The East Carolinian, January 28, 1997







TUESDAY
JANUARY 28,1997
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
services profit from illegal parking
Many students repeat offenders
JEFF GENTRY
SAFETY AND TRANSPORTATION ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
Students often curse the person who tows their car, but
according to officials they have only themselves to blame.
Students are often the victim of one of the wrecker service
under contract to ECU or the Greenville Pblice Department.
This can result in the student spending a small fortune to get
his or her car back and pay the fines they have acquired. .
Greenville police are responsible for patrolling the streets
off of Fifth St. Greenville Pblice Dept. Cpl. Haddock said the
streets off of Fifth St. are considered a residential zone, and
many of them are for two-hour parking. After two hours, the
car can be towed by one of the 20 or so wrecker services that
are employed by the city.
"We use a rotational service. They receive no compensa-
tion from us. Haddock said "They towing services receive
$65 as a towing fee, $10 of which comes to the city as an
administration fee
Parking and Traffic Services is responsible for on-campus
parking as well as commuter and freshman lots off campus.
University Exxon and University Amoco arc both contracted
by ECU to handle the towing services.
"We get a lot of repeat offenders from the university said
Univeristy Amoco Manager Tony Carraway. "Just today we
towed a car from a private lot on campus and when the girl
picked it up she left her release form here. It said she had
received a ticket on Jan! 13, 20, and 27
"It takes us about 45 minutes to tow a car Carraway said.
"That's from the time we get the call to the time we get back
here. It only takes about five or ten minutes to actually hook
up to the car, unless it's a front-wheel drive. Then it takes a
little longer. Despite that, we still make a lot of runs and the
car is gone by the time we get there
Carrawav said that most of the towing they do is from pri-
vate lots where people park despite the signs warning them
they will be towed if they park there. He also said students
normally will be towed only after they have received four sep-
arate tickets.
"If they get towed after having that many tickets, it could
cost anywhere from $60 to $150 to have their car back
Carraway said. "Their charge is around $30 or $40, but their
storage charge is $5 a day because they have to keep the cars
themselves
Carraway claims that while it is expensive to have your car
towed, he is by no means well off.
He said, "Jobs done for the city are spread out, so we get
about one out of every 20 jobs from them. Plus, we pay for
insurance on our trucks, and a new wrecker now runs you
about $52,000. It isn't the high paying, glamorous job people
think it is
A row of cars illegally parked on College Hill Drive received tickets Monday afternoon. The owners o these cars got off easy
this time; next time they could be towed.
Rec center staff
prepared for
emergencies
Detailed plan outlines
course of action for
employees
ANGELA KOENIG
HEALTHENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
ERIKA SWARTS
HOUSINGCONSUMMATORY ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
After the death of ECU alumnus Kevin Banks
at the new Student Recreation Center
(SRC), the safety of patrons has been in the
spotlight.
According to SRC's director Nance Mize,
after Banks collapsed on the basketball court,
the SRC's emergency plan went into effect.
"The facility supervisor responded first
and did CPR. Initially, the supervisor brought
Banks back and they (the staff) called 911
Mize said. "Everything that could have been
done was done. We had all of the equipment
necessary
All of the supervisors are certified in CPR
and first aid, and there is at least one located
at each game site. During peak hours, there
are more employees at each site. There have
been as many as six instructors assisting with
the weight training equipment alone.
The employees arc also blood born
pathogen trained to help them deal with acci-
dents that involve open wounds. They are
the only group with this training, which,
according to Mize, is extremely important
since there are numerous situations supervi-
sors could have to respond to on any given
day.
The supervisors of the intramural games
are also trained in these areas.
The center has a very detailed emergency
plan which all the staff members know. It fol-
lows the American Red Cross principles for
handling an emergency situation.
"It's used everywhere because it works
and it's easy to use said Mike Edwards,
coordinator of operations at the rec center.
The first employee makes contact with
the injured person and a second employee
calls 911. Additional personnel helps by con-
trolling the crowd and directing the ambu-
lance to the correct entrance.
If a student is injured at the center he or
SEE REC. PAGE 3
TUESDAY
lifestyle 8 j� TODAY:
Thespians perform ifcj partly sunny
play ' high 50
opinion5 low 25
Guest praises on-
campus dining V" -WEDNESDAY:
Sports12 jp party cloudy
Lady Pirates 4Lj�& high 45
notch victory over low 21
JMU
the east Carolinian
STUDENT PUBLICATION BLDG,
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
across from Joyner library
phone
328-6366 newsroom
328-2000 advertising
328-6558 fax
e-mail
uutec@ecuvm.cis.ecu.edu
Officials say campus
handicap friendly
Department for disability
support services
discusses access features
Marina Henry
SPECIAL POPULATION I UES
STAFF WRITER
NICOLE MCMULLEN
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
Editors note: This is the first of a tm part series
considering catnfms facilities'accessibility to the physi-
cally handicapped student.
A little known campus organization works to
insure that ECU is accessible to the physically
handicapped population.
According to the Handicapped Persons
Protection Act (HPPA), " It is a discriminato-
ry practice for a person to deny a qualified
handicapped person the full and equal enjoy-
ment of the goods, services, facilities, privi-
leges, advantages, and accommodations of a
place of public accommodation on the basis of
a handicapping condition
In order to make ECU a more handi-
capped-friendly place and to assist the univer-
sity in complying with HPPA, Disability
Support Services (DSS) was created. Funded
by financial grants from federal and state agen-
cies, DSS enables those in wheelchairs to have
the greatest amount of physical accessibility to
ECU's campus and buildings.
"Our buildings are mostly accessible by
ramps, elevators and such C.C. Rowe, the
director of DSS said.
DSS works in cooperation with many dif-
ferent departments on campus to achieve the
most accessibility possible.
"Whenever a classroom is on the second
floor or more of a building without an elevator
we work with the registrar to get the classroom
moved to the first floor so that the students
can attend the class said Fatti Musselman,
graduate assistant to Rowe.
However, Ragsdale, Graham, Rawl and
Austin are inaccessible with the exceptions of
their firsr floors. A problem was presented
when Christcnbury was the only gym on cam-
pus, as it is completely inaccessible. But the
new rec center is completely accessible, with
ramps into the pool, elevators and other fea-
tures that make the center enjoyable for all
students.
"A problem that we are now working with is
seating in Hendrix Theater Rowe said. "The
building was completed in 1974 and the floor
is on a continuous tilt, making sitting in a
wheelchair very uncomfortable. Level places
should be made for the students to sit, but
funding is something that we have to deal
with
DSS provides general support, counseling,
extracurricular services and specialized equip-
ment services for students.
"Some of our older buildings have elevator
buttons that arc too high for the average per-
son in a wheelchair to reach, so we have pro-
vided wooden bars with rubber tips in the ele-
vators for the student's convenience
Musselman said.
DSS functions to assist students in any-
way possible. Students with special needs are
asked to call the office for assistance.
" If a student needs to meet with a campus
official whose office is inaccessible to them,
then we will arrange a neutral meeting place
for the two to get together Rowe said.
The many functions of DSS include look-
ing for inconveniences such as roots breaking
up sidewalks and difficulties maneuvering
around construction. New additions to assist
students in wheelchairs include lifts in all
buses and the fully accessible dorms: Cotton,
Garrett, Slay and Umstead.
"Any inconvenience that a student notices
should be reported to my office so that we can
correct it Rowe said. "We sometimes over-
look things that are obvious to someone in a
wheelchair
Chris Mackey shoots baskets at the new student rec center.
PH0T0 BY DAVI0 FINCH
Healthy lifestyle advice available from campus organization
ANGELA KOENIG
HEALTHENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
STAFF WRITER
Department offers pre-
sentations and work-
shops
The Office of Health Promotion and Well-
Being offers many opportunities for students
to learn about aspects of health and well-
being. The office recently moved to the
Whichard building to increase availability to
students.
The office offers programs designed to help
increase awareness and to make wise choices
through workshops and presentations. They
have the only peer educator group on campus
and they train them to make these 50 minute
presentations to sororities, fraternities and res-
idence halls.
The presentations cover such topics as
alcohol, women, weight and body issues, safer
tanning, nutrition, date rape, sexuality, nutri-
tion and a new stress management program.
They also have the capacity to design special-
ized workshops for groups.
Another service they offer is a resource
room that includes books, videos and files with
up-to-date information on health topics rang-
ing from how to use seatbelts, information
about diabetes, to alcohol and sexuality.
These resources can be used for writing
papers, gathering information for workshops or
for personal use. Students can check out mate-
rials or use them in the office.
This information can also be accessed over'
the Internet by going through ECU's home-
page to the student life section, and from
there to the health promotion and well-being
area. This enables students to connect to the
15 page homepage of the office which gives
them more information on health topics.
"We did a study and found out that not a lot
of people utilize the web because it takes too
long to get information said Director Donna
Walsh. "What we've done is prescreen the
information and provide a link to the things
which will provide the best help Director
Donna Walsh said.
The office also coordinates the alcohol judi-
cial assessment program and the alcohol judi-
cial workshop. These programs work with stu-
dents who have received alcohol violations on
campus. They are educational programs that
teach the rules and regulations associated w ith
alcohol, discuss students' involvement wirh
alcohol, and making vise decisions.
The office is planning several events for the
next few months including Sexual .Assault
Awareness Week and discussions on safe
Spring Break activities in February, and the
second annual "Recycle Your Life" health fair
in March.
Last year's heaith fair featured over 35
booths and speakers on topics such as recy-
cling paper, recycling blood and bone marrow,
driving drunk and water safety.
They are also setting up locations to dis-
tribute pamphlets and brochures of informa-
tion so students can obtain information with-
out having to go to the office.
"We did a survey that found that students
are more likely to pick up information from
areas on campus than by coming to the office
Walsh said. "We identified the top site areas
and are planning to provide information there
to see how much this is utilized
The office is always seeking volunteers.
"We are always interested in having volun-
teers help with events because the whole
focus of the office is to help people lead happy,
healthy lives, and the more people who work
to do this the better off well be Walsh said.
For more information on volunteering or to
utilize their resources call Donna Walsh at 328-
6793 or visit 210 Whichard.
Information available
from the Office of
Health Promotion and
Weil-Being
alcohol
tobacco
other drugs
date rape
nutrition
blood pressure
sexuality
safer tanning
stress management
women, weight and body issues
diabetes





