last night
for another CA match up. The
Pirates also defeated American ear-
lier in the season, 60-66. Results of
last nights game were not available
at press time, but will be in
Thursday's edition of TEC.





4
MO
The Free Party Includes:
Video Karaoke
Lady Luck Casino
Mask Display
Bourbon Street Bingo
Spades Tournament
Tattoos
! ;

Movies 77ne to Kill 10:00 pm
Cabaret: Fettucini Brothers 9:30 and 11:30 pm
?J

. a
King and Queen Coronation 10:15 pm
DJ Dance 11:00 pm-1:30 am
Cajun BuffeM 1:00 pm-1:00 am
Prizes!Prizes!Prizes!
Must be present at 1:30 to win the Grand Prize!
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7T,HI997, 9PM- 2AM
I �- MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Free with valid ECU ID One free guest per ID- Guest passes available beginning January 31 D
V � at Community Service Desks and the Central Ticket Office at regular operating hours, J
?, Day of event tickets available at the Central Ticket Office until 6 pm, Community
f� T Service Desks until 9 pm and at theStudent Recreation Center 6 pm to 9pm, X
Sponsored by Student Life Major Events Committees division of ECU Ronald E. Dowdy Student Stores
�Hi


Title
The East Carolinian, February 4, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 04, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1185
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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