news
The East Carolinian
MAN CHARGED IN INTERNATIONAL TELEMARKETING
SCAM
RALEIGH (AP) - A call by a 72-year-old Goldsboro woman led to the arrest
of a Canadian man who is charged with running a massive international tele-
marketing scam.
After the initial tip from the Goldsboro woman, investigators followed a
trail of cashed checks that led them through dozens of bank accounts, alias-
es and phony businesses. The trail led them to a man identified as Boaz
Moshe "Bo" Langman, 41, of Montreal.
Papers filed in U.S. District Court in Raleigh charge Langman with con-
spiracy, wire fraud and money laundering. If convicted on all counts, he could
face a maximum of 40 years in prison and a $1 million fine.
TEENAGE RAPPER ARRESTED FOR SPITTING
RALEIGH (AP) - Racy Brown, a teen-age rapper in town for a concert, was
arrested Sunday morning for allegedly spitting on a manager and a front desk
clerk at the hotel where she was staying.
Brown, 17, whose real name is Inga Marchand, was arrested about 4 a.m.
and charged with two counts of simple assault.
According to a report filed with the Raleigh Police Department, the
Brooklyn, N.Y, native shouted and cursed at two employees at a Holiday Inn
and then spit on them about 11 p.m. Saturday after they told her they did
not have an iron.The rapper, well-known in the world of hip-hop music, is on
tour with the bands The Lost Boyz and Camp Lo. She also is promoting her
first solo album, "111 NaNa
POSSIBLE LINKS TO OLYMPIC PARK BOMBING
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) - Three men accused of bombing a bank, an abor-
tion clinic and a newspaper office in the Pacific Northwest are being inves-
tigated for possible links to the Olympic park bombing in Atlanta, a news-
paper reported.
Anonymous Justice Department and FBI officials told The Spokesman-
Review Sunday that the suspects were being investigated in the Atlanta
case, but cautioned that they have other leads and no solid suspects.
The men are being held without bail on charges of bombing a suburban
office of The Spokesman-Review and a nearby U.S. Bank branch, which also
was robbed. They are also charged with bombing a Planned Parenthood clin-
ic in Spokane and robbing the same bank branch two weeks before the
Olympics bombing.
w
POLLUTION IN CALIFORNIA
MARTINEZ, Calif. (AP) -People living in the shadow of one of the nation's
biggest concentrations of oil refineries and chemical plants have seen it all.
But what really worries them is what they have not seen.
Michelle Ozen lives 20 miles north of San Francisco in Contra Costa
County, home to 29 oil and chemical plants that handle 45 million pounds of
hazardous products and waste. Chevron Corp Shell Oil Co Dow Chemical
Co. and DuPont Inc. all have plants in the area. She is constantly worrying
about the air she is breathing. The number of plants involved poses a real
threat of a chemical cloud release that could travel for miles, putting 11
cities, as many small towns and a half-million people at risk.
GOAT THROWING
MANGANESES DE LA POLVOROSA, Spain (AP) - Defying a government
ban and animal rights protesters, villagers in northern Spain threw a goat
from a church tower in keeping with an annual tradition.
People waiting below the 43-foot belfry caught the animal in a tarp and it
apparently emerged uninjured.
Hundreds of area residents and tourists marched the goat through the
streets of Manganeses de la Polvorosa Saturday then cheered as young men
hurled the animal from the belfry.
p
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Pangea Associates Presents
How To Teach English as a Second Language Workshop
�Assessment Lanuage Acquisition � Innovative Strategies � Interactive Participa-
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9 a.m. - 5 p.m. � Saturday February 8, 1997 ECU�
Willis Building
Registration Mandatory
Call Pangea Associates� 800-706-6715 or 919-933-0399
pangea@msn.com
m .1
NG students divided over affirmative action
Necessity of pro-
grams questioned
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
Affirmative action and racial quo-
tas have come under fire at col-
leges in California and other
states.
Now, raced-based programs
appear to be causing a rift among
students leaders at the 16
University of North Carolina
schools.
That rift became apparent on
Friday night as the UNC Student
Government Association - made
up of four elected student leaders
from each of the 16 UNC campus-
es - made up a wish list for this
year's session of the General
Assembly.
Those discussions led to a sug-
gestion to' keep affirmative action
programs in place, a goal of
President CD. Spangier Jr. and
UNC's Board of Governors.
But Appalachian State
University student government
vice president Todd Poole said
those sentiments aren't shared by
many students. He declared that
he opposes affirmative action pro-
grams, as do the majority of stu-
dents at ASU.
"I think we need to get to a sys-
tem based on merit Poole said.
His comments sparked a long
and sometimes heated debate,
The News & Observer of Raleigh
reported.
"I was surprised by what a hard
crowd it was said Catilla
Everette, vice president of the stu-
dent government at N.C. Central
University, one of the state's five
historically black public universi-
ties. "But obviously this needed to
come out. We'd never talked about
affirmative action before
The students finally agreed by
a vote of 20-12 to use the phrase
"affirmative action" in their leg-
islative agenda.
The tally showed East Carolina
and UNC-Wilmington unanimous-
ly opposed to the proposal and
Appalachian State, Western
Carolina and UNC-Chapel Hill
divided.
Central, N.C. State University,
Fayetteville State and UNC-
Asheville, UNC-Greensboro and
UNC-Charlotte voted unanimous-
ly in favor of the phrase.
Still, more than a third of the
students voted against using the
words "affirmative action" in the
annual legislative platform.
Many students insisted they
were opposed not to the idea of
affirmative action, just the words -
which they feared would turn off
the legislators. Other students
were appalled at the thought of
watering down the words.
Only half the eligible delegates
attended the meeting. Three his-
torically black institutions -
Elizabeth City State University,
N.C. A&T University and
Winston-Salem State University -
as well as UNC-Pembroke and the
N.C. School of the Arts, were not
represented.
Spangier said UNC's version of
affirmative action is simply to
make sure no one's background
prevents him or her from attend-
ing one of the 16 campuses.
Another goal, Spangier said, "i9
to make sure everybody on campus
doesn't look the same way, because
society doesn't look the same
way
"Society is complex and part of
the college experience is learning
how to live in it he said.
North Carolina's low tuition is a
part of its affirmative action pro-
gram, Spangier said. So is its policy
of emphasizing class standing
more than test scores in cases
involving students from poor or
rural counties.
To help meet its integration
goals - a 10.6 percent black popu-
lation at historically white univer-
sities and a 15 percent white pop-
ulation at historically black schools
- the UNC system gives minority
students slight advantages in
admissions and distributes $1.6
million in scholarships to help
attract students to campuses
where they will be in the minority.
But in North Carolina, as across
the nation, more people disagree
with such policies.
"On some of our campuses,
people are saying, 'Wait a minute -
you're discriminating against me
now said Hank McCauley, vice
president of student government
at UNC-Wilmington. "I just think
there should be equal opportunity
for everybody
The Chronicle of Higher
Education reported this month
that North Carolina is one of sev-
eral states likely to see legislative
proposals to scale back affirmative
action programs.
"Either we do it now, or the
courts will order it said John
Hood, president of Raleigh's con-
servative John Locke Foundation.
"Racial discrimination should be
outlawed immediately
An opening is avail-
able for the following
staff position:
Assistant
Editor
To apply, come by the
Student Media Board
office on the second
floor of the Student
Publications Bldg. or
I call 328-6009 for
more information.
LoveLines
w iour key to a
Valentine's Day
" to remember!
You can win a "Perfect Valentine's Day" when you buy a
LoveLines ad. Just send your Valentine's Day greeting through
The East Carolinian and you're automatically entered to win the grand prize:
� Roses from Jefferson's Florist
� Dinner for two at Christine's in the Greenville Hilton
� two passes to a movie at Carmike Cinemas
� Coffee and dessert at Barnes & Noble Cafe
Or win one of two additional Valentine's Day packages being given away. And it's all
FREE compliments of The East Carolinian
and our participating sponsors. We'll contact
the winner by phone on Tuesday, Feb. 11. Christine's � Jefferson's Florist
Carmike Cinemas � Barnes & Nob! 2
and more to come!
Gmptete m ey (om caning to The fast Mk � 1& �m�y
only C0MlEfETIttHnMJUI)8m
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3 Thursday. January 23. 1997
1PWS
The East Carolinian
DISCOVER A LITTLE CORNER OF
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k- I �
Accross from the Courthouse
on the corner of Evans and Third Street
Begin your day with breakfast at Courtside Cafe
�V.ttllliim:
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bacon, ham or sausage; toast or homemade biscuits
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Lunch is served from 10:30 - 5:00 Monday - Friday
757-1716 � 300 Evans Street � 757-1716
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SHOE REPAIR
Rivergate East Shopping Center
3193-A East 10th St.
Greenville, NC
Phone 758-0204
Our Special! v is Sole & Heel Repair
All Rockport Soles � $25.00
Men's Rubber Heels - $6.00
Bring this coupon with our shoes
Mon-Fri 7:30 a.m. � 6 p.m.
Sat 9:00 a.m. � 2 p.m.
Brotherhood.
Honor. Respect
To some these are words.
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SIGMA NU
For more information, call 830-5439
ILLUMTNA
ILLUMINA'97 EXHIBITION
January 27 � February 23,1997
Mendenhall Gallery
CLOSING RECEPTION AND AWARDS PRESENTATION
Tuesday, February 18,1997
7PM - 9PM in Mendenhall Gallery
CHEW
OH THIS.
11
�oj��,
Grant provides private school funding
Plan involves tax-
payers mone
WINSTON-SALEM I W) - Some
state lawmakers arc pushing j plan
that would provide more public
money to private colleges, hut
they sav the plan would actually
save taxpayers money.
Sen. Aaron V. I'Mer. D-Union,
plans to introduee a bill in the
upcoming legislative session that
would increase two sources ot
tinanein" tor students who choose
to attend private colleges and uni-
versities.
One is the legislative tuition
grant, which provides 51,300 a
year for every full-time student
from North Carolina. The other is
the state contractual scholarship
fund, which sends $600 to private-
schools for each full-time student
from North Carolina. That money
goes into a scholarship fund for
needy students.
Plyler's bill would increase
each of those grants by $200, at a
cost of between S8 million and S10
million a year to state taxpayers.
Plyer said the plan would save
money by keeping easing the
space crunch at the state's public
universities, which expect to see a
sharp increase in enrollment in
coming years.
We're currently spending
51,950 to send students to private
universities he said. "But it costs
about S8.000 of the taxpayers'
money to send a student to one of
the state universities
Plyer said his bill could help
hold down another associated cost
as well - construction.
It would save us from having to
build so many additional buildings
and dormitories Plyler said.
Sen. Betsy Cochrane, R-Davie,
likes the idea of increasing the
amount of support for students
attending the private universities,
the Wmston-Salem Journal report-
ed.
"The problem again is the lack
of funding she said. I don't know
that the private colleges would end
up being a priority over the public
universities, for which we have
total responsibility
Lawmakers must also deal with
public colleges that are clamoring
for more dollars.
The board of governors for the
University of North Carolina sys-
tem has asked for 51.5 billion for
the 1997-98 budget year, about
5161 million more than the system
received this year.
A big chunk of that would go
toward increasing the budgets of
five universities - Appalachian
REC
continued from page 1
she should go to the customer ser-
vice desk or send someone to get
help if they are unable to walk.
Other than the incident Monday,
there have been no other significant
injuries at the center.
"Obviously when people play
recreational sports they know
there's a risk of injury. I can humbly
sav that we train the staff reallv well
State University, UNC-
Greensboro, UNC-Charlotte,
UNCAMlmington and East
Carolina University.
UNC governors say those five
schools have been underfinanced,
compared with the other universi-
ties in the system.
The board will ask the
Legislature for an extra $21 million
a year to correct that inequity.
'It's extremely important said
Jane Helm, the vice chancellor of
business affairs at Appalachian,
which would receive $3.4 million
more a year. In any area where we
are dependent on state resources,
it has an effect
Chancellor Patricia Sullivan of
UNGG, which would receive an
additional $6.8 million a year, said
the inequity has kept the universi-
ty from being able to hire as many
secretaries, advisers and counselors
as it needs.
It really is critical for us she
said. "You can imagine what a $6.8
million permanent addition to the
budget would do
so that they can respond as quickly
and appropriately as any facility
can Edwards said.
"We want to be preventative in
our policies so that we can stop peo-
ple from being hurt in the first
place. But the reality is that with
over 20,000 people on campus who
can use the facility, people will get
hurt, and we need to be prepared for
this Edwards said.
There are rules and safety poli-
cies for each area at the center
which are designed for the benefit of
the patron and staff to enforce these
policies.
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&
S

EVERY TUESDAY AFTER 9 P.M. DINE IN ONLY
APERITIVOS
WHO: ECU Sociology Professor Dr. Jeff Johnson
The South Pole: " My Cod! this is an awful place
WHEN: Today, January 28, 12 noon - 1pm
WHERE: Mendenhall Underground
Bring Your Lunch
FREE Drinks and Gourmet Dessert
Presented by the ECU Student Union. For More Information, Call
the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004, or Check Out Our Web Site!
www. ecu. eduStudent JJnionAHEHOMEPAGE. html
&
CALAMARES FRITOS 5 7
Squid dipped in a spicy batter, fried crispy, and served
with lime end ehipotle lauce For dipping.
POTATO SKINS 4.95
Potato skins fried to a golden brown, topped with melted
cheese, jalapenct, guacamole tomatoes, and tour
cream Add .9 5 for bacon, beef, chielien, or chill.
FIESTA PLATTER 75
Try an assortment of testy Mevlcen appetizers featuring
chili Mm, a mini queseditla. a beef and bean flauta. and
jalapeno poppers-all served with a red sauce for dipping.
GUACAMOLE! S
For you guacamole lovers, a blend of fresh avocados
mined with bits of tomatoes, onions, and cilantro, served
on a platter full of tortilla chips.
QUESO CON CH0RIZO 4-95
Melted Monterey lack cheese with sauteed peppers,
onions and tomatoes, topped with Mexican chorlzo
sausage and served with flour tortillas
JALAPENO POPPERS 4 7
Menicon poppers stuffed with cro�my Wisconsin
cheddar cheese and diced lalapenot. Served with
celery, carrot sticks, and ranch dressing for dipping.
NACH0S GRANDE 95
A plate full of erltp tortilla chips smothered with boant and
a bubbly topping of melted cheeie, alapenot, guacamole,
tomatoes, and black olivet. Add .95 for beef or ettck.n.
PIZZA GRANDE 5 9S
PIZZA CHICA J 9S
A erltp flour tortilla tmothered with beam, melted clieote,
o!ipeno, guacamole, diced tomatoet. block olivet, and tour
cream. Add .95 for beef or chicken.
BUFFALO WINGS 525
Try our homemade wlngt that are flying hot! Served with
celery, carrot ttlekt, and ranch droning for dipping.
CHICKEN FINGERS 5-75
Chicken tenderloin breaded end fried to a dollclout golden
brown. Served with honey mustard tauee or Ranch,
dressing and garnished with celery and carrot ttlekt.
MEXICAN FINGERS s 7S
What happened when the chicken erotted the border?
It got dunked In Buffalo sauce!
QUESO FUNDIDO J9S
SAY CHEESE! The perfect blend of cheete and lolopenet.






!
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January 21,1997
BOND ABSCONDER � A student was contacted in Brewster and transported to the Pitt County Detention
Er fofS�en? The �u skipped bond on drug and alcohol charges stemming from an .ncdent that
occurred off campus last year.
ASSIST RESCUE � While on patrol new the pond at the School of Medicine, an officer observed a female in a
vSS"e, doZwlL'fe officer couioot get the female to respond. Greeny lie Rescue was called and
responded. The female responded and was transported to PCMH for evaluation.
January 23,1997
SUSPICIOUS PERSON � A faculty member reported the possibility of an unauthorized person trying to see a
child in the pre-school.
ASSIST RESCUE � A resident in Fleming Hall was transported from Fleming to PCMH by CihlgOM
ater compWning of stomach pains. The resident hod taken an undetermined amount of .buprofen and Alteve
tablets.
January 24,1997
wniQF rriMPI AINT7DISORDERLY CONDUCT � Four students were issued campus appearance tickers for
Sp� rf ��� after a noise complaint was reported. All four subjects were
veiling and screaming west of Greene Hall when police officers approached.
BREAKING AND ENTERING OF MOTOR VEHICLE � Two vehicles were found to have been broken into in
dwTWrd and Reade Street parking tot. The victims, borh students, were contacted concerning the modems.
TRESPASSING � A non-student was issued a state citation and escorted off campus after he was seen in Fletcher
Hall. He had previously been banned from campus.
January 25,1997
POSSESSION OF MARIJUANA & DRUG PARAPHERNALIA � Two students in Aycock Hall were issued state
citations for simple possession of marijuana and possession drug paraphernalia.
January 26,1997
DiSOitDERLYOONDUCT � A swdem reported ttataiiotnerstu
dw�r�uterin Joyner Library. When approsched and questioned about the incident the f,
and abSvewardsthe offices The student was issued a campus appearance ticket and banned from Joyner Library.

mn us
the experience
of a lifetime
The East Carolinian has an
immediate opening for an
ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
for the Spring semester.
Come by our office to complete an application
or call 328-6366 for more information.
3t's excellence you'll nevet fot$et.
( It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
WOMEN'S BOWLING
TABLE TENNIS
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va the weekend of
February 14-16,1997, all expenses paid by Mendenhall Student Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Ail-Campos Women's Bowling Tournament
Wednesday, January 29
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
All-Campus Table Tennis Tournament (Men's & Women's Divisions)
O Thursday, January 30
aW 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
There ia a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor
of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 757-4711, for more information.
The office of
Health Promotion
& Well-Being
has moved!
We are now located in
Whichard 210.
Our resource room has many types
of up-to-date references on issues
such as health, sexuality, nutrition,
alcohol, and other drugs.
References include pamphlets,
brochures, boob, videos,
audio tapes and newsletters.
Visit our other Resource Room at Our Web Site:
www.ecu.eduhpwbhome.hrm
Call for more information 328-6793.
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WAY TO THE TOP.
If you didn't sign up for
ROTC as a freshman or
sophomore, you can still
catch up this summer by
attending Army ROTC
Camp Challenge, a paid
six-week course in
1"iership. Apply
w. ;� ay qualify
for a $4,000 scholarship
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You'll also have the
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Aft? ROTC
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For details, visit o4t Rawl Building or call
328-6967
zAPil Sigma Phi Epsilon
Founded: Richmond, VA, in 1901
� Fastest growing of the two largest Fraternities in the world,
one of the largest on campus.
Location: 505 E Fifth Street, two blocks from downtown across the
street from campus. We have two houses and a party room
for band parties. Alumni gave us $250,000 for renovations
to our back house which has been completed.
Academics: Balanced man scholarship.
Athletics: Chancellor's cup, which we are currently leading.
RUSH
Jan. 28-30
For more information
call 757-0487
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
The house with the heart!





5 Thursday. Janssry 23. 1997
I
opinion
The East Carolinian
easfetrolinian
Brandon Waddell Mm
MAROURR1TE BENJAMIN Dm Hint HEATHER BURGES Hm Mm
amy L. Royster MMM Rasa E�w Patrick irelan Pto ew
Jay Myers utaqkUkn celeste Wilson MM
Dale Williamson mom ufann Ew Carole Mehle Ha Can fw
AMANDA ROSS SpotB ffjl ANDY PARKAS Soff HmCMOt
Matt Hrge aasajoaj awcw
Sana ths ECU community snca 182&, na tat tl&0UmilMiw$mmBf1mlQmt1tmiflB
Vial a at rrm aananal in aach aoltion is rtw opinion of tha Edtionaf board. Tha East Carolinian antcomat lanan to
Of ftfay. ItmtBB to .?50 annJs, avtMh may bo adoad for dacancy or bfavity. The East Carofiman fosenot the right to
aot w lajact lanan for publication. Al lanan nuat be soned. lanan should be oddwuad to: opinion editor, The
Eaat Caraaman, Publications BuMing. ECU. GnannHe. 278584353. For information, call 8f8.32B.B388.
oumcw
Ws live in a litigious society. It makes no difference what the problem is;the answer
always seems to have the noun "lawsuit" attached in some manner. This recent trend
has tied up the court system in a way America has never seen.
Evidence of this new trend is not difficult to find.
Turn on the television, flip through the newspaper, turn on the radio; we love to sue
each other.
The fcod Lion grocery store chain just won $5.5 million in punitive damages -dam-
ages aimed to punish the guilty party - from Prime Turn Live because their methods of
investigative journalism were deemed inappropriate. In a nutshell, undercover
reporters for the ABC newsmagazine were hired by the grocery store chain in
Greensboro in the poultry department. The journalists used hidden cameras to show
the nation that food Lion bleaches their chickens prior to sale if the chicken's sales
expiration date had passed.
The journalists who produced this story did gain employment under false pretenses
and presented Food Lion in a bad light, the court concluded. But, ironically, Food Lion
never contested the accuracy of the program with regard to the chickens and other obvi-
ous FDA violations.
No member of The East Carolinian's staff was in the courtroom when this decision
was passed, nor has any member of the staff passed the bar exam, but we think they
missed the point. Isn't the FDA violations the most important issue?
Shouldn't the health and welfare of every customer be paramount to damaging the
reputation of Food Lion? Apparently not.
The truth got out anyway. ABC News has insurance to cover the $5.5 million loss, so
it's not likely they will be forced off the air. The entire reason Food Lion was exposed
hinged on the investigation being conducted without the knowledge of the grocery
store chain. Keeping the American public informed is the responsibility of the media.
We hope this judgment will not change the way investigative journalism is conducted.

tie Itjk �W 'mi
to je with fcr
Guest columnist application for Campus View
This is your chance to tell us and everyone who reads TEC what you
think about a certain topic. Please return this form The East Carolinian
office in the Student Pubs. Building. Please print
Name
Fr O Soph Jr CH Sr LZI
Phone number
Topic(s) about which I would like to write.
Please consider me for a postion as guest columnist for TEC. Iagree to allow TEC's staff to edit my sub-
mission for grammar, punctuation and libelous content. Other than those changes I will be notified of any
changes that may affect the length or content I understand TEC reserves the right to reject my submis-
sion. If I am selected, TEC will notify me two weeks in advance of publication; at that time a deadline for
submission will be assigned by the editor.
The East Carolinian needs students who want to write
opinions for our Opinion page.
We are looking for someone to fill our
Opinion Columnist position.
(responsibilities include writing a column every two weeks.)
And who knows, we might even pay you!
Apply at our office on the second floor of the
Student Publications Building
(across from joyner library).
GUEST
Martin
THOMAS
The joys of oncampus dining
I might be the only one, but I am
constantly disappointed by both the
product and the level of customer
service provided by ARAMARK, the
company contracted to be the sole
providers of food service to ECU.
Big deal, you might say, just eat
somewhere else. Will, the thing is I
don't really have anywhere else to go.
You see, I have chosen to live on
campus, Fleming Hall to be exact,
and my fear of eating crappy food is
overshadowed by my fear of losing
my parking place by driving in pur-
suit of a tasty meal. I also don't have
the time, desire, or facilities to con-
veniently cook my own food. ARA-
MARK has time to. cook and they're
close, so, for the last four years, I've
bought into a product that I don't
like.
I'm not a cafeteria jaded senior, if
that's what you were thinking. I
knew something was wrong when, as
a freshman, I first went in
Mendenhall and heard that yell,
"TWO LINES. WE GOT TWO
LINES PEOPLE It reminded me
of being down on the farm in
Alabama and Grandma calling the
pigs to be slopped (fed), "SOO-EY,
SOO-EY PIGGIES This attitude
is still around today. Maybe there
are many people waiting for food,
but I wish that I could be treated as
a customer, or at least a person and
not as a pig coming to be slopped.
I find myself saying thank you to
the server every time something gets
put on my plate. Why do I do that?
The server should at least seem
grateful that I've decided to patron-
ize his or her place of employ.
Precious few of the employees seem
to be happy even working there,
much less to serve me. 1 want to be
an appreciated customer who is
cared for and nurtured.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
The food I eat is not consistent-
ly good and it seems overpriced.
Every time I make a selection, it's a
gamble. Maybe the mashed potatoes
will taste funny, maybe the Beef
Burgundy will be horrid ("ONLY
ONE ENTREE AT A TIME,
STOOPID! YOU HAVTA COME
BACK), or worst of all, maybe one
of your four (and only four) chicken
fingers will only be one inch long and
all shriveled up. However I gamble,
I always seem to lose way more than
I intended. What's with drinks that
cost a dollar or more, small sand-
wiches that cost four, and five itty-
bitty cheese sticks that cost three?
Pains shoot through my body after I
pay $5.44 for 30 gummy worms. Ws
pay high prices for low quality food
of inconsistent taste. I want to be a
customer who can get consistently
good food at low prices.
I thought I was going to be able to
fix it all, high prices, shoddy service,
etc. when I found out about an ARA-
MARK- sponsored committee known
as the Student Food Service Advisory
Committee. I know such a thing
exists because I went to some of
their meetings last year. They were
very capably and efficiently run, in
part by a student, but yet I couldn't
help but feel that they were nothing
more than jazzed up "Edible
Suggestion" (an ARAMARK cus-
tomer service attempt) sessions. A'
tasty three-course, catered dinner
was served, ARAMARK news was
read, and then my fellow students
and I were allowed to whine. Most
people complained of taste or poor
service, and I brought up something
about undervalued meal plan equiva-
lencies, but I got tired and gave up
after sitting there for nearly three
hours. The best customer service
abilities ARAMARK has been capa-
ble of amount to little more than
even propaganda techniques. I want
to be listened to as a customer, but I
also don't want to-have things to
complain about.
The range to which ARAMARICs
control extends is most evident if
you've ever tried to hold a meeting
in Mendenhall Student Center. An
organization I work with promised
supper to its members for attending
one of its meetings. We were
instructed that ONLY ARAMARK
could provide the food. As we began
to look, it became obvious that there
were NO value options available to
us. Whereas we could have bought, a
sufficiently large party sub sandwich
for 25 people on the cheap, we were
required to buy an ARAMARK pre-
pared sandwich tray for about $70.I
want to be a customer who is able o
make free choices, especially aboat
my free time.
What frustrates me the most Is
the fact that we as members of thje
ECU community can never expect to
be treated as real customers because
we don't have to be treated as sudh.
Ws'll never have a 29 cent hamburg-
er day, we'll never be greeted witfja
sincere welcome, we'll never see; a
full staff of courteous, knowledge-
able servers at the cafeterias, aad
we'll continue to be fed the safe
propaganda that tries to convinceiis
that our four dollar sandwich is cpe
best that can be made. We are a cap-
tive audience of freshmen forced to
buy meal plans and upperclassmfcn
and graduate students corralled into
ARAMARK dining facilities by the
geography of campus and the
monopolistic control they exert.
Considering the situation, I guess
we're lucky to just have the privilege
of giving ARAMARK our money.
Rec center should express condolences
To the Editor,
On Jan. 20, 1997, my friend and I
were watching the 11 o'clock news
on Channel 8 and saw a story about
the Recreation Center. Thinking that
it was another story about the com-
pletion of the Recreation Center,
and how the place is improving the
lifestyles of the people at ECU, we
continued to watch. We were both
deeply shocked to find out that
someone was playing basketball, col-
lapsed, and later died sic. As unfor-
tunate as this tragedy was, the worst
was yet to come.
The next morning as we stepped
out of our dorm to go to class, we
checked to see if there was any form
of respect such as a cross or a wreath
around the building, there was noth-
ing. They did not even close the
Recreation Center for at least a cou-
ple of hours to show respect, it was as
if no one has any sympathy. Was ECU
so anxious to open this place that
they lost the true meaning why they
built the place to begin with.
Neither one of us knew the gen-
tleman that was only there to have
fun, but we did have one thing in
common with him, he was a human
being and whether we wanted to or
not he deserved a form of respect.
He, like most of us, has a family.
Whether it was intentional or not,
ECU was disrespectful to his family.
All in all, it was poor judgment on
ECU's behalf.
Myisha Hutchinson
Junior
Joy LaFrance
Junior
Rec center patrons need to be careful
To the Editor,
The recent tragedy at the new
Student Recreational Center (SRC)
has caused much concern around the
campus of ECU. The SRC is a great
new addition to an ever-growing ECU.
It could however be a danger, a great
danger. The Recreational staff has
done a fantastic job in opening up the
facility after many long delays, and
they should be commended. There
arc a few things that concern me, and
others around ECU. This brings me to
the reason why I am writing this letter
to TEC.
Already in a week, I have been a
frequent user of the SRC. I think it is
great that it is being used by everyone.
Evcrytime I have been there, the
place has been packed. The basketball
courts are filled, every piece of physi-
cal training equipment is being used,
there is a waiting line for the racquet-
ball courts, a number of people are
scaling up and down the climbing
wall, and the upstairs track looks like
the Boston Marathon.
Again, I think it is great that every-
one has gotten on the kick of exercis-
ing and working out. People however
need to know the importance of grad-
v
ualfy getting into a work out routine.
From what I have seen, people have
jumped right into working out too
much, some hours on end. I am a
Graduate Assistant for the EXSS
Department here at East Carolina,
talking to a student of mine, he went
for zero exercise to playing two hours
straight of basketball, running two
miles, lifting weights and ending up
by playing racquetball.
Ail of this in one night. He says he
has done this three days in a row.
Looking at this individual, it is quite
obvious that this student has not par-
ticipated in any exercise in a long
time. I am a frequent runner, another
example I see is on the inside track I
keep a normal regular pace, know the
distance I can run comfortably, and
stay within my target workout heart
rate. A number times in one week,
several tremendously out of shape
people go whizzing by at 100 miles an
hour. These people are huffing, puff-
ing, wheezing, and sweating to death,
I am surprised someone else hasn't
collapsed.
All I'm saying in this letter is for
those not used to physical activity
slow down. If you are a person in the
unchatered waters of working out.
Know your limitations, know your tar-
get heart rate and gradually work your
way back or into shape, Getting in
shape won't happen overnight, so quit
trying to act like it does. Though the
recent tragedy at the SRC was proba-
bly a freak unfortunate accident, and
hopefully won't happen again, the
reality is that there is a big chance of it
happening again if people are careful.
Don't be the individual that
increases the risks of it happening
again. Enjoy working out. Enjoy phys-
ical activity. Enjoy the new Student
Rec Center. But do it sensibly, know
your limitations. Ask the staff for assiv
tance on a quality workout program.
Also ask your doctor about your health,
your target heart rate, and other
important details related to physical
activity. These people are profession-
als, even though everyone thinks they
are, guess what? You're not. I am cer-
tainly not either, but just concerned
when I see people trying to over do
getting in shape.
Chris Libert
Graduate Student
ExerciseSports Science ;






6 Twtdtf. Jtmnry 28.1897
comics
Th� East Carolinian
E" Spare Time
By Farkas
BIOL 3221
By Rebekah Phillips
i Life on Tuesday
4b ��
t
By Chris Knotts
re so rfvcH J FerL
l�nV coflicir6 i5 tv
fi,oep. T ft�W��JS.
n
Snowman's Land
�SCTARlAI AM. HYfOO'TfcS.
1
By Rob Chapman
f VJE.U. JHAT A&WT VeGtTGl�
THW OowT E.VMJ HAO U�$ t
ACROSS
1 jungle sound
5 �Lama
10 Walked
14 Whale
15 Make changes
in texts
16 Strong cofd
17 FarmbuHding
IB Loyal subject to
a monarch
19 Last word
20 Voted into office
22 Theft
24 Witch
25 Kindled again
26 Put up with
30 Mate
34 Great tennis
serves
35 Lids
37 Made a mistake
38 Meadow
39 More joNy
41 Band perfor-
mance
42 Indian social
class
4 , t sines
4y H .reditary factor
46 Jioes
48 In a onvate
place
50 Catchers' gloves
52 Set a goal
53 Novel section
56 Web weavers
60 Kind of TV
61 Columbus' ship
63 Train wreck
64 God of war
65 Beg
66 Norwegian city
67 Direction
68 Make happy
69 Chick's sound
DOWN
1 Lounging gar-
ment
2 Spoken
3 Land measure
4 Western farms
O 199 Trim Mean Swwcs Inc
��Hi, � ii .eiwa
5 Representative 40
6 Included with
7 CiWar name 43
8 V 1 noint
9 Perfect images
10 Farm implement
11 European capi-
tal
12 Ready for busi-
ness
13 Say it isn't so
21 Old sailor
23 More mature
25 Hold back
26 Powders
27 Body of water
28 Rental agree-
ment
29 Ripped
31 Goaded
32 French river
33 Hemmed
36 Location
39 Deserve
45
47
49
51
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
62
Adventurous
undertaking
Violent wind-
storm
Chewy candy
Russian plain
52
Warble
Talon
Employ
Sts
RBI, eg
Comfort
Stir up
Spill over
Tchrs gp
Student Attorney General
Applications Are Now Available
The Student Attorney General is an SGA
Position which works closely with the
Dean of Students Office.
Applications can be picked up at
210 Whichard, Dean of Students Office,
and are due by 5:00 pm
on Thursday January 30, 1997.
rj&mii'&
E-rrfifeMEiffB
� to Mendenhcdl Student Center
m

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n
YOUR CENTER OF ACTIVITY
�i
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Don't miss ECU'S annual Mardis Gras party. Video Karaoke, BowlingBHIiards,
Bourbon Street Bingo. DJ Dance. Lady Luck Casino, a Spade Tournament
and more. Top it off with a delectable Cajan Buffet.
Friday, Feb. 7 from 9 p.m. until 2 a.m.
Students may attend by presenting their current valid ECU ID at the door. One
guest permitted with a student. Guest passes available beginning Jan. 31 at the
Central T.cket Office from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. and the the Community Service
Desks from 8 a.m. until midnight. On Feb. 7. guest passes are ava.lable at the
Central Ticket Office until 6 p.m.
The Incomparable
Vienna Choir Boys. A Special Added Attraction to the S. Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series. Sunday, Feb. 2 at 2 p.m. in Wright Auditorium
Student tickets are $7 in advance at the Central Ticket Office until 6 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 31. All tickets are $15 at the door.
?�
3tlumina. ')7
W


s
m
s
Student Art Exhibit in the Mendenhall Gallery through Feb. 28. Closing Reception
and Awards Presentation: Tuesday. Feb. 18,7-9 p.m.
G
Si
Feeling Minnesota (R) Jan. 31-Feb. 2 in Hendrix Theatre.
Free admission with ECU ID
aeu a kw
ALL-U-CAN-BOWL - Bowl the night away every 2nd and 4th Saturday of each
month from 8-11 p.m. $5 admission includes shoe rental and all the games you can
bowl, plus pizza and drinks from 8-9 p.m.
MONDAY MADNESS - Bowl for 50 cents a game every Monday 1-6 p.m.
(Shoe rental included!)
MIDDAY BREAK SPECIAL - Take a break from your hectic class schedule with
10 frames of discounted bowling. Every Wednesday and Friday from
1 p.m. until 6 p.m Only $1 per game (shoe rental included)
�JB
�s

Answers will be printed on Thursday
. HOURS:Mon-Thurs.8a.rr11 pm; Ml 8a.rn12 a.mSat. 12pm-12 W "r"
S&MEif f S fattif IB WMI MHEff 5 Mfsfci





7 Tuesday. January 28, 1997
The East Carolinian





8 Tuesday, January 28, 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
c,IreYievv Thespians honor Dr. King
Cravin' Melon
Red Clay Harvest
I'M HE ID
JTAtt �'� i T K R
In popular music there have alvvavs been trends that come along highlighting
a particular area or sound. Take the Motown era of music or the more recent
Seattlegrunge phase that has flooded the music market in the past couple or
vears. Along these lines has come the "roots rock" trend: back-to-basics rock n
roll with a soothing simple sound that combines rock, country, funk, and almost
anything else you can think of. The best examples of this are Hootie and the
Blowfish. Dave Matthews Band. Blues Traveler. Edwin McCain, etc.
This shift in music has enabled most of these bands to achieve high tame
in a relatively short period of time. And now we have the newest addition to
this category Cravin Melon. No strangers to this area of the country (.ravin
Melon has had an ama.ing amount of success since their start. I he band
formed in Greenville, S.C. in 1993 as a side project for the members of two
other local bands. That same year they released a five-song independent CU
that went through a period of moderate success.
Then in 1994, the band joined friends Hootie and the Blowfish and Kdwm
McCain on their club tours which helped get their name out to a huge m'm-
ber of people. This helped their next release. II here I Warm, Re. se I over 20,000
copies in about two vears. The success of the CD and the band s knack tor fill-
ing venues all over the South brought them to the attention of major record
Iftbcls
Fmallv. last spring, the band signed with Mercury Records. The fruit of that
signing is Cravin Melons debut album. Red CUn Hartest. The band went to
Los Angeles last summer and sorted through their collection of 30 or so songs
which thev could record. The 1 they ended up keeping on Red Clay Harvest
help to show everv facet of the band's sound and talent.
The CD starts off with the first single. "Come Undone The single was
receiving airplav all over the South before it was even officially released tor
broadcast. Catchy lyrics and guitar melodies make "(iome I ndone" a song that
gets stuck in vour head after only one listen.
' Unfortunately, the album hits a snag early on with the second track. Sweet
Tea " "Sweet Tea" was the single from Where I Wanna Re and had wonderful
success for an independent single. In fact, the song came in at number 92 on
Raleigh radio station WRDU's top I Oft of 1995, in between Pink Floyd and the
Rolling Stones. However, the re-recorded version contained on Red Uay
Harvest doesn't have the smcxith fluidity that made the original so catchy. It
seems that the band decided to experiment, using everything trom a new
bridge before the guitar solo to a voice box on the solo. However, change is not
alwavs better, and the new version takes some getting used to.
In fact all of the old songs contain differences that really set them apart
from the originals. "Pretend" and "Come A Day" contain new drum and guitar
leads that make them a bit edgier and rawer than before. In these cases, the
new versions shine equallv with the old.
Unfortunately, the uncharacteristically dark "Post Office doesn t quite
match up to it's predecessor. The new version is a totally new arrangement that
contains none of the upbeat, smooth sound of the original. Like. "Sweet lea.
this version takes some getting used to.
However, the new songs more than make up lor any drawbacks the old
songs mav have. From the stripped down sound of the countryish "Simple
Man" to the heartfelt honesty of "Can't Find My Way" and "Faithless Me, the
new songs shine and bring trie band out on top.
Overall. Red Clay Harvest should prove satisfying for anyone. Fans of the live
shows will be pleased with finally having recordings of songs that they have
heard live for over a year now. while fans of the past CDs should be able to find
pleasure in the "new" edgier sound the band has. Red Clay Harvest should also
prove to be an excellent wav to initiate people who are untamiliar with the
band. Hopefully. RedCha Harvest will stop Cravin Melon from being thrown in
a category along with any number of other bands and instead allow them to lie
recognized for their talent and sincerity.
Dale Williamson
SSISTNT 1.IFF.STYI ,1 EDITOR
Martin Luther King's birthday may be
over, but that simple fact does not
stop one from celebrating this great
man's vision. At least, that's the per-
spective the Thespians of Diversity
have taken.
On Wednesday, Jan. 29, ECU will
view Dr. King and his ideals from a
very unique angle when the
Thespians of Diversity share their dra-
matic talents and present Reginald
Watson's play. Ire Seen the Mountain Top
Rut It Don't Look So Good.
around Dr.
present-day
The story revolves
King's resurrection in
Atlanta and King's
disillusionment
when he. as Watson "fj0fiefuy people see-
states, "finds out fr '
that his dream has mg the play will learn
not been realized abmt farfj� Mfher
Watson, who is an
ECU lecturer in the King and themselves
English department
and the Thespians'
founder and organiz-
er, wrote Mountain
Top in January of
1996 in the hopes that it would be
educational as well as entertaining.
"Hopefully people seeing the play
Reginald Watson
ECU Lecturer and founder ol the
Thespians ot Diversity
will learn about Martin Luther King
and themselves Watson says. "It is
not just a play about a black
man; it is also about the
human being
Watson knows that an audi-
ence for such challenging
forms of entertainment
exists, even within a smaller
community like Greenville,
particularly since Mountain
Top has already played Si
cessfully to local audience'
The Thespians performed
the same play on campus
last year, and the response was so pos-
itive that they have been encouraged
to do an encore performance.
The basic premise of the play
involves Dr. King's interaction with
two young African-American youths
(one man, one woman). Through his
dialogue with this new generation of
African-Americans, Dr. King learns of
his lailures and his successes as his
people's leader, of our country's limi-
tations and its progressions, and of all
the work that is left to be done as well
as all the obstacles that have already
been defeated. More importantly. Dr.
King realizes that he has transcended
from being a simple man with a
dream to an iconic image of hope aid
energy for millions of Americans, j
SEE PLAY. PAGE 10
This Abby's road leads to Raleigh
Run Awty
I oaio 1 (fs
I tloni T.p� it hum i tn.nd Buy it Used Piy Full Prat
1
DEREK T. HALLE
SENIOR WRITER
"Here comes God, there goes me.
One's two shy, of making three And
three it was last Saturday night at the
Brewery in Raleigh when the home-
town heroes, Abby 6, once again raz-
zled and dazzled the audience into
another crescent evening.
The night opened when the master
of ceremonies, Rob Watson, proceeded
to jump on stage, grab his sticks, and
take the crowd by surprise.
Dressed in an array of red and
black, I monster took the stage as well.
Standing six-foot, three-inches tall,
Steve Wester, the band's marketing
genie and ground level bassist, backed
Watson with a smile and a huge five-
string.
The concert opened with a new
tune called "Mega Boogie a fresh
twist on hip-hop. Much to my surprise
was the way David Clawson, the
band's guitar-player-in-chief, took
hold of the energy that is Abby 6. Not
only did he refrain himself by certain
measures, he also allowed himself to
shine. The man didn't look at his gui-
tar once the whole show.
Taking a look around, 1 could
already see how powerful the band
was. By the beginning of the second
song, "Ha, Ha, Ha the entire bar was
a shambles. People were tossed from
one end of the floor to the other. Each
soul there took the words of the song
not only as a sing-along, but with the
sanctity of a hymn. Jim Morrison once
said "What people want is something
sacred and now, years later, Abby ft
keeps its audience not only enter-
tained but also feeling like members
of a cult.
When the band went into "Blame
a huge pick-me-up, I thought the
place was going to explode. I leaned
toward the back. This way I could
actually write the article. However. 1
didn't see your average mosh pit, I saw
art. It was a dance all of its own.
After the Spanish-influenced hit,
"Your Nowhere the band played one
of its most innovative songs to date,
"Killigan "Look into my eyes, my
eyes, my eyes, this could be my dis-
guise Watson's lyrics, combined with
his charisma, have the ability to carry
you from one place to the next.
The most impressive aspect of
Abby 6 is their ability to write songs
together. Each tone relates. They
combine more than simple chord pro-
PHOTO COURTESY
grcssions and rhyme schemes. They
follow a path less traveled in their
songwriting. Their sound takes me
away.
And away I did go to Raleigh to
catch the show. Reason being, the
Raleigh scene works, too. Sure, it's a
bit upbeat, but the scene has a strange
ability of welcoming everyone with
open arms. Not only has Abby ft relat-
ed to crowds in the Raleigh area, but
they have also blessed crowds in
Wilmington. In fact, they were the
band that was playing at the Mad
Monk on its last night of business.
Maybe soon they'll bless the Emerald
City with their groove and vibe. j
Abby 6 has been jamming for a few
years now. Not only have they filled, a
spot in Raleigh's local radio, but the
band has earned a huge amount ;of
respect among the youth, the green.
And the future is young.
With that in mind, the band plays
on. Through pain, through the most dif-
ficult times in their lives, they keep
playing. It is a connection unheard, a
chemistry unbalanced and balanced
again, piercing through the hourglass we
call time, and the sands run oh so thick.
Star Wars trilogy warps onto the big screen again
JAY MYERS
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
D A L E WI L L I A M S 0 N
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Every generation has some sort of
connecting force, something that
binds and defines the people as a gen-
eration. This force can take the shape
of a war, music, clothes, cars or poli-
tics. For the generation born between
1965 and 1975 (or thereabouts), the
one force that binds us all together
(for the most part) is not a political
event, a clothing fad or even a war (at
least not a real one). Our connection,
instead, centers around a cultural
phenomena unlike anything the
world had ever seen before. This
force was popular; it was entertaining;
it redefined the concept of consumer
merchandising; it made enough
money to feed several small nations;
it was a movie.
As sad as many may view this fact.
Star Wars is. and has been for a long
time, the defining force of a genera-
tion. Many of us who belong to this
generation cringe at the idea that
most college undergraduates were
born after Star Wars first played in the
theaters, and we are appalled when
we discover that someone has not
even seen the entire Star Wars trilogy.
For many of us, Star Wars not only
represents quality filmmaking filled
with fun and excitement, it also rep-
resents a time of innocence, namely
our childhood. We were children
when writerdirector George Ixicas
first blasted his story onto the big
screens. We saw all the films in the
Star liars trilogy (which also includes
The Empire Strikes Rark and Return of
the Jedi) more times than any human
being should see any movie. We com-
pletely bought into the merchandis-
ing of the films, begging our parents
to buy all the toys, lunchboxes, books,
t-shirts. posters, etc etc. These films
introduced us to the whole nation of
consumerism. We couldn't get
enough of it.
While these films have been avail-
able on video and laserdisc for years,
the translation to TV' has always been
lacking. Watching any film as big as
the Star Wars films on a TV set(no
matter how large) just doesn't carry
the same impact as experiencing the
film in all its explosive glory on the
big screen. For years, fans of the Star
liars films have been hoping for the
entire trilogy to be re-released in the-
aters so we can, for all intents and
purposes, relive our childhood.
Well, George Lucas and his pro-
duction company have finally given in
to our consumer demand. This Friday,
Star Wars will be reissued in theaters,
and the sequels are to follow quickly
behind (F.mpirean Feb. 21 and.rtron
March 7).
But wait! There's more. Not only
is Lucas re-releasing his films, he is
also "touching" them up with a tew
added scenes and improved special
effects. Some pictures of the new
changes have leaked out to fans and
commercials for the re-releases have
spotlighted others.
Lucas has said to the press that his
revision of the movies is truly a re-
"vision He wants to put down on
film, once and for all. his original
vision of the trilogy, something that
he was not able to do in the past
because of budgetary and technologi-
cal limits.
Most of the changes will be cos-
metic, like digitally adding more X-
Wing fighters to the attack
on the Death Star, or more
creatures and weird goings-
on in the background of
Mos Eisley spaceport (the
"wretched hive of scum and
villainy" that Obi-Wan
waxed poetic about).
But some of the changes
will alter the films signifi-
cantly. These have the
potential to be both good and bad
One new addition to Star Wars will
have Jabba the Hutt confronting Han!
Solo in Mos Eisley, a scene that was
originally shot for that film but later
cut because the actor playing Jabba
was not in keeping with Lucas' vision
of the character. It is exciting to imag-
ine the introduction of Jabba this
early on in the story and to get the
chance to view a previously unseen
piece of the film. This is a good move.
On the other hand, a change
involving Greedo the bounty hunter
has the potential to negatively affect
the entire trilogy. In the original Star
liars, Han Solo kills Greedo outright
by shooting him under the table � a
sneaky, cowardly, yet crafty survival
move on Solo's part. This is in keep-
ing with his character at the begin-
ning of the trilogy. Han is a thief, a
smuggler and a pirate whose only
purpose in life is to acquire more
wealth. Over the course of the trilogy
he is redeemed, and by the end of
Jedi he is a true hero. In the new ver-
sion of Star Wars. Greedo fires first,
and Han kills him in self-defense
thereby undercutting Han's heroic;
journey. This is what is known as a.
bad move.
And there are some scenes that
Lucas has decided are better left on;
the cutting room floor. One of Luke's;
SEE WARS, PAGE 10
s ENE INVOLVING
( ABOVE I I 0 HE
HAN � 0 AND JBBA THE 111 I THAT
INCLUDED IN I HE RE-RELEASE OF III
WAS ORIGINALLY CUT FROM SUl WAtS (RIGHT) HAS BEEN I) 1(1 ITALY AI 1 I R E I)
GO SEE JABBA fkGAIN FOR THE EIRST IIME.
I. FILM on
I III K I I s 1 10
FRIDAY, JAN. 31
I II c i s I i m POX





���
Mi i -i liliiri- Hill i -Fi-if
U Tutidiy, January 28, 1997
lifestyle
The East Carolinian
�'
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Tarantino releases the unseen
JAY MYERS
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
Quentin Taratino decided, after his
success with Pulp Fusion, to create a
company that would release films to
theaters that inspired, informed or
otherwise influenced his work. Most,
if not all, of these films would be ones
that had either been released in very
small numbers in the U.S. or films
that had never been seen on the big
screen in this country at all.
This new company, Rolling
Thunder Films, began its re-releases
last year. Of course, none of these
films have come to Greenville's
moviehouses (it's laughable to even
suggest that they might), but the first
film, Chungking Express, was recently
put out on home video. Even though
our theaters are severly lacking, our
video stores are actually pretty good,
so you should be able to find
Chungking Express in town. And I sug-
gest that you do.
Chungking Express is the work of
master Hong Kong director Wong
Kar-Wai, the man behind such classics
as Days of Being Wild, As Tears Go By
and Ashes of Ttme. Whilst caught up in
the endless editing on the larger-
than-life epic. Ashes of Ttme, Wong Kar-
Wai needed to take a break before he
killed himself. He did so by working
on another film. The original concept
had three stories interwoven and
crossing over each other during the
course of the film (sorta like Pulp
Fiction). By the time the second story
had been completed, he had enough
for a film, so he turned that material
into Chungking Express. He's releasing
the third story as a film unto itself
soon.
The plot for Chungking Express is
pretty basic - two cops get dumped
by their girlfriends. But what Wong
Kar-Wai does with this concept is
wonderful in its inception. The direc-
tor has been heavily influenced by
the French, new wave cinema of
Godard, Rohmer and others. If you've
ever seen Breathless (not the one with
Richard Gere) or The Biryde Thief,
then you will recognize the jump cuts
and cinema veritd camerawork of
Chungking Express.
But Wong Kar-Wai is not the only
factor which makes the film great. He
also pulled in some of the best of
Hong Kong's current acting stable to
help. The two principals are Takeshi
Kaneshiro, who plays Cop 223, and
Tony Leung Chiu-Wai, who plays Cop
663.
SEE UNSEEM. PAGE 10
Delta Epsilon Chi
East Carolina's newest coed business
fraternity is having an informational meeting.
ing, Wed. Jan. 29, 5:00 at Chico's
Open to all majors interested in Delta Epsilon Chi.
For more information call 328-7859.
Delta Epsilon Chi
BRIGITTE LIN CH1N-HS1A, HONG KONG'S GRETA GARBO,
BREAKS BAD IN WONG KAR-WAI'S CHUNGKING EXPRESS.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ROLLING THUNDER FILMS
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
While you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 B S. Evans St nftft- Hours:
Pittman Building '3' "UUI� Monday - Friday
Greenville, NC 8:00-4:00
Chivalry is
Alive and
Well at
Kappa
Alpha
Order
Dear Rushee,
As you are
contemplating
rushing a
fraternity this
spring, a number
oi doors will be
opened to you.
Here at Kappa
Alpha, we offer
the door like no
other.
As a rushee, you must choose the
organization which you wish to join. A
fraternity of men with whom you will call
"your brothers for the rest of your life.
We believe you will agree that, in fact,
-Kappa Alpha is the most unique and tradi-
tional college fraternity. We strive for both
'unity and selection. The brothers of KA hope
�to meet each and every rushee, so come out
Tjan. 28-30 for fraternity rush.
For Rides & Info: Call 757-0128
January 28-30
7-11PM
REPRESENTATIVES
FROM EACH SORORITY
WILL BE PRESENT
EVERY NIGHT OF RUSH
COME OUT & MEET THE
BROTHERS OF
KA

KA11th St.
Pantry 10th St
Wendy'sMcDonald's





10 Tuesday. January 28, 1997
ifcstyle
The East Carolinian
WARS
continued from page 8
best friends on Tatooine is a guy named
Biggs Darklighter, and he is the envy of
Luke because he has been accepted to
the Imperial Academy, the place where
Luke most wants to be. Biggs later joins
the rebellion and is killed in the first
film's Death Star battle, where he
fights alongside Luke. His death is trag-
ic for Luke, but the poignancy of this
moment is gone in the film because
Lucas decided that the early scene with
Biggs just didn't work.
Having not seen the new release
yet, it's hard to tell how seriously the
changes Lucas has made will affect the
Star Wars films we have come to love so
much. But changes or no, the chance to
see it one more time on the big screen
is a dream come true.
Of course, given the quality of the
theaters in Greenville (no THX sound
system, no Dolby sound system, hell ,
no stereo sound system), we will be
traveling to the Triangle to catch the
films. At least there we'll have comfort-
able seats, great sound and a screen
that's bigger than a 25" TV And if
you're going to see Star Wars on the big
screen, you had better do it right.
Especially if Lucas does as he plans
to do in 1998 and release the next film
in the Star Wars series Now that will be
an event.
And it won't stop there. Lucas plans
on releasing another Star Wars film in
1999 and another in the year 2000.
Once in the 21st century; there are
plans laid for yet another trilogy.
The next three films will take place
before the events that happen in Star
Wars, Empire and Jedi, and the last three
take place after. If Lucas succeeds with
what he is planning, and so far that has
been 20 years in the making, then your
kids and your kids' kids may be watch-
ing his films. Or maybe he'll die with-
out ever seeing it hrough to the end. I
hope not.
What ever the outcome, it is enough
that he made the first trilogy and filled
the imagination of an entire generation
with dreams of the future. The advent
of Star Wars was a unique and startling
moment for many reading this paper
right now, and maybe this week it will
work its magic a second time.
We just hope that you'll give yourself
a chance and go see it, too, if you
haven't. Then you can be big Star Wars
geeks like us. Is that too much to ask?
UNSEEN
continued from page 9
At the opening of the film, we learn
that Cop 223's girlfriend dumped him
over a month ago and he is still in the
doldrums about it. He obsesses about
this relationship for a good deal of
time, mostly while he hangs out at the
Midnight Express (a fast-food joint
that serves as the inspiration for the
film's title), and this concentration of
his turns into a unique and captivati-
ing character study. At this point, a
morally questionable woman in a
blonde wig (played to cool perfection
by the enigmatic superstar of Hong
ring cinema, Brigitte Lin Chin-Hsia)
enters Cop 223's life and things just
go weird (and kinda depressing).
Over in the other story, we are
introduced to Cop 663, another intro-
spective and bright guy who coinci-
dentally also hangs out at the
Midnight Express, although not at the
same time as Cop 223. Cop 663's girl-
friend is a stewardess who basically
treats him as a fly-by-night stopover.
One of the girls working at the
Midnight Express (played by the
spritely Faye Wong, Hong Kong's
answer to Madonna, in her film
debut) takes a shine to the shy, quiet
guy and surreptitiously tries to work
her way into his heart. The way in
which this relationship develops is
possibly one of the best on-screen
romances I have ever seen.
Light, stylish and fun, as well as
moody, contemplative and endearing,
Chungking Express is a marvel of mod-
ern filmmaking. Whereas many of the
other upcoming releases from Rolling
Thunder Films will be exploitation
flicks like the sleazy girl-gang film
Svcitchblade Sisters or the Italian horror
film The Psychic, Wong Kar-Wai's
Lnungking Express is no trashy B-film.
Instead it could be compared to the
high standards of most of America's
classic romance films like Breakfast at
Tiffany's, An Affair to Remember or The
Philadelphia Story and it would still
hold its own.
If Tarantino's other planned re-
releases are anywhere near as good as
this one, then I will be anxiously
awaiting their release at my local video
store. If not, then I'll always have Paris
I mean Chungking Express.
PLAY
continued from page 8
The play's cast includes Joe
Williams as Johnny, a bitter black
man who questions everything
(including Dr. King himself);
Rocquina Vaughn as Wanda, a young
black woman filled with hope for a
positive future; and Jeff Mobley as
the man who dared to dream. Dr.
Martin Luther King.
Playing a famous historical figure
like Dr. King proved to not only be
challenging for Mobley (who cur-
rently serves as president of the
Thespians of Diversity) but also very
rewarding.
"I see playing MLK as an honor
because it helps me appreciate what
he did Mobley says. "It helps keep
his legend and what he represents
alive
Aside from a nice slice of drama.
Mountain Top also offers bits of come-
dy as well as music and dance. Dance
sequences representing the overall
themes of the play will be performed
by Sebrina Cooke (who will dance to
Sam Cooke's "It's Been a Long Time
Coming") and Rachael Copeland.
Vocal performances will be sung by
Laetitia Lisane and Deborah Dixon
Trahom.
By combining several theatrical
genres within a single play, the
Thespians promise a genuine
evening of diversity, which is exactly
what Watson and his organization
represent.
"The play is about black and
white unity and that's what the
Thespians have been striving for
since the beginning Watson stress-
es.
The Thespians are open for any
and all students who want to be
active within a thriving group. As
Watson points out, "The name
'Diversity' means it is for all stu-
dents, and that means memberships
are open and encouraged for all
The Thespians of Diversity are
definitely thriving. They have been
keeping active by performing for the
entire Greenville community, includ-
ing elementary schools and churches.
They are scheduled to perform
another play. Black Voices From the Past,
in mid to late February.
Take the time to support the
Thespians and their dream. I've Seen
the Mountain Top But It Don't Look So
Good will be performed in
Mendenhall, room 244, at 8:30 p.m.
on Wednesday, Jan. 29. Admission is
free, but donations arc welcomed at
the door. For further information,
contact Reginald Watson at 328-6684.
Donald Stroud
STROUD & STROUD
Attorneys At Law
311 S. Evans St. Mall
Greenville, NC 27858
Office 919-752-5475
Home 919-946-5226
1987 ECU Graduate
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The East Carolinian
11 Tuesday. January 28, 1997
noo tins, nod f oo-�, grsat frisks
Millions have
already come
forward
"Last year I had an opportunity to live
on campus and be a winner. But instead
I chose to live off campuswhat a
mistake. I got stuck with utility, phone
and cable bills. The security deposit I
had to pay for the apartment really cut
me short on money. I had to eat my
own cooking and then wash all the
messy dishes. I even had to clean my
own bath room Yuck! I don't have time
to meet new friends because I have to
spend so much time cleaning my
apartment, not to mention shopping for
groceries. I have an 8:00 class, and
searching for a commuter parking space
is a big headache. If I lived on campus, I
:�:���
�jy�'v
could just walk to class. My roommate
has left Greenville and I'm stuck with
the rent. Now, it also looks like I will
have to find someone to sublet my
apartment because I won't be in
Greenville during the summer. Man, did
I goof by not choosing to live on campus.
I am so embarrassed.
I will definitely sign up to live on campus
next year! I hope to see you at
Sweetheart's in Todd Dining Hall the
week of February 17-21. Don't make
the mistake of living off campus like I
did!
You don't want to end up being embarrassed like poor
Rob here? Do you? He decided not to live on campus and look
what he had to put up with.
PRICE COMPARISON
BETWEEN ON AND OFF CAMPUS LIVING
ON CAMPUS-double OFF CAMPUS-One OFF CAMPUS-T OFF CAMPUS-Three
room wo air bedroom apt. living alone bedroom w I roommate bedroom w 2 roommates
COST COMPARISON per person per person per person per person
RENT $1780 for 9 months 3480 for 12 months 2460 for 12 months $23006r 12 months
UTILITIES Included $700 for 12 months $610 for 12 months fo00 for 12 months
UTILITY HOOK UP Included $�00 $5� $33
PHONf- Included 420 for I 2 months $210 for 12 months 140 for 12 months
(long distance excluded)
PHONE HOOK UP Included $100 $50 $3-
DEPOSIT S?;? included $320 $205 $192
CABLE Included $418 for 12 months $209 for 12 months 140 for 12 months
CABLE HOOK UP included $20 $13 $20
(including HBO 1.2. & 3)
TOTAL PER PERSON $l98month $463month $3l7month :�1K $288month
y
(Based on listing of off-campus housing prices and survey of off-campus students)





12 TuMday, January 28.1997
sports
i East Carolinian
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UFtJUK
DREAMS CAN COME TRUE
NEW ORLEANS (AP) - When Brett firvre took the Green Bay Kickers to
their Super Bowl championship on Sunday, with a 35-21 win, it was a victo-
ry for every country kid in cutoffs and T-shirt who ever threw a rock in a
pond and dreamed about being an NFL quarterback.
Favre's pond was just 50 miles or so away from the Superdome, in a
Mississippi mapdot called Kiln, a place deep in Bayou country where he
grew up the son of a high school coach and blessed with a rocket right arm.
The arm alone wasn't quite enough to carry fiivre to his championship.
He needed the courage to survive a roller coaster year that began with 46
days in a rehabilitation program after he became addicted to pain killers. It
continued with the death of his best friend in a van-train accident in which
his brother was implicated, and the involvement of his sister in a drive-by
shooting. ,
And it ended in the glare of the Super Bowl, with ftvre doing pretty
much what he wanted against New England.
On the second play from scrimmage, he threw a 54-yard touchdown pass
to Andre Rison, who was so wide open he strutted into the end zone.
JORDAN TOP VOTE GETTER FOR
EIGHTH STRAIGHT TIME
NEW YORK (AP) - Michael Jordan is the leading Ail-Star vote getter for a
record eighth straight time, and this time he did it even more convincingly
than beforejordan became the first player to garner more than 2 million
votes, finishing with 2,451,136 in results released Sunday for the Rrb. 9
game at Cleveland.
Joining Jordan in the Eastern Conference starting lineup will be forwards
Grant Hill of Detroit (1,868,020 votes) and Scottie Pippen of Chicago
(1,683,956), center Patrick Ewingof New York (1,395,759) and guard Penny
Hardaway of Orlando (1,132,024).
"It feels good Ewing said. "I'm very happy and looking forward to going.
It means a lot. I'm usually picked by the coaches, but now I'm back in the
starting lineup
For the Western Conference, the starters will be forwards Charles Barkley
of Houston (1,877,232) and Shawn Kemp of Seattle (1,713,049), center
Hakeem Olajuwon of Houston (1,487,310) and guards Gary Payton of
Seattle (1,206,539) and John Stockton of Utah (1,127,250).
"I really appreciate the fans voting me to be a starter. It means a lot. This
will be my fourth All-Star game and I'm really looking forward to it Payton
said.
The rest of the 12-man teams will be selected by the coaches in the
respective conferences and announced Tuesday. Houston's Rudy
Tomjanovich will coach the West and Doug Collins of Detroit will coach the
East.
L0MBARDI EVERYWHERE EXCEPT WHERE IT
MATTERD MOST SUNDAY
NEW ORLEANS (AP) - There was so much talk about Vince Lombardi in
the Big Easy this week that it seemed like he was along with Mike
Holmgren and these Packers for the ride.Everywhere you turned, there was
Lombardi. In windows, on posters, T-shirts, coffee mugs and even the cham-
pionship trophy - everywhere, in fact, except the two places where it mat-
tered most Sunday: the Packers roster and the play-calling. Those were
Holmgren, pure and simple.
"It's a different time. We're working under a different set of rules,
Holmgren said.
"But 1 know we believe in some of the same things. Commitment.
Discipline. Great work ethic. Those arc things I try to instill in my team -
high character people working very hard for a common goal
For all that, these are not your father's Packers. Mostly because
Holmgren is not your father's kind of coach.
PACKERS HAVE PRESENT TO GO WITH THEIR PAST
NEW ORLEANS (AP) - The Green Bay Packers finally have a present to
go with their past.
The 35-21 Super Bowl victory over the New England Patriots on Sunday
hardly brought back memories of Vince Lombardi's grind-it-out champions
of the'60s. .
Instead, it was a high-powered Pack - doing it with big plays, especially
by MVP Desmond Howard - that returned Green Bay to NFL prominence
and put the title back in Titletown, USA"
It was Brett Favre finding the duckwalking Andre Rison for a 54-yard
touchdown on the Packers' second offensive play, then throwing an 81-yard
TD pass to Antonio Freeman in the first minute of the second quarter to put
Green Bay ahead for good.
It was Howard scoring on a 99-yard kickoff return then striking an abbre-
viated Heisman pose in the end zone, a dagger in the heart of the Patriots,
who had closed to within six points at 27-21.
FLOYD DOMINATES THE SENIOR SKINS ONCE AGAIN
KOHALA COAST, Hawaii (AP) - Once again turning the Senior Skins
Game into "The Raymond Floyd Show Floyd dominated the event for the
over-50 foursome.
He won eight skins worth a total of $210,000 - including one hole worth
$140,000 Sunday - to capture his fourth straight Senior Skins title.
Jack Nicklaus kept it interesting when he birdied No. 15 to win
$150,000, building his earnings in the two-day event to five skins and
$170,000, and threatening Floyd for the championship.
But that was it for both him and Floyd, as each was eliminated on the sec-
ond hole of a playoff, leaving Lee Trcvino and Hale Irwin to scrap for the
remaining $80,000.
Irwin, playing in his first Senior Skins, won five skins and went home
with $160,000, half of that with a routine par on the third playoff hole at the
Mauna Lana Resort course.
Trevino, a late replacement for Arnold Palmer and playing for Palmer s
favorite charity, won no money.
Lady Pirates triumph over Dukes
TRACY LAUBACH
SENIOR WRITER
With a final score of 72-70, the Lady Pirates claimed victory over James
Madison in what very well may be the most memorable and satisfying game
of the season.
The Dukes held a slight lead over the Pirates in the beginning of the
game. With 13 minutes of play time remaining in the first half, freshman
guard Misty Home sank a three point field goal to turn the game around and
give the Pirates the lead, 12-10.
The girls stayed on top for the rest of the game, as four more three point-
ers were completed in the first half by Justine Allpress, Melanie Gillem and
Mary Thorn.
ECU dominated the court as their numbers continued to grow and
JMU's numbers stayed the same. With 6:50 left in the first half, Beth Jaynes
stepped up to the line to complete two free throws that put the Pirates
ahead by 16.
JMU's Sarah Schreib and Misty Coleback helped the Dukes pick up their
pace and come back to end the first half only nine points behind with a score
of 43-34.
Senior Captain Tracey Kcllcy said that she and her teammates headed
into the matchup against JMU with determination and pride.
"We went out onto the court tonight and played like we had nothing to
lose Kelley said. "We made up our minds that it was time for somebody to
come to our house and be afraid of us
The first basket of the second half of play came from JMU's Kish Jordan,
who put the ball to the hoop with a !3-foot jump shot. Allpress answered
� right back with a driving layup
and a free throw shot to once
again increase the Pirate lead
to 46-36.
With 11:44 remaining, ECU's
Gillem fouled, thus opening
the door slightly for the Dukes
as Jordan sunk two free throw
shots. Just 40 seconds later,
Jordan was sent to the line
once again after Home fouled
her. The shot was completed,
and the Pirate lead shrunk to a
five point spread.
Allpress, Gillem and Thorn
stepped up once again with
SCORE BOX
TRIVIAtimo
MMMMWMM
Which conference won the
NBA All-Star game last season
and who was named the most
valuable player in that game?
iifdan jaw puox sty pfiStw
Justine Allpress
Melanie Gillem
Tracey Kelley
Mary Thorn
Beth Jaynes
Jen Cox
Misty Horns
Danielle Melvin
19
16
13
12
4
3
3
2
SEE PIRATES. PAGE 13
Tracey Kelley tries to stop the ball as her opponent dribbles by. Kelley posted 13
points for the Lady Pirates in their victory over James Madison.
PHOTO BY CHRIS GAYD0SH
Edwards gets the
job done
TRAVIS NEWKIRK
STAFF WRITER
With the weather trying to cool
down for the winter and the CAA
race for first place heating up, no
player has been hotter on the Pirates
men's basketball team than Raphael
Edwards. Standing at 67" Edwards
has made a great addition to the
Pirate frontcourt. The transfer from
Kilgore Junior College has come to
East Carolina for a little bit of south-
em exposure.
Edwards hails from Brooklyn, NY,
and says he believes in role models.
"When it comes to role models in
life, it would be my mother and my
two older brothers Edwards said.
The transition from Junior
College to Division I-A has been
easy. Edwards says there is not too
much difference between Junior
College and Division I-A except for
playing with his teammates.
"In juco (junior college) I was the
show and I only cared for about two
or three guys on the team instead of
the whole team, like here at ECU.
It's more of a family atmosphere
Edwards said.
Edwards has become an impact
player immediately, leading the
team in scoring with 12.5 points per
game. Edwards has also lead the
team in rebounding on several dif-
ferent occasions, including 13
rebounds against American and
George Mason.
"I'm happy to be kjading the
team in scoring, and that is a result
of my teammates being good
enough to find me Edwards said.
Head Coach Joe Dooley is not
surprised by the production of
Edwards.
"Raphael is a very talented scorer
and that is his niche. He has a knack
for scoring Dooley said.
Edwards' teammate Tony
Parham agrees with Dooley about
his ability to score.
"He's a natural scorer and a
tough match up for most post men
in basketball, because he can play
inside and outside. Once he gets the
system under his belt his basketball
game will improve Parham said.
Edwards' point production is not
a fluke. His intensity in practice
earned him his first start vs.
Richmond on Jan. 19. That's not his
most treasured moment in his short
career at ECU, though. Edwards
says that when he got to suit up
against Court Authority in an exhibi-
tion game is a day that he will always
remember, because that was the
first time he put on the purple and
gold uniform.
Dooley said Edwards is perform-
ing better in practice and continues
SEE EDWARDS. PAGE 13
Raphael Edwards has been a dominant force for the Pirates, putting points on the
board and pulling down rebounds.
PHOTO C0URTF.SY OF SPORTS INFORMATION
THINGS YOU MIGHT NOT KNOW ABOUT RAPHAEL
HOMETOWN -BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
MOST MEMORABLE BASKETBALL EXPERIENCE - SUITING UP IN
FIRST GAME EVER FOR ECU AGAINST COURT AUTHORITY
FAVORITE TV SHOW - SPIDERMAN
D0IN' THE FLY
Kristen Olson swims the
butterfly for the Lady
Pirates. Both the men
and women's swim
teams suffered thier
first loss of the season
I to UNC-Wilmington on
Saturday. Both teams'
records now go to 8-1.
The swimmers will have
one final meet this
Saturday when they
host the Hokies of
Virginia Tech.
PHOTO BY CHRIS GAYDOSH

i






The East Carolinian
TEAM
James Madison
East Carolina
Old Dominion
UNC Wilmington
American ,
William 6 Mfky
George Mason
Va. Commonwealth
Richmond
CAA OVERALL STREAK
5-2
5-3
5-3
5-3
34
34
3-5
3-5
2-5
11-5
12-5
14-6
10-10
6-10
6-11
9-8
7-10
6-9
Won 2
Last 2
Lost 2
Won 4
Won 3
Lost 1
Wonl
Won!
Lost 4
Carolina mrogln at 7 pm� tinges. The
woman am on a two pat win stoat after
SPORTS BRIEFS
The men's basketball team dropped another conference game on Saturday when UNC-
Wilmington handed the Pirates a 57-51 loss. The loss drops the Pirates to 12-5 overall and 5-3
in the conference. Tony Parham was the only scorer in double figures with 15 points. Dink Peters
added nine, while Jonathan Kerner and Othello Meadows added eight points each.
The Pirates will look to get back on the winning track when they host Old Dominion Wednesday
night at 7 p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
PIRATES
continued from page 12
EDWARDS
continued from page 12
to improve each week.
"His practice habits are improv-
ing, but they're not where they need
to be. It's not something that you can
turn on and off but he's improving
weekly" Dooley said.
Edwards seems to have fun on the
basketball court. Whenever Edwards
makes a spectacular, acrobatic dunk
or leaps into the air to grab a
rebound, he resembles the star of his
favorite TV show - Spiderman.
"Everybody has an advantage
with their talent; it's just how you
use it. If someone stops me, I can
always pass to an open man. I have to
remember to be mentally focused
and prepare for basketball life.
Playing comes natural Edwards
said.
Edwards has the remainder of this
season and next year to intrigue and
dazzle Pirate fans. After that, who
knows what Edwards can accom-
plish.
"If I don't go pro, HI get a job
dealing with my major, communica-
tions, and broaden out from that
point. Hopefully I can get to the next
level. A lot of people say there is no
reason why I can't go to the pro's
unless I stop myself, and I will try not
to do that Edwards said.
two magnificent three pointers, six
field goals and five free throws to
pick up their numbers and lead by
15 with 5:40 left in the game.
The Dukes came back strong by
nailing five of six free throws and
turning in three three point field
goals in the closing minutes of the
game. With only 50.4 seconds
remaining, the score stood at 70-
68. Both Home and Thorn fouled
out and could do nothing but
watch their teammates fight from
the bench. Kelley nailed two free
throws and seven seconds later,
Jordan turned in two of her own,
making the score 72-70.
As Coach Donovan put it, the
biggest headache of the game came
when Allpress was fouled out with
8.2 seconds left in the game.
JMU's Misty Coleback went to the
line for two shots that, if complet-
ed, would send the ball game into
overtime.
"With three of our five starters
on the bench, the last thing we
wanted was to go into overtime
Donovan said.
Coleback, shooting one-and-
one, missed the shot. The game
was closed out with Pirate tears of
joy and a final score that was as
close as it gets.
"We arc taking nothing but pos-
itive away from this game with us
Donovan said.
According to Kelley, the big win
came about from having the atti-
tude they needed out on the floor
to keep fighting.
"I've never seen us play with
heart like we did tonight Kelley
said. "And now that we know we've
got it, we're gonna keep it
The Lady Pirates will look to
continue their winning ways when
they match up with Coastal
Carolina tonight at 7 p.m. in a non-
conference battle in Minges
Coliseum.
fiO
a
y MCAT Review
Distance Learning Course
East Carolina University School of Medicine
For more information call the Academic Support and Counseling Center
at 816-2500.
Register NOW to reserve your seat!
Ict
Tuesday
I rlirn;ir I I )0.a
0:00 - 1:0(1 mn
BAST
CAROLINA
UNIVBKS1TY
70's 80's 90's
Dance Party
ladles FREE till 11pm
AocJnosclny
Comedy Zone
Bruce Haines
I mmmmm thm fum wmU A0M.
Thii-rrJ.iy
Amsterdam
JMOaWsflajfr
Breakfast Club
RUR.RL.CL
IFC
Spring 1997
Fraternity Rush
Jan.28-30 8 - 11 pm
bids extended at
Alpha Sigma Phi - 422 W. 5th St.
Delta Chi - AMI House
Delta Sigma Phi - 510 E. 10th St
Kappa Alpha - 500 E. 11th St
Kappa Sigma - 700 E 10th St
Lambda Chi Alpha - 500 Qizabeth
Sigma Nu- 501 E 11th St
Sigma Pi - 506 E 10th St
Tau Kappa Epsilon - 951 E 10th St
12 midnight Jan 30th
OK4 Phi Kappa Psi - 909 Forbes
OKT Phi Kappa Tau - 409 Elizabeth
IIKA Pi Kappa Alpha -Sigma Sigma Sigma
I1KO Pi Kappa Phi - Hooker Rd.
I1AO Pi Lambda Phi - 2100 B E 3rd St
ZAE Sigma Alpha Epsilon - Alpha Phi
20E Sigma Phi Epsilon - 505 E 5th St
nT SigmaTau Gamma-211 N. Elm Apt 5
0X Theta Chi - 312 E llthSt
TgS
uLoorantLuft
l"K�
G5EI
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fiNl
(30
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El ICE �
Friendships are common, but Brotherhood lasts a lifetime.
Go Greek





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The East Carolinian
14 Tuesday. January 28. 1997





IS Tuesday, January 28,1997
classifieds
The East Carolinian
For Sale
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
COLLEGE VIEW APARTMENTS two
bedrooms, stove, refrigerator, basic cable,
washer dryer hook-ups, central heat and air.
All apartments on ground level. Call 931-
0790.
Large z bedroom i 12 bath xn-
(ral hac fireplace all appliances wd hook-
ups private patio ECU bus route $400 month
lus deposit call 830-6068.
s
1 deposit
NE BEDROOM APT. FOR sub-lease.
Tower Village Aprs, wd hookup, dishwasher,
huge dock patio. Lease ends July 31,1997.
$320month. Call 321-0828. Very quirt
neighborhood.
�ffeMALE ROOMMATE TO SHARE two
bedroom duplex, wd with neat, serious an-
thropology student. $275 12 utilities.
Please call Virginia at 756-5340 or 758-9437.
(4) 14X6 ICW CHROME split 5 star rims
wtires. 4 lug-came off of CRX. 6 months
old. Call Tracy 551-1363. $1000.
TOYOTA TRECEL 1990 4SP 133.000
miles accass $2,200, sony receiver dolby
prologic 180 watts $250, sony cd 5 disc $130,
5 piece speaker system $300. Call David
328-7706.
(4) 15X7 ALUMINUM GRAND prix rac-
ing 5 star rims wtires. 4 lug came off of crx.
Call Tracy 551-1363. $400.
NEEDTOSELL MEMBERSHIP at Pulse
fitness club. No enrollment fee Takeover
monthly payments of only $36. Call
Stephanie at 754-8088.
NEW YEAR RESOLUTION TO GET
FIT? TAKE OVER MEMBERSHIP AT
PULSE FITNESS CLUB $33MONTH
NOT LONG TERM. CONTRACT
ONLY THROUGH SEPT. 97. CALL
NICOLE 758-5833.
Mountain bike for sale. Giant
sedona good condition has trek shock wave
shocks. Asking $200 obo. Call 413-0660.
Leave message.
irgin
m
Male or female roommate
needed as soon as possible. Spacious 5 bed-
! room house has only 3 occupants and a Dal-
matian. Close to campus. We're cool. Really.
:757-9683
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROomMate
wanted. Fully furnished. Would have own
'bath. Located in Dockside $300 per month
:? 12 of utilities. Call 7S2-1074. Available
;Now!
�FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
TWO BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE, 2 12
IBATH, POOL, ON ECU BUS LINE.
IPLEASE CALL 752-0813.
;4 BEDROOM HOUSE ON Lewis Street
'needs subleasers for summer! Cute, spa-
�tjious and close to campus! Call 758-2154 -
leave a me
ncssage!
ED: Gkf
IWANTED: GRADUATE STUDENT
�.SEEKING 1 male housemate $170mo. In-
�cludes utilities. Close to campus. Call Kevin
752-5557.
For Sale
if
Help
Wanted
ACIOUS 3 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE
! 2 12 baths, stove, fridge, dishwasher, washer
dryer hookup. Located at Wildwood Villas
off Beech Street. Available Feb. 1. For more
information. Call Woodcliff Rentals9 758-
:S005.
: ROOMMATE NEEDED MOVE IN now
"or sub-lease for summer. Four bedroom
� Bouse on 406 Rotary Avenue. 2 houses from
center of campus. Call Jason or Jamie at 752-
13552.
;NAGS HEAD, NC- GET your group to-
�gethcr early. Two houses in excellent con-
dition; fully furnished: washer & dryer, dish-
Washer; central AC; available May 1 through
'August 31; sleeps 6 -$1600.00 per month;
� sleeps 8 -$2200.00 per month (757)850-1532.
TAKE OVER LEASE 2 BEDROOM at
� Wesley Commons, $405 per month plus de-
posit, wd hook-up, on ECU bus line. Open
; Immediately call 830-9162. Leave message.
2 BEDROOM APT. 1 12 BATH, water,
sewer included. One block from campus w
d connections. Forsale wd $100 each, draft-
ing table $60, futon $70. Call 752-8210.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED IM-
MEDIATELY to share two bedroom du-
' piex. $207month. Located behind Papa
Johns on Btownlea Drive. Free cable! Call
Misty 754-2169 leave message.
TAKE OVER LEASE AT DOCKSIDE. 3
bedroom 2 bath duplex with wd, beginning
21. Call 752-5628 Richie or Rodney.
NEVER BEFORE AVAILABLE! SHORT
walk to campus. Woodlawn Apts. - next to
AOTT house. 3 bedrooms, 212 baths - mint
condition. 5th Street Square - uptown, above
BW3, 3 bedrooms, 2 12 baths, sunken liv-
ing area. Also available a 2 bedroom above
BW3 and above Uppercrust Bakery available
Jan. 1st for $475.00 - $500month. Luxury
Apartments. Available now! Will ease for
December or January (6 mo. or year leases
available) Also available - "The Beauty Sa-
lon" - 3 bedroom apartment. If you see it
you'll love it! Call Yvonne at 758-2616.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR TWO bed-
room townhouse near campus. Bus goes to
gym and campus. $225month. Call 1-910-
674-MS9
2 BEDROOM 2 BATH, 1 12 blocks from
ECU campus stove, fridge, dishwasher,
washerdryer, water, sewer, basic cable in-
cluded. No Pets. For more information, call
Dogwood Hollow Apts. B 752-8900.
1 BEDROOM - WD HOOKUP. Close to
ECU Campus. For more information Call
Woodcliff Rentals 9 758-5005. No Pets!
FOURTEEN MONTH OLD PURE
breed Siberian Huskey needs a new home
and big yard. Price negotiable. Call Gloria
� 757-0655. Please leave a message.
" ALBINO BURMIS PYTHON FOR sale 5
months old 3 feet long comes with tank,
heat rock and light. 353-7495. Leave name
and number.
QUEEN WATERBEDSUITE HAScabi-
, nets and lighted bridge with 6 drawer ped-
estal $330 or best offer 756-9639.
AKC GERMAN ROTTWEILERS 9
weeks. $250 and up. Champion bloodline.
Call 919-353-7174.
TABLE AND 2 CHAIRS, $50; exercise
bike, $15. Call and leave message 353-1698.
burton twin 47 snowboard for sale. Only
used half a season. Asking $300 or best of-
fer. Call 754-8154. Ask for Shay.
; AT&T IBM COMPATIBLE PC 8MB ram
540mb HD 14.4 modem, monitor, printer,
keyboard, mouse, msoffice software, games.
etc. $500BO. Call (919)527-5237, anytime.
$f Services
" Offered
Services
Offered
ADULT TOY PARTY - FOR women only!
Earn free products just for hostessing a party.
Call a romance specialist today! 752-5533
and ask for Jenn.
NEED YOUR CARPETS CLEANED?
'Special rates fot flat-level apartments: 2-
bedroom $35 & 1-bedroom $25. For more
information, please call Economy Cleaning
Service at 931-1767.
FREE FOR ECU STUDENTS! WOULD
you like to put your resume or a classified
ad on the internet for free? We offer ser-
vices including resume designing and
internet access. If you are interested in any
of these, visit our Website at HTTP:
WWW.NCGALLERIA.COM or call 754-
2171 for more information.
12 OFF SECURITY DEPOSIT
WITH PRESENTATION OF
THIS COUPON
ftffffm raMMHHMMd
I and 2 iodmom (Unfa, ftafrlrtf r�of,
Wwh�r. Dryw Hookup Docks and Pitto.
in mott units. Laundry Facility,
Sand Volleyball Court.
Located 5 blocks from campus.
HUE WATTS, SEWER
frte�fc� 0mm
2 BEDROOMS
Stove'Refridfentor Dishwasher
Washer, Dryer Hookups
Patios on First Floor
Located S Blocks from Campus
.JMHfit "PA
bedroom, appliances, water, bask cable. 5 blocks f
campus. New ownership.
New Lanoscaptnt
THESE AND OTHER FINE PROPERTIES
MANAGED BY
MTT nWKKTY
MANAGEMENT
IMA BROWNLEA DRIVE
758-1921 OSJsr Expires J-JI-�7
Other
WARRENS HOT' DOGS NOW accept-
ing applications. Part-time third shift 12:00
am - 8:00 am. Very flexible. Please contact
Jan at 752-3647.
BUSINESSMARKETING STUDENTS:
NATIOnal Communications Company is
coming to Greenville, Part-time job oppor-
tunities. Get paid for excellent experience
in your field while attending East Carolina
University. Call 888-605-0906.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: EARN EX-
TRA CASH stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Midwest
Distributors, P.O. Box 624, Ola the, KS 66051.
Immediate response.
OCCASIONAL SITTING NEEDED
FOR CHILDREN - ages 3 and 6 months.
Prefer graduate student with Tuesday or
Thursdays free. Call 355-7875.
TELflSERVICE REPRESENTATIVE
NEEDED FOR office furniture company.
Structured program. Skills; people person,
comfortable talking on the telephone, enjoys
selling. Call 931-6904 and leave a message.
IF YOU ARE SEEKING part-time employ-
ment with an established company, then look
no further. ONLINE Collections has just
landed several collection accounts and has
an immediate need for telephone collectors.
Applicant must be aggressive, self moti-
vated, and poses excellent communication
skills. If interested, please contact Chris
Murphy at 754-1615 after 12 pm or Craig
Jackson at 757-2134 after 5 pm. Only seri-
ous applicants need to apply.
PART TIME HELP NEEDED at
Szechuan Express at the Food Court, the
Plaza Mall. 15 - 20 hrs. a week. Cashier ex-
perience preferred. No phone calls please.
Apply in person Monday thru Saturday be-
tween 10:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m.
HELP NEEDED FOR LOCAL business.
For free details, send a self-addressed
stamped envelope to: S.P.E.L Dept. D3,
106 Dogwood Drive, Washington, NC 27889
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: VERY
FUN WORK - flexible part-time hours
(mostly eves, and weekends). Must have
outgoing personality and reliable transpor-
tation. Own 35mm SLR camera a plus, but
not essential. No experience necessary, we
train. $7.00 per hour. Call Sara or Tosha�
1-800-722-7033 12-5 pm.
TriE GREENVILLE RECREATION &
PARKS Department is recruiting 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for the spring
indoor soccer program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the soccer skills
and have the ability and patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be able to couch
young people ages 5-18 in soccer fundamen-
tals. Hours are from 3 pm to 7 pm with some
night and weekend coaching. Flexible with
hours according to class schedules. This pro-
gram will run from the first of March to the
first of May. Salary rates start at $4.75 per
hour. For more information, please call Ben
James or Michae! Daly at 830-4550.
"INTIMATE ISSUES FOR MEN c
Women with Diabetes" February 3, 1997.
Free program sponsored by Pitt Co. Chap-
ter American Diabetes Association. Gaskin-
Leslie Center next to Pitt Co. Memorial
Hospital � 7 pm. For more info call 816-5136
from 8-4pm Mon-Fri or 1-800-682-9692.
iTS NO LONGER NECESSARY to bor-
row money for college. We can help you
obtain funding. Thousands of awards avail-
able to all students, immediate qualification
1-800-651-3393.
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Personals Announcements
Announcements
I DISCOVERED HE WAS A WRITER, a
romantic, intelligent, sensitive, but with a
dark mysterious side which was seductively
thrilling enough to melt my creamy, hot,
steamy mocha served by the Beanbag Cafe
on 3rd & Jarvis.
RIDE NEEDED TO CHARLOTTE or
Rock Hill, SC, weekend of Feb. 1st. Call
Jenny � 7915 will help pay gas, can leave
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info.
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SIGTAU: THANKS FOR the social. The
ice was quite nice. How about a toast to
the Sig Tau's who sang to us that night! We
had a GREAT rime and hope to get together
again real soon! Love the sisters of Pi Delta.
PS. Yang: thanks again for finding that CD!
And guys: we hope the pool table is OK.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON, THANKS for
the great time at Splash last week! We had
a blast. Congratulations Mandy and Harry
on your engagement! Love the Sisters of
Alpha Phi!
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA, WE truly enjoyed
your guest speaker last week. She was re-
ally inspirational. The brothers of Sigma
Alpha Epsilon.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
Exec of Order of Omega: President - Chris
Arline, Vice President - Mariah Cheek, VP
of Programming - Melissa Godwin, Secre-
tary - Laura Barden, Treasurer - Nikki
Noren
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
DELTA Zeta new member class of Fall
1996 on their initiation last semester:
Chasidty Evangelista, Sabrina Hays,
Samantha Styons, Mariah Cheek, Kelly
Pniitt, Ada Martinez, Audra Kennedy, Jen-
nifer Piron, Maggie Lewis, Shannon Meek,
Mandy Johnson, Gennell Brandenburg,
Brandy Nichol. You all are great! Love your
sisters.
THE BROTHERS OF SIGMA NU would
like to thank the lovely sisters of ALPHA
PHI for a wonderful time. Hope to do it
again soon.
ORDER OF OMEGA MEMBERS There
will be a brief meeting on Feb. 4 at 5:45 in
MSC221. Be there for important info!
TO THE SISTERS OF Delta Zeta: Con-
gratulations of a successful first night of
rush. And to all the girls that attended last
night, we really enjoyed getting to know you
and hope to see you tonight.
THANK PI LAM FOR having us over this
past Thursday night. We'll have to do it
again soon. Just next time keep all pets in
their cages! Thanks! Love the Pi Delta
Sisters.
ALPHA PHI, WE HAD a blast last week
with you guys. As always we look forward
to the next time that we get together. Sigma
Alpha Epsilon.
CONGRATULATIONS TO CARRIE
BARRETT and Kathleen Meaney on their
recent engagements! Ben and Luke are
lucky guys to have such awesome girls, and
Pi Delts at that! Nice rocks! Best Wishes
from all your sisters.
THANKS FOR THE "FANTAIN of
Youth" social Sigma Nu! Let's do it again
sometime! Love, the Sisters of Alpha Phi!
SIGMA PI THANKS EVERYONE who
came to the back to school party. It was
great. There will be many more parties and
late nights to follow.
PI DELTA WOULD LIKE to welcome
back Amy McGrath from her extended
break. We're glad you're safe and sound
and still speaking! We missed you and are
so glad to have you back! Love, Your Sis-
ters.
RESEARCH REPORTS
LwrjKt Ubnty of IntcfnuNon In U.S.
f 977 TWKS - 411SUUCCTS
OMfar Catalog Today with visa MC or COD
800-3510222
Or, rush $2.00 to:
11322 tthoA�g206-RR, LOS Angste, CA 90025
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
Carolina Sky Sports
(919) 49Q-SM4
Announcements
��� Hluo
S-3
THE GREENVILLE-PITT COUNTY
Special Olympics will be conducting an Ath-
letics (Track & Field) Coaches Training
School on Saturday, February 1 st from 9am
- 4pm for all individuals interested in vol-
unteering to coach Track & Field. We are
also looking for volunteer coaches in the fol-
lowing sports: Swimming, Bowling, Gym-
nastics, Rollerskating, Powerlifting, Volley-
ball, and Equestrian. No experience is nec-
essary. For more information please contact
Dwain Cooper at 830-4844 or Dean Foy at
830-4541.
SAM WILL BE HAVING Dr. Hebcrt, Dr.
Hunt, and Dr. Simerly give a workshop on
how to put together a good Policy case pre-
sentation. The meeting will be held on
Tuesday, January 28, in GCB 1028 at 3:30
pm. All Students Are Welcome
WED JAN 29 - FACULTY Recital, Pe-
ter Mills, saxophone, AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 8:00 pm Thurs Jan. 30 - Guest Re-
cital, Roger McVey, piano, AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 8:00 pm Fri-Sat Jan. 31-Feb. 1 -
ECU Religious Arts Festival a two-day event
celebrating excellence and creativity in reli-
gious arts, Janette Fishell, Director, for in-
formation call 328-6851 (Includes three pub-
lic concerts:) Fri Jan. 31 - Faculty Recital,
"Abendmusik John B. O'Brien, harpsi-
chord. Perry Smith, tenor. First Presbyterian
Church, 1400 S. Elm St 5:00 pm. Fri Jan.
31 � Faculty Recital: "Hymnus Paradisi?"
Janette Fishell, organ, First Presbyterian
Church, North Heritage Street, Kinston, 8:00
pm. Sat Feb. 1 - "Hymn Festival" The
Memorial Baptist Church, 1510 Greenville
Blvd. Southeast, Greenville, 4:00 pm Fri
Jan. 31 - Symphonic Wind Ensemble, Scott
Carter, Conductor and Jazz Ensemble A,
Carroll V. Dashiell, Jr Director, Wright Au-
ditorium, 8:00 pm Sat Feb. 1 - Eastern Dis-
trict High School and Junior High Honors
Band Concert, Wright Auditorium, 7:0 m
Sun Feb. 2 - Musicians Against Aids: A
Benefit for PICASO (Pin County AIDS Ser-
vice Organization). AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00 pm. (Tickets $10 - at door, or in ad-
vance from PICASO, 830-1660, or East Coast
Music and Video) Mon Feb. 3 - Faculty Re-
cital: Henry Doskey, piano, "Piano Music of
William Gillock AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00 pm.
AMA MEETING: THE AMERICAN Mar-
keting Association is having a meeting to-
night in GCB 1029. Come hear special guest
speaker Deon Levingston from FOX 8114
TV. It all starts at 6:00. AH majors welcome!
You'll be surprised what we're doing!
NEW ORGANIZATION TO ECU "La-
dies Elite" Minority Women who want to
serve our community while promoting Sis-
terhood and Academic Excellence. Interest
meeting Thursday, January 30, 1997, GCB
1010 7:00 pm Business Dress.
DO YOU WANT TO be part of ECU's old-
est honor fraternity? If you have a 3.3 GPA
and at least 32 credits, join Phi Sigma Pi for
their smoker Tuesday, January 28 at 7 pm in
GC 1032. Call Robin 931-01 for details.
ECU INVESTMENT CLUB WILL hold
its first meeting of the semester on Tuesday,
January 28th, in GCB 1010. Come and find
out what we're all about. All majors wel-
comc. Refreshments to be provided.
THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNI-
CATION Sciences and Disorders will be
providing the speech, language and hearing
screening for students who are fulfilling re-
quirements for admission to Upper Division
on February 3, 4, & 5, 1997 from 5:00-600
pm each day. These are the only screening
dates during the Spring Semester. The
screening will be conducted in the Belk An-
nex (ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic) lo-
cated next to the Belk Building (School of
Allied Health Sciences), near the intersec-
tion of Charles Street and the 264 by-pass.
No appointment is needed - Please do not
call their office for an appointment Wi ting
is outside the clinic waiting room. Sign in
begins 4:50 p.m. Screenings are conducted
on a first come, first serve basis.
THE REER SERVICES OFFICE will
hold orientation meetings in the Career Ser-
vices Building for seniors and graduate stu-
dents on the following dates: Wed. Jan. 29
at 4:00 pm, and Thur. Jan. 30 at 10:30 am.
Students will receive instructions on regis-
tering with Career Services, establishing a
credentials file, and the prrx lures for cam-
pus interviews.
CIRCLE K CLUB; FC JSING on the
Future for Children. Come learn about our
community service organization here on
Campus, Thursday, January 30; 7:00 pm
Mendenhall Social Room.
DISCOVER THE ADVANTAGES OF be-
ing a senior! The first 500 seniors that flash
their Purple Pirate Pass will receive a Zip-
pered CD holder, Wednesday, January 29,
Student Stores. Get your Purple Pirate to-
day! Sponsored by the ECU Ambassadors
and the ECU Alumni Association.
TUES JAN. 21 - GUEST Recital, Dennis
Askew, tuba, A J. Fletcher Recitai Hall, 8:00
pm Wed Jan. 22 - Senior Recital, Mandy L.
Lamm, flute, AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall, 7.00
pm Thurs Jan 23 -Faculty Recital, Malcolm
Tait, piano, AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00
pm Fri Jan. 24- Guest Recital, Eric Mandat,
clarinet, from Southern Illinois University,
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm Fri Jan.
24- Jazz At Night, Carroll V. Dashiell, Jr
Director, The Social Room, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, 8:00 pm. Sun Jan. 26 -Senior
Recital - Sandra Rathbone, violin, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 pm Mon Jan. 27
- Philidor Percussion Group, A.J. Fletcher
. Recital Hall, 8:00 pm Wed Jan. 29 - Fac-
ulty Recital, Peter Mills, saxophone, A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm.
AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION
WILL hold their next program on Febru-
ary 3, 1997 "Intimate Issues for Men and
Women with Diabetes All programs wiil
be held in the Gaskin-Leslie Center next to
Pitt County Memorial Hospital at 7:00 pm.
There is no cost for attendance. Everyone
is invited. Please mark your calendars for
the first Monday of each month. For more
information call 816-5136 from 8:00 am - 4:00
pm Mon-Fri. or call 1 -800-682-9692.
K-N-E-A-D A FRIEND RELAXATION
Massage Workshop - Instructor: Debra
Casebere, LMT of the Mlassage & Body-
work Center of Eastern Carolina. Fee is
$70couple (This includes instruction,
handbook and oil). All work will be taught
in pairs. You "Need" a friend to "KNEAD
a fricndeveryone is welcome! Saturday,
February 15, 1997, 9:00 am until 1:00 pm.
Location St Peter's Catholic Church Parish
Hall, 2700 E. 4th Street, Greenville, NC
For more information or to register call
Debra at 919-353-1121 ext. 1. You must pre-
register, walk-ins not accepted. Your rq
nation will be confirmed by phone or
Class size is limited. If this program is fi
you will be offered an alternate date.
ADULT STUDENTS TO FIND out
latest information of concern to you, si
up for the adult student lists.
ADULTSTU. Just bring your e-mail
dress to 211 Whichard. If you have
questions, call 328-6881.
THE OFFICE OF HEALTH PROMO-
TION and Welt-Being has moved! We aae
now located in Whichard 210. Our resource
room has many types of up-to-date refer-
ences on issues such as health, sexuality, nu-
trition, alcohol, and other drugs. References
include pamphlets, brochures, books, vid-
eos, audiotapes, and newsletters. Visit our
other Resource Room at our Web Site:
www.ecu.eduhpwbhome.htm Call for
more information 328-6793.
IN MEMORIAL: KEVIN BANKS yoii
were always a very kind, considerate, artd
humble human being. You never drank,
smoked or used drugs. You were too good
to be on this earth so the gentleman up-
stairs came to rake you away. We will mils
you. Your Friends & Roommates Pete,
Mike, Rich and Joe
ALPHA OMICRON PI WILL be holding
spring rush the 28th - 30th. For ndes and
information call the AOTT house at 7SJ-
0769 before 6 pm today. �
ECU LAW SOCIETY WANT to joitva
school organization that's fun and interest-
ing? Try the Law Society. Our meeting is
on Monday, Feb. 3rd at 5:15 pm in Ragsdaje
Room 130. We wiil have elections for all
offices and the society is open to all majors.
WOMEN'S RUGBY ORGANIZ&-
TIONAL MEETING Tuesday Jan.
at 7:00 pm in SRC Classroom. No
enee necessary! More info call Kelly or t
758-9368 sponsored by Rec Services at 328-
�!L
EAST CAROLINA HONORS ORGAN
ZATION will meet on Thursday, January
30th, 1997 at 5:00 pm in GCB Room 100S.
All honor students and students with a 3.3
GPA are invited to attend. For more info
call Yaqooh Mohyuddin at 758-3635.
YOU ARE INVITED TO THE it
monthly ECU International Coffee Hour
for International Faculty, Students and
Staff. Join us on Friday, January 31, 1997
from 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm. Ledonia Wright
African American Cultural Center (Bloxton
House)
ALOOD DRIVE SPONSORED BY b!fl�J
Biology Club. In Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter January 28,12 to 6. In the Multipurpose
Room.


Classifieds
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
OPEN LINE RATE$3.00
25 OR FEWER WORDS
STUDENT LINE RATE$2.00
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify.
ADDITIONAL WORDS - OVER 255 CENTS EACH
Bold T�ve $1 extra
ALL CAPS type$ 1 extra





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Title
The East Carolinian, January 28, 1997
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 28, 1997
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1183
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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